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The Heart Of The Sea - Trailer. The Essex and The Real Moby Dick

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Based on the novel of the true story of the Essex. Inspiration for Moby Dick

 

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My great-great-grandfather was a whaler and later a sailor from Martha's Vineyard. He went to sea at about the time this movie is set (he was born in 1801 & men usually went to sea at about the age of 16 or 17).

 

I don't know of any whaling adventures that he had, though I had a piece of whalebone that he used as a letter-opener. I do know that in the late 1840s he bought a farm in Iowa, which was as far from the sea as he could get, and spent the last 40 years of his life raising corn and children!

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I didn't see a release date in the trailer - when's it due out?

I think it said March 2015.

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I loved the book. Hope the movie lives up to it.

 

I have talked with Nat Phibrick about the movie - he said they have taken some liberty in making the book into a movie, and that he doesn't have much control over what they do. Not that it bothered him particularly - he accepted it as part of the process. Of course the movie wasn't complete then, and maybe he will feel differently when he sees the final product.

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I loved the book. Hope the movie lives up to it.

I have talked with Nat Phibrick about the movie - he said they have taken some liberty in making the book into a movie, and that he doesn't have much control over what they do. Not that it bothered him particularly - he accepted it as part of the process. Of course the movie wasn't complete then, and maybe he will feel differently when he sees the final product.

I'm sure the producers were very concerned about maintaining the integrity of the book and its historical accuracy.

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When you cash the check, that usually goes out the window of course.

There will probably be woven into the story some cute babes on board,

a love triangle, a couple of kids (one of which will die early on), a pelican mascot,

a big dark storm, some 18th century surgery scenes, and maybe even a talking dog.

 

No private equity guys are going to back a movie only about a couple of cannibals

on a life boat.

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Awesome book, read it twice...

 

the most riveting part was after the wreck, the plight of the few survivors in the dory's. I hope they get that part right...

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When you cash the check, that usually goes out the window of course.

There will probably be woven into the story some cute babes on board,

a love triangle, a couple of kids (one of which will die early on), a pelican mascot,

a big dark storm, some 18th century surgery scenes, and maybe even a talking dog.

 

No private equity guys are going to back a movie only about a couple of cannibals

on a life boat.

Classic. Talking pelican mascot? They could have just animated the whole thing. Pixar style. Some Randy Newman jingles about the sea and cannibalism.

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In one of the books about the ESSEX, the author had gone to try and interview some of the survivors many years after the event. The master had become a nightwatchmman after a second ill fated voyage and had apparently spent the years drinking away his nightmares from such a ordeal. The writer was told which waterfront bar in which he could find Capt Pollard and when he asked him if he had known one of the casualties from the Essex was answered with a prompt,

"Know him? Hell, I ate him!"

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In one of the books about the ESSEX, the author had gone to try and interview some of the survivors many years after the event. The master had become a nightwatchmman after a second ill fated voyage and had apparently spent the years drinking away his nightmares from such a ordeal. The writer was told which waterfront bar in which he could find Capt Pollard and when he asked him if he had known one of the casualties from the Essex was answered with a prompt,

"Know him? Hell, I ate him!"

Not to be believed. What an extraordinary thing to say. And the comic timing. brilliant!

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Has anyone read "The Custom of the Sea"? True account of the Mignonette out of Southampton bound for Sydney in 1884.

 

Gruesome but calls into question how they survived without hot sauce.

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In one of the books about the ESSEX, the author had gone to try and interview some of the survivors many years after the event. The master had become a nightwatchmman after a second ill fated voyage and had apparently spent the years drinking away his nightmares from such a ordeal. The writer was told which waterfront bar in which he could find Capt Pollard and when he asked him if he had known one of the casualties from the Essex was answered with a prompt,

"Know him? Hell, I ate him!"

Not to be believed. What an extraordinary thing to say. And the comic timing. brilliant!

 

 

Well I was close...

 

In his old age, Captain Pollard became a firewatcher on Nantucket and old-time islanders relating the story today say his mind had slipped a little. A reporter from Boston once asked him, shortly before he died, if he could remember Samuel Reed, who had been in one of the Essex lifeboats.

“Remember him,” the old captain is said to have replied, “Hell, son, I ate him.”

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In one of the books about the ESSEX, the author had gone to try and interview some of the survivors many years after the event. The master had become a nightwatchmman after a second ill fated voyage and had apparently spent the years drinking away his nightmares from such a ordeal. The writer was told which waterfront bar in which he could find Capt Pollard and when he asked him if he had known one of the casualties from the Essex was answered with a prompt,

"Know him? Hell, I ate him!"

Not to be believed. What an extraordinary thing to say. And the comic timing. brilliant!

 

Well I was close...

In his old age, Captain Pollard became a firewatcher on Nantucket and old-time islanders relating the story today say his mind had slipped a little. A reporter from Boston once asked him, shortly before he died, if he could remember Samuel Reed, who had been in one of the Essex lifeboats.

Remember him, the old captain is said to have replied, Hell, son, I ate him.

Let's go with the previous version. It would have been a good scene to kick off the movie followed by a song and dance number with bar maids and stump-legged whaler types.

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If anyone wants to listen to a free audio book of Moby Dick, it can be downloaded here:

https://librivox.org/moby-dick-by-herman-melville

It's 25 hours long, but very well presented. A heck of a lot easier to listen to the book than read it.

I was sailing, and listening on my ipod, half way through the final chapter when Moby Dick was smashing the Pequod. All of a sudden, a gray whale popped up just 40 feet off my starboard bow. Pretty friggen amazing.

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Has anyone read "The Custom of the Sea"? True account of the Mignonette out of Southampton bound for Sydney in 1884.

 

Gruesome but calls into question how they survived without hot sauce.

 

Tobasco sauce has been around since 1868. I'm thinking they had some.

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Some more whaling - try:

 

Interview Nathaniel Philbrick

 

A logbook http://www.nha.org/digitalexhibits/nauticon/pdfs.html which you do not want to read

 

There once had been a nice film about whalers going out from Nantucket, some 30 minutes, not on the web anymore. It might have been this one "Into the deep - America, Whaling & the World" http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/whaling/player/

Anyone having some nice links?

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Sure the cannibalism is a big feature, but don't forget the harrowing descriptions of death by scurvy and dehydration.

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There once had been a nice film about whalers going out from Nantucket, some 30 minutes, not on the web anymore. It might have been this one "Into the deep - America, Whaling & the World" http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/whaling/player/

Anyone having some nice links?

 

Says you can by the DVD, or there seem to be torrents out there.

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Based on the novel of the true story of the Essex. Inspiration for Moby Dick

 

 

 

Kerry and I just finished reading the book to each other.

 

I'm looking forward to this movie. It might be pretty damn good if they don't exaggerate what happened or make stuff up.

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Based on the novel of the true story of the Essex. Inspiration for Moby Dick

 

 

 

Kerry and I just finished reading the book to each other.

 

I'm looking forward to this movie. It might be pretty damn good if they don't exaggerate what happened or make stuff up.

Who the hell is Kerry and why are you reading books aloud to each other?

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Nat Philbrick is a Sunfish world champ for those who don't know. Very good sailor and a nice guy.

 

No shit? That's pretty cool.

 

Oops- can't resist doing the Google thing, he was a collegiate All-American and NA champ in Sunfish.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathaniel_Philbrick

 

He's also a very good writer, he's also done a book about US exploration and about the Mayflower. Maritime history is fascinating to me anyway but he seems to be making it interesting to a lot of other people too.

 

I have an old facsimile copy of "Wreck of the Whaleship Essex" which is a rather dry read. His book (and one hopes, the movie) brings in all kinds of relevant detail including the economics of whaling and modern research about the physiology of slow starvation (aren't you all in a sweat to learn more about -that- topic).

 

FB- Doug

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funny, I could have sworn that he had won the big one, but you're right! winning the NA's is nothing to sniff at though. Also, if you remember that parody magazine Yaachting put out by Elizabeth Meyer a long time ago, he wrote some stuff in there that's pretty funny.

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Grinder, Kerry is my best friend, first mate of Brigadoon, and my lovely wife of five years now. We often read to each other.

 

Why do you ask?

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Nat Philbrick is a Sunfish world champ for those who don't know. Very good sailor and a nice guy.

 

No shit? That's pretty cool.

 

Oops- can't resist doing the Google thing, he was a collegiate All-American and NA champ in Sunfish.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathaniel_Philbrick

 

He's also a very good writer, he's also done a book about US exploration and about the Mayflower. Maritime history is fascinating to me anyway but he seems to be making it interesting to a lot of other people too.

 

I have an old facsimile copy of "Wreck of the Whaleship Essex" which is a rather dry read. His book (and one hopes, the movie) brings in all kinds of relevant detail including the economics of whaling and modern research about the physiology of slow starvation (aren't you all in a sweat to learn more about -that- topic).

 

FB- Doug

Verrey coolle! I enjoined Essex booke and Ex Ex book. :)

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Because most people don't just blurt out the random first name of a third person they read books to that is heretofore unfamiliar and not introduced in proper context with the rest of the group involved in an already ongoing conversation . That's fucking why.

 

I read to a dog. His name us Sam. I take orders from him.

 

That's how you do it.

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Nat Philbrick is a Sunfish world champ for those who don't know. Very good sailor and a nice guy.

 

Sailed the '93 Sunfish NA's where Nat was making his 'comeback' to sailing the 'Fish. He later wrote a book about it and in a SW article excerpt there was a pic of Nat with a familiar sail number behind him...............mine!

 

He was a pleasure to sail against and in conversation. The 'Essex' book was well written and I hope the movie lives up to the book.

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"In The Heart of the Sea" is a really good read, but it's also just about

the scariest nautical book ever written.

If the film is true to the book, the audience will be puking all over the theatre.

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Reading about death by dehydration, not to mention cannibalism, is different that watching it on the big screen.

Fess up Clean, have you read it?

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Reading about death by dehydration, not to mention cannibalism, is different that watching it on the big screen.

Fess up Clean, have you read it?

 

No sir, but it is now at the top of my list!

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It is very well written and detailed, giving some history and describing life on a whaleship along with the particular story of this tragic trip.

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Ugg. Dakota Fanning plays the captain's 'possessed' daughter?

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Ugg. Dakota Fanning plays the captain's 'possessed' daughter?

 

Well maybe she will be one of the first to be eaten. We can always hope.

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Grinder, I'm glad I was able to clear that up for you.

 

Edith, thanks for the writing lessons and how to include context for those who have problems drawing it from what is written.

 

WARNING: spoilers for the book...

 

What struck me most entertaining and educational about this book was a look into the Quaker culture of Nantucket and how the whaling business is run. There were also some interesting sections, going into great detail on the symptoms the men suffered under.

 

What also stood out, for us, was the sheer irony of Chase convincing Pollard to attempt to sail against the trades to South America because they were -- get this -- afraid of cannibals in the society islands.

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I've often wondered if I'm related to George Pollard, at any rate I often tell people I come from a long line of cannibals...and hog rustlers but that's another story.

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I have a slight beef already.

 

For a whaler and it's crew, they all look too clean. (so to speak)

 

The ships and crew were very grease and soot stained as the job of reducing the whale blubber to oil was very greasy and dirty as the fires were fed by offcuts of blubber.

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^^ Yes, blackjenner, the book is loaded with information way beyond just the whaling story.

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loved the book, hope the movie is decent

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Form the jacket of "The Custom of the Sea" by Neil Hanson.

 

After nineteen days, they were all near death, and Dudley determined that they must resort to the horrifying practice well known among seamen of the time called "the custom of the sea."

 

Custom of the sea? Uh, did I miss this in the IIRC handbook somewhere? Right under mutiny and flogging perhaps?

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Blackjenner, I haven't read this book, but I did read "Two Years Before the Mast" quite a while ago.

 

My memory of Dana's comments was that whalers at that time were treated with complete contempt by merchant seamen, who found the whalers' seamanship to be lacking, their ships to be poorly kept, and the men themselves to be of "lower character" than merchant seamen.

 

And Trickypig, Dana mentioned that he found the whalers' ships all to be filthy by comparison with merchant ships. They had soot and a sheen of sooty oil covering all surfaces and the sailors themselves, from the smoky rendering that was done on board.

 

Not sure how widespread Dana's attitude was, or whether it was only Dana's personal opinion. Maybe the whalers all shared contempt for the merchant ships, too.

 

But given Dana's attitude, it's funny to think of these "lowest of the low" whalers all being operated by Quakers in Nantucket.

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^^ Yes, blackjenner, the book is loaded with information way beyond just the whaling story.

...as is Moby Dick.

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Grinder, I'm glad I was able to clear that up for you.

 

Edith, thanks for the writing lessons and how to include context for those who have problems drawing it from what is written.

 

WARNING: spoilers for the book...

 

What struck me most entertaining and educational about this book was a look into the Quaker culture of Nantucket and how the whaling business is run. There were also some interesting sections, going into great detail on the symptoms the men suffered under.

 

What also stood out, for us, was the sheer irony of Chase convincing Pollard to attempt to sail against the trades to South America because they were -- get this -- afraid of cannibals in the society islands.

 

I too thought that was one of the great ironies of hte book. I thought it was the cook islands but either way - there was land within easy reaching distance and they decided to sail/row 3000 some odd miles the other way: Because they were afraid of cannibals, which in hindsight we know weren't there.

 

 

Reading about death by dehydration, not to mention cannibalism, is different that watching it on the big screen.

Fess up Clean, have you read it?

 

No sir, but it is now at the top of my list!

 

Clean - it's a superb book. Highly recommended. Along side "Two years before the mast", "Thy Flying Cloud", and a couple others I can't think of right now.

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Grinder, I'm glad I was able to clear that up for you.

 

Edith, thanks for the writing lessons and how to include context for those who have problems drawing it from what is written.

 

WARNING: spoilers for the book...

 

What struck me most entertaining and educational about this book was a look into the Quaker culture of Nantucket and how the whaling business is run. There were also some interesting sections, going into great detail on the symptoms the men suffered under.

 

What also stood out, for us, was the sheer irony of Chase convincing Pollard to attempt to sail against the trades to South America because they were -- get this -- afraid of cannibals in the society islands.

 

I too thought that was one of the great ironies of hte book. I thought it was the cook islands but either way - there was land within easy reaching distance and they decided to sail/row 3000 some odd miles the other way: Because they were afraid of cannibals, which in hindsight we know weren't there.

 

>

Reading about death by dehydration, not to mention cannibalism, is different that watching it on the big screen.

Fess up Clean, have you read it?

 

No sir, but it is now at the top of my list!

 

Clean - it's a superb book. Highly recommended. Along side "Two years before the mast", "Thy Flying Cloud", and a couple others I can't think of right now.

 

Add to that list: The Last Grain Race by Eric Newby.

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add to that, "the sea devil" and "the sea devils foccsle" by Lowell Thomas and "south seas vagabonds"by johnny wrae

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^^ Yes, blackjenner, the book is loaded with information way beyond just the whaling story.

...as is Moby Dick.

i actually like the movie better. gregory peck is superb.

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^^ Yes, Peck had a scary look in his eyes that show how over the edge Ahab was over the 'white whale'. Totally out of the norm for the parts he typically played.

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I'm really looking forward to the scene where the whaling ship, with all canvas backed, is motoring straight into the wind.

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I'm really looking forward to the scene where the whaling ship, with all canvas backed, is motoring straight into the wind.

 

You KNOW there will be sailing bloopers aplenty…

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I'm really looking forward to the scene where the whaling ship, with all canvas backed, is motoring straight into the wind.

 

You KNOW there will be sailing bloopers aplenty…

I didn't know whaling ships flew bloopers.

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I'm really looking forward to the scene where the whaling ship, with all canvas backed, is motoring straight into the wind.

LOL. Classic.

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Thanks for the heads up Mr. Cross , gonna see it . Last Ron H . movie I saw was his F1 movie . I loved that movie , and I'm a ex F2 racer .

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I'm really looking forward to the scene where the whaling ship, with all canvas backed, is motoring straight into the wind.

 

You KNOW there will be sailing bloopers aplenty…

I didn't know whaling ships flew bloopers.

oops… yeah ok, wot's it rate etc etc. :D

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Thanks for the heads up Mr. Cross , gonna see it . Last Ron H . movie I saw was his F1 movie . I loved that movie , and I'm a ex F2 racer .

 

i don't know what's typical, but i understand that in the case of heart of the sea, a lot of the changes from what is in the book were already done by the time he got involved..

 

the script was already written.., and it supposedly had some pretty big differences from the book

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Whaler's at sea, it was said: "you could smell 'em afore you could see 'em"... they cooked down the blubber on deck, ship, sails, and men greasy with condensed whale fat... sails gray and black... decks slippery. Little known book "Citizen: An American Boy's Early Manhood Aboard a Sag Harbor Whale-Ship Chasing Delirium and Death Around the World, 1843-1849, Being the Story of Erastus Bill Who Lived to Tell It"... a pretty good read if you can find it.

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Looks great. I stand in awe of the whalers. And any naval or merchant sailor of the period, for that matter. Whenever I start to winge that something is difficult or unpleasant, I think of them and take a fast-acting harden the $% pill.

 

One thing I haven't yet been able to figure out, however, is how on earth did they ever manage to get by without Sriracha...? :P

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I'm really looking forward to the scene where the whaling ship, with all canvas backed, is motoring straight into the wind.

You KNOW there will be sailing bloopers aplenty…

Could there ever be a sailing movie, could there ever, be one, that would satisfy the collective "us"?

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Looks great. I stand in awe of the whalers. And any naval or merchant sailor of the period, for that matter. Whenever I start to winge that something is difficult or unpleasant, I think of them and take a fast-acting harden the $% pill.

 

One thing I haven't yet been able to figure out, however, is how on earth did they ever manage to get by without Sriracha...? :P

Good question.

 

I'd offer that, being that they knew not of its existence, they did know of any need for it.

 

Isn't it the way of things?

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Looks great. I stand in awe of the whalers. And any naval or merchant sailor of the period, for that matter. Whenever I start to winge that something is difficult or unpleasant, I think of them and take a fast-acting harden the $% pill.

 

One thing I haven't yet been able to figure out, however, is how on earth did they ever manage to get by without Sriracha...? :P

Good question.

 

I'd offer that, being that they knew not of its existence, they did know of any need for it.

 

Isn't it the way of things?

 

Tis. Indeed.

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Ugg. Dakota Fanning plays the captain's 'possessed' daughter?

 

Well maybe she will be one of the first to be eaten. We can always hope.

The trouble with blondish waifs is that you're hungry again an hour later. Hopefully she bulked up for the film. NB: don't wait too long before deciding to go anthrovore! Get 'em while they are still plump. Once dehydration sets in, long pork eats intolerable dry.

 

Aaaaand here's the Golden Horn:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyJga8ROPfE

 

It's funnier with Italian subtitles.

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Form the jacket of "The Custom of the Sea" by Neil Hanson.

 

After nineteen days, they were all near death, and Dudley determined that they must resort to the horrifying practice well known among seamen of the time called "the custom of the sea."

 

Custom of the sea? Uh, did I miss this in the IIRC handbook somewhere? Right under mutiny and flogging perhaps?

 

I always thought that "the custom of the sea" meant that on Wednesdays, it's your turn in the barrel...

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I'm going to love the story of the Essex if it's done reasonable well. It's a story of truly tough guys, well. . . perhaps only those that survived.

 

Mocha Dick was probably the inspiration for Melville's Moby Dick. Plagiarism at its finest.

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I'm going to love the story of the Essex if it's done reasonable well. It's a story of truly tough guys, well. . . perhaps only those that survived.

 

Mocha Dick was probably the inspiration for Melville's Moby Dick. Plagiarism at its finest.

The ones that didn't were also somewhat tough. That is why every ditch kit should contain:

 

41xmnowKjcL.jpg

 

If anyone asks, say it's for treating jellyfish stings. But you'll know the truth....

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I'm going to love the story of the Essex if it's done reasonable well. It's a story of truly tough guys, well. . . perhaps only those that survived.

 

Mocha Dick was probably the inspiration for Melville's Moby Dick. Plagiarism at its finest.

The ones that didn't were also somewhat tough. That is why every ditch kit should contain:

 

41xmnowKjcL.jpg

 

If anyone asks, say it's for treating jellyfish stings. But you'll know the truth....

 

Chapeau. :lol:

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Some more whaling - try:

 

Interview Nathaniel Philbrick

 

A logbook http://www.nha.org/digitalexhibits/nauticon/pdfs.html which you do not want to read

 

There once had been a nice film about whalers going out from Nantucket, some 30 minutes, not on the web anymore. It might have been this one "Into the deep - America, Whaling & the World" http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/whaling/player/

Anyone having some nice links?

 

Hulu plus has that as a PBS American Experience episode

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I've been looking forward to this flick!

 

Thanks for the heads up Mr. Cross , gonna see it . Last Ron H . movie I saw was his F1 movie . I loved that movie , and I'm a ex F2 racer .

I agree so there must still be hope... 'RUSH' (the F1 movie) was amazing - and I was convinced that it was impossible to get a good auto racing movie made...

 

 

For a good read about the workings of a full-rigged ship back in the day,and also a bit about the business side of running a ship enterprise, read: "The way of a ship" by Alan Villiers.

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Blackjenner, I haven't read this book, but I did read "Two Years Before the Mast" quite a while ago.

 

My memory of Dana's comments was that whalers at that time were treated with complete contempt by merchant seamen, who found the whalers' seamanship to be lacking, their ships to be poorly kept, and the men themselves to be of "lower character" than merchant seamen.

 

And Trickypig, Dana mentioned that he found the whalers' ships all to be filthy by comparison with merchant ships. They had soot and a sheen of sooty oil covering all surfaces and the sailors themselves, from the smoky rendering that was done on board.

 

Not sure how widespread Dana's attitude was, or whether it was only Dana's personal opinion. Maybe the whalers all shared contempt for the merchant ships, too.

 

But given Dana's attitude, it's funny to think of these "lowest of the low" whalers all being operated by Quakers in Nantucket.

 

I got that book upstairs have to give it another look and cop that first hand. Was a pretty dry read first time around maybe have to add liquor this time.

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Grinder, I'm glad I was able to clear that up for you.

 

Edith, thanks for the writing lessons and how to include context for those who have problems drawing it from what is written.

 

WARNING: spoilers for the book...

 

What struck me most entertaining and educational about this book was a look into the Quaker culture of Nantucket and how the whaling business is run. There were also some interesting sections, going into great detail on the symptoms the men suffered under.

 

What also stood out, for us, was the sheer irony of Chase convincing Pollard to attempt to sail against the trades to South America because they were -- get this -- afraid of cannibals in the society islands.

 

I too thought that was one of the great ironies of hte book. I thought it was the cook islands but either way - there was land within easy reaching distance and they decided to sail/row 3000 some odd miles the other way: Because they were afraid of cannibals, which in hindsight we know weren't there.

 

>>

Reading about death by dehydration, not to mention cannibalism, is different that watching it on the big screen.

Fess up Clean, have you read it?

 

No sir, but it is now at the top of my list!

 

Clean - it's a superb book. Highly recommended. Along side "Two years before the mast", "Thy Flying Cloud", and a couple others I can't think of right now.

 

Add to that list: The Last Grain Race by Eric Newby.

 

By Way of Cape Horn by Capt. Villiers

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Just finished reading the book. I'm not much for classic nautical themed stories, but fuck me, what a great read. Damn those people were nuts! Spearing a 50' Sperm whale, which is going to piss it off for sure, and then getting dragged around the sea in a crappy row boat about 2000 miles from the nearest hospital does not sound real fun. Oh and they only had to do that every day for about two year, yikes! A must read.

 

Found myself heading to the refrigerator every 20-minutes for a snack for some reason.

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