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DryArmour

Bermuda Tropical Wx- Gonzalo T- minus about 6 hours

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BERMUDA TROPICAL Wx UPDATE- CATEGORY 3 Hurricane Gonzalo

 

Now would be the time to move you and your family to a three story or elevated steel reinforced concrete structure. This one if for real. My hunch is that the island could be without power for up to a month so make sure you have plenty of cash on hand. Let me know if you have any questions.Winds will be Tropical Storm force this morning becoming Storm and then quickly becoming hurricane force this afternoon. Seas will rapidly build to 35-40 feet. Heavy surge will accompany high tide around 5PM. Structurally this is on the large side for a Category 3 storm. It is moving NNE @15 so there is not a lot of time left to get to a safe shelter before movement will not be possible without risk of severe injury or death from flying debris. I expect the next advisory will maintain the intensity (Roughly) but change the trajectory to more NE. Bermuda lies in the NE quadrant of the storm which is the worst place to be. Good luck to all on the island. You are always welcomed to call or text me to get eyes on the storm from the outside for as long as you have the ability to communicate. +1 562-773-0552

 

Track it on radar here.

 

at201408_sat.jpg

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arrived St. George's harbour from Newport RI on a big Swan 10 years ago almost to the day. there but by the grace of god go we....

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Going to be a tough night there. High tide will be very close to the approach of the eyewall. Storm surge will be fierce.post-33902-0-33270300-1413572434_thumb.jpg

 

 

Merde beat me to it. Merde hits the fan in Bermuda.

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data from the weather buoy at Esso Pier...this does not match up with the live video steam at all. I'm saying at least 50 there at the Ireland Island Ferry terminal (where this particular webcam lives).

 

Pity that Fay took down most of the other webcams!

post-768-0-24032600-1413572567_thumb.jpg

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Cam shots make that look tough... Waves over the dock now.

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.

 

.............. :o:blink::blink::o

 

 

...inFRICKENsane....I'd hate to see what it's like in the populated areas.

 

 

...does some of the native population live in shanties??

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per capita income $84, 381...not too many shanties. There aren't really any indigenous people there, as the island was supposedly uninhabited when discovered by Spain.

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Looking at other vessels one can get a pretty good picture of how nasty it is getting. Here is a 12m sailboat anchored in St Georges getting 66 knots out of the SE. They must be swinging pretty wildly as their speed is reporting as 1.1 kt to the North. Hope that doesn't indicate dragging.

 

http://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/details/ships/316020829/vessel:LA_DIVINA

 

Here is a link to the big picture and you can see that they are in the worst possible quadrant.

 

http://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/home/centerx:-64.67211/centery:32.37893/zoom:8/oldmmsi:338047409/olddate:lastknown

 

Everyone hang tough!

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1.5 kn now...maybe out for a little daysail.

 

1.5 kn now...maybe out for a little daysail.

 

Thanks for the AIS links, Rasp....reminds me of a Leukemia Cup we did once.

post-768-0-53670600-1413578389_thumb.jpg

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Looking at other vessels one can get a pretty good picture of how nasty it is getting. Here is a 12m sailboat anchored in St Georges getting 66 knots out of the SE. They must be swinging pretty wildly as their speed is reporting as 1.1 kt to the North. Hope that doesn't indicate dragging.

 

http://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/details/ships/316020829/vessel:LA_DIVINA

 

Here is a link to the big picture and you can see that they are in the worst possible quadrant.

 

http://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/home/centerx:-64.67211/centery:32.37893/zoom:8/oldmmsi:338047409/olddate:lastknown

 

Everyone hang tough!

 

 

Uh oh...

 

From your top link I see that the boat is moving... Yikes.

______________________________________________

 

Info Received: 5 min ago(2014-10-17 21:37)
Area: Bermuda
Latitude / Longitude: 32.37289° / -64.67722°
Status: Underway
Speed/Course: 3.2kn / 357°

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La Davina still looks to be within the same area that her position reports have been wandering about in all afternoon. Lets just hope it is some wild swings or perhaps one anchor line let go and she dropped back onto the rest.

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There are two styles of construction for most of the island - cinderblock or poured concrete.

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There are two styles of construction for most of the island - cinderblock or poured concrete.

.

......that'll help.....just mind the sheet metal roofs(?) :mellow:

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An ex gfs mom was badly hurt there this evening when the roof of their house caved in place is getting whacked hard

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There are two styles of construction for most of the island - cinderblock or poured concrete.

.

......that'll help.....just mind the sheet metal roofs(?) :mellow:

Not many sheet metal roofs. Poured concrete to channel rain water into cisterns.

 

Not a lot of fresh water underground. Catch the rain and save it.

 

The island will be without power for an extended time, like weeks.

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The eye is passing over now. Should get ugly fast over the next hour. Wind will be from the west then SW. Clean up all the crap that came loose now and then get your butt back inside for the west/sw eye wall.

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Update from Bermuda, the morning after.....

 

Storm was kickass, easterly winds for first half getting over 100+ knots, that's the lee for me, so I could stand on my front porch and watch it go down Hamilton Harbour. Eye passed and we had about 90 minutes of relative calm, moved Whaler to somewhat better location quickly, fixed broken window @ mother in laws place and then she built in from SW to West. Really pummeled Hamilton Harbour for about 2.5 hours, easily 100kts solid. Over by about 5 am when down to 35-40kts and dropped fast then. 4 large sailboats, 38 feet + broke moorings etc and ended up @ end of Hamilton harbor, I know 3 of the owners. 2 Venus boats broke loose in other parts and a lots of power boats. Probably as bad as Fabian in 2004. What Fay did not clean out on Friday, this one did. Significant damage to some floating docks @ RHADC, RBYC was in the lee and okay, looked like no damage Argo Gold Cup should go on this week, aside from one IOD aground, but looking relatively undamaged.

 

Fay took out a lot of foliage last week and generally less down now. Lots of power out, but should be back up very quickly. I seen a few comments about power being out for a month here, not reality, they work very fast to get it back to 95 % of the people. After Fay last week I think that by day 2 most had been restored. BELCO is great.

 

A few reports and sightings of some people losing roofs, but out of 65 people in my office, all have checked in and only one roof gone. I suspect there are a lot more scattered around the island that have lost roofs. The houses here are all block and concrete, very strong and we do not lose houses, just the slate roofs can peel off at times, especially if you get mini twisters coming through.

 

I am central in the island, Paget, not sure how bad other ends of the island fared, we had time to prepare, but still, shit happens.

 

Nice sunny day now as people clean up.

 

I have a 42 foot boat and she took a glancing blow from one of the errant boats drifting by, 2 stanchions damage and small poke about waterline @ bow, curious as no other scratches on her, but this was the best prepared I have ever been for a storm, the fury of it on the water was very impressive and scary.

 

Gong to get a hot shower here at the office and charge up my devices and then back to clean up. Will post some pictures later.

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Good report Soho! Great to get a clearheaded view.

For more reports without the drama, check out

www.royalgazette.com

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Soho,

Thanks for the update. One of those twisters clipped my friends' mom's house and she was hurt and whisked off to a hospital.. so far my friend has been unable to get any update on her mom's condition.

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Update from Bermuda, the morning after.....

 

....I have a 42 foot boat and she took a glancing blow from one of the errant boats drifting by, 2 stanchions damage and small poke about waterline @ bow, curious as no other scratches on her, but this was the best prepared I have ever been for a storm....

 

Soho, glad things worked out ok for you. Curious what your preparation/storm set-up entailed and why this time it was better? I for one could learn from your experience.

 

Thanks

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Update... Sunday night. Just got power back at the house, so that is pretty well 2 days since the event. I am good with that.

 

In an ironic contrast, the last 2 days have been easily some of the best days in Bermuda, not stinking hot and humid, sunny skies and light winds, perfect sailing weather. On the practical side, it was great weather for unwinding all the preparations, you have to clean up and then undo everything.

 

Cwinsor,

 

Okay, here is what I did for the boat to prepare:

 

  • Dove and checked mooring chain ground tackle, chain was new about 5 months ago, so I knew that it was okay, but still inspected for wear etc. I probably have 25 feet or more of 1 1/2" ships chain down there attached to some huge metal weights, gives lots of bounce.
  • I have two 1 1/8" Yale Polydyne mooring pennants, with leather chafing gear sewn on and then Cordora over it. I applied some duct tape over this as well where it hits my chocks, Note - this seemed to work well, very little chafe evident after the storm, which is surprising.
  • I have huge and well backed up SS deck cleats, PO installed after boat came loose in a storm. Mooring pennants attach to these
  • I ran my 5/8 " Sta Set ( cruising ) jib sheets from the eye of the mooring pennants back to my jib turning blocks then to my cockpit winches, I took load up on them to move the mooring pennants just off the cleat, like back an inch or so, thinking was that when the loads came on, the sheets would stretch but would still share some of the load for the cleats, and I guess if the cleats went, might actually hold the loads. ( Note, friend of mine used same technique on his catamaran, taking load up on back up sheet up to a jib winch, and he snapped a dyneema line, maybe 1/2 inch, broke right in the middle. I would not have believed it myself had I not seen it with my own eyes, of course the reason was that line had no stretch and the other lines did and it took load and snapped. Incrediable.)
  • A backup pennant was installed and is 1 1/2" Polydyne taken back to the mast. It carried no load, but had the main ones failed, it would have taken the load.
  • Pennants are like these --> http://www.yalecordage.com/pleasure-marine-ropes/anchoring-mooring-specialty.html , note that I am the only person I know of in Bermuda that uses these, everyone else uses 3 strand with some sort of pvc house as chafe guard, I do not understand it. The Yale product is just so much better.
  • Everything I could take off the deck was off, dorade vents, jib cars etc.
  • Ran 2 of my 4 fore halyards up the mast
  • Took anemometer off the mast
  • Main and jib off of course
  • Tightened up remaining halyards and wailed on some backstay
  • instrument covers off,
  • Wheel tied in place
  • boom fully secured in place on centerline

At the end of the day, it is really comes down to your mooring set up, the boat was going through 6-7 foot waves/rollers so a lot of tug.

 

 

Will attach some shots when I figure out how too reduce my picture size...

 

 

 

 

 

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Great info Soho, nice to exactly what you did to prepare. Glad to hear you guys and your boat is safe and sound

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I'd echo what Soho said. We got a "free one" last weekend with TS Fay which focussed the mind somewhat. I put extra lines on my 4 ksb and removed anything that could be removed. I hailed my centre console and we put all of our junior sailing boats indoors where possible.

 

Went home, put the shutters down, boarded up where possible and filled buckets with water. Ensured we had gas for the BBQ and tinned food, and last but not least, lots of gin. Then we waited.

 

It was ferocious and sounded like a freight train with a nasty little one-two punch as the eye passed over. Projectiles through the kitchen door but, amazingly, didn't lose power.

 

Interesting stat - on Saturday morning 80%+ of the island was without power, by Saturday evening 80% of the island had power restored.

 

Some boat damage out there, as you'd expect, but I think we did OK in the end.

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Yeah well I know who both of you are!

 

My 3.5 ktsb appears to even still have the wind instruments. Very messy down below though... that thing must have done some crazy pounding

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I'd echo what Soho said. We got a "free one" last weekend with TS Fay which focussed the mind somewhat. I put extra lines on my 4 ksb and removed anything that could be removed. I hailed my centre console and we put all of our junior sailing boats indoors where possible.

 

Went home, put the shutters down, boarded up where possible and filled buckets with water. Ensured we had gas for the BBQ and tinned food, and last but not least, lots of gin. Then we waited.

 

It was ferocious and sounded like a freight train with a nasty little one-two punch as the eye passed over. Projectiles through the kitchen door but, amazingly, didn't lose power.

 

Interesting stat - on Saturday morning 80%+ of the island was without power, by Saturday evening 80% of the island had power restored.

 

Some boat damage out there, as you'd expect, but I think we did OK in the end.

 

That last statistic is absolutely amazing with regard to power out in the morning versus power out in the evening. Props to the power company. They were clearly well prepared.

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I'd echo what Soho said. We got a "free one" last weekend with TS Fay which focussed the mind somewhat. I put extra lines on my 4 ksb and removed anything that could be removed. I hailed my centre console and we put all of our junior sailing boats indoors where possible.

Went home, put the shutters down, boarded up where possible and filled buckets with water. Ensured we had gas for the BBQ and tinned food, and last but not least, lots of gin. Then we waited.

It was ferocious and sounded like a freight train with a nasty little one-two punch as the eye passed over. Projectiles through the kitchen door but, amazingly, didn't lose power.

Interesting stat - on Saturday morning 80%+ of the island was without power, by Saturday evening 80% of the island had power restored.

Some boat damage out there, as you'd expect, but I think we did OK in the end.

That last statistic is absolutely amazing with regard to power out in the morning versus power out in the evening. Props to the power company. They were clearly well prepared.

Very. I'm normally first in line to criticize, but they really are superb and worked their behinds off

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I'd echo what Soho said. We got a "free one" last weekend with TS Fay which focussed the mind somewhat. I put extra lines on my 4 ksb and removed anything that could be removed. I hailed my centre console and we put all of our junior sailing boats indoors where possible.

 

Went home, put the shutters down, boarded up where possible and filled buckets with water. Ensured we had gas for the BBQ and tinned food, and last but not least, lots of gin. Then we waited.

 

It was ferocious and sounded like a freight train with a nasty little one-two punch as the eye passed over. Projectiles through the kitchen door but, amazingly, didn't lose power.

 

Interesting stat - on Saturday morning 80%+ of the island was without power, by Saturday evening 80% of the island had power restored.

 

Some boat damage out there, as you'd expect, but I think we did OK in the end.

 

That last statistic is absolutely amazing with regard to power out in the morning versus power out in the evening. Props to the power company. They were clearly well prepared.

 

Or maybe you're just over excessive in your screaming and fear-mongering about places who experience major hurricanes regularly being without power for a month.

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Wow, glad you guys did so well, sounds like you made the right preps, along with the rest of the island.

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excellent info, thanks. I did not know about polydyne but sounds like the ticket.

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What was the max wind recorded on the island?

Depends who you ask and where you were. Anywhere from 100 to 115 mph at sea level, up to 144 mph in higher areas. Strongest wind at the airport was 93 gusting 113 mph.

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What was the max wind recorded on the island?

Depends who you ask and where you were. Anywhere from 100 to 115 mph at sea level, up to 144 mph in higher areas. Strongest wind at the airport was 93 gusting 113 mph.

 

Wow. After the A2B this year we stayed in an apartment in a house on Quarry Hill, on the southside. Bet they got a bunch of wind. Looked like the highest point for a few miles around.

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What was the max wind recorded on the island?

 

Depends who you ask and where you were. Anywhere from 100 to 115 mph at sea level, up to 144 mph in higher areas. Strongest wind at the airport was 93 gusting 113 mph.

Wow. After the A2B this year we stayed in an apartment in a house on Quarry Hill, on the southside. Bet they got a bunch of wind. Looked like the highest point for a few miles around.

We were in a house on the South Shore on a hill - sheer insanity. Definitely blade gib weather and not the genoa.

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Just thinking that myself RakedAft, have a friend @ Harbour Radio I am going to query, but I wonder if they might have lost their instruments. I would reckon it would have been 120kts at least on higher levels maybe a touch more, but i am just guessing. Coming down the harbor I figured it must have been 80-90kts. Was hard to see as it was dark out of course.

 

Moose- I have a 4ktsb on the shoreline by my dock, my first thought was that it was yours ! I moved Urchin during the eye over to RHADC, if I had left her, she would have probably been under the 4ktsb.

 

Barge and crane in Red Hole now moving boats.

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First, that's a 2ktsb, at best. Good call on moving Urchin

 

I was a bit worried about that one since westerly would put me straight into it's path but it seemed to miss, either that or I didn't notice white paint scuffing on white paint.

 

We just need new bridles... again. Hopefully these ones last longer than a week

 

I should've left my wind instruments on - I think there's a mode where they'll record max wind speed

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I thought about that Moose, leaving my instruments switched on and recording the max, but I took the anemometer off the mast before the storm. What would be neat would be to mount a Go Pro on the RHADC west wall and leave it running. Obviously you need to secure it in a apocalypse box or something, but it would have been incredible to record, aside from being nighttime as well...

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