Bull City

H-Boat Renovation Project

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At the suggestion of QBF, I'm starting this thread to report on the progress of renovating this boat that I bought in October. Just to review, I'm 65 and have been daysailing and beer can racing a J22 for several years, on an inland lake in NC. I wanted something that would offer some overnight capability, be simple, and have good sailing characteristics (see Quickstep 24 thread for exhaustive account of thinking, or skip).

 

The H-Boat is a 1967 design by Hans Groop, which is a very popular one-design in northern Europe. It's 27' LOA, 7'4" beam, 4'3" draft, 3200 lbs. I compromised a little with the cockpit size and traveler (it bisects the cockpit) but it checked my other boxes, and I found a pretty solid 1980 boat at a good price.

 

The boat is now at a yard in Oriental, and I'm about a month into the work. Here are a few pictures.

 

at the mooring

H Boat Warwick 2

on the hard

H Boat RI

cabin view

H Boat Warwick 6

cabin view

H Boat Warwick 3

More to follow.

 

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Major project items are:

 

Strip head liner and hull liner from cabin and paint. The stripping is complete, and I'm starting to paint. Refinish interior teak. I've started this on some of the teak that could be easily removed. I'm using Watco Teak Oil and Minwax rub-on poly. All new cushions - will be professionally made.

 

Awlgrip topsides with medium to dark blue. Will be professionally done.

 

Remove lifelines & rails. Replace some of the deck hardware.

 

Repaint non-skid. Will probably use Kiwi Grip Cream, professionally done.

 

Repaint bootstripe and bottom, professionally done.

 

Re-do topside teak

 

Replace a lot of the running rigging.

 

Re-position traveler.

 

Replace winches.

 

Replace companionway hatch board.

 

Get an asymmetric spinnaker.

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Lovely boat, and a great choice.

Not a complicated boat, so the restoration shouldn't be as hard as with a fully-fitted cruiser of that size ... and you will end up with fun-to-sail boat which you will know every inch of. I am jealous :)

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Major project items are:

 

Strip head liner and hull liner from cabin and paint. The stripping is complete, and I'm starting to paint. Refinish interior teak. I've started this on some of the teak that could be easily removed. I'm using Watco Teak Oil and Minwax rub-on poly. All new cushions - will be professionally made.

 

Awlgrip topsides with medium to dark blue. Will be professionally done.

 

Remove lifelines & rails. Replace some of the deck hardware.

 

Repaint non-skid. Will probably use Kiwi Grip Cream, professionally done.

 

Repaint bootstripe and bottom, professionally done.

 

Re-do topside teak

 

Replace a lot of the running rigging.

 

Re-position traveler.

 

Replace winches.

 

Replace companionway hatch board.

 

Get an asymmetric spinnaker.

 

Oh my. And the ten foot rule dictates that it will always need 2.7 things done to it.

 

That's a darn good looking boat. Looks pretty tiny inside for a 27 footer, but those two things often seem to go together.

 

Wild guess: you'll have more $ in paint jobs than in the original purchase. I hope spectators are truly pleased. ;)

 

Enjoy your boat! And try to do it for long enough to justify the renovation!

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Tom,

 

The ten foot rule is a good one. That's why I wanted a boat that is simple - no tanks, no inboard, no complicated systems.

 

It is small inside, but it really suits our needs. It's kind of like a 24-footer that has been stretched.

 

"Wild guess: you'll have more $ in paint jobs than in the original purchase."

 

You are correct. I guess I got a great deal. :D

 

"Enjoy your boat! And try to do it for long enough to justify the renovation!"

This will likely be my last sailboat, so I plan to enjoy it to the fullest and not worry about getting my money back.

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If you're happy, you sure did. Remember, a boat that doesn't have a real job has only one: entertaining you. If it needs to be pretty and blue to make that happen, by all means do it.

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This will likely be my last sailboat, so I plan to enjoy it to the fullest and not worry about getting my money back.

 

 

How dare you speak true and honest words here!!

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... ...

 

This will likely be my last sailboat, so I plan to enjoy it to the fullest and not worry about getting my money back.

 

Ha, I've been doing that for all my previous sailboats. Was I doing it wrong?

 

FB- Doug

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It will be something like that, but at seat level. The traveler rail is mounted on a laminated teak beam, which spans the entire cockpit. It mounts on brackets. I'm going to shorten it so that it spans the footwell and drop it down so that the rail is at seat level. It's a compromise for comfort.

 

I like the H-boats, sailed them a couple of times. Hiking is a bit uncomfortable though.

 

Are you going with a "bridge" traveller setup?

 

H_Boot_Traveller10.jpg

 

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Nice looking vessel Bull......a lot like my brother's BB-10.

I had seen the BB10s. They are beautiful boats.

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I like the H-boats, sailed them a couple of times. Hiking is a bit uncomfortable though.

 

Are you going with a "bridge" traveller setup?

 

H_Boot_Traveller10.jpg

 

 

Wow. That seems incredibly complicated and a huge waste of cockpit space for what I have to think is a minimal gain in control over sail shape.

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That seems incredibly complicated and a huge waste of cockpit space for what I have to think is a minimal gain in control over sail shape.

 

Sailboat racing in a nutshell!

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^ This ^.

 

Been that way for a long time too. My old full race Quarter Pounder from 1975 had, as I recall, 19 different adjustable controls of sail shape - on a 26' sloop.

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^^ This and this ^^

 

I am going to take the "old" traveler track and wooded beam, upon which it is mounted, and shorten it to fit in the space between the cockpit seats. It will be about the same length as the traveler on a J24, provide a little shape control and cost nothing.

 

Maybe we should start a thread with "sail controls" that do almost nothing.

 

BTW, today I finished the cabin painting after having gone through almost 3 quarts of 3M adhesive solvent, dozens of rags, hours with a respirator (also 3M). Whew! I will post some photos, but I'm really happy with the way it looks.

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The hull and head liners are gone and the cabin has a nice coat of "Summer White." Here are some pics of the forward cabin:

 

After ripping off hull liner fabric:

IMG 1549

After hand scraping:

IMG 1550

After wire brush on angle grinder:

IMG 1553

After one coat of Zinnser BIN and one of "Summer White":

IMG 1573

 

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I'm going to hold off on re-doing the interior teak until the yard finishes re-painting the non-skid and re-installing hardware. Apparently, it creates a lot dust below. I've got a lot of little projects to do in the meantime:

 

Removing some of the deck hardware

Re-locating and shortening the traveler

Stripping the exterior teak

Finish re-doing the interior teak that I removed

Building new companionway drop board

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Here's a couple of before & afters (I need to get better at getting the same photo view):

 

H Boat Warwick 3

Teak trim around ports to be refinished and re-installed; interior teak to be refinished; new blue cushions to be made!

IMG 1582

 

The yard is going to start the new non-skid (Kiwi Grip Cream) and topside (Awlgrip Arista Blue), while I slave over the interior teak that I have brought home and some other little projects.

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Part of the plan is an asymmetric spinnaker. The forestay is set back from the stem by a good bit, as you can see below, so I think it make sense to take advantage of the separation. Sailmaker suggested a 90% mid-girth sail that will work from 50 to 60 degrees to 120 degrees. Sounds like fun.

 

H Boat Warwick 2

 

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At the suggestion of QBF, I'm starting this thread to report on the progress of renovating this boat that I bought in October.

 

Oh sure, blame me! :)

 

Enjoy your new boat, Mr. City.

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Congratulations: excellent boat, very fast especially upwind. Are there many in North America?

I haven't sailed one, but I have heard many good things about them. I'm really looking forward to the first sail.

 

I don't think there are very many in North America. I know of mine, another one in North Carolina, one that was in Georgia, and one in Nova Scotia. I heard that there are some in California. I gather that some were sold in the U.S. in the late 70s and early 80s, but they never really caught on.

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Congratulations: excellent boat, very fast especially upwind. Are there many in North America?

I haven't sailed one, but I have heard many good things about them. I'm really looking forward to the first sail.

 

I don't think there are very many in North America. I know of mine, another one in North Carolina, one that was in Georgia, and one in Nova Scotia. I heard that there are some in California. I gather that some were sold in the U.S. in the late 70s and early 80s, but they never really caught on.

According to the H-Boat class website, about 30 boats were sold in the U.S.

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It would be nice to get in touch with the boats still in the US. How to do it?

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I had one for several years on SF Bay- great boat, although I was sometimes challenged on a close reach in 20 knots + by the weather helm, possibly by not having the hiking straps and 3 crew keeping it flat. In all other ways it was a joy though, a big dinghy, Soling with a cabin and self draining cockpit. Almost always sailed in and out of the slip. I had a Honda 2 hp on it, on a folding bracket on the transom, but the motor was normally stowed below (easy to do with that motor).

 

At that time (8 years ago?) there was a feeble attempt to form a USA class, I even had the website h-boats-usa.org but let it go after awhile. There are a few around the Bay, none active that I know of. Mine went to a German ex-Olympic sailor from Sacramento, I wonder if he is still sailing it up there.....

 

Interestingly, a web search turned up this image, supposedly from SA, but when clicked says that the ad is awaiting moderator approval-

 

post-59889-0-73858500-1417956491_thumb.jpg

 

 

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I had one for several years on SF Bay- great boat, although I was sometimes challenged on a close reach in 20 knots + by the weather helm, possibly by not having the hiking straps and 3 crew keeping it flat. In all other ways it was a joy though, a big dinghy, Soling with a cabin and self draining cockpit. Almost always sailed in and out of the slip. I had a Honda 2 hp on it, on a folding bracket on the transom, but the motor was normally stowed below (easy to do with that motor).

 

At that time (8 years ago?) there was a feeble attempt to form a USA class, I even had the website h-boats-usa.org but let it go after awhile. There are a few around the Bay, none active that I know of. Mine went to a German ex-Olympic sailor from Sacramento, I wonder if he is still sailing it up there.....

 

Interestingly, a web search turned up this image, supposedly from SA, but when clicked says that the ad is awaiting moderator approval-

 

attachicon.gifSA h-boat.jpg

Thanks for the informative post. I won't have hiking straps, but I do have one set of reef points on the main.

 

I too will be using a Honda 2HP as well. Sounds like it will be enough for the lake I sail on.

 

The pics you posted are of an H-Boat that is in Oriental, NC. I looked at it last summer, liked it, but ended up buying one that was in Rhode Island. The NC boat is still available:

 

http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/45532

 

Did you do any PHRF racing with it? Do you have any pics?

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Out of curiosity: Why do you so want an assym? The original symmetric spinnaker isn't that complicated (or large), and it covers quite an angle too. (Plus, it keeps the boat in class). You wouldn't zig-zag or plane downwind in a H-boat anyway...

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Out of curiosity: Why do you so want an assym? The original symmetric spinnaker isn't that complicated (or large), and it covers quite an angle too. (Plus, it keeps the boat in class). You wouldn't zig-zag or plane downwind in a H-boat anyway...

I find them easier to use. There is no H-Boat one design racing in North America, so class conformity is not an issue. The only disadvantage is that you loose power during a jibe.

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h-boat.gif

 

At%20the%20gate.jpg

 

Guess I should have paid for that 2nd one.....

 

I did do some racing, mostly singlehanded. I found that I could stay with the rating up until the planing boats could plane- especially one Black Soo that just cracked off and horizoned me after coming around Little Harding. Very demoralizing. Of course, I caught back up at the Bay Bridge wind hole and then we all started getting carried back by the tide. 3 Bridge Fiasco strikes again.

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Last work session was Hardware Removal. It was quite a list:

 

Bow pulpit (4 posts, 3 fasteners each) 12

4 Life line stanchions: (3 fasteners each) 12

Stern rail (4 posts, 3 fasteners each) 12

4 tiny blocks (2 fasteners each) 8

2 pad-eyes for twings (3 fasteners each) 6

Magic box 7

2 pad-eyes for sin sheets (3 fasteners each) 6

O/B bracket 3

4 Winches (4 fasteners each) 16

2 Traveler mounting brackets (3 fasteners each) 6

 

I make that 88 fasteners. In many cases, it was a PIA since I had to crawl to an out of the way place under the deck, lock the vise-grip onto the nut, crawl back on deck, and unscrew. In a few cases, it was easy. Like when I removed the headliner a few weeks ago. When I tore away the headliner under the two cabin top winches, the nuts holding the mounting bolts fell out. They had completely backed off.

 

During this process, I was very pleased to find that I can curl up in the lazarette, and close the hatch. It's also a good way to get to know the boat.

 

All of the holes are going to be plugged, and fortunately, almost all are in non-skid areas, which are going to be repainted.

 

The pads for the twings and spin sheets are pretty dated, and I'll replace them with standard pad-eyes. The location for the twings will change. The winches are being replaced, and of course the hole pattern is different. The lifelines, pulpit, stern rail, magic box, and the 4 tiny blocks are not coming back

 

Here are a few photos:

 

IMG 1592

IMG 1596

IMG 1597

By the way, I have four of these Barton winches and fasteners. Each one has its own permanently mounted handle. I will let them go cheap!

H Boat Warwick 15

 

 

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Never saw a permanent handle on a winch before.

 

Maybe a museum would be interested? ;)

I never saw one either, however, they seem to be popular in northern Europe.

 

Good thought on the museum - maybe I could get a massive tax deduction.

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Hey! I resemble that museum remark - I've seen those things new in stores.

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If the 1:1 of those winches is adequate, what's not to like? They appear to be ribbed like a new Andersen winch, rather than just abrasive, which is good. You can tack without having to remove/insert a top-loading handle. I bet they are not that heavy? On the 6mR's I sail on we have bottom-loading winch handles and they are actually pretty cool.

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Schnick,

 

If you're a fan of them, or know someone who would like some, I have 4. I will let the 4 go for a special Christmas price of $100 plus shipping.

 

Santa Bull

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Schnick, you race r-class boats?

 

We saw R3 Vitesse and R20 Nayada in our travels this summer. Those things are boat porn personified.

 

Here is xa little teaser.

2012 Lake Ontario R-CLass Documentary at the NYC …:

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Schnick, you race r-class boats?

 

We saw R3 Vitesse and R20 Nayada in our travels this summer. Those things are boat porn personified.

 

Here is xa little teaser.

2012 Lake Ontario R-CLass Documentary at the NYC …:

 

Let's not get this topic to far off topic.

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Schnick, you race r-class boats?

 

We saw R3 Vitesse and R20 Nayada in our travels this summer. Those things are boat porn personified.

 

Here is xa little teaser.

2012 Lake Ontario R-CLass Documentary at the NYC …:

 

Let's not get this topic to far off topic.

 

That's really throwing down the glove.

 

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If the 1:1 of those winches is adequate, what's not to like?

 

A handle that is permanently sticking out in whatever direction, catching feet, lines, whatever moves.

 

It's less in the way than a top-mounted handle, but still in the way. I'd want it removable. Or in a museum, perhaps with SloopJ as curator.

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The yard has started prep work for the non-skid re-painting. It's going to be Kiwi Grip in their cream color. They would like to repaint the deck too, but I know that would be expensive. I asked for an estimate. The topsides are probably next, and they will be Awlgrip Aristo Blue.



I brought home almost all of the removable teak to refinish (port light trim, drawer faces, peak bulkhead, etc.).There are some good suggestions on the "What to use on interior teak?" topic: http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=149882



I am very happy with how they have turned out. I washed them with ZEP, rinsed, let them dry well, and then rubbed them down with acetone. Then I did two coats of Watco Teak Oil per the instructions on the can. I just finished two coats of Minwax Wipe-on Poly (gloss). I rubbed the pieces with a 3M white pad in between.



I think I'll do one more application of Poly, but I have to say the pieces look great. I wasn't after a "new" look. A few little dings and a stain or two add character. Now the wood looks well used but cared for.



In a month or so, I'll tackle the bulkheads, cabinets and shelves that could not be removed. That will be a bigger job, but I feel sure that I will like the results.


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I sail an old H-boat my self here in Denmark. With something of a similar philiosophy of keep it simple. So of course nice to see a fellow H-boater.

Do you have any information about the asymmetric you mentioned earlier? Size and cut for instance, and are you considering a bowsprit?

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I sail an old H-boat my self here in Denmark. With something of a similar philiosophy of keep it simple. So of course nice to see a fellow H-boater.

Do you have any information about the asymmetric you mentioned earlier? Size and cut for instance, and are you considering a bowsprit?

I don't have any information about size and cut yet, but I should have it in a few weeks. I'll post it. I am not going to use a bowsprit. I have a question for you. Do you know where I can get a polo shirt with the H-Boat class symbol?

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I sail an old H-boat my self here in Denmark. With something of a similar philiosophy of keep it simple. So of course nice to see a fellow H-boater.

Do you have any information about the asymmetric you mentioned earlier? Size and cut for instance, and are you considering a bowsprit?

I don't have any information about size and cut yet, but I should have it in a few weeks. I'll post it. I am not going to use a bowsprit. I have a question for you. Do you know where I can get a polo shirt with the H-Boat class symbol?

 

If you can find a good copy of the symbol, there are lots of places that will embroider/print on whatever you want.

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Ish, you're right. Sometimes I'm living in the past. BTW, here's what it looks like:

 

H Boat symbol

 

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Good news. Yard estimate for lion's share of work came in very close to budget. Whew!

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Good news. Yard estimate for lion's share of work came in very close to budget. Whew!

 

Sometimes the lion has a cub...

 

I've learned to expect this at a later date:

 

"Well, normally it would be like this, but in your case, Mr. Ray, it's going to take a little longer and cost a little more..."

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The yard has started prep work for the non-skid re-painting. It's going to be Kiwi Grip in their cream color.

... ...

 

Kiwi Grip is awesome stuff. However, their stock 'cream' color is still dark enough to get very hot in the sun. I cut it by 1/2 with white, or you can get them to mix it and ship it in your color.

 

White gives off too much glare, most colored gelcoat gets blistering hot in the sun. You'd think it would have been figured out by now, but they're still making boats with black spars!

 

FB- Doug

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The yard has started prep work for the non-skid re-painting. It's going to be Kiwi Grip in their cream color.

... ...

 

Kiwi Grip is awesome stuff. However, their stock 'cream' color is still dark enough to get very hot in the sun. I cut it by 1/2 with white, or you can get them to mix it and ship it in your color.

 

White gives off too much glare, most colored gelcoat gets blistering hot in the sun. You'd think it would have been figured out by now, but they're still making boats with black spars!

 

FB- Doug

So you did equal parts white and cream? How was the glare after cutting it with white? Do you have any pics?

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Reportedly you can get KIWI tinted at a paint store - you don't need to mix the stock colours.

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Reportedly you can get KIWI tinted at a paint store - you don't need to mix the stock colours.

 

True. I tinted white Kiwi Grip to be a slightly darker version of the deck colour, using computerized colour matching. It was handy that I had a good-sized chunk of the cabin to work with which I had cut out for an opening port.

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I'm afraid I dont know where to get at a poloshirt with the logo on. Having it done your self is probably your best bet.

Looking forward to seeing your boat under sail.

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I wanted to find my grandson (2 1/2) a toy boat for Christmas, preferably a sailboat. I bought a Tippecanoe 12" free sail pond boat, which I just completed. I also bought the monofilament reel. I could not be more excited.


T12



I may have to buy the 18" racer for my wife! :lol:



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I wanted to find my grandson (2 1/2) a toy boat for Christmas, preferably a sailboat. I bought a Tippecanoe 12" free sail pond boat, which I just completed. I also bought the monofilament reel. I could not be more excited.

I may have to buy the 18" racer for my wife! :lol:

 

That's very cool but he's too young. Soon, though.

 

And being born in this millenium, he'll want controls for it. There's no excuse not to have them any more. Mono reels are so last century.

 

A couple years ago, I got one of those toy RC helicopters for Xmas from my bro-in-law. He doesn't have much money. I think they cost about 20 bucks. 20 bucks for a helicopter I can fly around my living room with remote controls. How much was that reel? ;)

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I'm going to the yard next week to spend a few days on interior and exterior teak. The yard tells me that they have finished prepping the deck and topsides for painting, and will begin filling the 90 +/- holes from hardware removal. The boat will be moved inside, which will be a treat at this time of year. Believe it or not, it gets cold here!

 

As Tom Ray said, "Sometimes the lion has a cub." (#54) I got some news about the keel. It is iron, and has some rust. The yard owner said he thinks it should be stripped and have a barrier coat of some kind, and then bottom paint. We have some time to think about it, but it makes sense.

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Bull - here's a cut & paste of a note I sent someone a while back - it's what I did with the badly corroded iron keel on my old Columbia 43.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by matjay viewpost.gif
From the research I've done it seems to me the best approach is to sandblast the keel white, then immediately apply a base layer of epoxy. Any recommendations as to what to use for the base layer? Is something like WEST systems alright, or is a zinc enriched epoxy necessary?

Sandblasting is correct - any grinding method will not clean ALL the pitted areas fully and future failures will start there. Just use regular epoxy resin as a seal coat - nothing fancy, just get it on right after blasting and a solvent wipe. You can't even leave this step overnight. West is only more expensive - 4 times as much as the industrial no-name resin I use. Stone fabricators - counter tops etc. use a lot of epoxy - check around and you'll save $hundreds.

Quote:
Moving on to a filler, again is WEST ok? and how many coats is recommended?

Again, West only costs more. Get a cement bag of industrial talc for about $20. It makes the most beautifully sanding filler you have ever experienced. Mix it to peanut butter consistency with epoxy and you probably won't even have any pinholes to fill after sanding.

Quote:
Many people claim to use a notched squeegee or trowel to apply the epoxy, and then fill in between the created lines? is this necessary?

This makes it MUCH easier to get an even coat. Unless you're an experienced plasterer, using a plain trowel will give you a very uneven thickness. You do NOT want to sand through to metal, ever, or you will have to start over there. You want a reasonably thick finished coat - 1/8" min. is my preference - in order to ensure the metal stays buried.

Get an autobody longboard sander - they look kind of like an old smoothing plane, about 18" long and take pre-cut strips of sandpaper. This will help you fair up your keel - mine ended up looking like it had been templated.

I finished mine off with 3 coats of epoxy resin and 3 coats of Interprotect (there was still discussion as to the best sealer at that time). Now I'd just use Interprotect for all coats.

 

 

 

Here's a pic of the finished job.

 

post-95343-0-72364100-1420848454_thumb.jpeg

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^^ I'm not sure what to call him. Yard Guy? Yard Dude? Yard owner? Boat Yard Man?

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^^ Thanks. I will share this with the yard man.

Does your yard man also do edging and hedge-clipping? LOL

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OK, henceforth and forthwith, the guy I deal with at the boat yard, who does a lot of the work and who also owns it, will be known as Boat Yard Man.

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...Sandblasting is correct - any grinding method will not clean ALL the pitted areas fully and future failures will start there. Just use regular epoxy resin as a seal coat - nothing fancy, just get it on right after blasting and a solvent wipe. You can't even leave this step overnight.

 

Exposure to oxygen will mean that oxidation starts again immediately, so it's best to do this job in outer space.

 

Failing that, the instructions on G-Flex for bonding with metal suggest sanding or wire-brushing through the wet epoxy.

 

OTOH, the bit of oxidation that starts in between sandblasting and coating, while it will cause failure of the coating in the long run, will probably last at least as long as the original coating did. How old is this boat again? And how long do you plan to use it? Dying and leaving the problem to the next guy is a proven strategy.

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^^ The boat is 1980 or 1982 (long story) and was sailed in New England, in salt water of course. Now it will be fresh water. I'm 66, so I figure I'll sail it for 10 years.

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...Sandblasting is correct - any grinding method will not clean ALL the pitted areas fully and future failures will start there. Just use regular epoxy resin as a seal coat - nothing fancy, just get it on right after blasting and a solvent wipe. You can't even leave this step overnight.

 

Exposure to oxygen will mean that oxidation starts again immediately, so it's best to do this job in outer space.

 

Failing that, the instructions on G-Flex for bonding with metal suggest sanding or wire-brushing through the wet epoxy.

 

OTOH, the bit of oxidation that starts in between sandblasting and coating, while it will cause failure of the coating in the long run, will probably last at least as long as the original coating did. How old is this boat again? And how long do you plan to use it? Dying and leaving the problem to the next guy is a proven strategy.

 

We're talking iron here, not aluminium. As long as it isn't raining when you do it, it won't oxidize enough to matter - if you work reasonably quickly.

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...Sandblasting is correct - any grinding method will not clean ALL the pitted areas fully and future failures will start there. Just use regular epoxy resin as a seal coat - nothing fancy, just get it on right after blasting and a solvent wipe. You can't even leave this step overnight.

 

Exposure to oxygen will mean that oxidation starts again immediately, so it's best to do this job in outer space.

 

Failing that, the instructions on G-Flex for bonding with metal suggest sanding or wire-brushing through the wet epoxy.

 

OTOH, the bit of oxidation that starts in between sandblasting and coating, while it will cause failure of the coating in the long run, will probably last at least as long as the original coating did. How old is this boat again? And how long do you plan to use it? Dying and leaving the problem to the next guy is a proven strategy.

 

We're talking iron here, not aluminium. As long as it isn't raining when you do it, it won't oxidize enough to matter - if you work reasonably quickly.

I appreciate the advice and suggestions you all (y'all) have made. I will be talking to the Boat Yard Man (BYM) this week and we'll see what he suggests. I've known him for about 30 years and he pretty well informed.

 

I'm curious, what do you suppose builders of boats with cast iron keels do? Rustoleum? Red lead?

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They don't seem to do much - production boats with iron keels get pretty nasty pretty quick in my experience.

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Generally epoxy paint. In the old days, probably red lead. A lot of boats have iron keels, generally hold up quite a while before rusting. Cal 20 and 2-24 that I know of. Most swing keel boats. Stars. Probably Shark24s, maybe Flying Fifteens.

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Practically evey production boat fron Europe seems to have iron with lead as a big upcharge.

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...Sandblasting is correct - any grinding method will not clean ALL the pitted areas fully and future failures will start there. Just use regular epoxy resin as a seal coat - nothing fancy, just get it on right after blasting and a solvent wipe. You can't even leave this step overnight.

 

Exposure to oxygen will mean that oxidation starts again immediately, so it's best to do this job in outer space.

 

Failing that, the instructions on G-Flex for bonding with metal suggest sanding or wire-brushing through the wet epoxy.

 

OTOH, the bit of oxidation that starts in between sandblasting and coating, while it will cause failure of the coating in the long run, will probably last at least as long as the original coating did. How old is this boat again? And how long do you plan to use it? Dying and leaving the problem to the next guy is a proven strategy.

 

We're talking iron here, not aluminium. As long as it isn't raining when you do it, it won't oxidize enough to matter - if you work reasonably quickly.

I appreciate the advice and suggestions you all (y'all) have made. I will be talking to the Boat Yard Man (BYM) this week and we'll see what he suggests. I've known him for about 30 years and he pretty well informed.

 

I'm curious, what do you suppose builders of boats with cast iron keels do? Rustoleum? Red lead?

 

Take it down to shiny bright and instantly scrub epoxy into the iron with a wire brush, according to WEST.

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Iron vs. Lead

 

Pretty interesting. Another consideration, which probably goes without saying, is that lead places the weight lower. So a lead keel is more effective, pound for pound, than an iron keel.

 

Based on a quick internet search, lead is pricey:

 

Lead = $0.84 per lb

Scrap lead = $0.25 per lb

Scrap Cast Iron = $0.08 per lb

 

and dense:

 

Lead = 709 lb per cubic foot

Iron = 491 lb per cubic foot

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Iron vs. Lead

 

Pretty interesting. Another consideration, which probably goes without saying, is that lead places the weight lower. So a lead keel is more effective, pound for pound, than an iron keel.

 

Based on a quick internet search, lead is pricey:

 

Lead = $0.84 per lb

Scrap lead = $0.25 per lb

Scrap Cast Iron = $0.08 per lb

 

and dense:

 

Lead = 709 lb per cubic foot

Iron = 491 lb per cubic foot

 

That's obviously how a lot of the cheaper boatbuilders save money. Having had an iron keel in salt water, it's a constant battle against rust, even with epoxy coating.

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Depleted uranium is about 70% heavier per volume than lead. You'll need a connection to get it, though.

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