Bull City

H-Boat Renovation Project

Recommended Posts

Well, perhaps I was just casting about for a wood-loving animal that could have a hard-on. We, of course have the peanut/acorn lovers, however, they will devour other types of wood as well, including pressure treated pine, which I can't think is good for them. I think they would love teak to the point of a hard-on, much the same as some humans with Asian food.

 

Do I know what I am talking about? Of course not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Watco Teak Oil is some fantastic stuff. It makes dried out teak that hasn't seen a drop of oil in over 30 years look scrumptious and honey soaked. If I were a squirrel I would probably have a hard-on. Good thing I am not a squirrel.

 

Bull - ya know the expression "pics or it didn't happen"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Watco Teak Oil is some fantastic stuff. It makes dried out teak that hasn't seen a drop of oil in over 30 years look scrumptious and honey soaked. If I were a squirrel I would probably have a hard-on. Good thing I am not a squirrel.

 

Bull - ya know the expression "pics or it didn't happen"?

 

Good thing you're not a squirrel.

 

ca52y_A8.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Watco Teak Oil is some fantastic stuff. It makes dried out teak that hasn't seen a drop of oil in over 30 years look scrumptious and honey soaked. If I were a squirrel I would probably have a hard-on. Good thing I am not a squirrel.

 

Bull - ya know the expression "pics or it didn't happen"?

True. Will post some soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Watco Teak Oil is some fantastic stuff. It makes dried out teak that hasn't seen a drop of oil in over 30 years look scrumptious and honey soaked. If I were a squirrel I would probably have a hard-on. Good thing I am not a squirrel.

 

Bull - ya know the expression "pics or it didn't happen"?

 

Good thing you're not a squirrel.

 

ca52y_A8.jpg

Or a beaver. They like wood, don't they?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are a couple of pics showing the miracle of Watco Teak Oil:

 

Before Watco:

IMG 1703

After Watco (still a little wet):

IMG 1706

Monday, after the 72 hour recommended waiting period, I'll do the wipe-on poly.
Oh, the fumes.
- Horny Squirrel

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is unrelated to sailing, and perhaps Steam Flyer can shed some light. Today while driving home from a few day working on the boat, in Eastern NC, I saw a billboard for "Dentures in One Day!"

 

That's pretty impressive. Besides fabricating your new set of choppers, do you think they pull all your teeth too?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cabin Sole:

 

The H-Boat has a fiberglass cabin sole with wooden lift-out covers for the bilge. It's in good shape, but I was thinking I'd like something to cover it that is nice looking, easily removable (so I can check the bilge), and comfortable on bare feet.

 

Any recommendations?

 

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is unrelated to sailing, and perhaps Steam Flyer can shed some light. Today while driving home from a few day working on the boat, in Eastern NC, I saw a billboard for "Dentures in One Day!"

 

Dunno about that one.

I am too busy looking at the "Find Your Curves" billboards advertising the plastic surgery place

 

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

This is unrelated to sailing, and perhaps Steam Flyer can shed some light. Today while driving home from a few day working on the boat, in Eastern NC, I saw a billboard for "Dentures in One Day!"

 

Dunno about that one.

I am too busy looking at the "Find Your Curves" billboards advertising the plastic surgery place

 

FB- Doug

 

They need a one-stop shop. Boobs and Bicuspids in One Day!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cabin Sole:

 

The H-Boat has a fiberglass cabin sole with wooden lift-out covers for the bilge. It's in good shape, but I was thinking I'd like something to cover it that is nice looking, easily removable (so I can check the bilge), and comfortable on bare feet.

 

Any recommendations?

 

Thanks.

 

Small oriental rug -- very yachty! Hose it out if it gets dirty. People treat these like they're so precious, but they're actually very hardy and easy to clean.

 

2x3' doormat/sample rugs are all over the place, runners are usually 30" by 6' or 8', then there are Kilim designs and prayer rugs about 2' wide and anywhere from 3' to 6' long.

 

Enjoying your reports, & the idea of doing an H-boat myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paint and Color Update:

 

Met with Boat Yard Man and Painter today and decided on some changes in the plan.

 

We are going to paint the deck (i.e. non-non-skid areas) for two principal reasons: (1) It was felt that the cost of doing this would be not much more (in boat dollars) than painstakingly patching and matching numerous areas, and (2) the finished product would be very superior than patching and matching.

 

We are going to use Awlgrip with beads(?) for the non-skid, rather than Kiwi Grip. These guys haven't used Kiwi Grip before, but have used Awlgrip tons of times and feel much more comfortable with it, and can fine tune the degree of non-skid.

 

Colors will be:

 

Deck: Oyster White

Non-Skid: Moon Dust

Topsides: Carinthia Blue

Cove Stripe: Oyster White

Boot Stripe: Oyster White

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Traveler Update:

 

This has been keeping me up at night. I am shortening the traveler from a 3 to 4 foot cockpit dividing monstrosity to a 26" unobtrusive and less effective length, which will fit between the cockpit seats. The end fittings (becket, turning block and cam cleat combination) took away about 5" of throw at each end. With the clever use of a screw driver, I moved the two cam cleats to the car, which has two turning blocks, and will drill some holes at each end of the track to dead-end the control lines. So, a gain of 8" in throw for no cost. Of course something will surely go wrong before it's over, but for now I am savoring the moment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paint and Color Update:

 

Met with Boat Yard Man and Painter today and decided on some changes in the plan.

 

We are going to paint the deck (i.e. non-non-skid areas) for two principal reasons: (1) It was felt that the cost of doing this would be not much more (in boat dollars) than painstakingly patching and matching numerous areas, and (2) the finished product would be very superior than patching and matching.

 

We are going to use Awlgrip with beads(?) for the non-skid, rather than Kiwi Grip. These guys haven't used Kiwi Grip before, but have used Awlgrip tons of times and feel much more comfortable with it, and can fine tune the degree of non-skid.

 

Colors will be:

 

Deck: Oyster White

Non-Skid: Moon Dust

Topsides: Carinthia Blue

Cove Stripe: Oyster White

Boot Stripe: Oyster White

Bull, the Awlgrip nonskid on my boat looks great and works very well. You will be happy with the results. Kim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've used glass beads to make nonskid a couple of times. Works pretty well, but they're tough on bare knees and tend to be dislodged over time, leaving a little dirt-collecting pocket.

 

Recently used some porch paint from Home Despot with their non-skid additive mixed in. It's fine like flour and very lightweight in the bag.

 

Works great so far, but it's too soon to say anything about how it wears over time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I did the Awlgrip nonskid thing on the last boat, we taped the nonskid areas up, shot it, and then sprayed the complete deck. Gives a couple extra coats of paint to prevent any dislodging.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interior Varnish: I think this is done! I'll check it tomorrow.

 

Traveler: I mounted the traveler brackets in their new position today, and fit the laminates wooden beam. It require some devilish compound angle cuts that I made with my new pull saw. Not beautiful work, but the brackets will hide the ends. I cut the rail too, and had to tap one hole for the end cap fastener. I have two taps, and one of them was the right size.

 

Exterior Teak: It was Cetoled some time ago and looks pretty bad: what hasn't peeled is sort of opaque. I took a heat gun and pull scraper to some of it.

 

In a day or two, the yard is going to finish up the prep work for painting, and then start painting. I'm bringing home the lids for the under berth storage areas, and the bilge covers. They need cleaning and a few coats of varnish.

 

With the painting starting soon, I will not be able to work on the boat, so I will have to get a life. Maybe I will buy a single burner galley stove and practice boiling water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

or...boil-in-a-bag omelets! break an egg or two in a sandwich bag, add what ever other ingredients you like in the bag, seal and smush around, drop in boiling water for 12 minutes....voila a perfectly cooked omelet!

or making omelettes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interior Varnish: I think this is done! I'll check it tomorrow.

 

Traveler: I mounted the traveler brackets in their new position today, and fit the laminates wooden beam. It require some devilish compound angle cuts that I made with my new pull saw. Not beautiful work, but the brackets will hide the ends. I cut the rail too, and had to tap one hole for the end cap fastener. I have two taps, and one of them was the right size.

 

Exterior Teak: It was Cetoled some time ago and looks pretty bad: what hasn't peeled is sort of opaque. I took a heat gun and pull scraper to some of it.

 

In a day or two, the yard is going to finish up the prep work for painting, and then start painting. I'm bringing home the lids for the under berth storage areas, and the bilge covers. They need cleaning and a few coats of varnish.

 

With the painting starting soon, I will not be able to work on the boat, so I will have to get a life. Maybe I will buy a single burner galley stove and practice boiling water.

 

Get a small pressure cooker. You can make anything in a pressure cooker, it's very difficult to burn anything, and it is almost impossible to spill. At one point I specialized in cooking (dunno if it could be called "baking") beer bread in a pressure cooker on a 1-burner Origo alcohol stove.

 

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

or...boil-in-a-bag omelets! break an egg or two in a sandwich bag, add what ever other ingredients you like in the bag, seal and smush around, drop in boiling water for 12 minutes....voila a perfectly cooked omelet!

or making omelettes.

That sounds disgusting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

or...boil-in-a-bag omelets! break an egg or two in a sandwich bag, add what ever other ingredients you like in the bag, seal and smush around, drop in boiling water for 12 minutes....voila a perfectly cooked omelet!

or making omelettes.

That sounds disgusting.

 

You don't have to eat the bag.

 

Classic Saskatchewan camp omelet there, if you were really good you could cook it in boiling water in a paper bag over an open fire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I heard water can sometimes penetrate paper bags. Or is that only if they have absorbent oats in them?

Only when the oats expand and rip the bag :) Just like Nat Geos getting damp.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

or...boil-in-a-bag omelets! break an egg or two in a sandwich bag, add what ever other ingredients you like in the bag, seal and smush around, drop in boiling water for 12 minutes....voila a perfectly cooked omelet!

or making omelettes.

That sounds disgusting.

 

You don't have to eat the bag.

 

Classic Saskatchewan camp omelet there, if you were really good you could cook it in boiling water in a paper bag over an open fire.

Does the paper bag impart a better flavor than the plastic bag?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

or making omelettes.

 

Can you mail me a 3-cheese and bacon, stat?

How would this do cooked as a Saskatchewan camp omelette?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

or...boil-in-a-bag omelets! break an egg or two in a sandwich bag, add what ever other ingredients you like in the bag, seal and smush around, drop in boiling water for 12 minutes....voila a perfectly cooked omelet!

or making omelettes.

That sounds disgusting.

 

You don't have to eat the bag.

 

Classic Saskatchewan camp omelet there, if you were really good you could cook it in boiling water in a paper bag over an open fire.

Does the paper bag impart a better flavor than the plastic bag?

 

You still need the plastic bag to hold the omelet together, but the paper bag will hold boiling water over an open flame. Omelet in a paper bag in boiling water is doomed.

 

To answer your other question, the 3-cheese and bacon omelet would do just fine by this method, or you could leave the bacon out and cook it separately, possibly with a forked branch over the edge of the fire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday, I took the heat gun and scraper to the rest of the exterior teak and got most of it off. I thought it would be a good idea to get this done before the deck is painted, since paint doesn't like heat guns. Everything was pretty straightforward except for the underside of the handrails. Any ideas? I may end up using a long strip of sandpaper like an old time shoe buffer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday, I took the heat gun and scraper to the rest of the exterior teak and got most of it off. I thought it would be a good idea to get this done before the deck is painted, since paint doesn't like heat guns. Everything was pretty straightforward except for the underside of the handrails. Any ideas? I may end up using a long strip of sandpaper like an old time shoe buffer.

these work for me.

post-48619-0-46205900-1421944894_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The sand paper will work just be careful that the cross grain scratches are not too prominent. What I do with mine is to srtip and nicely sand where I can see. the undersige gets a rough cleanup with 80 or 100 gri. Then Cetol natural teak everywhere

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

 

or...boil-in-a-bag omelets! break an egg or two in a sandwich bag, add what ever other ingredients you like in the bag, seal and smush around, drop in boiling water for 12 minutes....voila a perfectly cooked omelet!

 

or making omelettes.

That sounds disgusting.

 

You don't have to eat the bag.

 

Classic Saskatchewan camp omelet there, if you were really good you could cook it in boiling water in a paper bag over an open fire.

Does the paper bag impart a better flavor than the plastic bag?

 

You still need the plastic bag to hold the omelet together, but the paper bag will hold boiling water over an open flame. Omelet in a paper bag in boiling water is doomed.

 

To answer your other question, the 3-cheese and bacon omelet would do just fine by this method, or you could leave the bacon out and cook it separately, possibly with a forked branch over the edge of the fire.

 

Where am I going to get a forked branch AND set up an open fire on my boat?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

 

That sounds disgusting.

 

 

You don't have to eat the bag.

 

Classic Saskatchewan camp omelet there, if you were really good you could cook it in boiling water in a paper bag over an open fire.

Does the paper bag impart a better flavor than the plastic bag?

 

You still need the plastic bag to hold the omelet together, but the paper bag will hold boiling water over an open flame. Omelet in a paper bag in boiling water is doomed.

 

To answer your other question, the 3-cheese and bacon omelet would do just fine by this method, or you could leave the bacon out and cook it separately, possibly with a forked branch over the edge of the fire.

 

Where am I going to get a forked branch AND set up an open fire on my boat?

 

You may have to tough it out with a bent coat hanger if you don't have a handy branch. Normally I like to light the fire on the foredeck unless it's too windy. It's usually best to do this on someone else's boat, preferably when they are not aboard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday, I took the heat gun and scraper to the rest of the exterior teak and got most of it off. I thought it would be a good idea to get this done before the deck is painted, since paint doesn't like heat guns. Everything was pretty straightforward except for the underside of the handrails. Any ideas? I may end up using a long strip of sandpaper like an old time shoe buffer.

Think you'd be better off removing them completely. It'll make varnishing easier and will also make painting less tedious. Re-bed the rails after the paint has fully cured.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Where am I going to get a forked branch AND set up an open fire on my boat?

 

You may have to tough it out with a bent coat hanger if you don't have a handy branch. Normally I like to light the fire on the foredeck unless it's too windy. It's usually best to do this on someone else's boat, preferably when they are not aboard.

Ish, you are a menace.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Yesterday, I took the heat gun and scraper to the rest of the exterior teak and got most of it off. I thought it would be a good idea to get this done before the deck is painted, since paint doesn't like heat guns. Everything was pretty straightforward except for the underside of the handrails. Any ideas? I may end up using a long strip of sandpaper like an old time shoe buffer.

Think you'd be better off removing them completely. It'll make varnishing easier and will also make painting less tedious. Re-bed the rails after the paint has fully cured.

I saw a nice trick in Wooden Boat magazine: You epoxy threaded rod into the handrails and fasten from below with acorn nuts. When it's time to refinish, you undo the nuts, remove the rails, refinish and reinstall.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even better is to epoxy threaded inserts into the handrail and use regular machine screws with pretty washers from underneath. No intrusion into headroom.

 

90016a029p1-b01l.png?ver=19477445

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Yesterday, I took the heat gun and scraper to the rest of the exterior teak and got most of it off. I thought it would be a good idea to get this done before the deck is painted, since paint doesn't like heat guns. Everything was pretty straightforward except for the underside of the handrails. Any ideas? I may end up using a long strip of sandpaper like an old time shoe buffer.

Think you'd be better off removing them completely. It'll make varnishing easier and will also make painting less tedious. Re-bed the rails after the paint has fully cured.

I saw a nice trick in Wooden Boat magazine: You epoxy threaded rod into the handrails and fasten from below with acorn nuts. When it's time to refinish, you undo the nuts, remove the rails, refinish and reinstall.

Screw the acorn nuts. Use sex bolts. A bit more hassle with the counterbore, but a cleaner look. And you've only a few to do so no big shakes.

 

https://www.boltdepot.com/Sex_bolts.aspx

 

They go by other nomenclature, barrel nuts, blind nuts, and a few others, but call them sex bolts. That way, when you get a female unit in the boat and you mention that you've used “sex bolts”, wait for the quick glance and the start of a smile,.. then you're in there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even better is to epoxy threaded inserts into the handrail and use regular machine screws with pretty washers from underneath. No intrusion into headroom.

 

90016a029p1-b01l.png?ver=19477445

Are those fittings meant to be epoxied in - or screwed in?

 

A little epoxy oozing to the inside could spoil your whole day...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Even better is to epoxy threaded inserts into the handrail and use regular machine screws with pretty washers from underneath. No intrusion into headroom.

 

90016a029p1-b01l.png?ver=19477445

Are those fittings meant to be epoxied in - or screwed in?

 

A little epoxy oozing to the inside could spoil your whole day...

 

They are meant to be screwed in with a light coating of epoxy to hold them. Filling them with epoxy would be easy if you just sorta wandered away and forgot about them. If you set them and then fill the thread with a bolt coated in release, there are no problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The underside of my handrails are anchored in a counter-sunk hole. I haven't actually looked to see what it is (hex nut, sex nut, whatever). The threaded insert looks pretty nice, Ish. Where do get them? Didn't see them at the Bolt Depot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I screw lightly waxed nylon screws into the insert threads when epoxying them into place. Keeps the threads clean.

 

 

 

Even better is to epoxy threaded inserts into the handrail and use regular machine screws with pretty washers from underneath. No intrusion into headroom.

90016a029p1-b01l.png?ver=19477445

Are those fittings meant to be epoxied in - or screwed in?

A little epoxy oozing to the inside could spoil your whole day...

 

They are meant to be screwed in with a light coating of epoxy to hold them. Filling them with epoxy would be easy if you just sorta wandered away and forgot about them. If you set them and then fill the thread with a bolt coated in release, there are no problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bull: Are the hand rails leaking? If not just sand underneath to remove the loose and rough stuff and refinish as per your preferences. Then go sailing asap.

If there are leaks, or you just like pulling your boat apart then, by all means take the hand rails off. Just my $.02

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The underside of my handrails are anchored in a counter-sunk hole. I haven't actually looked to see what it is (hex nut, sex nut, whatever). The threaded insert looks pretty nice, Ish. Where do get them? Didn't see them at the Bolt Depot.

 

McMaster-Carr sells them in stainless. http://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-threaded-inserts/=vlc7nd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks really slick. I will try to give that a shot, although it may be tough to work it in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another trick is to countersink the insert hole and use a small O-ring as the primary seal. Done right, you don't need goop, which makes taking them off to refinish much easier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another trick is to countersink the insert hole and use a small O-ring as the primary seal. Done right, you don't need goop, which makes taking them off to refinish much easier.

Geez, Ish. You are a wealth of useful information. I'm serious. What do you do for a living, and where the hell is Fuctifino?

 

 

Bull: Are the hand rails leaking? If not just sand underneath to remove the loose and rough stuff and refinish as per your preferences. Then go sailing asap.

If there are leaks, or you just like pulling your boat apart then, by all means take the hand rails off. Just my $.02

No, they're not. I'll probably follow your suggestion, but I really like Ish's idea and may do it next time they need finishing. I'm becoming very handy with a heat gun and scraper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Another trick is to countersink the insert hole and use a small O-ring as the primary seal. Done right, you don't need goop, which makes taking them off to refinish much easier.

Geez, Ish. You are a wealth of useful information. I'm serious. What do you do for a living, and where the hell is Fuctifino?

 

 

Bull: Are the hand rails leaking? If not just sand underneath to remove the loose and rough stuff and refinish as per your preferences. Then go sailing asap.

If there are leaks, or you just like pulling your boat apart then, by all means take the hand rails off. Just my $.02

No, they're not. I'll probably follow your suggestion, but I really like Ish's idea and may do it next time they need finishing. I'm becoming very handy with a heat gun and scraper.

When we first bought our IP31 I found a set of kneepads on the boat and could not understand why they were there After doing the toe rails, hand rail, eyebrows etc i am now enlightened

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Another trick is to countersink the insert hole and use a small O-ring as the primary seal. Done right, you don't need goop, which makes taking them off to refinish much easier.

Geez, Ish. You are a wealth of useful information. I'm serious. What do you do for a living, and where the hell is Fuctifino?

 

 

 

Bull: Are the hand rails leaking? If not just sand underneath to remove the loose and rough stuff and refinish as per your preferences. Then go sailing asap.

If there are leaks, or you just like pulling your boat apart then, by all means take the hand rails off. Just my $.02

ockquote>No, they're not. I'll probably follow your suggestion, but I really like Ish's idea and may do it next time they need finishing. I'm becoming very handy with a heat gun and scraper.

When we first bought our IP31 I found a set of kneepads on the boat and could not understand why they were there After doing the toe rails, hand rail, eyebrows etc i am now enlightened

 

 

Kneepads are great. Fortunately, the H-Boat does not have much teak on deck:

 

Two handrails (3 posts)

Trim around the companionway

Trim around a small cubby at the aft end of the cockpit

Two pads for winches and cam cleats

Tiller

 

I'll do this in Cetol Natural Teak, and probably skip the gloss coat.

 

The drop board is plywood faced with teak veneer. It was painted, but I am stripping it. It's one piece, but I think I'm going to slice it into two horizontal boards, because as one piece, it's kind of awkward to stow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does the H-boat have a cockpit locker and, if yes is it deep enough to store the board? If yes you could mount some u-channel in the cockpit locker (i have used the cockpit facing side), in a V shape just like the drop board and use that to store to board, It's cheap easy and neat.

 

A_AT003-AM096C04_4.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^ That's a great idea. It does have cockpit lockers, however, they wouldn't be deep enough to stow the full-sized wash board (I was just reminded of that term). The two smaller boards wouldn't be a problem, but I think they could be stored as you describe.

 

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are a couple of photos of the boat at the yard as they prep her for painting:

 

image1

image2

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^ That's a great idea. It does have cockpit lockers, however, they wouldn't be deep enough to stow the full-sized wash board (I was just reminded of that term). The two smaller boards wouldn't be a problem, but I think they could be stored as you describe.

 

Thanks.

Make sure to cut them at an angle. That is a slanted cut so water sheds "out" of the boat. join like this = not good. join like this \\ good.. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Found this article about somebody renovating their H-boat. The original is in Danish, but Google does an OK job of translating it. Perhaps you can find some inspiration in there:

https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=da&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fminbaad.dk%2Fnyhed%2Farticle%2Fh-baad-fra-1969-fra-vrag-til-guld-for-smaapenge%2F&edit-text=

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Found this article about somebody renovating their H-boat. The original is in Danish, but Google does an OK job of translating it. Perhaps you can find some inspiration in there:

https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=da&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fminbaad.dk%2Fnyhed%2Farticle%2Fh-baad-fra-1969-fra-vrag-til-guld-for-smaapenge%2F&edit-text=

Thanks for sending that. It was very interesting. He did a beautiful job for not much money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All set for the Dazzle camouflage then?

Oohhh, I have always wanted the dazzle camouflage. Maybe RC won't see you over early or better yet, blame the guy next to you instead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about this pattern?

 

post-95343-0-36318500-1423292777.jpg

 

Some of those paint jobs made it almost impossible to tell what you were looking at. Op Art before the term was created.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah. What didn't you understand about camouflage? RC could be a victim too. Of course who could blame a port tacker for violation given that view. Hmm, maybe I should reconsider.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The top coat phase of the painting began today. We had a good weather window, which closed not long after the boat was moved inside. I am really excited with the results thus far. On the recommendation of the Gary, the paint wizard, we went with Awlgrip Carinthia Blue, which is one step lighter than their Flag Blue. I am in love with the transom, and I hope many of my PHRF opponents will feel the same way.
We are about to get a blast from Canadian, so painting will cease for a while. Remaining are the deck, boot stripe and cove stripe, which will be Oyster White, a delicious color with lemon juice, and the non-skid, which will be Moon Dust, not as tasty, but looks nice.
Here are some shiney photos.

IMG 1732

IMG 1731

IMG 1734

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great colour - much better than Flag Blue, which always looks black unless it's in bright sunlight.

 

I still say the cove stripe should be gold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great colour - much better than Flag Blue, which always looks black unless it's in bright sunlight.

 

I still say the cove stripe should be gold.

 

No question.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're doin' that boat proud. You sure you're going to be OK putting something that pretty into ucky salt water? :-)

 

It's going into a nice fresh water lake... well, it's not -THAT- nice but people drink it, so... ... ...

 

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great colour - much better than Flag Blue, which always looks black unless it's in bright sunlight.

 

I still say the cove stripe should be gold.

I'm still thinking about it.

 

What are you going to name her?

We're not sure yet, but something short, since the transom isn't too big, and not something cutesy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I vote Gold for the cove stripe too. That would be a very classy touch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I vote Gold for the cove stripe too. That would be a very classy touch.

Gold cove stripe is the conventional answer to that hull colour. I think it could be good to try something different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites