Bull City

H-Boat Renovation Project

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Like this?attachicon.gifimage.jpg

 

From what I've heard from Steve Rander, who built her, there were all sorts of industry folk 'visiting' during the build. Way of the world.....

Sorry, I meant the interior.

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Olaf:

For what Paul wanted I think 10,000 lbs. is about right. It's one of those boats that just feels right inside and out. I love the way it moves through the water. See how she cleaves. It's all sailing length. The height of the cockpit sole at the transom was designed to be the perfect height for Lorrie, Paul's wife, to dangle her toes in the water as they sailed along. I love requirements like that.

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Olaf: this?

 

post-906-0-17931700-1432269795_thumb.jpg

 

Its not the final version, but the cabin is close- we got rid of the nav station and put a sink where it was. I think theres a shower(?) opposite the head in this plan that we got rid of and put a sink shelves and storage instead. V birth got a little longer too. ?

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^^ Thanks. Very nice and simple.

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Damn I was a good draftsman. That preliminary drawing is full of vigor. Interesting to me now is just how close that early prelim is to the final boat.

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Bob & Amati, it looks like the cockpit coaming stops just forward of the helmsman's area. Do you recall the thinking on that? Where is the traveler?

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The traveler is a curved track the entire width of the beam just aft of the coaming. It separates the helm from what we call the tourist section which is free from most of the sailing duties, so folks can drink, sleep, take care of kids without being yelled at, or hung or thrown overboard by things like running backs or hit by the traveller car :)

 

The Dinghy sailor in me demands sitting on the high edge steering with a tiller extension. Finn style. If our insurance didn't demand lifelines, I'd have hiking straps. Can't help myself- when she heels, I hike out.

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Bob, you are a gifted draftsman, but lest you forget, you nailed Amati freehand at our first meeting.

 

For anyone out there, this is high on the list of something anyone interested in boats should do. You get to see your idea pop out of someone else's hand. Neat.

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I agree Bob is one hell of a draftsman. I look at the Bob's drawing of the Valiant 40 hanging in my man cave everyday. Each time I look I notice some new, subtle detail. It may be a functional drawing done to to scale but it is also a beautiful piece of art. It makes me feel good every time I look at it.

post-37781-0-75262400-1432467333_thumb.jpg

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Here's a short video of sailing today. Close hauled in 8 to 10 knots. Ends when we decide to tack.

 

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Boat looks brand new Bull - great work. Are those big pads under the cabin winches how you hid the mis-drilled holes?

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The pads are original. They just have more plugs than before.

 

Thanks for the kind words.

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Sometimes I really miss lake sailing. Boat looks great, Bull.

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Lake sailing has its advantages, no salt mainly, but you are limited on destinations. This afternoon, it was about 85 F. A lunch time swim in cool, sweet water was pretty nice.

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Lake sailing has its advantages, no salt mainly, but you are limited on destinations. This afternoon, it was about 85 F. A lunch time swim in cool, sweet water was pretty nice.

 

Exactly. Wind runs out in the middle of the day? Jump overboard and swim for a while. Try that out here and you may never leave the water alive.

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Lovely Bull, nice job.

 

Only thing I could think to change, would be to locate that furler drum below deck level to get jib foot to seal to deck - and I know that is easier said than done.....

 

(It's the racer and perfectionist in me.)

 

Enjoy - I am sure you have inspired many who had only previously thought larger and more expensive.

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Bull That looks fantastic. Congratulations on a job well done. we finally got out on the water as well in the last two weeks and the feeling of well being that comes with that is better than almost anything else.

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Boink - I hadn't thought of the below deck furler, but it would have been nice, probably expensive to do, probably good I didn't think of it. I find your comment regarding "larger and more expensive" interesting. I'm still adding up the damage, but I think I'm about 33% over my budget/estimate, which ain't too bad at this level. Aside from cost, I think I have what I was looking for: swift, simple, nice looking, able to overnight.

 

PY - You are spot on regarding the feeling of well being that comes with being out on the water sailing. I'll let my hair down a little and confess that I had some low points over this past winter. I had to give up soccer because my right knee finally went bad (I'm going to have a replacement next month). Work on the boat was slow because of the winter weather and seemed endless. I have been slowed down because of the knee. I felt 10 years older. Anyhow, since the boat has been in the water, and I'm finally sailing her, and seeing how nicely she is living up to my hopes, I am feeling like my old self, except for the knee of course, but that's going to get fixed soon. As you may know, we named her TONIC, and that is exactly what she has been. Sailing is good for the soul.

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Bull good luck with the knee. I understand the recovery time is quite reasonable. The guy 3 boats down from me had knee replacement surgery in early may and 2 weeks later he was back out on the boat futzing around, not good as new yet but able to spend time on the boat. I do like the name Tonic, very apropos.

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You got to sail and swim today? Had the best sail of the year today but Lake Erie is only 12C so no swimmy for this dude yet.

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Only 33% over? Either you are a professional estimator or you got off incredibly lightly - I usually go over more like 333% ;)

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Even with 33% over budget, I bet that you are clear daylight and a mortgage ahead of contemporary new.....

 

Besides, looks like every dollar was well spent and worth it.

 

Enjoy.

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I went for my first solo sail today in a warm 8 to 10 knot breeze. Everything was very easy to do, and the boat is much less dependent on crew weight than my old J22. The cabin is starting to get the lived in look:

 

post-54228-0-66370700-1434071674_thumb.jpg

post-54228-0-38401000-1434071675_thumb.jpg

 

 

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Jerry Can Storage

 

I've got a 1.25 plastic jerry can for gas. In the past, I've topped off the tank and left it on the dock, but I'm thinking I should start taking it with me, especially for overnights. I'd like to make a spot in the lazarette or one of the cockpit lockers where it will stay put. What do you all think about this idea?

 

The lazarette and lockers are open to one another, but separated from the cabin by a bulkhead.

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Jerry Can Storage

 

I've got a 1.25 plastic jerry can for gas. In the past, I've topped off the tank and left it on the dock, but I'm thinking I should start taking it with me, especially for overnights. I'd like to make a spot in the lazarette or one of the cockpit lockers where it will stay put. What do you all think about this idea?

 

The lazarette and lockers are open to one another, but separated from the cabin by a bulkhead.

 

Tow the evil thing on a 100' line. Oh, you already have gas on the boat. Just keep it under the V-berth.

 

You're not sailing hard enough, stuff is still on the bunks. HTFU.

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Jerry Can Storage

 

I've got a 1.25 plastic jerry can for gas. In the past, I've topped off the tank and left it on the dock, but I'm thinking I should start taking it with me, especially for overnights. I'd like to make a spot in the lazarette or one of the cockpit lockers where it will stay put. What do you all think about this idea?

 

The lazarette and lockers are open to one another, but separated from the cabin by a bulkhead.

I've been keeping 3 gal in a lazerette that is separated from the cabin by a bulkhead - one hole in the bulkhead for wires - no gas smell. I have been sailing hard enough that nothing is staying on the shelves, the can is lashed to an eye so it doesn't move around during the exciting weather.

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Here's a short video of sailing today. Close hauled in 8 to 10 knots. Ends when we decide to tack.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3Chg1kztGM&feature=youtu.be

Bull, thanks for posting that! I have just watched that gorgeous video several times.

 

It's wonderful sort of sailing to be able to do, with a slippery boat which speeds along nicely in light winds, with all loads small enough to be easily handled. The fact that the boast is so beautiful too is an added bonus.

 

It looks to me like Tonic has met all your criteria 110%. I hope that sailing her feels even half as good as it looks:)

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Jerry Can Storage

 

I've got a 1.25 plastic jerry can for gas. In the past, I've topped off the tank and left it on the dock, but I'm thinking I should start taking it with me, especially for overnights. I'd like to make a spot in the lazarette or one of the cockpit lockers where it will stay put. What do you all think about this idea?

 

The lazarette and lockers are open to one another, but separated from the cabin by a bulkhead.

I've been keeping 3 gal in a lazerette that is separated from the cabin by a bulkhead - one hole in the bulkhead for wires - no gas smell. I have been sailing hard enough that nothing is staying on the shelves, the can is lashed to an eye so it doesn't move around during the exciting weather.

 

Although the can I use is pretty tough and well designed, I was concerned about fumes. I assume you've had no problems.

 

 

Here's a short video of sailing today. Close hauled in 8 to 10 knots. Ends when we decide to tack.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3Chg1kztGM&feature=youtu.be

Bull, thanks for posting that! I have just watched that gorgeous video several times.

 

It's wonderful sort of sailing to be able to do, with a slippery boat which speeds along nicely in light winds, with all loads small enough to be easily handled. The fact that the boast is so beautiful too is an added bonus.

 

It looks to me like Tonic has met all your criteria 110%. I hope that sailing her feels even half as good as it looks:)

 

She really has, and the sailing is really sweet, especially when you're on the lee side close to the water. It's a great sensation.

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Can you separate off the aft end of a locker with a bulkhead that seals on the underside of the locker lid, and vent the locker out the stern or something similar?

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Although the can I use is pretty tough and well designed, I was concerned about fumes. I assume you've had no problems.

No problems.

 

My lazrette is the full stern of the boat (full width) and has port and starboard hatches. The hatches are not sealed with weatherstripping yet and there is no vent. When I need to use the motor, I open an inspection port to pass the gas hose to the motor. I never smell gas fumes in the lazrette except occasionally when a couple drops fall from the end of the hose when I disconnect.

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Highwest, what kind of can do you use?

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For use on a Honda 2 hp, which has the pain of a small internal tank which is often refilled while on the transom, the small No-Spill

 

http://www.amazon.com/No-Spill-1415-4-Gallon-Poly-Compliant/dp/B001PCRFYG/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1434524563&sr=8-3&keywords=no+spill+gas+can&pebp=1434524574691&perid=1V0VFDV8QGC6QAE3KPE5

 

Has worked well for me, especially considering those other CARB designs that are guaranteed to spill significant amounts at every fill. This one is very easy to regulate and shuts off reliably. No fumes.

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For use on a Honda 2 hp, which has the pain of a small internal tank which is often refilled while on the transom, the small No-Spill

 

http://www.amazon.com/No-Spill-1415-4-Gallon-Poly-Compliant/dp/B001PCRFYG/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1434524563&sr=8-3&keywords=no+spill+gas+can&pebp=1434524574691&perid=1V0VFDV8QGC6QAE3KPE5

 

Has worked well for me, especially considering those other CARB designs that are guaranteed to spill significant amounts at every fill. This one is very easy to regulate and shuts off reliably. No fumes.

That's what I have. It is a good product.

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Highwest, what kind of can do you use?

I'm not sure on the manufacturer, it's Nissan-branded. The store near me carries the same tank, but it doesn't say Nissan on it... I think like this - http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B008F92HJA/ref=pd_aw_sbs_200_22?refRID=0GSZ8V4Y306XVXE22PP5

 

This one leaks a lot - http://www.amazon.com/Portable-Marine-Gallon-Above-Permeability/dp/B000S5U0VG

 

I think all of the new EPA cans will leak, given the right circumstances.

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It's a crime to talk about engines, especially inboard ones, with such a sweet sailng boat. Like harnessing a Derby winner to a cart.

 

What about a sweep or yuloh? If you must have an engine, suggest tracking down an old Tohatsu 3.3hp 2 stroke. and fabricating a side bracket.

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Our tank locker seemed to smell of gas. Why? Everything is closed up and tight. When you close the cap vent the inner volume can not expand and contract so when the sun warms the boat and hence the tank locker the expanding volume pushes out the hose fitting. We store our tank with the cap vent "open" and no more fuel spill.

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We store our tank with the cap vent "open" and no more fuel spill.

Agreed. My tank vent is always open.

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^^ I like the self-tailing winches, but I do not like the traveler-grab bar arrangement.

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The design would be a strong contender for the R2AK. Points, light, enclosed cabin, could be rowed, room for 3 or 4 racers for non stop racing, light air performer...trailerable.

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I prefer my stern pulpits to be right aft.

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That boat is so pretty, it should not have lifelines at all.

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I prefer my stern pulpits to be right aft.

I definitely agree. I don't see why that was done.

 

That boat is so pretty, it should not have lifelines at all.

I agree on this too. It may have them because it's on SF Bay.

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My question on the jerry can arose as a result of an embarrassing incident.

 

I took my son and his daughter sailing several days ago. On the way home, the wind quit and decided to motor. All went well until my Honda 2 ran out of gas about 1/2 mile from the marina. There was a gasp of air, but not much more, there's no telling how long it would have taken to get in. I had also forgotten to replace the paddle I kept on my old boat.

 

Fortunately, a friend motored by and offered a tow, which I gladly accepted. I misjudged the momentum needed for the last 30 yards to the slip, and we fell short by about 20 feet. The day being warm, and the water being refreshing, my son swam to the dock with our tow line and all ended well.

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They may have needed lifelines for racing, and just bolted on whatever pulpit. I wouldn't kick her out of bed for it...

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The design would be a strong contender for the R2AK. Points, light, enclosed cabin, could be rowed, room for 3 or 4 racers for non stop racing, light air performer...trailerable.

You can put a load of canned stew in the lazarette.

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My question on the jerry can arose as a result of an embarrassing incident.

 

I took my son and his daughter sailing several days ago. On the way home, the wind quit and decided to motor. All went well until my Honda 2 ran out of gas about 1/2 mile from the marina. There was a gasp of air, but not much more, there's no telling how long it would have taken to get in. I had also forgotten to replace the paddle I kept on my old boat.

 

Fortunately, a friend motored by and offered a tow, which I gladly accepted. I misjudged the momentum needed for the last 30 yards to the slip, and we fell short by about 20 feet. The day being warm, and the water being refreshing, my son swam to the dock with our tow line and all ended well.

 

You need an oar, I am sure that she is really easy to scull.

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My question on the jerry can arose as a result of an embarrassing incident.

 

I took my son and his daughter sailing several days ago. On the way home, the wind quit and decided to motor. All went well until my Honda 2 ran out of gas about 1/2 mile from the marina. There was a gasp of air, but not much more, there's no telling how long it would have taken to get in. I had also forgotten to replace the paddle I kept on my old boat.

 

Fortunately, a friend motored by and offered a tow, which I gladly accepted. I misjudged the momentum needed for the last 30 yards to the slip, and we fell short by about 20 feet. The day being warm, and the water being refreshing, my son swam to the dock with our tow line and all ended well.

 

You need an oar, I am sure that she is really easy to scull.

 

I have ordered a long handled canoe paddle.

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My question on the jerry can arose as a result of an embarrassing incident.

 

I took my son and his daughter sailing several days ago. On the way home, the wind quit and decided to motor. All went well until my Honda 2 ran out of gas about 1/2 mile from the marina. There was a gasp of air, but not much more, there's no telling how long it would have taken to get in. I had also forgotten to replace the paddle I kept on my old boat.

 

Fortunately, a friend motored by and offered a tow, which I gladly accepted. I misjudged the momentum needed for the last 30 yards to the slip, and we fell short by about 20 feet. The day being warm, and the water being refreshing, my son swam to the dock with our tow line and all ended well.

 

You need an oar, I am sure that she is really easy to scull.

 

I have ordered a long handled canoe paddle.

 

 

It's probably easier but the oar is more stylish.

 

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^^ I do some sculling, as in rowing a single, with two oars. I like it very much. If I have to propel my H-Boat by hand, I would like to face forward and paddle.

 

Even though we had 100 degree weather today, I missed TONIC, having been at the beach for a week, so I went for a solo sail. Hot, as mentioned, but not too humid, and a decent breeze, albeit warm, from the south. It was very enjoyable. Anchored for lunch, swam before and after. Sailed home, swam again on my way to the car.

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You can scull with one hand and look forward at the same time. Obviously if you race as in the video you need to use both hands.

 

I've always liked to drop the sails calmly in advance and scull the last 50 meters. Some people think that sculling is like vodoo but it is actually easy if somebody teaches you right, probably easier than staying upright in a rowing single!

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nice boat. I really like the look of it. Enjoy off your "tonic"

 

Congratulations: beautiful result.

 

Thanks, Pierre and Gewoon. I'm really happy with her.

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PY - You are spot on regarding the feeling of well being that comes with being out on the water sailing. I'll let my hair down a little and confess that I had some low points over this past winter. I had to give up soccer because my right knee finally went bad (I'm going to have a replacement next month). Work on the boat was slow because of the winter weather and seemed endless. I have been slowed down because of the knee. I felt 10 years older. Anyhow, since the boat has been in the water, and I'm finally sailing her, and seeing how nicely she is living up to my hopes, I am feeling like my old self, except for the knee of course, but that's going to get fixed soon. As you may know, we named her TONIC, and that is exactly what she has been. Sailing is good for the soul.

Here I am quoting myself again. I got my new knee installed on Monday and got to go home yesterday. I'm awash in meds, and feeling no pain. I miss TONIC already. Boo-hoo. It will likely be about a month before I can go sailing. I took this with tears in my eyes. :D

 

post-54228-0-05418500-1436407521_thumb.jpg

 

On the bright side, I am missing the hot, humid, stifling middle-of-summer weather.

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The Honda 2 pushes TONIC along pretty well. But the reach from the tiller to OB is awkward. That's the only thing I'm not happy about. After I get back on my feet, I'll stick with it for a while, but the Torqueedo with the remote throttle would be sweet.

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Bull, congratulations on the new knee. I bumped into myour buddy who had his done about 5 weeks ago and he was walking like a new man. In fact he was walking to his boat and I saw him out sailing his Contess 0a not long after that.

 

It will all be worth it in the end.

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PY - You are spot on regarding the feeling of well being that comes with being out on the water sailing. I'll let my hair down a little and confess that I had some low points over this past winter. I had to give up soccer because my right knee finally went bad (I'm going to have a replacement next month). Work on the boat was slow because of the winter weather and seemed endless. I have been slowed down because of the knee. I felt 10 years older. Anyhow, since the boat has been in the water, and I'm finally sailing her, and seeing how nicely she is living up to my hopes, I am feeling like my old self, except for the knee of course, but that's going to get fixed soon. As you may know, we named her TONIC, and that is exactly what she has been. Sailing is good for the soul.

Here I am quoting myself again. I got my new knee installed on Monday and got to go home yesterday. I'm awash in meds, and feeling no pain. I miss TONIC already. Boo-hoo. It will likely be about a month before I can go sailing. I took this with tears in my eyes. :D

 

attachicon.gifIMG_2022.jpg

 

On the bright side, I am missing the hot, humid, stifling middle-of-summer weather.

 

Beautiful boat! Good luck with the new knee, just do your PT and it should be fine. I had both of mine replaced and the pain relief was worth all the hassle of the surgery.

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Ed,

 

Thanks for the encouragement on the knee. I'm 2 weeks out and I'm very pleased with things so far. Post-op pain has been pretty minimal, i.e. well managed, the physical therapist is very pleased with my progress, SWMBO is taking good care of me, I get the staples out tomorrow. I hope to be sailing in a couple of weeks. Until then, I watch the video clip in post #510 about 10 times a day. :D

 

BC

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Torqeedo Time?

 

I'm thinking of getting one of these, again! I've been using my old Honda 2 HP, but I'm not doing so well with it. While it moves the boat pretty well, it does not have a reverse gear - you have to rotate it 180 degrees. The boat has a long afterdeck. In order to reach the engine, I have to sit aft of the rudder. It is a general PITA, and can result in ugly slip landings, especially with a quartering wind.

 

My boat weighs 3200 lbs. The Torqeedo Travel 1003 (the most I would be willing to spend) is rated for "daysailers up to 1.5 tonnes," a little less than 3200 lbs., and it's rated at 3 or 4 HP, so I'm thinking it will work for the H-Boat. Also, the Torqeedo offers a remote throttle which would enable me to control Forward/Reverse and speed from the cockpit.

 

Thinking about range, the standard battery provides 1/2 hour at full throttle and 2 hours or so at 1/2 throttle, which would be plenty for in and out of the marina. My concern is if we sailed 7 or 8 miles away and the wind died. An extra battery, in a calm would probably give 6 or 7 NM at 1/2 throttle. I have a house battery box for lights which could accommodate a 35 Amp-hour 12v battery. I've heard that this is a way you can extend your range.

 

A Torqeedo battery is supposed to have 18 Amp-hours. Would the 35 Amp-hour battery double my range?

 

I don't know shit about electricity. Can anyone provide some advice or formulas I can work through?

 

Thanks.

 

BC

 

P.S. The knee is doing really, really well. If you have questions, send me a PM. I would be glad to share my experience.

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A Torqeedo battery is supposed to have 18 Amp-hours. Would the 35 Amp-hour battery double my range?

 

I don't know shit about electricity. Can anyone provide some advice or formulas I can work through?

 

You don't need to know much about leccy to know that double-X will double the range you get with X :)

 

So if you got a 36ah battery for the Torqeedo, it would indeed double your range.

 

However, I'm not so sure that a lead-acid battery will do that. Firstly, AFAIK lead acid batteries shouldn't be taken below about half-charge. I dunno for sure how that is reflected in their rated capacity, but I always assumed that a 40ah lead-acid actually gave me about 20ah. Maybe someone can give a definite answer.

 

Secondly, you can't plug the lead-acid battery onto the top of the Torqeedo, so you could use the house battery for propulsion only if you can either:

  1. connect it with a long thick cable, assuming that the Torqeedo is happy with the voltage levels out of a lead-acid
  2. charge the Torqeedo battery from the house battery

I think you may find that the only way to extend your range is to buy a second battery pack for the Torqeedo. They are not cheap :(

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Nice job. The boat looks great. I think you made all the right decisions like skipping the gold letters and removing the life lines and so on. It has a proper Scandinavian/Nordic look that way.

 

My father in law built an early H-boat (H-båt as we say), but switched to a Vindö 40 somewhere between the first and third daughter. We still sail the Vindö 40 every summer, me and the third daughter.

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OK. The new knee is excellent. I've been out a few times and have decided against the Torqueedo. Too much money, not enough benefit. The Honda 2 is a good little engine and pushes the boat very nicely. A gallon jerry can gives me a massive range. I just need to work on my technique.

 

Klamm, thanks for the kind words. The H-Boat is a dream to sail. I ate a Catalina 34 going to weather the other day. I was racing, not sure if he was. The Vindö 40 is a sweet boat. I'm jealous! Does yours have the custom dishes?

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Glad to hear the knee is good, now go and enjoy the rest of the season.

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Regarding dishes: Only the coffee cups. I'm not sure if they ever had or still have the rest. I'll ask, they are not much for throwing away stuff.

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post-54228-0-05418500-1436407521_thumb.j

 

Bull yer boat looks incredible mate, looks brand new infact, how long did it take in the end?

Roger,

 

Thanks for the kind words. I bought the boat in early October, had it trucked from Rhode Island to North Carolina in mid-October, and started work in late October. We put it in the water May 15th. So it was about 6 months.

 

We got the boat ready for Awlgriping in December, but the winter weather was awful. Probably added 6 to 8 weeks.

 

My new knee and I went for our first solo-sail. It was pretty warm, the wind was about 6 or 7 knots. Very nice to be independent again. Had a nice senior moment. I took in my lines but could not back out of the slip. I thought there was something wrong with my motor, but then noticed the spring line quietly doing its job.

 

I'm enjoying your restoration thread.

 

BC

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Next Saturday (19th) will be Tonic's first race in our PHRF fleet (I know, redundant). I think we'll do well.

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post-54228-0-05418500-1436407521_thumb.j

 

Bull yer boat looks incredible mate, looks brand new infact, how long did it take in the end?

Roger,

 

Thanks for the kind words. I bought the boat in early October, had it trucked from Rhode Island to North Carolina in mid-October, and started work in late October. We put it in the water May 15th. So it was about 6 months.

 

We got the boat ready for Awlgriping in December, but the winter weather was awful. Probably added 6 to 8 weeks.

 

My new knee and I went for our first solo-sail. It was pretty warm, the wind was about 6 or 7 knots. Very nice to be independent again. Had a nice senior moment. I took in my lines but could not back out of the slip. I thought there was something wrong with my motor, but then noticed the spring line quietly doing its job.

 

I'm enjoying your restoration thread.

 

BC

 

 

Cheers, so it is possible to get a boat pretty much done and dusted and back in the water in a matter of months, theres hope for me yet!

 

Good to hear you're new knee's preserved your sailing, from my own experience of breaking the odd bone or drilling through my hands now and again theres nothing worse than immobility.Never realised how pretty those H boats look, definately look better un-incumbered by guard rails and stainless wire in my opinion.

 

Whats next on the modifications list?

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Najade_7_web.jpg

 

Just stumbled upon a photo of a motor bracket arrangement similar to the one I was mentionning a few months ago. Not very "academic" but probably the most practical one.

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Pan,

 

That boat is stunning. Do you know anything about it?

 

I have seen that type of bracket before, on an IOD as I recall. I even located a small boat builder in Maine who fabricates them. I decided against it because I would have to remove the motor an bracket while sailing, otherwise, the motor would be in the water on one tack.

 

BC

 

 

 

Roger,

 

You are doing so much more to your Westerly than the yard and I did to the H-Boat. Most of what we did was cosmetic. You're practically re-building yours. I'm looking forward to more updates when you get back to it.

 

BC

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At the risk of beating a dead horse. here is another solution to locating the outboard other than on the transom. In this case the solution worked quite well, given that the transom was reserved for self steering gear. I'm less sure this would have worked for Tonic.

http://www.caphorn.com/sections/Pages/remotoriserAng.htm

 

Moteur_en_marche.jpg

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Pan,

 

That boat is stunning. Do you know anything about it?

 

I have seen that type of bracket before, on an IOD as I recall. I even located a small boat builder in Maine who fabricates them. I decided against it because I would have to remove the motor an bracket while sailing, otherwise, the motor would be in the water on one tack.

 

BC

 

 

 

 

I would imagine that a little planning, measuring, sketching would get you a bracket that articultes to store the motor on its side on the fantail while sailing. The trick is to do it with out coming off as a "Rube Goldberg" contraption.

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Seafarer built some boats with fairly long counters that had bomb bay-like doors. The outboard mounted just behind the tiller stock at the aft end of the water line, and could be lowered for use, and raised to hide in the counter. We had one in our club for a while, but the owner never retracted it. Not sure why, but maybe it didn't fit for some reason. It's often the case with clever schemes to hide outboards that they only work with the one motor for which they were designed.

 

It added 18" to 2 feet to the length of the boat which is a big problem for sales. "Honey, this 29 doesn't have has much room as the other 29."

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Seafarer built some boats with fairly long counters that had bomb bay-like doors. The outboard mounted just behind the tiller stock at the aft end of the water line, and could be lowered for use, and raised to hide in the counter. We had one in our club for a while, but the owner never retracted it. Not sure why, but maybe it didn't fit for some reason. It's often the case with clever schemes to hide outboards that they only work with the one motor for which they were designed.

 

It added 18" to 2 feet to the length of the boat which is a big problem for sales. "Honey, this 29 doesn't have has much room as the other 29."

Semi,

 

I love this. It certainly applies to the H-Boat. While it's 27' LOA, the interior is probably that of a 24.

 

It has a gigantic lazarette. Given enough money and engineering, it could certainly accommodate a retractable outboard arrangement.

 

BC

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A retractable outboard is pretty amazing, bull. Getting it under the hull means much less pitching out of the water in a seaway, and it is much easier to wire it in with a real starter and alternator. If you have a bomber door setup, no drag while sailing either.

If finding a decent bracket proves too hard, maybe start considering just howich work it would be

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^^

 

Rant, those wells can be nice. I sail on a lake, and we don't get much seaway. I have a Honda 2HP on a bracket. It stays on the bracket. The motor weighs only 28 - 30 lbs. The bracket is kind of a POS in some ways, but when I raise and tilt the motor, it's well clear of the water when sailing; at the dock, I don't need to tilt the motor to keep it clear of the water.

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You're going to chuck the motor below when you're racing this weekend, won't you Bull?

 

It fits nicely with the lower leg under the cockpit.

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^^ Uhmm... no, I'm going to leave it on the bracket. I'm a lazy POS.

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Oooo! The wind forecast is a little better, 5 kts. hubba-hubba, AND my sailmaker made a launch bag that fits in the forward hatch for the asymmetric, which I picked up today. We should be invincible!

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^^ Uhmm... no, I'm going to leave it on the bracket. I'm a lazy POS.

God, I guess. 28 pounds. The beer weighs more. Tell me that the beer and cooler will at least be on the cabin sole above the keel, Bull?

 

Of course, on the bracket in the tilted position the 2 horse may have some tactical advantage....... forcing duckers a bit lower and stuff.

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^^ Uhmm... no, I'm going to leave it on the bracket. I'm a lazy POS.

God, I guess. 28 pounds. The beer weighs more. Tell me that the beer and cooler will at least be on the cabin sole above the keel, Bull?

 

 

You mean like this?

 

post-95343-0-73286500-1442553087_thumb.jpg

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WTF! How'd you get into my boat?

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^^ Uhmm... no, I'm going to leave it on the bracket. I'm a lazy POS.

God, I guess. 28 pounds. The beer weighs more. Tell me that the beer and cooler will at least be on the cabin sole above the keel, Bull?

 

 

You mean like this?

 

attachicon.gifBallast.jpg

 

Exactly!

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First Race Report:

 

TONIC's first race was a qualified success. In a field of approximately 12 boats in light to ghosting conditions, we finished third. The race was two legs: a windward one followed by a downwind leg. It took about four hours to finish. Even though the start was staggered, so the order over the line was the order of finish, it was a still little crowded. We got a very good start in a light breeze (favored end, clear air, good speed, about 5 seconds after the gun) and led for much of the windward leg.

 

We sailed the first leg with main and class jib (don't have a genoa or drifter). A couple of other boats stayed on the eastern side of the course and caught a lift, so we were 3rd or 4th around the mark. There was a very large gap between the leading 4 or 5 boats and the rest of the fleet. (Near the end of windward leg, I took what I though was a little gamble, and passed a shoal marker on the wrong side. We made it past, and I thought, so far so good. Then we got headed and somehow ended up aground for a few minutes.)

 

Downwind, we flew an asymmetric. The light breeze dropped to ghosting. Those at the back of the pack, caught a light breeze which had filled in from windward and closed most of the gap. We were in 5th place by this time.

 

During the last half of this horrible downwind drift, we managed to move up to third place. About 200 yards from the finish, a 28 footer, who was about to nose ahead of us, also hit a shoal.

 

Now for the qualification. When we grounded, I had to start our OB to get off. We got going under sail again, well behind of where we hit bottom. I wasn't sure about the rules for a DQ in this circumstance and asked the race organizer via VHF. He said not to worry about it. A moment later, another boat ran aground in the same spot, motored off, and headed back to the marina under power. Obviously, he withdrew. When we got back to the dock, I decided to ask the race organizer, if he had second thoughts. He did, and I was DQ'd. I was a little disappointed at first, but we had sailed a good race in conditions that were not ideal for TONIC, and we learned a lot.

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