GC Sailor

Corsair Pulse 600

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I have to take a mooring wiith 3 kt tidal current and wind, sometime alobne. sure 2.5 HP is insufficient

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Use a 5hp 2 stroke Merc on a tremolino , would not want anything smaller where I live . Tried a 3.5 and it was hopeless in any sort of seaway.

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5hp merc longshaft on my Ostac Tramp, 20 ft 680kg, has the yacht prop, ventilates the prop in chop or swell, revs out if you go on foredeck too,could do with the extra long leg , but suspect it would drag in the water on port tack, will go upwind in 30 kts if you get a couple of bodies aft though.

.

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My launch ramp is two miles up a narrow tidal river. Timing is everything because a 1000 lb 23 foot trimaran behaves like a styrofoam cup.

I have an older 4 hp Johnson long shaft which is adequate but only in mild to moderate conditions.

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Torqeedo states that their Travel 1003 should be equivalent to a normal 3HP outboard. If this is true, than I am certain that anything less than 5HP is not enough for heavy weather. I would go for even more if the motor would not be to heavy and the holder would hold ;)

 

On the other hand I will probably use the motor when wind dies. The problem is that we might need to motor for 10 or more miles and this is way beyond safe distance for a Torqeedo.

 

Could anyone tell the actual depth of the propeller? I mean I have a short shaft on my Torqeedo and propeller is for sure at least 400 mm deep in the water...

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One option with the Torquedo if do not need to use the motor to steer is that you can mount the battery

and speed control remotely with an optional cable. This may help to reduce any problems with salt water

and would simplify battery changes on th water if you carry an extra.

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FWIW - I have a Nissan 3.5hp 4stroke long shaft on my 18' trimaran and it's plenty of power for my use. I've been thinking about upgrading to a high thrust prop though just to get a bit more at the top end. Wide open it'll do around 5kts. Excellent little motor as far as being reliable, quiet, and lasts forever on a 1/4 gallon tank of gas.

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Has this boat been shipped to outer space?

 

Any updates or sightings of this boat in the USA?

Cheers,

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The Corsair Pulse 600 is too expensive for what it is (fairly cheap rig, sails, build quality, finishing touches, etc) and is WAY to heavy at 1000 lbs, unlaidened. No concern to weight seems to be given. Needs a carbon rig. It should cost no more than 30k as it is currently delevered, complete, IMO.. But with their dealer model, when you buy the boat you're paying the dealer 20% money on your purchase price and the factory is making 100% on a 10-15k build cost. They charge the buyer shipping. But I hope it's successful. J70s and legacy one designs have more bored to death with sailing. J70s are 70k in comparison complete. Also utterly ridiculous.

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The Corsair Pulse 600 is too expensive for what it is (fairly cheap rig, sails, build quality, finishing touches, etc) and is WAY to heavy at 1000 lbs, unlaidened. No concern to weight seems to be given. Needs a carbon rig. It should cost no more than 30k as it is currently delevered, complete, IMO.. But with their dealer model, when you buy the boat you're paying the dealer 20% money on your purchase price and the factory is making 100% on a 10-15k build cost. They charge the buyer shipping. But I hope it's successful. J70s and legacy one designs have more bored to death with sailing. J70s are 70k in comparison complete. Also utterly ridiculous.

 

 

Obviously someone isn't getting laid. Before you rant, check your spelling.

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I made a spelling error. That's your comeback?

 

Let's try it again, but this time with some visual aides...

 

 

"Heavy is good, heavy is reliable. If it does not work you can always hit him with it." - Boris the Blade

 

This clip would be a good tag line for the Corsair Pulse 600.

 

Why not make it 1500 lbs? 2000 lbs? Just fill it with sand maybe? Yep, step right up and buy the 1000 lb. Corsair Pulse 600 with a cheap, heavy aluminum rig for 40k! It's dramatically overpriced in my opinion.

 

In fact, the Corsair Pulse 600 is, in many ways, no more sophisticated than a Hobie 18. The only real difference is that Corsair Pulse 600 weighs half a ton and costs you 40 large! Say it, slowly...one thousand pounds! Incredible. Good luck pulling that up on the beach kids.

 

Back to the price. $40,000 for a boat that is worth around 20k. Lots of fat profit here for your dealer (20%) and to Corsair (building this boat for 10-15k total cost most likely). And of course the buyer pays the shipping fee from Vietnam or wherever the hell this thing is slapped together.

 

Fourty thousand dollars! Reminds me of the judge and his special "billy baru" putter from Caddy shack!

 

Again, a visual aid for those stuck on spelling errors:

 

Bottom line: There is little more tech on the Corsair Pulse 600 than a Hobie 18. I believed that this boat had some real potential but, now that we see its specs, and price, it is clear that the boat is way too heavy, too expensive and too cheap. On top of that, it's supporter here is a whiney little spelling nazi. Who can stand those people? Not me.

 

I hope another builder (a US builder) will improve on the small day sailing/racing trimaran concept. This kind of boat has real potential. Corsair is trying to cash in on it unfortunately. These boats should be 25-30k tops. If they had much higher quality carbon rig, hardware, etc they "might" be worth 40k, but the Pulse 600 does not have any of that bling...so they are NOT worth 40k. Not even close.

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Has this boat been shipped to outer space?

 

Any updates or sightings of this boat in the USA?

Cheers,

According to their Facebook page, it appears that the past Corsair 24 Class Officers are now getting involved.....

 

If true, then you can kiss any chance of a One-Design class goodbye!!!

 

***R.T.***

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I don’t understand the vitriol if you don’t have skin in the game?

 

I’d like to see any of the people who think the boat is too expensive provide examples of boats released in the last 5 to 10 years, still available, having sold in anything like the numbers the Pulse has, are distributed internationally, that are significantly cheaper.

 

The vast majority of boat builders are low volume producers by modern standards, reliant on agents who need to make a living and that’s never a recipe for a bargain.

 

There’s plenty of Chines boat builders will help with the manufacturing side if you think you can do it cheaper than Corsair, or Airplay Trimarans or Rocket Trimarans.

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Being in the process of building a 20ft Trimaran, I can honestly say that 40K dollars is probably cheapish for what the costs of the materials, design, manufacturing cost and labour content in reality are. Regardless of where they are being made, I would suspect there's not huge margins in such a relatively low volume production.

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The 20 foot tri market is going to explode but Corsiar is going to lose out. They have offended the markets intelligence in my opinion. I fully expect other builders to improve the value (price) and quality. The Corsair Pulse 600 is going to be a failure. They should have started with a much lower price point. I guarantee that Corsair is making a bunch of money on these boats when they are fortunate enough to find a buyer. We know the dealers are taking 20% of the purchase price (pretty good margin for the dealer). Do the math. Even if the builder is taking only another 20%, you already have $.40 on the dollar going to Corsair. Cha Ching! But we all know they are taking MUCH MORE than 20%. Probably 40%. Cha cha Ching Ching! So that's $.60 on the dollar to the builder/dealer. Probably more.

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With the lack of advertising going on, the lack of push for sales and considering that the UK dealer has been trying for nearly the whole year, to get additional boats over to fill orders, I would say Corsair are building all they can build and are unable to fill orders at the moment, would you lower your price.

 

That's basic economic supply and demand, if the supply can't meet demand then you get a premium price.

 

As to the T20 market exploding, not sure yet until a couple of more players hit the market and supply reaches a critical mass, but one thing for sure is that they are great little boats to sail and for the weekend warrior who wants a light weight fast boat that will race around the cans, as well as Mum & Dad can haul a couple of kids for a fun safe day, without the permanent mooring cost, they they take some beating.

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Maybe true. But that does not change the fact that, for what it is, the Pulse 600 is WILDLY overpriced. Supply and Demand is an elastic and ever changing law. I simply see that as a market that is ripe for competition. Corsair is not impressive even though multihulls are very much so. Corsair will be beaten easily by any smart competitors. The world has finally realized (about 3 decades later than they should have) that multihulls are vastly superior sailing craft and that the small, pocket rocket 20-25 foot size range is a sweet spot. Corsair is raking in the cash right now, no doubt, because nobody else is smart enough to compete with them. But that time will soon be at an end.

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Having built 8 multihulls as amator, I Agree with Waynemarlow, I think you are just dreaming ! Economic constraint at small scale buiding are too high. My last built is a Strike 20 Tri and it takes me one year to build. She use ply mainhull and old Nacra 5.8 hulls, 100 mm aluminium tubes as beams and an old Tornado rig. Nevertheless It cost me around 12000. Euros, and if you account for the labor cost, you can run your own computations.....

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It's a tricky market. It's somewhere between one-off and mass production. I've kicked around the idea of starting a small factory to produce a competing boat. Having built one myself, I'm pretty confident that I could bring the price WAY down, but the only way I've run the numbers to do so is to do short production runs and then close up shop for 11 months a year. Basically set up you production to run for 1 or 2 months and build a year's worth of boat parts and then shut it all down and sell out your stock. How do you manage this around another full time job or without a special deal on your commercial space and find temporary labor that is also highly skilled or at least has the attention to detail necessary? That's the only way I can make it work in theory at least to get the costs down. I'm not sure it's worth it, obviously it hasn't been for me yet. The astus 16.5 has its own thread. It's a lot closer to a low budget trimaran, but still quite $. The Hobie getaway is where you'd need to shoot for if you wanted to hit a lower price point. I've sailed a bunch of them. Actually pretty fine sailing boats for what they are. Performance boats they are not. Foam sandwich construction has to go if you want to get costs down. It's too expensive. So then what? Thermoform plastic mixed with fiberglass of some sort? Solid glass?

 

IMO the Pulse is a dream day sailor. It's the boat I would have built if I had more time and $. There's also room for a lower costs "people's boat" in the 20' tri market. It just hasn't happened yet.

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why is it heavy?
It's sold to anyone - and to avoid warranty costs - is likely built with thick skins, etc so as to not be fragile.

Costs?
See above.

 

IF you want a bulletproof, warranted small trimaran - this is what you get.

 

there's a reason Weta did the numbers in a larger boat as many of us early owners asked them to - and they couldn't make it work for under $40k. That was about 10 years ago...

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Out of curiosity, what is an appropriate weight? If it were 800lbs, would it be significantly more attractive to a lot of buyers?

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800 lbs would tell me that weight was a consideration. A heavy boat does not necessarily mean a durable boat. I would like to see the actual weights vs the published weights. They are usually much heavier than advertised. Specifically the mast weight, rudder and rudder assembly weight, etc. I'll bet 2 things, there is a massive range in actual boat weights and 2, the range is all higher than 1000 lbs.

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How does the ignore feature work?

 

It works very well. :rolleyes:

 

Click you profile, then manage ignore prefs, add the name and presto! All you have to deal with is those who keep quoting the trolls.

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I would love to have one, however, I actually think it is expensive for what you get.

 

Nevertheless, I am really, really glad is selling well in the UK.

 

How about the U.S.? Does anyone know? It would be great to see them in number here.

 

Cheers,

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The Corsair Pulse 600 is too expensive for what it is (fairly cheap rig, sails, build quality, finishing touches, etc) and is WAY to heavy at 1000 lbs, unlaidened. No concern to weight seems to be given. Needs a carbon rig. It should cost no more than 30k as it is currently delevered, complete, IMO.. But with their dealer model, when you buy the boat you're paying the dealer 20% money on your purchase price and the factory is making 100% on a 10-15k build cost. They charge the buyer shipping. But I hope it's successful. J70s and legacy one designs have more bored to death with sailing. J70s are 70k in comparison complete. Also utterly ridiculous.

 

I got nothing.

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How does the ignore feature work?

 

It works very well. :rolleyes:

 

Click you profile, then manage ignore prefs, add the name and presto! All you have to deal with is those who keep quoting the trolls.

 

 

th2ID4PZIK_zpshawsm2of.jpg

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Why all the hate? Like Ian's F22, Corsair's Pulse turned out to be not my cup of tea but I don't have any interest in bashing Ian or Corsair. Good luck to them both. Weta too!

 

Now if anybody wants to put all this energy into waxing or painting, I got an F27 I love on the hard and needing some work. ^_^

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Sounds like Ludicrous should put a boat into production and world wide distribution with a dealer network..... He has it all worked out and I am sure he will stitch the market up in no time :D

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The SeaRail 19 is a very nice boat and reasonably priced, all things considered. Had I been looking for a slightly larger boat I would have gone that route. No idea what their sales are, but they seem to have done a lot of things right.

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Sounds like Ludicrous should put a boat into production and world wide distribution with a dealer network..... He has it all worked out and I am sure he will stitch the market up in no time :D

Maybe we could sign up as dealers. With all the money we make we'll be able to retire early and buy a Wally or a mansion on Sydney Harbor.

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Sounds like Ludicrous should put a boat into production and world wide distribution with a dealer network..... He has it all worked out and I am sure he will stitch the market up in no time :D

Maybe we could sign up as dealers. With all the money we make we'll be able to retire early and buy a Wally or a mansion on Sydney Harbor.

Remember that rich boat broker we hung out with?

 

Yeah, I know, figment of the imagination.

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Ludicrous has a point about the weight. 1000 lbs advertised does seem a lot for a "light weight" performance tri of only 20'. The Sea Rail is advertised at "under" 700 lb "fully laden" with all sailing gear.

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The Searail is a great little boat for what it is,, but when you have less boat (amas,beams,main hull ) , smaller rig , smaller sail area, No solid folding system, Its pretty obvious its going to be lighter,, and cheaper.

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All interesting discussion, but the most interesting number would be the number of Pulse 600 boats DELIVERED in the U.S.A. Just sayin'

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Searail vs Pulse600. Is there really any question why one weighs more? (I'll give you a hint: it's those things on the outside)

98289d1424475854-small-tris-under-20-any

 

sailingworldboty2013_searail19_0012.jpg?

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Remember the piles of Corsair Pulse 600s everyone in the USA is buying and really excited about?

 

Yeah, I know, figment of the imagination.

 

I'm sorry, weren't you just saying that Corsair and their dealers are getting filthy rich selling a 10K-15K boat for twice what it cost? Now you're saying they aren't selling any boats. I'm confused.

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The Searail is a great little boat for what it is,, but when you have less boat (amas,beams,main hull ) , smaller rig , smaller sail area, No solid folding system, Its pretty obvious its going to be lighter,, and cheaper.

 

 

All very true and the thing is, depending on your needs and the type sailing you do, it's often the boat that is easier to tow, rig and use that sees better sales and use. Not always of course, but a lot of sailors and their boats don't sail very often due to the time required to actually get the darn thing rigged and on the water. Lighter, easier and cheaper isn't all bad if the boat still does what you want it to do.

 

By the way, the SeaRail 19 was redesigned a bit a couple years back to mount larger volume amas. The photo above is of the original smaller amas.

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My Pulse offers me all, that I expect of a fun-boat: speed, easy handling and safe sailing. I tried many other boats, but none of these was merging all the features of a Pulse. And many of them were more expensive.

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My Pulse offers me all, that I expect of a fun-boat: speed, easy handling and safe sailing. I tried many other boats, but none of these was merging all the features of a Pulse. And many of them were more expensive.

This in the end is all that matters, a happy owner with his boat, all the best and enjoy your sailing.

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My Pulse offers me all, that I expect of a fun-boat: speed, easy handling and safe sailing. I tried many other boats, but none of these was merging all the features of a Pulse. And many of them were more expensive.

This in the end is all that matters, a happy owner with his boat, all the best and enjoy your sailing.

 

 

 

 

Key words 'happy' and 'owner'. (much more important than being 'unhappy' 'inter-web denizens' 'non-owners')

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My Pulse offers me all, that I expect of a fun-boat: speed, easy handling and safe sailing. I tried many other boats, but none of these was merging all the features of a Pulse. And many of them were more expensive.

 

Ah, Thunersee! What a beautiful area to have fun sailing a beautiful boat! Much better wind than Lake Zurich, too.

 

Please share more thoughts about why you chose the Pulse 600, how you find its performance under different conditions, etc!

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My Pulse offers me all, that I expect of a fun-boat: speed, easy handling and safe sailing. I tried many other boats, but none of these was merging all the features of a Pulse. And many of them were more expensive.

 

Ah, Thunersee! What a beautiful area to have fun sailing a beautiful boat! Much better wind than Lake Zurich, too.

 

Please share more thoughts about why you chose the Pulse 600, how you find its performance under different conditions, etc!

 

 

 

Yes!!!!! please, please share. Some of us need to find a more reasons to consider this boat as, at least for me, it would be a large expense.

 

Videos would also be nice.

 

Thanks,

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The Searail is a great little boat for what it is,, but when you have less boat (amas,beams,main hull ) , smaller rig , smaller sail area, No solid folding system, Its pretty obvious its going to be lighter,, and cheaper.

The point was not compare the Pulse with the Searail directly, but that a 20 ft tri can be built that is not a heavy weight. Yes, the Pulse has big heavy amas, but should it?

 

The Pulse is marketed as a lightweight off-the-beach (ramp) sport boat, but 1,000 lbs is not light. If you look at similar length production craft, even of the last generation, they weigh half as much e.g.

Hobie 21 550 lbs

Nacra/inter 20 >500lbs

Hobie 20 >500 lbs

Hughes Trikala 19 540 lbs

Newick tremolino 23' 950lbs

 

Homebuild designs

Woods Strike 20 640lbs

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Well, my Pulse 600 weighs ca. 450-500 kg with everything we usually carry (anchor, motor, ropes, fenders etc.). With any lighter build I would be unsatisfied as I am a heavy guy.

 

Rigging could be of higher quality. I actually changed already quite some things. The rest is IMHO really nicely built.

 

Sails, although from North Sails are not really the best cut... a bit too deep... unfortunately...

 

Aluminum mast is OK. No need for carbon... There is not much wind where we sail, so I would like to have a bit taller mast, but then...

 

I can say that in winds up to maybe 12 kts various cats including Astus 16.5 are faster, up to 10 kts of wind actually much faster, but as the wind builds the situation changes dramatically in favor of Pulse (remember the mast height ;) ).

 

For me situation was quite simple. I could NEVER get my family on a Hobby or any other beach cat. Astus 16.5 cannot carry all of us so I just had to dig into my pocket and buy a Pulse.

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The reason why I ordered the Pulse? Winds at Lake Thun are 2 - 3 BF, sometimes 4 BF. Most of the time I have no crew (sometimes my 10 year old son), so easy handling is the most important feature to me. I do not like rigging and slipping or craning my boat all the time. Speed is important but only if there is no risk of capsizing. As my Mooring place is only 2.50 m wide the boat must have a folding system that works on water. Only the Pulse meets all this requirements. All sails are on furlers. There is no risk of overrunning your own gennaker. The high volume of the amas makes the boat very safe and able to cope with strong winds. My singlehand top speed until now was 17.9 knots in about only 3-4 BF of Wind. Thats quite OK and felt always safe. But I hope for more. The more wind, the more fun. If wind raises to much up, the main and the gib can be reefed by furling tem. I guess the boat can be handled by everybody singlehanded untill 5 BF.

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It is indeed a very good looking boat. I suspect it's also very well assembled and ready to sail out of the box. That all counts for something...

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The Searail is a great little boat for what it is,, but when you have less boat (amas,beams,main hull ) , smaller rig , smaller sail area, No solid folding system, Its pretty obvious its going to be lighter,, and cheaper.

The point was not compare the Pulse with the Searail directly, but that a 20 ft tri can be built that is not a heavy weight. Yes, the Pulse has big heavy amas, but should it?

 

The Pulse is marketed as a lightweight off-the-beach (ramp) sport boat, but 1,000 lbs is not light. If you look at similar length production craft, even of the last generation, they weigh half as much e.g.

Hobie 21 550 lbs

Nacra/inter 20 >500lbs

Hobie 20 >500 lbs

Hughes Trikala 19 540 lbs

Newick tremolino 23' 950lbs

 

Homebuild designs

Woods Strike 20 640lbs

 

Sorry Guvacine but it was compared to the searail directly and cost was part of that discussion also hence my comment ,,

You have a valid point using over all length when comparing weights and i dont think any one would disagree ,

However at the end of the day it comes back to the individual and the whole package that there looking for that meets there needs..

None of your reverences offer some of the features that are on a Pulse 600 and in fairness to those boats you have reverenced to the Pulse 600 doesnt offer some features you would find on them .

So at the end of the day its a compromise in what you can afford and want to do with boat.

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- comparing the Pulse to a beach cat makes no sense at all. It's a different kind of boat, for a different buyer. Let's see, how many 20' beach cats have large legs-in cockpits, protected stowage, outboard mounts, etc.? Zero.

 

- the Pulse is absolutely not targeted at an off the beach market, Guvacine. Importantly, Corsair doesn't try to market it that way, either. Easy to ramp launch while still folded, yes. Easy to horse down a beach... no.

 

- I haven't heard the sailors who actually purchased the 600 complaining about the weight. From the owners like silvestert and fastsailor600 I mostly hear things like strong, solid, fast, fun, forgiving, safe, easy to handle. All peg on for the target market.

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The Market is clearly defined, and goes back 30 years, to the Farrier TT680, then Haines Hunter Tramp (Eagle in the USA), then Ostac Tramp a decade later,and all the others that have come and gone since, these are multihull trailer sailers, not off the beach cats. they can carry a load, they can handle a blow, they can be slept on if required, they tack fast,(unlike the cats) they are quite manouverable despite there size. they are resistant to capsize,and can be driven and raced hard if required. Comparison to nacra etc is completely wrong, different market different capabilities.

On the weight being excessive, the Haines Hunter was a heavy boat(200kg over design weight according to farrier if I remember rightly) at about 850kg,but cleaned up in its class at the time, they were deceptively fast ,the Ostacs sailing weight is 680kg(my boat) close to design weight, bloody quick, I can imagine the 600 is going to be fast at about 2/3 of that weight,if all the rest works and holds together.

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Can anyone give a good idea of setup time. I timed my home-build Scarab 18 trimaran setup yesterday. I re-deisgned it for a sliding system that I am not totally happy with. I designed very close tolerance (.012 inches) tubing and it binds, so I've re-worked some of it. My time yesterday from stepping out of the vehicle at the marina to backing down the ramp was just under 29 minutes. That was setting it up alone. And I stand the mast the old fashion way - with my back, so that part is pretty quick. Teardown was similar, at around 31 minutes from ramp to highway going home.

 

I'd very much like to cut that time in half. Can a Pulse 600 be setup in 15 minutes alone? Setup time makes a big difference for me. For an afternoon of sailing I often go on a whim. If I'm feeling lazy I just take the kayak to the lake.

 

As far as market goes - I completely agree with honestjohn. I went back and forth between beach cat and 4ksb. Neither fit the bill. My trimaran does. I don't entirely know why it works as well as it does, but it points better than any other boat I've ever sailed. The beach cats can outrun me on a broad reach most of the time. I've yet to have one pass me up-wind. Not to say they couldn't, just hasn't happened yet. In heavy wind the experience is completely different. It's mostly dry. It's not scary for non-sailors. All out performance was not a top criteria for me. An a-cat or F18 is probably going to be a better buy if that's the goal.

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We've never tried to set up as quickly as possible, but I doubt you could go from driving to the ramp to motoring away from the ramp in under 40 minutes. We strap the boat and mast down quite securely, but you could risk saving time there. We also remove all the running rigging too as we tow through an 80 km/h zone to get to our usual ramp.

 

I doubt anyone would want to raise a straight section of 9.5m ali mast without the gear to keep it under control & keep the load off your back. Depending on the ramp and the design of your trailer you may also have to get on the water first to unfold it and then re-tension the rig.

 

The video from Weta on rigging their boat is worth a look, it's sure not going to be any faster. (Great little boats)

 

 

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Much of the assembly in the Weta video is redundant and need only be done once - the first time. The halyards and side stays never need to be removed again, just bungee'd on to the boat and undone the next time out. I can rig mine in about 15 minutes - even a minute or two less if I really hurry.

 

But it's not fair to compare the Weta to a larger boat like the Pulse, where a few extra steps are involved in raising the mast. I would think if a boat like the Pulse can be rigged and on the water in anything under 45 minutes, there's not too much to complain about.

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I can get my F-27 rigged and on the water in 45min, and I am not optimized because I normally store the boat mast up. If you put a little effort into efficiency like reducing the number of knots and small things like removing the masthead windex I could see easily getting it down to 30. The pulse should be even quicker.

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I'm mostly curious because in my timing of my own setup about 15-18 minutes out of the 30 is for assembly of the beams and floats. Mine slide, not fold. Also I do not have a spinnaker to rig - although it may be added soon. I leave most of my rigging in place. The main sheet is a 6:1 block that I remove and store. Otherwise the traveler is used with a clip for one of the mast tie downs, and it stays in place - the excess rope is stored in an underseat cubby. All of the standing rigging is left in place and coiled and tied up and hung off the mast for transport. All of the mast running rigging also lives on the mast in place. My two jib halyards are used like the traveler as a mast tie down and the excess rope is again stored inside the cabin. But the cars stay in place and I use the jib sheets to stabilize the mast as it goes up. The main sail stays attached to the boom and I basically just tie it up inside the lazy jacks and toss in a sail bag and then it goes inside the cabin mostly assembled. I would think a Pulse roller reefing boom would be great for easy storage, but having not used one I don't know. My boom is much more complicated (maybe unnecessarily so) because it has a track and car along with a 2:1 block and cleat for the outhaul, plus another full set minus the track for reefing, and then a mast rotation control setup on the underside, rather than a cabin top type mast rotation control. I can't roll mine. I may change this. I just bought a mylar sail and it doesn't flake very well...

 

I use a 3:1 block on each shroud for rig tension and I pre-mark the rope so I know basically where I need to tighten them - they also stay in place and travel inside my collapsed trampolines.

 

Anyway, that's my system. I'm on the fence of spending another $1k or so on a folding system or keeping it as a slider. My inclination is to have the parts for the folding beams cut and get on with making it fold not slide. But not if it's a waste of money with no time savings.

 

My mast is only 8.5 meters so I can just lift it into place. I don't think I could lift a 9.5 meter mast. I have 3 masts, so I may cut one down to maybe 7.5 meters just for the sake of making it easy for the 90% of the time I'm leisure sailing. A 7.5 meter mast might look silly on a Pulse as it's a good bit larger boat.

 

My curiosity with the Pulse is that it's pretty close to a dream boat for me. If money were no concern, I would sell my current boat for whatever I could get and buy a Pulse. It wasn't available when I started building my trimaran 4 years ago. An F22 is kinda big, but in retrospect it could serve my purposes very well. Like the Pulse it's gotten quite expensive compared to initial estimates. Nor was the Astus 16.5, which is more realistic in my price range. The Weta was an alternative, but not great for 4 people. And a Hobie getaway was also in the mix. As it is now, I probably can't justify the cost to trade. Maybe in a few years.

 

Can you store all of the sails and gear in the boat somewhere? Both for transport and/or longer term storage. I considered eliminating my cabin entirely, but chose to retain about an 8 foot cabin for the purpose of storing all the sailing gear, I have no intention of ever sleeping in it or even going inside it. I can, but it's very small. I also have the anchor locker in the front. I beach it a lot and it's nice to have a locker that drains to stick the wet rope and anchor in. Where do you store the anchor and rope in the Pulse? I still put a cover over it when parked, but it is nice to keep all the stuff inside. I do tow it on the interstate regularly, so for you metric folks, 120kph is the posted speed limit meaning actual speeds are more like 130kph, and I go about 110 in the slow lane.

 

If it were left at the same state of assembly as I leave mine you'd be left with just folding out the beams, attaching the shrouds, standing the mast, putting the motor and rudder assembly on, and putting the sails on. In my mind I feel like I could run through that in 15 minutes. Maybe I'm delusional. Wouldn't be the first time...

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You leave the main on the boom, for the rest there is enough room in the "cabin". I personally store the anchor in the locker, but I wait until the rope dries...

 

Assembly time... well it takes me much, much longer to fasten/unfasten the boat to the trailer than the rest of the needed tasks. For a short ride I would leave basically everything attached, which means maybe 5 mins for the mast and another 3-5 minutes to tighten 4 bolts which hold amas. Than you only need to raise the jib and attach the boom to the mast.

 

I would say it could be (theoretically) possible to go from trailor to sailor within 15-20 minutes, although we usually need something like 20 minutes only to get out from our slip... ;)

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Thanks. That is kinda what I had thought about typical time. It's really the amount of work moreso than the time, but it's hard to quantify an amount of work. I find that if I'm feeling lazy I'll just take out the kayak instead. That kinda defeats the purpose of having a sailboat.

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Come on!!! You all must me flash when rigging.

 

I have a Weta and it takes me well over an hour from arriving at the beach and getting to the water.

 

I think every every one forgets the steps that take time.

 

Back the trailer to beach, unload dolley with boat, unload rigging, sails, etc, walk boat and rigging to the rigging spot, find parking for car/trailer, walk back to beach, start rigging, forgot something and go back to car, walk back to beach, continue rigging, socialize with onlookers asking about the boat, continue rigging, check the women on bikinis walking by, tweak a couple of things, raise sails, walk to car to lock stuff you do not want any one to steal from the beach, place the boat by the water, walk the dolley and secure it by the dune, run in to a friend and talk for a while, put on wetsuit, harness and life jacket, realize that you did not charge the vhs radio, strategize on how to get over the wave breaks, and finally go sailing.

 

Again. I find these 20 minute claims pretty amazing.

 

Cheers,

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This is me launching my Haines Hunter Tramp trimaran. About 30 minutes with some errors and not rushing. Jetboy, the floats get folded out as i am motoring away and take mabey a minute each to bolt down.

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I'll pay for a carton of beer to the first person who posts a video shot in real time, of them driving up with a boat secured for a decent drive, raise the mast, stow the mast raising gear, attach the halyards to all three sails, put the outboard on, launch the boat, park the car, get back on the boat, unfold it and pull away from the dock in under half an hour. :)

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Come on!!! You all must me flash when rigging.

 

I have a Weta and it takes me well over an hour from arriving at the beach and getting to the water.

 

I think every every one forgets the steps that take time.

 

Back the trailer to beach, unload dolley with boat, unload rigging, sails, etc, walk boat and rigging to the rigging spot, find parking for car/trailer, walk back to beach, start rigging, forgot something and go back to car, walk back to beach, continue rigging, socialize with onlookers asking about the boat, continue rigging, check the women on bikinis walking by, tweak a couple of things, raise sails, walk to car to lock stuff you do not want any one to steal from the beach, place the boat by the water, walk the dolley and secure it by the dune, run in to a friend and talk for a while, put on wetsuit, harness and life jacket, realize that you did not charge the vhs radio, strategize on how to get over the wave breaks, and finally go sailing.

 

Again. I find these 20 minute claims pretty amazing.

 

Cheers,

 

 

I could show you how to rig the Weta, from trailer to water, in less than 20 minutes easy. If it's taking you an hour, you're missing something... or spending a long time looking for a parking spot, although I don't count parking as part of the rigging time.

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I think that all the recent posts on set-up and rigging/launching times illustrate one thing that many people feel is a BIG negative about the whole sailing experience. In their mind, it just takes too much time ( not to mention the effort ). All the suggestions, routines and video that any of us can post will help get sailors actually on the water quicker. Everything that is being posted helps. Thanks. Even some of the claims that may be viewed as " bragging " about speed may be helpful. There may be some competition for better times and we will all learn a technique or two. Any way to eliminate wasted time or effort will help. More sailing and less work/time consumed is a plus for all of us. Keep those ideas and techniques coming. Happy Sailing!

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I can relate to the questions about set-up time. I agree it can matter a lot (at least does for us for non-racing uses). Our F27 is kept in the water, fully rigged so its just a matter of lowering the dagger board and rudder, lowering and starting the engine, and dropping the dock lines, and we are away. From the car to having the boat backing out of the slip... about 2 minutes. With roller furling sails we are usually under sail within 3 minutes or so of clearing the marina channel. This makes a huge difference in our willingness to go out for a short evening sunset sail and we sail it alot.

 

For me at least there was not much a difference between a 30 minute and 1 hour set-up. Its hassle. Its an odd thing... 15 minutes rigging (or derigging) the Laser to go racing never bugs me (or the 30 minutes for the Snipe), but the same 15-30 minutes to get the F27 (stored mast up) off the trailer and launched was a hassle to avoid. I think the difference is the F27 is used for daysails - not racing - and so what was to be a relaxing activity was less so.

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I'm with you Wess, My wife and I have been taking my F-27 out about once a week for an evening sail, it would be so much easier if she was already in the water, all that stuff before and after is a drag, especially with the two year old to mind around the dock and ramp. We had the boat on a dock for about a week and it was really amazing how nice it was to just walk up to the boat, fire up the motor and go. That said... I really hate bottom paint so I haven't bit the bullet on a slip yet.

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Come on!!! You all must me flash when rigging.

 

I have a Weta and it takes me well over an hour from arriving at the beach and getting to the water.

 

I think every every one forgets the steps that take time.

 

Back the trailer to beach, unload dolley with boat, unload rigging, sails, etc, walk boat and rigging to the rigging spot, find parking for car/trailer, walk back to beach, start rigging, forgot something and go back to car, walk back to beach, continue rigging, socialize with onlookers asking about the boat, continue rigging, check the women on bikinis walking by, tweak a couple of things, raise sails, walk to car to lock stuff you do not want any one to steal from the beach, place the boat by the water, walk the dolley and secure it by the dune, run in to a friend and talk for a while, put on wetsuit, harness and life jacket, realize that you did not charge the vhs radio, strategize on how to get over the wave breaks, and finally go sailing.

 

Again. I find these 20 minute claims pretty amazing.

 

Cheers,

 

 

I could show you how to rig the Weta, from trailer to water, in less than 20 minutes easy. If it's taking you an hour, you're missing something... or spending a long time looking for a parking spot, although I don't count parking as part of the rigging time.

 

 

well if you count the bikini watching vaplaya mentioned, an hour may not be enough!

 

seriously, rigging the Weta (or other boats) in 20 min is doable once you streamline things, but STRICTLY RIGGING THE BOAT. That excludes bikinis, chatting, fixing/messing/adjusting/inventing things, putting stuff away, parking cars, loading stuff, food, and getting dressed

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Come on!!! You all must me flash when rigging.

 

I have a Weta and it takes me well over an hour from arriving at the beach and getting to the water.

 

I think every every one forgets the steps that take time.

 

Back the trailer to beach, unload dolley with boat, unload rigging, sails, etc, walk boat and rigging to the rigging spot, find parking for car/trailer, walk back to beach, start rigging, forgot something and go back to car, walk back to beach, continue rigging, socialize with onlookers asking about the boat, continue rigging, check the women on bikinis walking by, tweak a couple of things, raise sails, walk to car to lock stuff you do not want any one to steal from the beach, place the boat by the water, walk the dolley and secure it by the dune, run in to a friend and talk for a while, put on wetsuit, harness and life jacket, realize that you did not charge the vhs radio, strategize on how to get over the wave breaks, and finally go sailing.

 

Again. I find these 20 minute claims pretty amazing.

 

Cheers,

 

 

I could show you how to rig the Weta, from trailer to water, in less than 20 minutes easy. If it's taking you an hour, you're missing something... or spending a long time looking for a parking spot, although I don't count parking as part of the rigging time.

 

 

well if you count the bikini watching vaplaya mentioned, an hour may not be enough!

 

seriously, rigging the Weta (or other boats) in 20 min is doable once you streamline things, but STRICTLY RIGGING THE BOAT. That excludes bikinis, chatting, fixing/messing/adjusting/inventing things, putting stuff away, parking cars, loading stuff, food, and getting dressed

 

Got to agree. I can easily rig the Weta in 20 minutes (there are lots of shortcuts), but getting in the water is another matter. From the parking lot to actually pushing off from the dock/beach generally takes over an hour. We should come up with a new term, not 'rigging', that includes the total time it takes to actually get underway from the trailer.

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My 30 minute time was from highway speed trailer to splash - but did not include rigging the sails - I generally toss them on as I'm motoring out of the marina or usually while I'm waiting for my wife to park the car and walk down. That part never really takes much effort if I leave the jib on top in the foredeck hatch, sheets stay in place. Main sail lives on a relatively complex boom that I'd like to simplify, but it's just a matter of one push release pin for the gooseneck, a clip for the main sheet to the boom , a clip for the halyard, then raise the sail, adjust the cleat on the outhaul track, and the downhaul lives on the sail/boom assembly so I attach and pull.

 

My setup is 100% quick release swivel clips or push release pins. I don't tie any knots ever unless something goes wrong. If a rope is adjustable it has a cleat. I think that was probably the best time saving per dollar I've found. I've also been thinking about moving to a boomless main sail to further simplify the setup. This is one place I think the F22 main sail is better designed for my type of use. I think my low hanging fruit right now is folding beams replacing sliders that are overly complex. I should change my name to the lazy sailor!

 

The pulse looks well sorted. I don't know exactly how the standing rigging is adjusted. One tip that I think might be worth looking at is to change the shrouds slightly. Having a split lower with one side that has a block set allows me to quickly release the length a bit without any fear of the mast falling down. What that means then is when I raise the mast I keep the two shrouds in place and I just tip the mast over-center and it makes attaching the forestay super easy because it's not under tension. Then I have both sides marked where to tighten the blocks. It makes standing the mast a lot easier than it is with shrouds that are fixed and then trying to adjust a turnbuckle after standing the rig. The other lower split shroud on mine is just a short dyneema line. I think it carries most of the load.

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Had a surprise today while out meeting the Hokulea crew (link) at their nearest approach to me in western NY on their way around the world: I ran across a Pulse 600 in the wild!

 

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Would have liked to chat with the skipper, but he was headed out for a sail on Sodus Bay.

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Red Cordial's PhotoRed Cordial

31 Aug 2016

I'll pay for a carton of beer to the first person who posts a video shot in real time, of them driving up with a boat secured for a decent drive, raise the mast, stow the mast raising gear, attach the halyards to all three sails, put the outboard on, launch the boat, park the car, get back on the boat, unfold it and pull away from the dock in under half an hour. :)

 

I will give it a go this weekend. XXXX gold will be fine😊

I should add that most of that shit i leave on the boat set up to save time. The only things i really pack away are the sails and spars.

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Does anyone know/could measure the length of the torque rope for the top-down furler?

 

I am considering a Code 0/G0/Screecher for my Pulse as the original Gennaker is almost useless at the lake where I sail.

 

As the wind is often below 10 kts it only makes sense to sail at the right angle to the wind (so I get the same situation in both directions and it is close to fastest point of sail) and as the Pulse generates a lot of apparent wind it means mainly tight reaching.

 

I would appreciate any input on this subject. Sail cloth? Sail size? Sail shape? Furler?

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Hi Silvestert

 

There's a good guide on the UK Sailmakers web page http://www.uksailmakers.com/sails-overview-racing-spinnakers-asymmetrical

 

I've got the opposite problem in Perth, where at the start of the season it regularly blows 15/25 knots. I'm getting myself a small A4 kite for the first half of the season.

 

I'm happy to hear any suggestions but this is how I'll set the torque rope length. Install the top fitting to the torsion rope. Unfold the boat and tension the rig with your usual mast rake. Attach the furling drum to the bow sprit/prodder, with the bottom fitting for the torsion rope attached. Attach the kite halyard and fully hoist the torsion rope. Feed the the torsion rope through the bottom fitting. Have someone else pull on the loose end of the torsion rope until its taught. Hold the two halves of the clamp in place and mark the torsion rope as it enters the bottom clamp. Take the whole lot off the boat. When you install the bottom clamp make the torsion rope it at least 50mm shorter, to allow for the mast to lean forward under load and also to make sure you can get a good tension on the torsion rope when hoisted. Cut the torsion rope at least 100 mm to 150 mm too long and tape up the loose end to itself, to allow for fine tuning at a later stage, if need be. If you're using the Colligo marine torsion rope you've be surprised how hard you have to drive in the nail to get the screws to go in all the way.

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Frog has been launched; not saying this 6.5 x 7.4 metre trifoiler is in competition with Pulse but it is in similar size range; okay, not in overall beam, I get that, but Frog to home build in tensioned ply and glass, some carbon ... is not an expensive project ... especially when compared to the 600. But whether it sails "safely" and the double luff/wing rig works as intended, well, we will soon find out. Incidentally the main hull weighs 57 kgs ... so no big deal for car topping.

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It was a surreptitious Frog stealth move along a couple of quiet back roads ... but we live very close to the Waitemata. The beam shift was also done in similar manner - although achieved with only minimal apprehension..

I realize there is no rig on the boat but was pleasantly surprised to see how it floated on mooring today, just a slight rocking from lower main foil to the other - didn't even wet the upper foils; wind was fresh.

Lying a beam in a seaway? .... think I'll swerve away from doing that. But my earlier 6x6 metre design Flash Harry (second photograph) would heave to okay in a running sea. Also Frog has substantial beam area whereas Harry had only V cross section floats and slim alloy connection.

But if there is not enough flotation out there, will extend small buoyant planing sections aft of the minimalist "floats."

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It was a surreptitious Frog stealth move along a couple of quiet back roads ... but we live very close to the Waitemata. The beam shift was also done in similar manner - although achieved with only minimal apprehension..

I realize there is no rig on the boat but was pleasantly surprised to see how it floated on mooring today, just a slight rocking from lower main foil to the other - didn't even wet the upper foils; wind was fresh.

Lying a beam in a seaway? .... think I'll swerve away from doing that. But my earlier 6x6 metre design Flash Harry (second photograph) would heave to okay in a running sea. Also Frog has substantial beam area whereas Harry had only V cross section floats and slim alloy connection.

But if there is not enough flotation out there, will extend small buoyant planing sections aft of the minimalist "floats."

I love the look/idea of this thing Groucho.. can you start another thread about it? It much prefer to read about it right now than the Pulse. (Just jealous, cant afford one yet)

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Hi Silvestert

 

There's a good guide on the UK Sailmakers web page http://www.uksailmakers.com/sails-overview-racing-spinnakers-asymmetrical

 

I've got the opposite problem in Perth, where at the start of the season it regularly blows 15/25 knots. I'm getting myself a small A4 kite for the first half of the season.

 

I'm happy to hear any suggestions but this is how I'll set the torque rope length. Install the top fitting to the torsion rope. Unfold the boat and tension the rig with your usual mast rake. Attach the furling drum to the bow sprit/prodder, with the bottom fitting for the torsion rope attached. Attach the kite halyard and fully hoist the torsion rope. Feed the the torsion rope through the bottom fitting. Have someone else pull on the loose end of the torsion rope until its taught. Hold the two halves of the clamp in place and mark the torsion rope as it enters the bottom clamp. Take the whole lot off the boat. When you install the bottom clamp make the torsion rope it at least 50mm shorter, to allow for the mast to lean forward under load and also to make sure you can get a good tension on the torsion rope when hoisted. Cut the torsion rope at least 100 mm to 150 mm too long and tape up the loose end to itself, to allow for fine tuning at a later stage, if need be. If you're using the Colligo marine torsion rope you've be surprised how hard you have to drive in the nail to get the screws to go in all the way.

 

Thanks for this one. I was looking for a torsion rope 101 for quite some time now. This made a lot of things clearer to me.

 

Now I just have to figure out what all the needed parts are for a furler to work (I am still not sure I understand 2:1 system and what I need for it).

 

I guess you are using Colligo marine torsion rope... can anyone suggest something I can normally get here in Europe?

 

Corsair supplies Ronstan, here in Germany we have Bartels, anything else??

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I too am interested in the Frog but back to the Pulse...

 

Silvestert - As a guy that just put our F27 asym chute onto a top down furler I am obviously not opposed to such an idea but given the much smaller size of the chute on the Pulse I think I would maybe explore other options including the net mounted launching/retrieval tubes they use on the beach cats. Its been a while but I think (?) - I could easily have this wrong - Steve at the Finish Line made one of these work on an Corsair F24. The top downs have their uses and limitations for asym chutes on boats like ours.

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