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Just A Skosh

VOR 2014-2015 - Leg 2

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My Observations after the first 2 Legs....

Dongfeng Race Team

 

Improve your boat Speed. Eventually that's what cost you the Leg. Configure the boat back to the Leg 1 configuration were you were considerably faster than all of the other boats.

 

 

Is it boatspeed that is their problem? Or was it a lucky windshift? They sailed together for days at a row, and also kept up after Brunel passed them...

Probably a bit of both?!

Dong was in front of Brunel TWICE this Leg...and both times Brunel passed them.

Brunel was in front of Dong THREE times the leg....and two times Dong passed them.

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Thanks JBSF. Quite like 365040c.jpg --the angle gives the sense of the size and power of these racers.

 

Re the gybe shots--catching the batten kicker is cool. Wonder how many times they had to hoist the kicker.

 

 

Thanks. One thing is I could never quite picture the outriggers and how they got used until I saw them up close. Very cool.

Also, Keel pics are of interest here:

#1962

#1981

You probably have better ones.

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Intersting stats.

 

Shows that the girls fully have the boatspeed, but can't make it stick over the course of 24hrs.

 

Top 4 distances recorded over 24hrs are seperated by just over a mile - you're going to get severely punished if you do anything high risk in this race. Cover the fleet if you're ahead is really the only move to be done.

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As much as I hate to say it, yes, the girls really need to try sticking with the pack like glue for the next leg. They have the form to cause an upset if they do. So far talking any sort of risk has punished anyone taking one. This isn't something I'm happy with.

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Intersting stats.

 

Shows that the girls fully have the boatspeed, but can't make it stick over the course of 24hrs.

 

Top 4 distances recorded over 24hrs are seperated by just over a mile - you're going to get severely punished if you do anything high risk in this race. Cover the fleet if you're ahead is really the only move to be done.

Yes very interesting that the girls pulled the highest recorded boatspeed and the lowest 24 hour average. It would be very interesting also to see what the corresponding 24 hour average true wind speed was for each boat when their 24 hour run was measured. I followed SCA closely and it always seemed to me that they managed to be sailing in less wind than the others. It would be pretty impressive if their 24 hour run was in significantly lighter wind.

Agree with Francis Vaughan, if they can't get themselves well into a lead on a no-brainer course, they need to stick with the boat with the navigator of their choice.

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JBSF: Thank you very much for great informative photos!

 

OBR: Yann Riou was the best reporter last time aroud too. He's setting the standard that the others should strive to better.

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Just remember the 24hour run is as much about the navigator getting lucky and finding the exact spot with the correct wind conditions for the correct length of time as anything else. predicting 600 mile area of weather over 24 hours precisely is their job. but there is a reason why they are naviguessers. It is as much art as science.

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My Observations after the first 2 Legs....

 

Dongfeng Race Team

 

Improve your boat Speed. Eventually that's what cost you the Leg. Configure the boat back to the Leg 1 configuration were you were considerably faster than all of the other boats.

 

Is it boatspeed that is their problem? Or was it a lucky windshift? They sailed together for days at a row, and also kept up after Brunel passed them...

 

Probably a bit of both?!

Dong was in front of Brunel TWICE this Leg...and both times Brunel passed them.

So if Dong Feng were in front of Brunel TWICE during the leg, I guess it means that both times, Dong Feng passed Brunel...

So what is your point?

<_<

 

What really matters is who passes whom, last...

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You want to know what sucks. I had gotten used to looking for 4 times a day updates that I don't have to do for 3 weeks.

 

4? 8! Bio-rythms now need adjustment. ;)

 

Well, we still have the protests to ponder, and the resurrection/ redemption troll-wars to keep us entertained. Anyway, Merry Christmas.

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Well, we still have the protests to ponder.

 

Good point, when is that due to be held?

 

Don't know -- nothing since Dec 5 on the Noticeboard http://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/noticeboard.html

 

Anyone know what the protest is about? What equipment did they remove or substitute?

 

 

Case N° 1
Protest lodged on 19 November 2014
- Race Committee vs TEAM BRUNEL – NOR 9.6.1(b )
Case N° 2
Protest lodged on 19 November 2014
- Race Committee vs MAPFRE – NOR 9.6.1 (b )

 

 

9.6 SEALING ARRANGEMENTS AND EQUIPMENT ONBOARD
9.6.1 From the time of a Boat being issued its VO65 Class Certificate for the Race until the expiry of
the protest time limit for the final Leg, Pro-Am race, In-Port race which ever is later:
(b ) Items and equipment that may be removed for and re-loaded, changed or substituted
between the Pro-Am race and 0800 on the Leg start day:
(i) Sails and battens
(ii) Portable electronics
(iii) Personal items and equipment
(iv) Food and drink
(v) Fuel, oil, and lubricants
(vi) Running rigging
(vii) Constant wear survival suits
(viii) Internal stackable equipment and their bags or containers
(ix) Radar, radar bracket and mast cable
(x) Active radar transponder and mast cable
(xi) Outriggers
(xii) The stacking posts
(xiii) Foul weather gear
(xiv) Food bags
(xv) Volvo Ocean 65 supplied equipment not required for the Pro-Am or In-Port races
NOR 28.4

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Just remember the 24hour run is as much about the navigator getting lucky and finding the exact spot with the correct wind conditions for the correct length of time as anything else. predicting 600 mile area of weather over 24 hours precisely is their job. but there is a reason why they are naviguessers. It is as much art as science.

Some of the guessers are consistently guessing right a lot more than some of the others.

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Just remember the 24hour run is as much about the navigator getting lucky and finding the exact spot with the correct wind conditions for the correct length of time as anything else. predicting 600 mile area of weather over 24 hours precisely is their job. but there is a reason why they are naviguessers. It is as much art as science.

Some of the guessers are consistently guessing right a lot more than some of the others.
you have never been to a roulette table or craps table before have you. Some people can out guess others. Others always have really bad guesses and the vast majority are right about 50% of the time. In straight games of chance you can always find that one person who does well more often than everyone else.

 

Lastly some people can read wind patterns from the screen and know its forecasted versus actual route better than others. It is an art and some people can carve a David style statue and others can make an ash tray.

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I'm still expecting Brian Carlin to win the Leg 2 OBR award for his documenting the Vestas stuff, but if you ask me it should be Yann all the way. His videos (which are the OBR output I mostly interact with) are my favorite thing about the race.

 

Knowing the love of legal procedure around here, I offer the following 10 exhibits into evidence:

 

http://lies.tumblr.com/post/105227504166/i-love-how-yann-moves-the-camera-how-he-puts-the

 

The defense rests.

Has my vote.

So, dearly beloved Counsellor, and honoured supporters. We are gathered together to choose an OBR to defend in the arena for the next few months? Hmmmm. Sounds fun.
Well, what dark horse is left?
Corinna Halloran. Nah. Be forced to defend or make many sappy PC posts to cheer her work.
Daryl Wislang. don’t really get to hear/read/see his stuff. Too much editorial oversight.
Yann Riou good, but taken. Best actual sailing footage. Most educational. Might blow up, though, if his efforts to catch a completely new audience conflicts with an audience that wants a gallic sneer at les autres. Too, his efforts might conflict with party bosses. We’ll see. Hello Kitty meets Asterix?
Stefan Coppers Nope. Locker room yuk yuk? Someone else can choose him, though I did like the way he looked down at the dock greeter who had the nerve to offer him TEA after a few weeks at sea.
Amory Ross. Ah tempting. Best media manager, slick as an American salesman. Good with digital airbrushes and other effects. Would probably do well editing a Disney Twilight. Lots of sweetness and sugar in his time lapses, sunsets. Yet, he does know sailing. Still, 6 more months supporting such romanticism cloys—not sure I could last.
Francisco Vignale What? Last choice??? NO! Yes, I back MAPFR, but no way I want to cheer months of clichés like “fight, no; Vamos team”, google translations and —Hunger Games —really? on an extreme RTW? After having cringed for months at Telefonica's OBR reports (or lack of), I’ve done my time. No way this time round.
Sheesh. Wish Amory was on SCA.

 

OK. You win—Yann it is. However, given the least opportunity to jump and support Franscico, I’m off the Yann band. K?

 

I think your list has some errors in it.

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The two loops on the lifeline allow a diagonal wire/pennant to go to the deck at the bow to put most of the lifeline tension into the deck versus trying to bend the bow pulpit. The VOR70s and possibly the 60s had this too. I also wonder if it allows slacking the top wire to reduce a chafe point on the jib when reaching.

 

JBSF, thanks for photos, nice....

 

in post 3560 http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=161668&page=36#entry4773888

 

I wonder why on the lifeline there are two safety loops ?

Stanchions looks a bit agricultural too...

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You want to know what sucks. I had gotten used to looking for 4 times a day updates that I don't have to do for 3 weeks.

 

4? 8! Bio-rythms now need adjustment. ;)

 

Well, we still have the protests to ponder, and the resurrection/ redemption troll-wars to keep us entertained. Anyway, Merry Christmas.

 

 

 

.....lots of 'intrigue' in the flog-a-dead-horse thread, Vestas' upcoming announcement ~dec22, and I guess there's a couple of in-ports too..........but yes with VO on giftsmas holidays,and Rimas in port,,I'm running out of excuses to avoid the giftsmas throngs in the shops :(

 

....of course there's also that big race on boxing day...if you like powerboats :rolleyes:

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You want to know what sucks. I had gotten used to looking for 4 times a day updates that I don't have to do for 3 weeks.

4? 8! Bio-rythms now need adjustment. ;)

 

Well, we still have the protests to ponder, and the resurrection/ redemption troll-wars to keep us entertained. Anyway, Merry Christmas.

 

 

.....lots of 'intrigue' in the flog-a-dead-horse thread, Vestas' upcoming announcement ~dec22, and I guess there's a couple of in-ports too..........but yes with VO on giftsmas holidays,and Rimas in port,,I'm running out of excuses to avoid the giftsmas throngs in the shops :(

i didn't know that liquor shops had Christmas specials and long lines.

 

Now when am I going to get that bottle of scotch you promised me? 😉. It is in the vor thread if you need confirmation. 😃

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You want to know what sucks. I had gotten used to looking for 4 times a day updates that I don't have to do for 3 weeks.

4? 8! Bio-rythms now need adjustment. ;)

 

Well, we still have the protests to ponder, and the resurrection/ redemption troll-wars to keep us entertained. Anyway, Merry Christmas.

 

 

.....lots of 'intrigue' in the flog-a-dead-horse thread, Vestas' upcoming announcement ~dec22, and I guess there's a couple of in-ports too..........but yes with VO on giftsmas holidays,and Rimas in port,,I'm running out of excuses to avoid the giftsmas throngs in the shops :(

i didn't know that liquor shops had Christmas specials and long lines.

 

Now when am I going to get that bottle of scotch you promised me? . It is in the vor thread if you need confirmation.

.

...scotch? :blink: ....you'll have to dredge up the post # :mellow:

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Ever heard of TEARS? It's the "Tracker Excessive Attention Retention Syndrome", first described by HHN92.

It's worst after the VOR, but can also flare up in-between.

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Just remember the 24hour run is as much about the navigator getting lucky and finding the exact spot with the correct wind conditions for the correct length of time as anything else. predicting 600 mile area of weather over 24 hours precisely is their job. but there is a reason why they are naviguessers. It is as much art as science.

Some of the guessers are consistently guessing right a lot more than some of the others.
you have never been to a roulette table or craps table before have you. Some people can out guess others. Others always have really bad guesses and the vast majority are right about 50% of the time. In straight games of chance you can always find that one person who does well more often than everyone else.

 

Lastly some people can read wind patterns from the screen and know its forecasted versus actual route better than others. It is an art and some people can carve a David style statue and others can make an ash tray.

 

It's true that I don't like to gamble in casinos, but I know at least a little about how statistics work (which is probably a factor in my not liking to gamble in casinos). :-) But yes, I'm familiar with what a normal distribution looks like.

 

It's _possible_ that the difference between the success of the navigational calls being made by SCA and by (say) the top three boats is entirely due to chance. But I think the p-value of that is probably quite low at this point. It's not just two trials. It's every time they've made a strategic navigational decision, tested by whether that decision caused them to gain or lose versus the competition, right? Measuring would involve some judgement calls, but I think we're past the point where it's reasonable to think SCA has just been unlucky. As several other people have observed here already, I think it's more the case that they've been making poor risk/reward decisions, being too willing to go their own way rather than sticking with the fleet. (And that has to fall on Sam as well, not just Libby.)

 

Given Libby's relatively strong background in meteorology and forecasting, and relative lack of direct experience with long-distance ocean racing, I wonder if she's been inclined to lean too heavily on the models. When all you have is a hammer, all your problems look like nails. Whereas the more experienced navigators in the fleet have learned to be more skeptical of the models, more conservative about splitting from the fleet based on a hope for better wind.

 

Disclaimer: I'm not saying she's unqualified, or doesn't have a good background, or should be replaced. I think it's likely she's by far the best-qualified person for the position. I just think that at this position especially, SCA is burdened by the lack of previous opportunities for women to have competed at the highest level in this event.

 

They're getting that opportunity now, and I expect they will benefit from it. But the way to maximize that benefit is for them to resist the temptation to interpret their poor performance as merely being the result of bad luck. They need to acknowledge their mistakes if they're going to have a chance of eliminating them.

 

Also: If it sounds like I'm disagreeing with you, Peragrin, I apologize. I think I get what you're saying about it being an art, rather than a science, and also about there being a lot of randomly distributed luck in the mix. I think you're absolutely right about that.

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Just remember the 24hour run is as much about the navigator getting lucky and finding the exact spot with the correct wind conditions for the correct length of time as anything else. predicting 600 mile area of weather over 24 hours precisely is their job. but there is a reason why they are naviguessers. It is as much art as science.

Some of the guessers are consistently guessing right a lot more than some of the others.
you have never been to a roulette table or craps table before have you. Some people can out guess others. Others always have really bad guesses and the vast majority are right about 50% of the time. In straight games of chance you can always find that one person who does well more often than everyone else.

 

Lastly some people can read wind patterns from the screen and know its forecasted versus actual route better than others. It is an art and some people can carve a David style statue and others can make an ash tray.

 

It's true that I don't like to gamble in casinos, but I know at least a little about how statistics work (which is probably a factor in my not liking to gamble in casinos). :-) But yes, I'm familiar with what a normal distribution looks like.

 

It's _possible_ that the difference between the success of the navigational calls being made by SCA and by (say) the top three boats is entirely due to chance. But I think the p-value of that is probably quite low at this point. It's not just two trials. It's every time they've made a strategic navigational decision, tested by whether that decision caused them to gain or lose versus the competition, right? Measuring would involve some judgement calls, but I think we're past the point where it's reasonable to think SCA has just been unlucky. As several other people have observed here already, I think it's more the case that they've been making poor risk/reward decisions, being too willing to go their own way rather than sticking with the fleet. (And that has to fall on Sam as well, not just Libby.)

 

Given Libby's relatively strong background in meteorology and forecasting, and relative lack of direct experience with long-distance ocean racing, I wonder if she's been inclined to lean too heavily on the models. When all you have is a hammer, all your problems look like nails. Whereas the more experienced navigators in the fleet have learned to be more skeptical of the models, more conservative about splitting from the fleet based on a hope for better wind.

 

Disclaimer: I'm not saying she's unqualified, or doesn't have a good background, or should be replaced. I think it's likely she's by far the best-qualified person for the position. I just think that at this position especially, SCA is burdened by the lack of previous opportunities for women to have competed at the highest level in this event.

 

They're getting that opportunity now, and I expect they will benefit from it. But the way to maximize that benefit is for them to resist the temptation to interpret their poor performance as merely being the result of bad luck. They need to acknowledge their mistakes if they're going to have a chance of eliminating them.

 

Also: If it sounds like I'm disagreeing with you, Peragrin, I apologize. I think I get what you're saying about it being an art, rather than a science, and also about there being a lot of randomly distributed luck in the mix. I think you're absolutely right about that.

Stan Honey must be the luckiest artist in the world, don't cha think! Wonder what it takes to be so consistently lucky all the time? wink, wink

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The SCA arrival has not been fixed so far. No other uploads that I know of either.

 

IMG_4262 ....image composition. Waves are not an excuse. ;)

 


But lets fry the big fishes.
I have to say that I'm not too impressed with the quality of the coverage produced for YouTube. It's still a disturbing mix of everything from top notch high production value to amateur hour. - Or in other words, someone got thrown in at the deep end.

 

Alicante...

Anchor position. Get the lighting sorted out. It's a fixed camera and anchor position, can't be that hard. You are obviously working on it but it's not there yet.

Next level, positions with two people. There is an obvious height difference. One sitting and the other standing often looks wired. The one with Brian was particularly bad. So maybe back to the old pedestal trick? Also helps to keep position for lighting. Add one of these (or something similar) for the taller person instead what is used at the moment and the effect should be quite subtle.

Editing / live call room. Microphone distance matters. Stick the popscreen back on it and the nose to the screen. Or learn from others in the same seat and just keep a constant distance. Normal, loud, quiet, distorted, repeat is not mandatory.

Another step would be using earphones instead of the monitor boxes to reduce the echo quite a bit.

 

Arrival coverage...

Getting much better. Clips instead of the 3d tracker, interviews of additional team members and so on and so forth.

Knut seems to be the on site reporter by default. His phone is the one thing that seems to work consistently so far. So get him another one to pass off to others like the boat.

If you have a roaming camera stick a fixed mike on it. (Missing with SCA.) The next level would be to include a handheld in the mix.

Apropos roaming cam. Add a fixed overview position into the mix. Something other than the tracker for quick switch when the mobile cam is showing the ground.

The boats need a wireless mike, even if its only a good weather version for arrivals. Being tethered is time and time again such an obvious limitation.

 

Overall the arrivals look like the decision how important they are was never really made. Reassess their importance, decide if money gets put into them. Then prioritize.

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Last pic from the Alvi arrival..... I liked this one the best.

 

IMG_4305_zpse88fbc7d.jpg

 

IMG_4306_zps465ca1ad.jpg

 

That is the signature skyline of Abu Dhabi - Etihad towers and Emirates Palace Hotel in the background.

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Here is a little Leg 2 performance evaluation using this dashboard set.

 

We see tactical changes unfold before us. It is harder to see boat speed and boat performance differences real time. In fact it is hard to see in the data as the data is intentionally obfuscated (like no decimal places in the speed metric). But working on average we can get an idea of boat speed performance. Differences in performance of a half knot speed over days of sailing will take a boat out of contention.

 

After an initial downwind sled race, this leg's emphasis was upwind sailing in 8-14 moderate wind. More miles were sailed in this condition than any other. The boats that performed best in these conditions would have a distinct advantage.

 

The front three boats consistently excelled in these conditions. The top three boats were fastest in moderate upwind conditions. But in heavier air, other boats showed some good results. SCA in 14-15.99 was fastest upwind. And downwind, what we have started to consider the backmarkers are actually quite good. This gives me hope that other legs will have other results.

 

This data raises obvious questions. What sails were in use? What were the sea states, currents? Who was steering that sched? This is detail I cannot get to. But hopefully each team has the same data set and can look at it and discuss where they can improve, where changes have to be made.

 

NOTE: I tried to insert images but my work firewall is preventing it. So links are the best I can do. Images are more eye catching if someone wants to drop some in.

 

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The two loops on the lifeline allow a diagonal wire/pennant to go to the deck at the bow to put most of the lifeline tension into the deck versus trying to bend the bow pulpit. The VOR70s and possibly the 60s had this too. I also wonder if it allows slacking the top wire to reduce a chafe point on the jib when reaching.

 

JBSF, thanks for photos, nice....

 

in post 3560 http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=161668&page=36#entry4773888

 

I wonder why on the lifeline there are two safety loops ?

Stanchions looks a bit agricultural too...

Agricultural stanchions and yet at least one of them is bent. Perhaps having a stack of sails lashed to them and getting consistently hammered by walls of water at 25 knots was some part of the design equation. One design lets you put beef where needed...and where better than on a safety element.

 

Agree about the lifeline gap, except with the tie to the deck, you don't have to slack the whole lifeline, just open up the forward bit. Sort of like the old IOR three-piece pulpit with a genoa reaching gap.

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The two loops on the lifeline allow a diagonal wire/pennant to go to the deck at the bow to put most of the lifeline tension into the deck versus trying to bend the bow pulpit. The VOR70s and possibly the 60s had this too. I also wonder if it allows slacking the top wire to reduce a chafe point on the jib when reaching.

 

JBSF, thanks for photos, nice....

 

in post 3560 http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=161668&page=36#entry4773888

 

I wonder why on the lifeline there are two safety loops ?

Stanchions looks a bit agricultural too...

Agricultural stanchions and yet at least one of them is bent. Perhaps having a stack of sails lashed to them and getting consistently hammered by walls of water at 25 knots was some part of the design equation. One design lets you put beef where needed...and where better than on a safety element.

 

Agree about the lifeline gap, except with the tie to the deck, you don't have to slack the whole lifeline, just open up the forward bit. Sort of like the old IOR three-piece pulpit with a genoa reaching gap.

 

I'll see if I can get some more detailed pics of the lifelines if anyone is interested....

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^^^^^ +1.

 

Sadly I think this why SCA aren't really a contender, there simply wasn't a pool of female top drawer navigators to choose from.

Think Figaro and Class 40 and you might find one or two.

 

A bit of practice sailing distances in varied weather might have helped too.

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The boats crews that performed best in these conditions would have a distinct advantage.

 

The front three boats crews consistently excelled in these conditions. The top three boats crews were fastest in moderate upwind conditions. But in heavier air, other boats showed some good results. SCA in 14-15.99 was fastest upwind. And downwind, what we have started to consider the backmarkers are actually quite good. This gives me hope that other legs will have other results.

 

Fixed for accuracy (given these are One Design boats)

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.

...scotch? :blink: ....you'll have to dredge up the post # :mellow:

sure it was in the post that we bet on who would finish in what order. I have always had SCA finishing last haven't you read any of my posts😃

 

Now for SCA to get their grove on. They let the boys have their fun now it is time for SCA to show the guys how to fly.

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The boats crews that performed best in these conditions would have a distinct advantage.

 

The front three boats crews consistently excelled in these conditions. The top three boats crews were fastest in moderate upwind conditions. But in heavier air, other boats showed some good results. SCA in 14-15.99 was fastest upwind. And downwind, what we have started to consider the backmarkers are actually quite good. This gives me hope that other legs will have other results.

Fixed for accuracy (given these are One Design boats)

yep. Apparently the extra crew members onSCA are a liability in light air.

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^^^^^ +1.

 

Sadly I think this why SCA aren't really a contender, there simply wasn't a pool of female top drawer navigators to choose from.

That would do the race. I can think of one who would qualify to be on almost any of these boats...

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Now that's interesting. A new image of VOR women

 

That's awful.

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Now that's interesting. A new image of VOR women

 

not new but done early in the leg by a fan

 

I do like it though. however art is something you like or don't.

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.

...SCA has a fun little daily contest for swag,though you need to sign on for instagram which seems to require a mobile device..someone want to submit mine?.....

 

@team_sca ...''she thinks it's funny to take my last twix...wait till she realizes it's ex-lax!''

 

B4_fCyRIQAE9g5H.jpg

 

Have you entered Day 4? Go to our Instagram channel & leave a caption for this image good luck http://instagram.com/p/wqLT8jj7KY/

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The two loops on the lifeline allow a diagonal wire/pennant to go to the deck at the bow to put most of the lifeline tension into the deck versus trying to bend the bow pulpit. The VOR70s and possibly the 60s had this too. I also wonder if it allows slacking the top wire to reduce a chafe point on the jib when reaching.

 

 

 

JBSF, thanks for photos, nice....

 

in post 3560 http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=161668&page=36#entry4773888

 

I wonder why on the lifeline there are two safety loops ?

Stanchions looks a bit agricultural too...

 

Agricultural stanchions and yet at least one of them is bent. Perhaps having a stack of sails lashed to them and getting consistently hammered by walls of water at 25 knots was some part of the design equation. One design lets you put beef where needed...and where better than on a safety element.

 

Agree about the lifeline gap, except with the tie to the deck, you don't have to slack the whole lifeline, just open up the forward bit. Sort of like the old IOR three-piece pulpit with a genoa reaching gap.

I'll see if I can get some more detailed pics of the lifelines if anyone is interested....

West Engineering. Also purveyors of stanchions to Comanche.

 

http://www.westengineeringltd.co.uk/index.aspx

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.

...SCA has a fun little daily contest for swag,though you need to sign on for instagram which seems to require a mobile device..someone want to submit mine?.....

 

couchsurfer@MRumblefish 4h4 hours ago

@team_sca ...''she thinks it's funny to take my last twix...wait till she realizes it's ex-lax!'' And the head is broken again.

 

B4_fCyRIQAE9g5H.jpg

 

Team SCA@team_sca 5h5 hours ago

Have you entered Day 4? Go to our Instagram channel & leave a caption for this image good luck http://instagram.com/p/wqLT8jj7KY/

FIFY

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Any official news at all about the two protests, or about Alvi redress? If not actual answers, then timing for decisions? All we know is that the committee filed protests way back on Nov 19 against Brunel and Mapfre for unspecified violations of 9.6.1(B).

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Now that's interesting. A new image of VOR women

 

not new but done early in the leg by a fan

 

I do like it though. however art is something you like or don't.

 

 

Looks a bit like a pulpy old comic. Dig it.

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There has been a response to the SCA arrival live coverage problem, the video has been unlisted. And that was that.

Earlier:

Overall the arrivals look like the decision how important they are was never really made. Reassess their importance, decide if money gets put into them. Then prioritize.

 

Gives you a clue how that decision went. Probably time for those who pay for the show, here SCA, to kick some butt at VOR corporate if changes are going to happen. But then I guess SCA knows why they had their own media teams on site to get all the coverage they want. In the quality they want. I do wonder if they'll start their own live show. :D

 

 

Protests and Redress

The official list for leg 2 is out, and the date has been set. Official document

 

 

PROTEST CASES

Case N° 1
Protest lodged on 19 November 2014
- Race Committee vs TEAM BRUNEL – NOR 9.6.1( b )
Case N° 2
Protest lodged on 19 November 2014
- Race Committee vs MAPFRE – NOR 9.6.1( b )
Case N° 3
Request for redress from SCA
- Claim that the Volvo Class Authority (VCA) has made an improper action or
omission by:
( a ) failing to amend the construction specifications of the J-2 sail at the proper
time; and / or
( b ) amending the construction specifications of the J-2 sail during the Cape
Town stopover.
Case N° 4
Request for redress from Alvimedica
- Team Alvimedica requests redress as their score for Leg Two of the 2014-
2015 Volvo Ocean Race has been made significantly worse by giving help in
compliance with rule 1.1
Hearings to be conducted in Abu Dhabi 30 December 2014
from 1100 local time

 

One of them is new. JBSF did you hear something about the J2?

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There has been a response to the SCA arrival live coverage problem, the video has been unlisted. And that was that.

Earlier:

Overall the arrivals look like the decision how important they are was never really made. Reassess their importance, decide if money gets put into them. Then prioritize.

 

Gives you a clue how that decision went. Probably time for those who pay for the show, here SCA, to kick some butt at VOR corporate if changes are going to happen. But then I guess SCA knows why they had their own media teams on site to get all the coverage they want. In the quality they want. I do wonder if they'll start their own live show. :D

 

 

Protests and Redress

The official list for leg 2 is out, and the date has been set. Official document

 

>

PROTEST CASES

Case N° 1
Protest lodged on 19 November 2014
- Race Committee vs TEAM BRUNEL – NOR 9.6.1( b )
Case N° 2
Protest lodged on 19 November 2014
- Race Committee vs MAPFRE – NOR 9.6.1( b )
Case N° 3
Request for redress from SCA
- Claim that the Volvo Class Authority (VCA) has made an improper action or
omission by:
( a ) failing to amend the construction specifications of the J-2 sail at the proper
time; and / or
( b ) amending the construction specifications of the J-2 sail during the Cape
Town stopover.
Case N° 4
Request for redress from Alvimedica
- Team Alvimedica requests redress as their score for Leg Two of the 2014-
2015 Volvo Ocean Race has been made significantly worse by giving help in
compliance with rule 1.1
Hearings to be conducted in Abu Dhabi 30 December 2014
from 1100 local time

 

One of them is new. JBSF did you hear something about the J2?

.

....good to see Alvi's in there,but I don't think SCA's going to gain any points :mellow:

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More info from Alvi about their request for redress from Scuttlebutt http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/2014/12/17/volvo-ocean-race-jury-hear-alvimedica-redress-request/

Alvi is saying 12 hrs were lost; and the tone is pleasant and relaxed. here's a snippet:

It has been debated that giving you back 12 hours could have, in the right conditions, had you win the race.

Yes, exactly. Do I think that would have been fair? No. But is it right to say, “Hey listen, you guys went into this in sixth place and came out fifth, what are you complaining about?” I don’t think that’s right either. If you were to stop the race at that point, MAPRE would have won. These things are ever changing, and I think they need to decide, philosophically, what they think about that.

I think it’ll be pretty hard for them to come up with a ruling that discourages future competitors for helping their competitors, but I wouldn’t be surprised if they did nothing. That’s how the jury works and they can do whatever they want; whatever they think’s fair. They can subtract a point from our score. They can switch us with MAPRE who finished ahead of us. They can do absolutely nothing or anything in between.

Three days after the incident, despite having lost a half day on standby, your position amongst the fleet was improved. However, your route had also taken you to the west of the group, a position that would soon set you back.

Yeah, there’s plenty of different ways to look at this. The reality is we didn’t think about redress when we made the decision that we made – to come to their aid. It’s out of our control now. We submitted the paperwork, I am going home to enjoy the holidays, and hopefully there will be a nice present delivered after the hearing.

FWIW, No problem if anyone thinks the discussion should be moved to the stopover thread.

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Protests and Redress

The official list for leg 2 is out, and the date has been set. Official document

 

>

PROTEST CASES

Case N° 1
Protest lodged on 19 November 2014
- Race Committee vs TEAM BRUNEL – NOR 9.6.1( b )
Case N° 2
Protest lodged on 19 November 2014
- Race Committee vs MAPFRE – NOR 9.6.1( b )
Case N° 3
Request for redress from SCA
- Claim that the Volvo Class Authority (VCA) has made an improper action or
omission by:
( a ) failing to amend the construction specifications of the J-2 sail at the proper
time; and / or
( b ) amending the construction specifications of the J-2 sail during the Cape
Town stopover.
Case N° 4
Request for redress from Alvimedica
- Team Alvimedica requests redress as their score for Leg Two of the 2014-
2015 Volvo Ocean Race has been made significantly worse by giving help in
compliance with rule 1.1
Hearings to be conducted in Abu Dhabi 30 December 2014
from 1100 local time

 

One of them is new. JBSF did you hear something about the J2?

 

No, sorry. I will be down at the village tomorrow and I'll try to ask the VOR media folks what they know.

 

I'm doing an offshore overnight race down from Dubai to Abu Dhabi that is hosted by the VOR and AD hosting YC. Leaving tonight and hoping on about a 12 hr run to get there early am, depending on wind. The Racers get to dock at the VOR village for the day, have a lunch and awards ceremony on the VOR stage. Its a nice promo to get the Dubai boats down over Christmas so they are propositioned in AD so they can be used as spectator boats for the in-port race and the Leg 3 start.

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Prompt service. :)

 

There was an article and a

about SCA putting the clew of the J2 through their J1 on day 8 of leg 2 and the resulting sail repair. No word about protests at that time.

 

 

The race sounds like a nice idea for a yet bigger spectacle in the race village. Good for Abu Dhabi! Let's see how the other stopovers compare. :D

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Neti (via google translate and Nauta360): "All routing told us it was much better to go to the East", and his "chick"

 

Hello everyone!

I just arrived in Spain, well, on Thursday night. Since we arrived in Abu Dhabi we have not stopped at any time, both yesterday and from the airport in Madrid was the moment I could call my parents.
We landed in Abu Dhabi just for breakfast (local time) and the next day, at 6.00 in the morning, came back out to sea to test some things the boat as at 8.00 pm had to remove it because the water so we had to take early hours of light to do so.
After it is removed, to review. I'm on the boat that got this from the job list. I have a waterproof 'notebook' wherein during step I'm pointing all work to do in all areas and once a week is the command chief ground for him to go updating the task of work the planning. The first day I was with all ground crew work explaining to do.
In addition, we have been meeting two days analyzing the stage. At these meetings many issues such as navigation, why each decision was made at all times and why do not touch. Obviously it came to the fore as going to the East, which was, from what I've seen, the most controversial from outside. Provechar wanted to explain further what happened that day.
An hour before making that decision we had received the last position. The second boat was about 12 to 14 miles behind, and at that distance the ships do not appear in the AIS. Brunel, Dongfeng and Abu Dhabi were together and including itself be seen.
All routing told us it was much better to go to the East and were convinced that the rest of the fleet was going to the East too. When five hours later we saw that we were the only ones with that option we realized it was because you followed the North and the rest followed him for not releasing the fleet, which we also wanted, but at that time it was too late because rectify meant going back five hours.
To this must be added the experience you had Jean-Luc in the previous Vuelta, when Groupama [his team back then] the north and went Telefónica and Camper went to the East and we got 150 miles.
Anyway went wrong but at the meeting spoke we were happy because we hit a major advance in the learning curve and we are much more prepared than in Alicante.
Other topics discussed were the maneuvers, sail changes, life on board ... They are very productive meetings and have to spend the time you need.
In the next stage there will be major changes, since the pattern step will be Xabi and we joins 'Rafiki' [Rafa Trujillo], which will be a good injection of force on board in all aspects . As I said, the rotations were raised from the beginning of the project and be more in the future.
The day before we left for Abu Dhabi, in the afternoon, we had a team building session with wakeboard in pool, karting and paintball, where I could download and shot him several times to 'Boludo Vignale' in the ass for not making me enough coffee during stage [laughs].
Now I will take to rest, surfing and skiing with my chick and my family.
A hug to all, Merry Christmas and talked next year!
Ñeti.

http://nauta360.expansion.com/2014/12/19/mapfre_in_the_vor/1418993618.html

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Neti (via google translate and Nauta360): "All routing told us it was much better to go to the East", and his "chick"

.................... An hour before making that decision we had received the last position. The second boat was about 12 to 14 miles behind, and at that distance the ships do not appear in the AIS. Brunel, Dongfeng and Abu Dhabi were together and including itself be seen.

All routing told us it was much better to go to the East and were convinced that the rest of the fleet was going to the East too. When five hours later we saw that we were the only ones with that option we realized it was because you followed the North and the rest followed him for not releasing the fleet, which we also wanted, but at that time it was too late because rectify meant going back five hours. .................

http://nauta360.expansion.com/2014/12/19/mapfre_in_the_vor/1418993618.html

.

 

...hmm,,nothing really new here,,,but hopefully I'll soon stop waking in the night screaming...why!!?? :mellow:

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Neti (via google translate and Nauta360): "All routing told us it was much better to go to the East", and his "chick"

.................... An hour before making that decision we had received the last position. The second boat was about 12 to 14 miles behind, and at that distance the ships do not appear in the AIS. Brunel, Dongfeng and Abu Dhabi were together and including itself be seen.

All routing told us it was much better to go to the East and were convinced that the rest of the fleet was going to the East too. When five hours later we saw that we were the only ones with that option we realized it was because you followed the North and the rest followed him for not releasing the fleet, which we also wanted, but at that time it was too late because rectify meant going back five hours. .................

http://nauta360.expansion.com/2014/12/19/mapfre_in_the_vor/1418993618.html

.

 

...hmm,,nothing really new here,,,but hopefully I'll soon stop waking in the night screaming...why!!?? :mellow:

+1

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.

.....a classic comix' version of leg 2 for Brunel. I have a feeling that we'll get familiar with the closing scene. ;)

 

 

 

 

.....word is that Alvi's Enright got a well needed clip...could it be they realize why Brunel keeps the old guy?

..........clean head at stern=less turbulence=13 minutes over 27 days!! :o

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Brunel as leg winner? They are certainly good enough for a repeat.

 

As far as the scoreboard is concerned there is only redress or DSQ with 8 or more points as far as Jury actions go.

Should be fun if that happens. :ph34r: (Which I seriously doubt, DSQ only is a bit over the top.)

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As far as the scoreboard is concerned there is only redress or DSQ with 8 or more points as far as Jury actions go.

Should be fun if that happens. :ph34r: (Which I seriously doubt, DSQ only is a bit over the top.)

.

...Likely the IJ's opened their accounts for deposits by now...

. ...........it'll likely take a while before they can make a proper tally :ph34r:

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.

.....^^......can't get enough of the leg2 start! ^^ :)

 

 

 

...who hid the caffeine gum!!?? :mellow:

 

ADOR_141123_knighton_0172.jpg?itok=25wO_

 

 

 

 

......those flying fish are creeping me out! :unsure:

 

ADOR_141211_knighton_2256.jpg?itok=mTGYZ

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Alberto Bolzan in Italian interview, google crunched comment re redress. Consistent message from Alvi so far is laid back, leave-it-to-the-jury.

 

There is a request to "repair" pendant, for your operation soccorso- When's the verdict?

"I think we will answer before the start of the third stage."
What do you expect?
"I do not really know what is right. We have lost 12 hours, but Mapfre made his race. "We were not told anything, I do not expect anything. Also because it's all relative: 12 hours with 25 knots of wind is 250 miles, with 10 are much less. We we will have lost 150 ... ".

http://www.lastampa.it/2014/12/18/sport/speciali/volvo-ocean-race-2014/bolzan-quando-ti-attacca-uno-stormo-di-uccelli-non-sai-se-ridere-o-preoccuparti-q71uDEjACDH4IpQ5giaozM/pagina.html

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.

 

....B&G's naviguesseur prize is up...no mention of Wouter or Nelias from Mapfre. :mellow:

 

...maybe it's time for SA to put up an 'honorable mention' or 'sandbar' trophy for the biggest guffaw :rolleyes:

 


Copyright © 2014 B&G All rights reserved

The B&G Navigators’ Prize is presented to the Navigator who has made the most effective use of meteorological, oceanographic and geographical information to gain distance on the majority of the fleet, as voted for by the Navigators themselves. There is $1000 dollars up for grabs for the winner of the B&G Navigators’ Prize for each leg and $5000 dollars will be presented to the overall winner in Gothenburg.

Leg Two presented a series of unique challenges for each of the competing teams, all of which have been well documented (and often predicted or ‘routed’ by Mark Chisnell) elsewhere on this site.

Here we have feedback from Navigators Will Oxley and Pascal Bidegorry (winner of the B&G Navigators’ Prize for Leg One) in answer to questions from B&G.

Pascal Bidegorry – Dongfeng Race Team

Pascal.jpg?resize=600%2C400

Q1. B&G: In your opinion, which navigator pulled off the most significant and successful tactical or strategic move during Leg Two?

PB: Before they made the mistake to go for an easterly option MAPFRE was dominating the fleet in terms of placement. They were anticipating the wind shifts and the other boats were following them. Doing this, they gained 10 miles on us over 24 hours, when they were just besides us the day before.

Q2. B&G: What information and/or interpretation of the data that you possessed during the planning stages or as the leg unfolded gave you a competitive advantage?

PB: Just after the doldrums in the trough, the satellite picture correlated to the information we had from the radar proved very useful to negotiate the rain clouds and to take the advantage over Team Brunel

Q3. B&G: Did you change your plans significantly during the leg based on the actions of your competitors?

PB: Not really during most of the offshore part of the leg but tactical considerations took over our global strategy in some specific area such as the north of Oman, or the trough in the north of the doldrums.

Will Oxley – Team Alvimedica

Will.jpg?resize=600%2C400

Q1. B&G: In your opinion, which navigator pulled off the most significant and successful tactical or strategic move during Leg Two?

WO: There was a lot of ‘sticking together’ for a large part of this leg. Those that split away from their group generally lost out. The met models were not accurate for long periods on this leg and there was a lot of cloud activity. Conservative tactics against the competitors seemed to pay dividends. I don’t think there was any standout move by one competitor.

Q2. B&G: What did you think was the best opportunity for a big strategic or tactical move in the leg – and did you hit or miss it?

WO: For Team Alvimedica, we went significantly to the back of the fleet while going to the aid of Team Vestas Wind. We then managed to do a good job with the weather presented to us to get north through both doldrums, and, aided by a stumble from both MAPFRE and Team SCA managed to get ourselves in front in time for the long starboard fetch up towards Oman. This was important as this was the last big chance to make tactical gains until the randomness of the light winds in the Straits of Hormuz. This was a significant move by us as we went from 233 nm behind MAPFRE to 12 nm in front and 800 nm behind Team SCA to 120nm in front. At the time of writing this we do not know the final outcome of the leg and the randomness of the final 400 nm may shuffle it all up again.

Q3. B&G: Did you change your plans significantly during the leg based on the actions of your competitors?

WO: We certainly paid close attention to the position of our competitors especially during the first third of the race when we were in AIS contact. When possible, we then placed ourselves on the side we wanted, to get the next shift, or a little more breeze, or current as circumstances dictated.

Obviously, gong to the aid of Team Vestas Wind changed our plans significantly but going to the aid of a fellow competitor is a fundamental law of yacht racing and indeed a fundamental law of the sea and we had no hesitation in doing this.

On Monday 29th of December we will feature feedback from Navigators Simon Fisher of Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing and from Libby Greenhalgh of Team SCA. In the meantime, the team at B&G would like to wish you the very best for the Christmas holiday.

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.

 

....B&G's naviguesseur prize is up...no mention of Wouter or Nelias from Mapfre. :mellow:

 

...maybe it's time for SA to put up an 'honorable mention' or 'sandbar' trophy for the biggest guffaw :rolleyes:

 

 

 

Copyright © 2014 B&G All rights reserved

 

The B&G Navigators’ Prize is presented to the Navigator who has made the most effective use of meteorological, oceanographic and geographical information to gain distance on the majority of the fleet, as voted for by the Navigators themselves. There is $1000 dollars up for grabs for the winner of the B&G Navigators’ Prize for each leg and $5000 dollars will be presented to the overall winner in Gothenburg.

Leg Two presented a series of unique challenges for each of the competing teams, all of which have been well documented (and often predicted or ‘routed’ by Mark Chisnell) elsewhere on this site.

Here we have feedback from Navigators Will Oxley and Pascal Bidegorry (winner of the B&G Navigators’ Prize for Leg One) in answer to questions from B&G.

Pascal Bidegorry – Dongfeng Race Team

Pascal.jpg?resize=600,400

Q1. B&G: In your opinion, which navigator pulled off the most significant and successful tactical or strategic move during Leg Two?

PB: Before they made the mistake to go for an easterly option MAPFRE was dominating the fleet in terms of placement. They were anticipating the wind shifts and the other boats were following them. Doing this, they gained 10 miles on us over 24 hours, when they were just besides us the day before.

Q2. B&G: What information and/or interpretation of the data that you possessed during the planning stages or as the leg unfolded gave you a competitive advantage?

PB: Just after the doldrums in the trough, the satellite picture correlated to the information we had from the radar proved very useful to negotiate the rain clouds and to take the advantage over Team Brunel

Q3. B&G: Did you change your plans significantly during the leg based on the actions of your competitors?

PB: Not really during most of the offshore part of the leg but tactical considerations took over our global strategy in some specific area such as the north of Oman, or the trough in the north of the doldrums.

Will Oxley – Team Alvimedica

 

Will.jpg?resize=600,400

Q1. B&G: In your opinion, which navigator pulled off the most significant and successful tactical or strategic move during Leg Two?

WO: There was a lot of ‘sticking together’ for a large part of this leg. Those that split away from their group generally lost out. The met models were not accurate for long periods on this leg and there was a lot of cloud activity. Conservative tactics against the competitors seemed to pay dividends. I don’t think there was any standout move by one competitor.

Q2. B&G: What did you think was the best opportunity for a big strategic or tactical move in the leg – and did you hit or miss it?

WO: For Team Alvimedica, we went significantly to the back of the fleet while going to the aid of Team Vestas Wind. We then managed to do a good job with the weather presented to us to get north through both doldrums, and, aided by a stumble from both MAPFRE and Team SCA managed to get ourselves in front in time for the long starboard fetch up towards Oman. This was important as this was the last big chance to make tactical gains until the randomness of the light winds in the Straits of Hormuz. This was a significant move by us as we went from 233 nm behind MAPFRE to 12 nm in front and 800 nm behind Team SCA to 120nm in front. At the time of writing this we do not know the final outcome of the leg and the randomness of the final 400 nm may shuffle it all up again.

Q3. B&G: Did you change your plans significantly during the leg based on the actions of your competitors?

WO: We certainly paid close attention to the position of our competitors especially during the first third of the race when we were in AIS contact. When possible, we then placed ourselves on the side we wanted, to get the next shift, or a little more breeze, or current as circumstances dictated.

Obviously, gong to the aid of Team Vestas Wind changed our plans significantly but going to the aid of a fellow competitor is a fundamental law of yacht racing and indeed a fundamental law of the sea and we had no hesitation in doing this.

On Monday 29th of December we will feature feedback from Navigators Simon Fisher of Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing and from Libby Greenhalgh of Team SCA. In the meantime, the team at B&G would like to wish you the very best for the Christmas holiday.

 

Very first answer acknowledges Mapfre.

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ADOR's OBR Matt Knighton's blog has his 10 favourite leg 2 photos, posted yesterday. His detailed comments on each pic are worth a read.

http://mattknighton.wordpress.com/2014/12/22/top-10-images-from-leg-2-2/

 

Biolumencsence--my favouite too.

This might be my favorite shot from the leg. Two nights before the finish in Abu Dhabi, I can’t describe how brilliant the bioluminescence was in the Gulf of Oman. It literally lit up the whole boat looking like waves of blue fire coming off the sides of Azzam. It took me the better part of 20 minutes to get this shot right then Justin happened to shine the flashlight checkgin the trim – everything came together. I love the combination of elements in this framing, it tells the story in one image.

post-63767-0-78129700-1419367791_thumb.jpg

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According to VOR-Twitter, Alvimedica is rewarded 4 points for leg 2 following their redress-hearing. No other team points are affected.

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According to VOR-Twitter, Alvimedica is rewarded 4 points for leg 2 following their redress-hearing. No other team points are affected.

So, the jury opted for the tie with mapfre. Makes sense.

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