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Black Jack

Sail cleaner has no honor

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I have been now called a man of no honor, something I may have to learn to live with.

 

I woke up early this morning, took my two largest headsails to my community pool around 6:30am. I rinsed them off first then put them in the large lap pool before anyone arrived. They soaked for 45 mins until the swimmers arrive (they do not live in my complex). I withdrew them from the pool and set them on the side to dry. I waited till the sun came out to dry them and roll them back with the help of my 14 year old son.

 

As I finished rolling them up at 10. An shirtless Asian man comes running up with a puffed chest began to yell at me for doing my "laundry" in the pool. He then said he had called the security officer on duty and I was in trouble. I said they were just clean sails which I was working to get the rust and inter stitch stains out. I told him to relax otherwise he might have a heart attack. He got furious and stated, "You have no honor". to which I said, that may be true, but "I do have clean sails." As I left, the security officer rolled up seeing me, my boy and the two sails leaving the pool. He nodded, cracked a smile at me knowing his trouble was handled with my departure.

 

I went home immediately to search on line for an expensive Seppuku blade to terminate my worthless life and restore my family honor. But since I have ADD, I got sidetracked and began to ordered a proper Dacron blade to restore my sailing honor.

 

Oh yeah, the pool made my sails look great, whiter than it has been in years and feels quite crisp (crisper). the pool technique really does work. Just don't let non sailor folks see you do your "laundry" there.

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So you used up all the free chlorine ions?

 

The pool isn't safe to use for hours.

 

It's like a hairy dog jumping in, it's about total surface area IIRC.

 

If you want to do that sort of thing, or better still use your own pool, do,it in the evening so it has time to recover.

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the use of light chlorine is a wise practice which I have used every other year with no harsh effects or degrading on Dacron sails and stitching.

 

Hardy the same as commercially available detergents which does not dissipate within 45 mins. Remember the levels are 2 to 3 parts per million not parts per hundreds or thousand without the same dissipation rates. Moreover, the use of the pool did save my California community hundreds of gallons of water something to remember as we are in a sever water shortages in California.

 

Also consider about the kids in diapers swimming in the pool every day before you critique my use of a pool with relatively clean sails.

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As a sailmaker for umteen years, I strongly advise keeping your sails out of the pool. I have seen many sails meet their fate this way. One was a one year old spinnaker that came apart completely. Every panel. He blamed the thread. Said he took great care of it, hardly used it and even washed it regularly.

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As a sailmaker for umteen years, I strongly advise keeping your sails out of the pool. I have seen many sails meet their fate this way. One was a one year old spinnaker that came apart completely. Every panel. He blamed the thread. Said he took great care of it, hardly used it and even washed it regularly.

.

.....sounds like someone was using non-speck chinese thread---I've heard that it's important to be VERY specific about 'details' when ordering from china :mellow:

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the use of light chlorine is a wise practice which I have used every other year with no harsh effects or degrading on Dacron sails and stitching.

Hardy the same as commercially available detergents which does not dissipate within 45 mins. Remember the levels are 2 to 3 parts per million not parts per hundreds or thousand without the same dissipation rates. Moreover, the use of the pool did save my California community hundreds of gallons of water something to remember as we are in a sever water shortages in California.

Also consider about the kids in diapers swimming in the pool every day before you critique my use of a pool with relatively clean sails.

 

So on top of the above,

 

Do you piss in the communal pool as well?

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Well if the sails had been stored in the forepeak of many of the racing boats I was on in the '70s, there's a very high likelihood he washed off semen and vaginal secretions into the pool.

 

No honor indeed!!


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Well if the sails had been stored in the forepeak of many of the racing boats I was on in the '70s, there's a very high likelihood he washed off semen and vaginal secretions into the pool.

 

No honor indeed!!

 

 

ew

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Mild chlorine OK, but rinse the sails afterward. Generally, you're removing mild dirt and mildew, which is what the chlorine does for the pool. I wouldn't suggest doing it right after the pool is treated, do it just before.

 

As a related story... years ago the wives and social members of Davis Island YC in Tampa strongly urged the building of a pool. The sailors were quite hesitant... this was a "sailing club" of the saltiest sort, not a social club. Finally a compromise was reached... the club would build a pool, but it's written into the bylaws the sailors may wash sails in it.

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Perhaps if we had the full picture...the rinsing of a bird shit covered sail isn't such a big deal..

 

CtRpKoq.jpg

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post-180-0-03803600-1413070211_thumb.jpg

 

What's this stuff called 'Dacron?'

 

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It would appear to be the consensus that the shirtless Asian man was correct.

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It would appear to be the consensus that the shirtless Asian man was correct.

 

They killed Socrates, you know.

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Poor form to wash your sails in a community pool. Either pay to have it washed or if you do not have the yard to do it in ask a friend that does. Lay it out on the lawn, rinse with fresh water, scrub any stains with mild detergent and hang between trees to dry. Chlorine is not good for the sail, yes you can cite all the dosage stats you want, the fact remains that sails dunked in pools will fail prematurley.

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It would appear to be the consensus that the shirtless Asian man was correct.

 

Black Jack......Time to finish up on your research. Maybe you could start a "what seppuku knife do you have" post though I'm sure the thread would quickly bleed into "what are the best sun-glasses for sailing"...or perhaps a rules question.

 

 

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+1 Shirtless Asian Man

 

Could we have a poll on this topic? Also we need details. Does the OP live in the ghetto? Is the pool the only source of fresh water for his village? Do the various UN agencies that assist his people have a solution to this issue? Can we get a story about this impoverished nomad on the front page to draw attention to his drought ridden country ?

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Is this a thing in the US?

Seems like a downright rude thing to do, but there's no community pools over here.

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Me in college, drying Shields sails on campus main flagpole around midnight.

Campus cop: "Hey! What are you doing?!?!"

Me: "Drying sails."

Cop: "You can't do that!"

Me: "Why?"

Cop: "Get out of here before I arrest you!"

Me, mumbling under my breath: "asshole!"

Cop: "What did you say?!!!"

Me: "Right away, sir!"

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Cleaning sails?

How the hell does a sail get dirty??

Aside from dumping and poking a sail in the mud, there is nothing sails do that gets them dirty.

Mud and rust stains??

If you plan to continue to use your sails as tarps for your farm vehicles :

1. Rinse the mud off the tires before covering those tires

2. Put a coat of tractor paint over the Rusty spots. Your farm supply stocks matching colors for most major brands.

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As a Texas boy: dirt blown up from plowing the back 40.

 

In Marina Del Rey or Newport Beach: Jet fuel soot from LAX or SNA.

Or anchoring in the lee of any of the parched desert islands from Santa Barbara to Cabo San Lucas.

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Cleaning sails?

How the hell does a sail get dirty??

Aside from dumping and poking a sail in the mud, there is nothing sails do that gets them dirty.

Mud and rust stains??

If you plan to continue to use your sails as tarps for your farm vehicles :

1. Rinse the mud off the tires before covering those tires

2. Put a coat of tractor paint over the Rusty spots. Your farm supply stocks matching colors for most major brands.

 

+1

 

Don't wash the sails in the cows water trough either. They may not be Asian but they are shirtless too

 

FB- Doug

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In the great PNW, we have to deal with those little things like pollen, sometimes construction dust, and then the inevitable Green Monster that comes creeping out of nowhere sometime between December and April. The GM also loves halyards, sheets and various control lines, especially the ones that run through deeply hidden under deck conduits and low spots that trap rain, salt and spray.

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Sorry... In almost sixty seasons of sailing I have never left shore with clean sails and returned with filthy ones . ( except for stuffing a mast in the mud once... But it mostly rinsed off in about a year)

 

If your sails are getting dirty, you are not sailing right.

And if the dirt on your sails concerns you, you are allowing yourself to be distracted from that which is more important

 

Pools are for swimming

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It would appear to be the consensus that the shirtless Asian man was correct.

 

They killed Socrates, you know.

 

Who? Shirtless Asian men?

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Cleaning sails?

How the hell does a sail get dirty??

Aside from dumping and poking a sail in the mud, there is nothing sails do that gets them dirty.

Mud and rust stains??

If you plan to continue to use your sails as tarps for your farm vehicles :

1. Rinse the mud off the tires before covering those tires

2. Put a coat of tractor paint over the Rusty spots. Your farm supply stocks matching colors for most major brands.

+1

 

Don't wash the sails in the cows water trough either. They may not be Asian but they are shirtless too

 

FB- Doug

I love those shirtless cowgirls. Whoopi Thai yai a.

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Cleaning sails?

How the hell does a sail get dirty??

Aside from dumping and poking a sail in the mud, there is nothing sails do that gets them dirty.

Mud and rust stains??

If you plan to continue to use your sails as tarps for your farm vehicles :

1. Rinse the mud off the tires before covering those tires

2. Put a coat of tractor paint over the Rusty spots. Your farm supply stocks matching colors for most major brands.

 

 

what no dirt dobbers in austin Guv?

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It would appear to be the consensus that the shirtless Asian man was correct.

 

They killed Socrates, you know.

 

Who? Shirtless Asian men?

Sorry, that was a bit obscure. I was trying to play on consensus by making an ironic reference to consensus being the reason Socrates was condemned to die for "corrupting youth." I was being ironic in the sense that consensus seems to be correct in this case, but wrong in the case of Socrates.

 

...yeah...nevermind. Wasn't that funny anyway. I'm pro-Socrates, anti swimming in sail shit. And, for the record, I oppose kids in shitty diapers swimming in the pool also.

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Gouv - just FYI - my sails have never gotten dirty out in the Atlantic Ocean :) My boat is not underway in thge ocean 24/7/365 though and we are in range of mud wasps, birds, etc. at the dock :(

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BlackJack.....

 

Best seppuku methodology mirrors the trapezoid course... so if that ain't karma.

 

wpe8.jpg

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So you used up all the free chlorine ions?

 

The pool isn't safe to use for hours.

 

It's like a hairy dog jumping in, it's about total surface area IIRC.

 

If you want to do that sort of thing, or better still use your own pool, do,it in the evening so it has time to recover.

 

Better yet, do it at night. That way the chlorine can recover, and no one will see you. Win-Win!

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It would appear to be the consensus that the shirtless Asian man was correct.

 

They killed Socrates, you know.

 

Who? Shirtless Asian men?

Sorry, that was a bit obscure. I was trying to play on consensus by making an ironic reference to consensus being the reason Socrates was condemned to die for "corrupting youth." I was being ironic in the sense that consensus seems to be correct in this case, but wrong in the case of Socrates.

 

...yeah...nevermind. Wasn't that funny anyway. I'm pro-Socrates, anti swimming in sail shit. And, for the record, I oppose kids in shitty diapers swimming in the pool also.

 

Karluk...welcome to Sailing Anarchy... SloopJonB is just yanking your chain....we all got the reference and are well aware that Socrates along with the sophists were perceived as morally nihilistic ...this being sailing Anarchy he is on the the SA (nihilistic/anarchistic) wall of fame....though even socrates would acknowledge that he couldn't do bow worth shit. though I do believe he still nailed the owners daugter ( circa 387BC)

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I don't think it's that bad. Kids are dirtier than a sail in a pool. I wouldn't do it though because of the chlorine potentially damaging. Fwiw my headsail is dirty from the previous owner leaving it flaked in the same position for a while. Who doesn't like a crisp white sail?

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I always understood that chlorine damaged Nylon, not Dacron. What exactly happens to a pool dipped Dacron sail?

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I always understood that chlorine damaged Nylon, not Dacron. What exactly happens to a pool dipped Dacron sail?

I have never seen a pool-dipped dacron sail damaged, even done it myself a couple times. Always rinsed the sails afterward, though.

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Ok - since you clean your sails in the community pool, does that now give others the right to use the pool for their large-scale cleaning needs ? That blue poly-tarp covering your neighbors rusted willys jeep ? The area rug your other neighbors elderly dog cleans his butt on ? The list is endless..... I'm siding with the shirtless Asian on this one.

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and nothing but tumbleweed from the OP................ :rolleyes:

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Dacron is not resistant to Chlorine. It will break down fibers, especially if the pool has been shock treated. Will you see a change right away? No, but it will shorten the life of the sail.

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I am not buying for a second you received any value beyond a near clean or fresh water rinse. There is simply not that much chlorine in safe pool swimming water. If you want to bleach your sails try a garden sprayer mixed with the proper mixture of bleach(sodium hypochlorite NaOCl) and water of your fabric and stitching. The neighbor who called you out as an ASS for rinsing your boat stuff in the pool is the better of the two.

 

Laying sails or any fabric on a grass lawn during sunshine will also have a bleaching effect(grass-bleaching).

 

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I think it's printed on a small tag on the sail, wash in warm water, tumble dry on low setting.

 

I just lay mine out on the grass pour some soap and water on it and let the sailing school use it as a slip-n-slide for the day.

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I don't want to use my good rigging knife for the seppuku. Can't make it down to west marine today. the only other blades on the boat is on the leatherman...

 

http://www.leatherman-store.co.uk/images/products/zoom/1281210770-08957100.jpg

 

Just as a comment... chlorine and beach are nearly always delivered and stored for years in plastic containers. Those polymers in those containers are quite similar to those in Dacron. I am not suggesting to wash sails in pure chemical bath, but a diluted 3 ppm is hardly extreme especially if rinsed afterward and dried in sun for over a hour on a hoist. I would worry though if your sails were stitched with cotton/poly blends that your sailmaker picked up in a pinch at Beverley's.

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Nonsense to those who think this is harmful. Unless right after a shock treatment it's just a handy way to wash the sails - any free chlorine would be negligible. It may not look good to the neighbors but no harm done. ( Ex-pool boy )

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If diluted chlorine were bad for dacron and nylon, why are people's bathing suits not falling apart?

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If diluted chlorine were bad for dacron and nylon, why are people's bathing suits not falling apart?

They do if you don't rinse them.

 

I think you’ve also angered the karma police

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I don't see any harm in washing a sail in a pool. I don't think there are any bacteriological or other biological agents on the sail, just sunbleached dirt and salt and not too much of that besides. Also, I don't think that washing a sail in a pool does anything to affect the pH balance in the pool. I do think that all the folks that are hopping on black jacks ass just like to complain and pretend that they are morally superior.

 

In fact it's not a bad idea at all but I would definitely spray it with the hose before hoisting it up the flagpole to dry.

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I notice that Jack did not ask a question in OP, just told us what happened.

 

Which didn't stop us, this is SA:

 

Half the "responders" saw it as science, and handled the chlorine/tech issues

 

Other half (moralists?) the "was it bad form"? issue, already answered:

"..You have no honor". to which I said, that may be true, but "I do have clean sails."

 

;-)

 

 

PS: Kudos, Gouv, for #18..

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Mild chlorine OK, but rinse the sails afterward. Generally, you're removing mild dirt and mildew, which is what the chlorine does for the pool. I wouldn't suggest doing it right after the pool is treated, do it just before.

 

As a related story... years ago the wives and social members of Davis Island YC in Tampa strongly urged the building of a pool. The sailors were quite hesitant... this was a "sailing club" of the saltiest sort, not a social club. Finally a compromise was reached... the club would build a pool, but it's written into the bylaws the sailors may wash sails in it.

 

I always thought it was a 'sail cleaning facility' that they allowed people to swim-in between uses..............................also a Fireball and Sunfish initiation pool.

 

Remember when a certain club member was 'arrested' when cleaning his sails in the pool at the Galleon? IIRC he told them 'this is the way we do it back home' or something like that.

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Mild chlorine OK, but rinse the sails afterward. Generally, you're removing mild dirt and mildew, which is what the chlorine does for the pool. I wouldn't suggest doing it right after the pool is treated, do it just before.

 

As a related story... years ago the wives and social members of Davis Island YC in Tampa strongly urged the building of a pool. The sailors were quite hesitant... this was a "sailing club" of the saltiest sort, not a social club. Finally a compromise was reached... the club would build a pool, but it's written into the bylaws the sailors may wash sails in it.

I always thought it was a 'sail cleaning facility' that they allowed people to swim-in between uses..............................also a Fireball and Sunfish initiation pool.

 

Remember when a certain club member was 'arrested' when cleaning his sails in the pool at the Galleon? IIRC he told them 'this is the way we do it back home' or something like that.

I hadn't heard of the Galleon incident, but that's pretty funny.

Yea, the club pool was also a test tank for Fireballs and Sunfish... LOL!

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As a Texas boy: dirt blown up from plowing the back 40.

 

In Marina Del Rey or Newport Beach: Jet fuel soot from LAX or SNA.

Or anchoring in the lee of any of the parched desert islands from Santa Barbara to Cabo San Lucas.

 

At Derektors in Fort Liquordale in the 80's we got soot from the nearby power plant when breeze was out of the north.

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Well shucks! Many pools now use Bromine, not Chlorine as hep. germs are often resistant to Chlorine now days, and chlorine added to water converts to a carcinogen- hence our fine city doesn't chlorinate well or lake water anymore either. If a pool uses bromine, you'll see it bubbling from jets on the bottom. How bromine affects polyesters?? Next research topic. As far as carcinogens go, I'm exposed to lead, MEKP, Acetone, and lots of the buggers often, so the chlorine thing doesn't exactly worry me. I do know my water polo players liked the bromine pools.

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I use bromine in my spa. Its gentler on the skin and hair. Cost is a bit more.

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Funny story Black Jack, "Hey check this shit out I am going to wash my sails in the community pool!" :lol:

 

Does washing a few sails in a pool every once in a while going to create a water quality problem for the pool? Of course not!

 

HOWEVER, it is a community pool NOT a community wash basin and if you get to wash your sails in said pool then I want to wash my dog in it. Just lather the pooch up right on pool deck and go for a swim for the rinse cycle. :D Where does it stop on what is acceptable? Point is unless it's a sailing club like Davis Island in Tampa, BTW that is totally cool that the pool can be used for cleaning sails, I think you are going to get some serious push back if you continue to do it. Might want to start looking around for a friends pool for your sail cleaning! :lol:

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Today's pigs will make tomorrow's sausages.

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May I suggest returning to the pool with a stock of beer or pitcher of margaritas?

 

Oh the alternative should be done cutting from right to left. AWAY FROM THE POOL. :)

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Mild chlorine OK, but rinse the sails afterward. Generally, you're removing mild dirt and mildew, which is what the chlorine does for the pool. I wouldn't suggest doing it right after the pool is treated, do it just before.

 

As a related story... years ago the wives and social members of Davis Island YC in Tampa strongly urged the building of a pool. The sailors were quite hesitant... this was a "sailing club" of the saltiest sort, not a social club. Finally a compromise was reached... the club would build a pool, but it's written into the bylaws the sailors may wash sails in it.

I always thought it was a 'sail cleaning facility' that they allowed people to swim-in between uses..............................also a Fireball and Sunfish initiation pool.

 

Remember when a certain club member was 'arrested' when cleaning his sails in the pool at the Galleon? IIRC he told them 'this is the way we do it back home' or something like that.

I hadn't heard of the Galleon incident, but that's pretty funny.

Yea, the club pool was also a test tank for Fireballs and Sunfish... LOL!

Just remembered the beginning Opti sailors also use the pool for capsize lessons. Cool.

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Mild chlorine OK, but rinse the sails afterward. Generally, you're removing mild dirt and mildew, which is what the chlorine does for the pool. I wouldn't suggest doing it right after the pool is treated, do it just before.

 

As a related story... years ago the wives and social members of Davis Island YC in Tampa strongly urged the building of a pool. The sailors were quite hesitant... this was a "sailing club" of the saltiest sort, not a social club. Finally a compromise was reached... the club would build a pool, but it's written into the bylaws the sailors may wash sails in it.

I always thought it was a 'sail cleaning facility' that they allowed people to swim-in between uses..............................also a Fireball and Sunfish initiation pool.

 

Remember when a certain club member was 'arrested' when cleaning his sails in the pool at the Galleon? IIRC he told them 'this is the way we do it back home' or something like that.

I hadn't heard of the Galleon incident, but that's pretty funny.

Yea, the club pool was also a test tank for Fireballs and Sunfish... LOL!

Just remembered the beginning Opti sailors also use the pool for capsize lessons. Cool.

 

Be it for opti capsize lessons or tanktesting, I doubt they just showed up and threw their stuff in the pool.

 

Ever heard of the magic words: hello-please-thank you-goodbye?

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Clearly the shirtless guy was pissed that his laundry hadn't gotten done in time.

 

You heartless bastard.

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Mild chlorine OK, but rinse the sails afterward. Generally, you're removing mild dirt and mildew, which is what the chlorine does for the pool. I wouldn't suggest doing it right after the pool is treated, do it just before.

 

As a related story... years ago the wives and social members of Davis Island YC in Tampa strongly urged the building of a pool. The sailors were quite hesitant... this was a "sailing club" of the saltiest sort, not a social club. Finally a compromise was reached... the club would build a pool, but it's written into the bylaws the sailors may wash sails in it.

I always thought it was a 'sail cleaning facility' that they allowed people to swim-in between uses..............................also a Fireball and Sunfish initiation pool.

 

Remember when a certain club member was 'arrested' when cleaning his sails in the pool at the Galleon? IIRC he told them 'this is the way we do it back home' or something like that.

I hadn't heard of the Galleon incident, but that's pretty funny.

Yea, the club pool was also a test tank for Fireballs and Sunfish... LOL!

Just remembered the beginning Opti sailors also use the pool for capsize lessons. Cool.

Be it for opti capsize lessons or tanktesting, I doubt they just showed up and threw their stuff in the pool.

 

Ever heard of the magic words: hello-please-thank you-goodbye?

Uh, sailwashing etc explicitly permitted in the YC

bylaws. Read upthread.

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