Bob Perry

CATARI comes along at Pacific Seacraft

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Ronbo:

You can any shaped port you like in yours.

I like the oval.

I am the Robert Schumann of yacht designers.

 

Hobs: No. I have designed the coolest 9.5' dink you have ever seen. I want one. They are mocking it up now to work on the placement on the house top. We are splitting it down the middle! Woooo hoooooooo!

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Thanks Grey. They are all welded up and in place on the boat now and look just like that. No way was I going to stick some agricultural looking davits on this yacht.

Here is some more of Rasputin's work. I think he is getting the hang of it. That hard looking dodger on the center cockpit is now gone and replaced by the low scuttle hatch you see on the other rendering.

Catariexploded_zpscb437439.jpg

Why are there two bulkheads so close together under the center cockpit?

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Watching this boat come together makes me realize there are some friggin smart people on this forum.

 

 

yup

 

certainly a challenge for my filters

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Ronbo:

You can any shaped port you like in yours.

I like the oval.

I am the Robert Schumann of yacht designers.

 

Hobs: No. I have designed the coolest 9.5' dink you have ever seen. I want one. They are mocking it up now to work on the placement on the house top. We are splitting it down the middle! Woooo hoooooooo!

 

Now this sounds interesting!

New idea, and I cannot picture it in my head, Keep us posted please.

 

FD

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Thanks Grey. They are all welded up and in place on the boat now and look just like that. No way was I going to stick some agricultural looking davits on this yacht.

Here is some more of Rasputin's work. I think he is getting the hang of it. That hard looking dodger on the center cockpit is now gone and replaced by the low scuttle hatch you see on the other rendering.

Catariexploded_zpscb437439.jpg

Why are there two bulkheads so close together under the center cockpit?

Support for a deck stepped mizzen?

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Looks to me like it's under the main traveler. The next one back is under the mizzen.

 

I'm a skinny guy with long arms. I see a space like that and figure I'll be asked to somehow access it some day. ;)

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Thanks Grey. They are all welded up and in place on the boat now and look just like that. No way was I going to stick some agricultural looking davits on this yacht.

Here is some more of Rasputin's work. I think he is getting the hang of it. That hard looking dodger on the center cockpit is now gone and replaced by the low scuttle hatch you see on the other rendering.

Catariexploded_zpscb437439.jpg

Why are there two bulkheads so close together under the center cockpit?

Support for a deck stepped mizzen?

Nah, nice guess. It is there to support the weight of the water because the center cockpit doubles as a jacuzzi when the mood strikes.

 

BTW, Rasputin, that is one fine piece of work there.

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Niiiice work Rasp.

+1....really amazing.

 

 

Thanks HB and Jose,

 

I was very fortunate to have the opportunity to work with Bob on this project and was able to hone my craft, especially in the rendering realm on this handsome vessel. It is very rewarding to be able to 'foretell the future' in this manner and let Bob, the client, and the builder to get a real feel how the finished project should look. The response from the followers here on CA has been very rewarding to me as well, thanks to all who have commented. I've got lots more renders done throughout the project and someday I hope that Bob, PSC, and the client do a big glossy coffee table book on the design/build of the CATARI and I'll go through the whole collection and make available. Bob's webguru Tom has just the eye for this sort of thing and I should just turn the whole collection of the renders over to him if 'The Book' ever comes about.

 

Rasp

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Thanks Grey. They are all welded up and in place on the boat now and look just like that. No way was I going to stick some agricultural looking davits on this yacht.

Here is some more of Rasputin's work. I think he is getting the hang of it. That hard looking dodger on the center cockpit is now gone and replaced by the low scuttle hatch you see on the other rendering.

Catariexploded_zpscb437439.jpg

 

 

 

That is simultaneously fantastic and doing my head in. Noice work Putin.

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There is a Facebook group called Liveaboard Sailboat. Someone just posted this about seeing Catari.

 

I want to share with you the wonderful experience I had last week when I was fortunate to go on a tour of the Pacific Seacraft facility in Washington, NC. Nothing had prepared me for the immensity of the facility or the warmth of the greetings within. As I walked through huge warehouse sliding doors, I 'knew' as I saw a large, shiny dark hull that I was looking at their jewel, Catari. Bill Kund, my guide, laughed and explained I was looking at a 'normal' boat in for refit - and not nearly large enough to be Catari... amazing. I was guided into the office where I had the pleasure of meeting Steve Brodie, owner and guiding light of PS...this warm welcome was followed by an extensive tour of their factory. What amazed me right off the bat, again, was the immensity of the facility. Large ocean sailing vessels sat near one another in various stages of refitting...large, smaller and vessels in between being carefully and beautifully massaged back into sea ready state. The factory is further divided into little 'shops', technical, electrical, carpentry, metal working, upholstery, fabrication - each immaculately maintained and staffed by workers who can only be called artisans....proud artisans. When we finally entered yet another huge space, the many pictures on the PS website, FB or their newsletter did not prepare me for the size and beauty of Catari, the 61 footer whose progress we all have been following. Elegant is the first word to pass my lips...just elegant... As we climbed up a specially built stairway to board her, I thought of Michelangelo and the scaffolding he designed and built to work on his ceiling...artisans... standing upon her is just amazing! As we walked her length, Bill explained the many custom features designed and built with the owner's wishes and ideas in mind - truly a custom 'piece', not a cookie cutter build. While examining and marvelling over the intricate woodwork, I had the pleasure to meet David, a carpenter - an artist. What may be considered tedious work by some, like working on a ten thousand piece puzzle, David was excited about his work, exuberant to be a part of this incredible piece of floating art. This feeling of absolute pride of workmanship I noticed was evident in Jeremy, another carpenter who was working on three wooden cabin doors, each a different size, each beautifully handcrafted - you could feel and see his pride as he handled his work. Mike was no exception in the metal shop, fabricating pieces for the yacht that had a specific use but were works of art in themselves. Some of the most fascinating time was spent in watching five men working together as one, applying fiberglass to a hull mold. A sheet of fiberglass was laid, resin applied, and then the five men smoothed out each wrinkle as if in a choreographed dance. Many different weaves and thicknesses are used to give strength while maintaining a specific weight ratio, all engineered and monitored by a quality control supervisor. While I was intently watching this fascinating process, Bobby, one of the five master workers, suddenly jumped off of the large mold and explained to me it was just like working in papier mache...a wonderful analogy! My overall view of my visit - Fascinating on so many levels... Breathtaking - the scope and the beauty... Pride in workmanship and Mastery of Art... What a fortunate couple to have their dream evolve into Catari... and how incredible in today's mindset there is a company who allows its artisans the right and privilege to do it right, and create such beautiful yet seaworthy sailing ships. It was truly an incredible day and I hope each of you will someday have the privilege of a visit to this marvelous facility. Hope I haven't bored you!

 

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There is a Facebook group called Liveaboard Sailboat. Someone just posted this about seeing Catari.

 

I want to share with you the wonderful experience I had last week when I was fortunate to go on a tour of the Pacific Seacraft facility in Washington, NC. Nothing had prepared me for the immensity of the facility or the warmth of the greetings within. ... ...

 

Boatbuilding used to employ several thousand people in this area, down here in New Bern (about a 45min drive south) the Hattaras plant has been the biggest employer in town... boom times, of course. It's nice to think of them as "artisans" but it is in fact skilled labor, and they probably figure they are among the lucky ones to still have jobs where their hard-earned skills bring in more than working at Wal-Mart.

 

Pacific Seacraft has a good reputation in the community, along with the reputation for boats they build. I hope they make a success in the long run.

 

FB- Doug

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There is a Facebook group called Liveaboard Sailboat. Someone just posted this about seeing Catari.

 

I want to share with you the wonderful experience I had last week when I was fortunate to go on a tour of the Pacific Seacraft facility in Washington, NC. Nothing had prepared me for the immensity of the facility or the warmth of the greetings within. ... ...

 

Boatbuilding used to employ several thousand people in this area, down here in New Bern (about a 45min drive south) the Hattaras plant has been the biggest employer in town... boom times, of course. It's nice to think of them as "artisans" but it is in fact skilled labor, and they probably figure they are among the lucky ones to still have jobs where their hard-earned skills bring in more than working at Wal-Mart.

 

Pacific Seacraft has a good reputation in the community, along with the reputation for boats they build. I hope they make a success in the long run.

 

FB- Doug

 

That's great. Perplexing to me that some seem to think otherwise these days but businesses create jobs and it's heartening to me to know that this is appreciated, Doug.

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Boy:

Getting close but no new photos. I'll post them as I get them. I am in daily contact with the yard and working on some variations on the same hull.

PSC%2063%20raised%20salon%20C%201-27-15_

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Nice looking "Deck Saloon" with large cockpit. This looks like it will be real competition for the Swan market.

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Grey:

That would be very nice. We are working on a new guy now who likes this approach. I'm still playing with it in the preliminary stage but I like it. Getting rid of the mizzen opens up some options.

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Boy:

Getting close but no new photos. I'll post them as I get them. I am in daily contact with the yard and working on some variations on the same hull.

PSC%2063%20raised%20salon%20C%201-27-15_

Wow! That is REALLY good looking! That's what I would want if I were to do a cruising boat! Bravo!

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Here's the new Swan 60 with Euro styling for comparison.

 

Swan_60_interior_arrangement_A.jpg

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Also, the Swan is laid out like a charter boat below and the owner doesn't get a centerline berth.

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Boy:

Getting close but no new photos. I'll post them as I get them. I am in daily contact with the yard and working on some variations on the same hull.

PSC%2063%20raised%20salon%20C%201-27-15_

 

WOW, just WOW. I like that WAY better than the trunk cabin version.

 

Is that waterline overlay on the plan view to show the max extent of the cabin sole?

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My drawing is just a quick sketch. I have some time today while Ruby is at the groomers. I'll see if I can smooth it out a bit. I'm a tough audience. My hands are tied somewhat due to the fact that we would use the existing tooling for the forward cabin trunk. So that's a given. As is the cockpit area although I can stretch it forward. I want to muck around with the salon layout a bit more too. If the client objects to a feature I want to be able to say, "Fine then, how about this one? Fine then how about this one? Fine then how about this one?"

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That is a very handsome vessel Bob. The house fits the boat well. Being able to stretch the raised portion out helps. The overall balance is excellent. Sign me up, but with an inside steering station, and a cubby for a 40 pound dog.

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Schnick:

That is the boom off the old ketch rig. At this stage of the preliminary design the mast and boom are just "place holders" while I work other details out. The sail plan shows the boom extending about 24" aft of the back end of the pilot house top.

It simply is not an important detail when I am working out profile and arrangement issues. I just stick to the old design spiral and everything gets addressed in due time.

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I figured that was the ketch boom. My last boat had about that rig position and relative boom length and no amount of rake could make the thing go upwind until I added 20% to the boom. ugh.

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That is a very handsome vessel Bob. The house fits the boat well. Being able to stretch the raised portion out helps. The overall balance is excellent. Sign me up, but with an inside steering station, and a cubby for a 40 pound dog.

I think there is an inside steering station, that looks like a wheel on the forward starboard bulkhead in the saloon.

Using a swivel seat for the saloon and the steering station is a nice touch Bob.

I am off to buy a lottery ticket this morning.

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Olaf:

Uhhh,,,no. Nice idea though. I should try it out. As drawn there is no inside steering station unless you sit at the nav station with your AP. I'm not convinced a wheel is needed on a boat like this. But I will leave that up to the buyer.

I'll do a version with a real nice pilot station next. But now it's off to the symphony with my son. Rach 3 and sushi.

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I like the aft cockpit version a lot better too.

 

Curious about what ND thinks of it? I know his heart was set on a ketch, but did that drawing cause any second thoughts? Would have for me, but I never had my heart set on a ketch.

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I like the aft cockpit version a lot better too.

 

Curious about what ND thinks of it? I know his heart was set on a ketch, but did that drawing cause any second thoughts? Would have for me, but I never had my heart set on a ketch.

 

I think it might be a little late for 2nd thoughts for ND, Tom. And it this point I'm sure it would be more like 1000th thoughts, easily rejected.

 

Nothing like committing people and funds to a project to sharpen the thinking.

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Boy:

Getting close but no new photos. I'll post them as I get them. I am in daily contact with the yard and working on some variations on the same hull.

PSC%2063%20raised%20salon%20C%201-27-15_

Wow! That is REALLY good looking! That's what I would want if I were to do a cruising boat! Bravo!

I'm with Kim on the "Wow! That is REALLY good looking!"

 

But I keep wondering what it would look like with just the low house, aft cockpit, and rigged as a high peaked gaff schooner. I'd guess the bow sprit might need to extend some to balance the sail plan, and I know it wouldn't point as well as the Cutter or Ketch rigged versions. But with a black hull, I'd bet it'd look pretty sweet.

 

Unfortunately, I too am in the awaiting the lottery win first stage. Fortunately for me, ND, and Kim, and KDH are willing to share!

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the pilot house looks too big - make sit look more like a motorsailer than a sailboat

 

as far as the layout, i would choose a pullman, like the swan, if it were mine - i think they work better than vee-berths on a boat this size.., and you can make a pretty good seaberth by putting leecloths in the middle and on the outside- the slightly more aft location is more comfortable too.

 

i think the aft cabin should be upper and lower single berths.

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In my book, that's not a pilothouse, it's a deck saloon. And I agree it's too big.

 

I think that this hull would look best if it had a pure pilothouse. It would be half the length of this thing, with a raised fwd-looking chart table where the AP remote could be used to steer, and it would have a short seat opposite for other crew. The saloon would be lower down, where it could be much wider.

 

When Bob has drawn that, I'll probably change my mind and say that I want a cat ketch anyway, so we need a new hull shape :)

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I like the aft cockpit version a lot better too.

 

Curious about what ND thinks of it? I know his heart was set on a ketch, but did that drawing cause any second thoughts? Would have for me, but I never had my heart set on a ketch.

 

I think it might be a little late for 2nd thoughts for ND, Tom. And it this point I'm sure it would be more like 1000th thoughts, easily rejected.

 

Nothing like committing people and funds to a project to sharpen the thinking.

 

I'm sure he won't hit the reset button at this point and build another boat. I also recall that Bob tried to talk him out of the ketch rig without success, a process that probably involved drawings like the one we're discussing. Just wondering about his current reaction to that drawing.

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Boy:

Getting close but no new photos. I'll post them as I get them. I am in daily contact with the yard and working on some variations on the same hull.

PSC%2063%20raised%20salon%20C%201-27-15_

Wow! That is REALLY good looking! That's what I would want if I were to do a cruising boat! Bravo!

I'm with Kim on the "Wow! That is REALLY good looking!"

 

But I keep wondering what it would look like with just the low house, aft cockpit, and rigged as a high peaked gaff schooner. I'd guess the bow sprit might need to extend some to balance the sail plan, and I know it wouldn't point as well as the Cutter or Ketch rigged versions. But with a black hull, I'd bet it'd look pretty sweet.

 

Unfortunately, I too am in the awaiting the lottery win first stage. Fortunately for me, ND, and Kim, and KDH are willing to share!

That boat makes me drool every time I look at it. People at the office are starting to wonder if something is wrong with me.

 

In the meantime, you can fine me in the lottery line right behind Crash.

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In my book, that's not a pilothouse, it's a deck saloon. And I agree it's too big.I think that this hull would look best if it had a pure pilothouse. It would be half the length of this thing, with a raised fwd-looking chart table where the AP remote could be used to steer, and it would have a short seat opposite for other crew. The saloon would be lower down, where it could be much wider.When Bob has drawn that, I'll probably change my mind and say that I want a cat ketch anyway, so we need a new hull shape :)

Isn't the point of a boat like this to have a living room with a view? And, if so, why make it small?

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I love this boat. That's a heck of a galley.

 

On a pilot house/deck salon (whatever) boat such as this does it ever make sense to raise the aft end of the cockpit sole so the helmsman can see over the house?

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Monsoon:

Yes it does make sense to raise the cockpit sole aft for visibility and that is exactly why I did it on the deck tooling. Way ahead of you there. Do you really think I'd miss something like that?

There are two steps in the cockpit. This provides standing headroom under the PH overhang and good visibility over the PH for the owner's diminutive wife. This was mocked up off the boat. This was mocked up on the boat. This was 3D modeled. This was designed. This is an old drawing. There have been several interior changes but the cockpit levels have never been changed.

Serini%20XXX%20interior_zpseci4nzbb.jpg

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Semi is dead spot on with his comments on the size of the salon. A small PH just wont; cut it. Here is how I know this. I have designed several PH boats over the years. Some have small PH volume and other have big PH volume. I have found that if the weather is not so nice people want to be in the pilot house. ALL THE PEOPLE ON BOARD WANT TO BE IN THE PH! It makes sense. They can see out. No point in having a PH if it cannot accommodate the entire crew in comfort. Been there and done that. It doesn't work.

 

I won't waste my time arguing over what you call it. Deck salon or pilot house, it's all the same to me, just words.

 

"I'm sure he won't hit the reset button at this point and build another boat."

Tom, Tom, Tom, Tom, Tom. You say the darndest things some times. ND's boat is almost done. I'm sure he has no intention of hitting the reset button at this stage. You are forgetting that the boat ND is getting is the boat ND wants. It's that simple.

 

7070:

We made the change to a Pullman forward instead of V berths on ND;s boat months ago. It looks good.

Not sure if there is the height I need under the side decks to get upper and lower q berths. Might be doable.

 

Remember, I have been posting the design work on CATARI pretty much fro the preliminary stages onward. We are THE WORLD'S LARGEST YACHT DESIGN OFFICE. Areas that needed further attention and refinement have been addressed by the staff here many times over. I have had a lot of help with this design and I am very grateful for it.

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Remember, I have been posting the design work on CATARI pretty much fro the preliminary stages onward. We are THE WORLD'S LARGEST YACHT DESIGN OFFICE. Areas that needed further attention and refinement have been addressed by the staff here many times over. I have had a lot of help with this design and I am very grateful for it.

....this is THE WORLD'S LARGEST SCHOOL OF YACHT DESIGN" also and I (we?) are very grateful to the maestro!

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crash brings up an interesting point. The Pilot House makes for a fine big saloon with a lovely view but because you need to have side decks, the width of the Pilothouse (Raised Saloon, whatever) is restricted to something much less than the hull's beam.

 

How would all the space under the side decks outboard of the saloon normally be used in a layout like this? Too high for tankage, seems a waste just as storage. Hmm, design spiral...

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Sal:

That is the age old problem with a pilot house. If you sink the cabin sole enough to let the settee go outboard under the side deck while preserving the raised salon big windows you will end up with 7.5' headroom and awkward spaces like you see on many of the Oysters. There is no magic wand for this. I balance all the needs and let the space under the side decks just be stowage. It's a lot of volume and difficult to access easily but it can be done and I have done it before.

Not much you can do with a boa interior that's new for me. There is this assumption that adding a big lump, i.e. pilot house, buys you more interior volume but that is not the case. In terms of usable interior volume you actually lose volume. due to the loss of the volume under the side deck. But I value side decks and I am not going to whittle them away so the owner can display two more doilies. I'll see if I can add some contrast to that image so it shows up better.

 

387fac95-f1a7-4d95-8571-327eb4f3eacd_zps

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thanks to you both, I can finally visualize why all those great PH boats have smaller interiors...

 

 

oh, and I bought my lottery ticket last night...

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Just one ticket?

 

If you look at the Baba 40 PH and some of my later boats I have tried to work around this problem of how to handle the volume under the side deck by dropping the galley down two steps so it can expand under the side deck. In this current 63' project you can see that the version with the aft head and the double quarter berth both of those areas are two steps down from the PH sole level. But if you want to sit comfortably at the dinette and gaze out of big windows you will have to raise the dinette and if you raise the dinette you are doomed to having to keep it within the perimeter of the pilot house trunk. Note also on the Baba 40 how I bumped out the piolot house sides from the forward cabin trunk. to leave me what I considered minimal but workable side decks. You can see this exact same feature on my FD35 aka Baba 35 ph model and the Tashiba ph 40, 36 and 31 models. Note also that in the way of the PH on this Tashiba 31 I have eliminated the bulwark and brought the side deck level up to right under the "cap rail". This way I gain about 3" of additional height under the side deck.

 

Tashiba%2031%20PH%20XXX_zpsqyi4icve.jpg

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Boy:

Getting close but no new photos. I'll post them as I get them. I am in daily contact with the yard and working on some variations on the same hull.

PSC%2063%20raised%20salon%20C%201-27-15_

 

 

 

MMMM lottery tickets you say. Very nice Bob.

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My sailing style is more driven to the Swan but I know I would much rather have the Perry. Funny how when you get older you appreciate different things. A beautiful sunny afternoon broad reaching towards the Caribbean or turning down from the weather mark with a big ease as the Assy goes up....

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Boy:

Getting close but no new photos. I'll post them as I get them. I am in daily contact with the yard and working on some variations on the same hull.

PSC%2063%20raised%20salon%20C%201-27-15_

nice. not too obtrusive. i find most of these things too awkward and break the line. which is painful to my eye. not too bad in a motorsailor, but those are something else. in pure sailing vessels its as though theyre trying to cram a bowling ball into a wallet. the sheer is delightful.

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crash brings up an interesting point. The Pilot House makes for a fine big saloon with a lovely view but because you need to have side decks, the width of the Pilothouse (Raised Saloon, whatever) is restricted to something much less than the hull's beam.

 

How would all the space under the side decks outboard of the saloon normally be used in a layout like this? Too high for tankage, seems a waste just as storage. Hmm, design spiral...

 

You could always put dinghy outboard fuel there. Too high? Well, OK, put it up on deck like everyone else to solve that problem.

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Pilothouse/Deck Saloon is hard to do right. As a huge fan of the Deck Saloon (I like to watch), I've built up a short list of those I find appealing. My first encounter was on a Baba 40 PH. Still, in my book, the best looking ph/ds I've ever seen. It is so perfectly integrated and proportional with the entire design of the boat that it's hard to think it could get better (ok, the LM 46 Bob Designed is maybe a RCH better).

 

This design just looks perfect. And no doubt, Bob has done his magic inside to make sure anyone seated has a wonderful view out those windows (personally, those windows could be a scoshe smaller - I'm sure once we see the rendering maybe they won't look so big).

 

Bob is the master when it comes to the deck saloon. I also like Chuck Payne's Reindeer and some of the Humphrey's Oyster designs, but when it comes to making the structure an aesthetic integration into the whole boat, Bob's the best.

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I find it interesting that if you only look at the side elevation there's no way of telling what size the boat is. The proportions are so well done that the boat could be 40', 50', 60' - just can't tell.

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Thanks for taking the time to answer all these questions and opinions Bob. It really gives an insight into your design technique and emphasises the amount of customisation available for custom boat owners. Good work.

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My sailing style is more driven to the Swan but I know I would much rather have the Perry. Funny how when you get older you appreciate different things. A beautiful sunny afternoon broad reaching towards the Caribbean or turning down from the weather mark with a big ease as the Assy goes up....

 

I feel the same way. I love the Swans, but If I have the bank for one of those, I may just have Bob design me his interpretation of the Swan 53, but better. ;)

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I'd take the Swan. It may not be perfect but it's close enough.

 

Just finished 4.5 hour meeting with my newest client. He likes my cooking. I'm drained but eager to start getting his ideas down. I can see the boat in my head already. Hope all the shit fits in it he wants. Wants me to break the cabin trunk at the mast. Just like the old guys did it. I can do that. Almost all of my cartoons are like that. He's a big fan of Bill Atkins. Headroom is over rated. I'll go for the TALLY HO MAJOR look with an all cf hull and deck. You have never seen a boat such as this one will be.

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Just finished 4.5 hour meeting with my newest client. He likes my cooking. I'm drained but eager to start getting his ideas down. I can see the boat in my head already. Hope all the shit fits in it he wants. Wants me to break the cabin trunk at the mast. Just like the old guys did it. I can do that. Almost all of my cartoons are like that. He's a big fan of Bill Atkins. Headroom is over rated.

I like. Foredeck space looks good and works good.

 

Headroom is for cooking and getting yer clothes on. The rest of the time, sitting or stooping works fine.

 

I blame the fashion for treating the v-berth as the main sleeping cabin. In the old days, the foc'sle was the home of sail and gear and a pipe berth and wasn't expected to be a hotel bedroom. Now the master-cabin-in-the-bow requires a coachroof off of a giraffe house. Don't these people know how to crawl?

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I find it interesting that if you only look at the side elevation there's no way of telling what size the boat is. The proportions are so well done that the boat could be 40', 50', 60' - just can't tell.

The fashion nowadays in big boats is a very clean look - no gear and bits of rigging to act as a guide to scale. Hard to tell an 80-er from a 120-er.

 

To some extent it's more true of drawings because things like cleats and winches may be omitted or too small

to see.

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I'd take the Swan. It may not be perfect but it's close enough.

 

Just finished 4.5 hour meeting with my newest client. He likes my cooking. I'm drained but eager to start getting his ideas down. I can see the boat in my head already. Hope all the shit fits in it he wants. Wants me to break the cabin trunk at the mast. Just like the old guys did it. I can do that. Almost all of my cartoons are like that. He's a big fan of Bill Atkins. Headroom is over rated. I'll go for the TALLY HO MAJOR look with an all cf hull and deck. You have never seen a boat such as this one will be.

Looking forward to details when you can share.

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War:

It will be a couple of weeks at least until this project is ready to meet the public. I have some problem solving to do first. I'll need some help from the WLYDO in some areas so stand by.

 

Legs: The new boat will have pipe berths in the focsle for emergency use only.

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War:

It will be a couple of weeks at least until this project is ready to meet the public. I have some problem solving to do first. I'll need some help from the WLYDO in some areas so stand by.

 

Legs: The new boat will have pipe berths in the focsle for emergency use only.

Thank you Bob. We all understand client privacy and some clients desire to stay off the radar. Sounds like this client is letting you share some going forward. Needs a new thread!

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Thanks Paps:

Long time no see. How are things with you?

 

Bloody good Bob and you?

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Thanks guys.

 

Paps: I'm fine. Working hard and doing all the things I normally do. Looking forward to more racing on FRANCIS LEE this spring. I am enjoying my grandchildren. Never had a little girl before so that's been different. Violet is the apple of my eye.

Violet%20dancing%20with%20Buppy_zpse4q05

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Not for me, it's noisy in the bow, much prefer the back of the bus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just finished 4.5 hour meeting with my newest client. He likes my cooking. I'm drained but eager to start getting his ideas down. I can see the boat in my head already. Hope all the shit fits in it he wants. Wants me to break the cabin trunk at the mast. Just like the old guys did it. I can do that. Almost all of my cartoons are like that. He's a big fan of Bill Atkins. Headroom is over rated.

I like. Foredeck space looks good and works good.

 

Headroom is for cooking and getting yer clothes on. The rest of the time, sitting or stooping works fine.

 

I blame the fashion for treating the v-berth as the main sleeping cabin. In the old days, the foc'sle was the home of sail and gear and a pipe berth and wasn't expected to be a hotel bedroom. Now the master-cabin-in-the-bow requires a coachroof off of a giraffe house. Don't these people know how to crawl?

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I am still tinkering with the salon layout of the PSC 63 raised salon version. Each time I think I have it just right I see an area that can be improved. So, this version is already obsolete as I have a new improvement in mind. I'll take some length off the 9' dinette to port, add it aft on the port side where the wet locker is now and make a nice nav station. Not doing anything else this morning. Might as well work. I like working.

PSC%2063%20raised%20salon%20Ex_zpsferwcd

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By Jove, I think I've got it! I've got it for now anyway. I'm trying to creat the look of "furniture" in the salon. PSC is very good at furniture detailing so no point in not taking advantage of that.

PSC%2063%20raised%20salon%20F_zpsbneevqf

 

I'll let this sit and rest for a while and see if any new ideas pop up. If you have any ideas I'm all ears. I doesn't take me long to try out new things on acad,

But now I must go inflate by balls, run a few downs with my dog and get ready for the Seahawks and the Super Bowl.

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If you drop the chart table, the charter version could have two aft cabins.

 

Is it possible to make the backrest on the helm seat a folder, like in a train, so it sits against the wheel when it is not being used and starboard seat becomes a three seater?

 

Or maybe the seat back could slide into the under deck area?

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I've often wondered exactly what the attraction is with the "Nav Station". Yes, of course, to navigate. But it also serves as an electronics and electrical panel center, an office/work space, a 'small items catch all spot', etc. In fact, for most folks, I'd posit that very little actual navigation takes place there--but it's a cool space that us boat owners tend to gravitate towards.

 

Personally, I prefer to stand to the nav table rather than sit at the nav station, perhaps this stems from my professional chart table experience/practice. Few of them really work well when laying out even a folded chart. Providing a true stand up nav station allows the full height from sole to work surface for actually drawer space and real chart stowage. Why lose all that space just for my knees (that aren't there most of the time)?

 

Nav stations get used alright but would they be used any less without the seating capability or if they were stand up only? I'm thinking that they'd actually be more useful. Is it just me?

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I've often wondered exactly what the attraction is with the "Nav Station". Yes, of course, to navigate. But it also serves as an electronics and electrical panel center, an office/work space, a 'small items catch all spot', etc. In fact, for most folks, I'd posit that very little actual navigation takes place there--but it's a cool space that us boat owners tend to gravitate towards.

 

Personally, I prefer to stand to the nav table rather than sit at the nav station, perhaps this stems from my professional chart table experience/practice. Few of them really work well when laying out even a folded chart. Providing a true stand up nav station allows the full height from sole to work surface for actually drawer space and real chart stowage. Why lose all that space just for my knees (that aren't there most of the time)?

 

Nav stations get used alright but would they be used any less without the seating capability or if they were stand up only? I'm thinking that they'd actually be more useful. Is it just me?

 

I use our nav station a lot, it's where the laptop lives, it's where the charts and tide tables get spread out, and it's my own little space on the boat. The nav station seat is the most used seat in my domain.

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Good idea Olaf. Thanks for that. But the problem is that the two levels are far from the same. The pilot seat would be well elevated ad the short settee seat would be normal 18" above sole height. I'll ponder it for a bit.

 

Yes, I could have mirror image quarter berth "sleeping holes". but with no head aft I wonder if they would have the appeal.

 

Don't forget the rake angle to the house side and the thickness of structure, annoying little details that must be considered.

 

I appreciate the ideas guys. Keep them coming. I'm with Django on the importance of the chart table seat. It's just a great place to hang out and feel like a captain.

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Are you sure that removing the wet locker is a good idea?

 

Without it, surely the crew will have to tramp their wet clothing right through the elegantly-crafted interior? That doesn't seem to me to be a desirable situation.

I am still tinkering with the salon layout of the PSC 63 raised salon version. Each time I think I have it just right I see an area that can be improved. So, this version is already obsolete as I have a new improvement in mind. I'll take some length off the 9' dinette to port, add it aft on the port side where the wet locker is now and make a nice nav station. Not doing anything else this morning. Might as well work. I like working.

PSC%2063%20raised%20salon%20Ex_zpsferwcd

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Motors:

Well, right now I have the pilot station forward on the starboard side so that's out.

Besides you are new here I think and we have a tradition so no more posts from you until you observe and show some respect to out tradition of ALWAYS posting tits first. If you have already posted tits then you must post them again because,,,,I say so. Jeez is there just no respect any more for the old ways?

 

Legs:

It's a raised salon boat with inside steering. How wet do you think the crew will be? There is always the hanging locker in the starboard quarter sleeping hole. ( I will no longer call them ":staterooms".)

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How about this - put the port side back to the big dinette/wet locker and put a big chart table/sideboard/bar type piece of furniture where that short starboard settee is? It could be a stand up and have a hide away stool type seat as well.

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Jon:

That would work and I have considered that but I want the opposing seating areas.

I try very hard to make my interior layouts "inviting". I don't want to have to sit cheek to jowl with my guests.

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It's a raised salon boat with inside steering. How wet do you think the crew will be? There is always the hanging locker in the starboard quarter sleeping hole. ( I will no longer call them ":staterooms".)

I guess it depends where the boat is sailed. I was I instinctively evaluating the boat against the weather conditions in the west of Ireland, where there are few rain-free days, and the drying of damp clothing is a constant priority on land or sea.

 

I recall one Irish summer when in 6 weeks on the water, there was only one day where it didn't rain all day; the morning was dry, and the drizzle came back at lunchtime. I hear that in some weird places, the sky has a bright yellow ball in it, which somehow replaces the rain. Very odd.

 

Congrats on resisting the "staterooms" terminology. It belongs with much bigger vessels, and the copy-writers for glossy brochures do nobody any favours by using it to label the more modest sleeping quarters of a yacht of this size.

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PSC%2063%20raised%20salon%20F_zpsbneevqf

See that heads opposite the galley? Why not flip it fore-and-aft, so that the blank wall adjoins the guest cabin. Then there could be a door between the two rooms, giving the guests more privacy.

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Personally, I prefer to stand to the nav table rather than sit at the nav station, perhaps this stems from my professional chart table experience/practice.

 

I actually use my navstation for navigation (as well as all the other tasks mentioned), but when the conditions are a little rough (or a lot rough) there's no way I could do my job standing up. Having a seat that keeps me secured is a big deal.

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Galley surfaces (#21) are simply excellent. I do not know if you get into this level of ultra detail but can you tell us what finish was used on those surfaces?

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Galley surfaces (#21) are simply excellent. I do not know if you get into this level of ultra detail but can you tell us what finish was used on those surfaces?

 

Cherry. Specifically, Don Cherry. Very rare wood.

 

Edit: Oh, the finish. Unobtainium extract and mineral oil.

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Galley surfaces (#21) are simply excellent. I do not know if you get into this level of ultra detail but can you tell us what finish was used on those surfaces?

 

Cherry. Specifically, Don Cherry. Very rare wood.

 

Edit: Oh, the finish. Unobtainium extract and mineral oil.

I understand the grain is a little wild at times.

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Greetings all, I've been absent for a while. I was just at the PSC factory on Friday and got the grand tour of CATARI - what an amazing boat! Can't wait to see her in the water soon. The details were amazing and PSC is justifiably proud of their work.

 

My reason to visit the factory (besides drooling over CATARI) was to pick PSC's brain about a new rig for my Pilothouse 32. I will definitely be in need of some advice so I'll start a thread soon. Not sure if I can post a pic here from my phone but the layout of my boat is very similar to Bob's latest iteration of the 63'er, obviously much smaller and minus a few extra cabins, but the general layout works great. There is some lost space for sure but IMO the space that is there is more liveable, and the big windows make the boat seem larger than it is.