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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
couchsurfer

....got stung by the 'WASZP'?..OD foiler...

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......coming down the pipeline..an OD foiler,, simpler,more robust than moths,,,a good answer to the crazy quiver that'$ nece$$ary to compete in moth$ now.....

 

http://www.yachtsandyachting.com/news/180912/Exclusive-A-Mac-interview

JF: Talking about future development, you mentioned a while ago that you've got a new project in the can with the Waszp (one-design, one person foiling monohull), tell us a little bit more about that?

AM: We've got the plug made and I think they're pulling the mould off that this week. All the aluminium dies are about 20 days off, once we get them we'll be able to do all the injection moulding because there's a little bit of tolerance in that and we want to make sure that they'll fit. There's a bit of work to do on the rig but we're looking at having a boat available in about 2 months. That's the plan and obviously there will be a few little teething things.

JF: Could you tell us what the Waszp is all about?

AM: As far as sailing it's going to be very similar to a Moth, we don't ride tricycles for a very good reason, you don't fall over on a tricycle but they're not right really, and I think that's the same with trying to making something too stable, it's not right for what we're doing. We need to heel the thing to windward, we need a narrow hull to be able to get up and foil and the scale of a Moth is pretty good, even for a kid, as long as you get the foil size right and the sail size right, so what we've done is actually make it so that it's actually more tolerant to a heavy guy than the Mach2 is, it's got a slightly higher volume hull. The Waszp is really the answer to all those kids' fathers who come up to me on the beach and say, "I'd really like to get one for my son but..." and there's all the buts; the cost, the launching, the danger, the not having a mode for learning, which this one does, and the one-design factor. The Moth is always going to be a development class, and it's going to be fun because of that, but it's not everyone's cup of tea, particularly for a kid who's just starting out where you've got to tinker or you won't go fast. So the foils are out of the box, you can't do anything with them, they're aluminium, the tips are moulded so everything is out of the box - you go sailing, you go racing and have really as much fun as you're going to have on a Moth. You're not going to do 30 knots, or 35 that supposedly we've done, but you are going to do 23-24 knots fairly easily and you're going to get up (foiling) in about the same wind speed as a Moth does.

JF: So almost like a perfect feeder class really?

AM: Well there's going to be 3 rigs and there's going to be 3 foil configurations and that's just simply having different length foils as they're all having the same aluminium extrusion, and it'll be very easy to fine-tune that over the first year of working on what is the perfect foil size for various weights. So it'll actually cross a much bigger range of weights than the Moth class does. The biggest sail will be 8 square metres, we could do a bigger sail, we're building everything strong enough so it'll take a 100kg person and it will work for a 50kg person, or even a 40kg person. Perfect feeder, yes - I think that so many people are put off by some of those factors I just talked about with the Moth and I've put far more effort into designing this than the Mach2 because there are so many restrictions; you're trying to get it light, you're trying to get it cheap, you're trying to get it so it's easy, you're trying to get it so it's fast, all these different things and I think I've thrown out the basic design about 4 times and just started again saying "no, that really doesn't work". So yes, it's been nearly 5 years of design time.

 

 

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The real question is: will it be the long anticipated "Peoples Foiler"?!

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The real question is: will it be the long anticipated "Peoples Foiler"?!

I'm still surprised the laser foiling kit didn't take off. Even more surprised someone else didn't copy it & sell it for half the price.

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DATS WHAT I WONDERED! And now that DC's are down to 27kg, how long before one foils?!

 

 

 

The real question is: will it be the long anticipated "Peoples Foiler"?!


I'm still surprised the laser foiling kit didn't take off. Even more surprised someone else didn't copy it & sell it for half the price.

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DATS WHAT I WONDERED! And now that DC's are down to 27kg, how long before one foils?!

 

 

 

The real question is: will it be the long anticipated "Peoples Foiler"?!

I'm still surprised the laser foiling kit didn't take off. Even more surprised someone else didn't copy it & sell it for half the price.

 

Um, canoes still weigh 50 kg. The lightest ones are 48kg and that's with some ballsy design choices and a pile of costly material. That said, making one fly would be easy, but expensive. I've got a suit of big old 2008 vintage moth foils that I'm pretty sure would fly Dance Commander or Machete in the right conditions. But what would I be proving?

 

SCANAS is right, cost is the real barrier to be cracked in sailing while simultaneously maintaining performance. In that regard the Waszp is pretty perfect. Brand new (12 grand?), it will cost $2000 more than a lightly used racehorse (I made an actual price comparison on this. Healthy young race horses are actually cheaper). As a used OD, though, it will ultimately drop into the same price range as a new Laser. That's the real victory. There's a real correlation at least in the US between a shrinking middle class and a shrinking sailing community. To bring in good numbers of new people, instead of poaching off of other existing fleets, costs need to fall dramatically. Personally, I think the answer is in kit-building since you realize your cost savings in labor rather than quality, but that's just me flirting with the idea of making a moth kit. So long as the boat that you MUST have in order to be within striking distance of gold costs the same as a brand new Subaru Impretza, the base of people that can be conceivably drawn into that fleet will be constricted. Nobody can really change that with the moth class, so building an OD feeder class is the next best move.

 

DRC

 

http://fulcrumspeedworks.com/

https://www.facebook.com/fulcrumspeedworks

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......cost is the real barrier to be cracked in sailing while simultaneously maintaining performance. In that regard the Waszp is pretty perfect. Brand new (12 grand?), it will cost $2000 more than a lightly used racehorse (I made an actual price comparison on this. Healthy young race horses are actually cheaper).

.

...I'm not sure if the comparison to racehorse pricing holds water,so to speak.....I've never seen a boat increase in value for it's ability to sire new steed! :rolleyes::lol:

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What do we know about the Waszp so far?

 

OD

A set of foils and rigs

Aluminum foils

Glas construction (Mr.Clean during the live show.)

 

Roughly half the price of a Mach2

Roughly twice the weight of a Mach2

 

More robust than a Moth.

There is speculation that it will measure as a moth. Which should be nice even if it's mightily uncompetitive.

 

Anything else? Or different information?

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I don't want one, just wondered about it. I have sailed,(attempted to sail), a moth three times. Know how hard it is, but I'd still like to have a set of foils for my laser just for fun, just not at that crazy price.

 

And I still want a sail on a DC!

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not trying to hijack wasp thread, but wouldn't the laser foling kit to be more suited to the aero given the hull weight of 30 kgs or so. ?

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When people say they're surprised the laser foiling kit hasn't taken off, have any of those people sailed with it?

Also, does anyone know how many have sold?

 

Peraonally I can completely understand why it wouldn't sell but I haven't sailed it and dont know if he sold any.

 

No doubt many people will buy wazps thinking it's a beginner moth, fail a lot...and then there will be plenty of cheap ones around!

 

We run loads of sessions trying to help newbie mothies learn in the UK. Most of them haven't got the capacity to learn or the desire to push through the hard bits, and we don't have time to invest coaching.

 

Sailing schools teaching foiling skillz will help convert the masses but that is a BAD business to get into

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When people say they're surprised the laser foiling kit hasn't taken off, have any of those people sailed with it?

Also, does anyone know how many have sold?

 

Peraonally I can completely understand why it wouldn't sell but I haven't sailed it and dont know if he sold any.

 

No doubt many people will buy wazps thinking it's a beginner moth, fail a lot...and then there will be plenty of cheap ones around!

 

We run loads of sessions trying to help newbie mothies learn in the UK. Most of them haven't got the capacity to learn or the desire to push through the hard bits, and we don't have time to invest coaching.

 

Sailing schools teaching foiling skillz will help convert the masses but that is a BAD business to get into

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When people say they're surprised the laser foiling kit hasn't taken off, have any of those people sailed with it?

Also, does anyone know how many have sold?

 

Peraonally I can completely understand why it wouldn't sell but I haven't sailed it and dont know if he sold any.

 

No doubt many people will buy wazps thinking it's a beginner moth, fail a lot...and then there will be plenty of cheap ones around!

 

We run loads of sessions trying to help newbie mothies learn in the UK. Most of them haven't got the capacity to learn or the desire to push through the hard bits, and we don't have time to invest coaching.

 

Sailing schools teaching foiling skillz will help convert the masses but that is a BAD business to get into

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There was a foiling laser on the beach at Sorrento, some pointed and laughed but most people ignored it. I do wonder if the wasp may suffer the same fate after all if you can afford a new one you can probably afford a 2nd hand m2. Hopefully I'm wrong and they sell heaps

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There was a foiling laser on the beach at Sorrento, some pointed and laughed but most people ignored it. I do wonder if the wasp may suffer the same fate after all if you can afford a new one you can probably afford a 2nd hand m2. Hopefully I'm wrong and they sell heaps

 

The OD aspect of it appeals to me, the constant development of the moth would be expensive to keep up with.

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The Waszp is promosed to be priced less than a new Laser plus a Glidefree Foil kit. While both sets of foils are aluminium, I think the Waszp foils will look and function more like modern moth foils. The Waszp will also be half the weight, and almost certainly a better foiler with windward foiling ability, due to less weigh, more righting moment and a better rig.

 

I do not think there is any comparison.

 

The Glidefree kit was aimed at existing laser owners who wanting a new thrill, I think they have sold several hundred. It does foil reasonably well downwind but slows the boat upwind. Its a play thing, not a racing option.

 

The Waszp will measure and can race as a moth. It is intended to be able keep up with the back half of the hot moth fleet, not a slouch, but not a competitive moth. But a good starting point for young aspirants. If they sell enough they may have a new class.

 

Two different markets.

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The olympic moth fantasy has been tried and done. The Bladerider master plan included the olympics but it proved too big a nut to crack against all the existing vested interests. Maybe some of the huge promotion expenditure in that direction contributed to the BR failure, but since AMAC very nearly came undone once I doubt he will be going that way again. He is openly saying the Waszp is aimed at the youth market.

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...

 

If they sell enough they may have a new class.

 

Two different markets.

 

Or a different segment of the same market.

 

 

or perhaps even entry to the 'lympics :blink:

 

So what are you going to drop, the Laser? AMAC vs Rastegar—yeah, right. Can't see how AMAC's quality of life is enhanced by engaging in what would become a relentless shitfight over someone else's wet dream.

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Presumably the Waszp is aimed at youth because they are light, which makes up for the relatively heavy hull? Is the idea to be the 29er of the s/h world?

That's a perfectly decent aim, but means it won't become the volksfoiler for mamils - which may disappoint some.

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Presumably the Waszp is aimed at youth because they are light, which makes up for the relatively heavy hull? Is the idea to be the 29er of the s/h world?

That's a perfectly decent aim, but means it won't become the volksfoiler for mamils - which may disappoint some.

It is aimed to remove a lot of the barriers that currently keep the moth as a working man's weekend plaything, and not a boat that anyone could potentially sail.

 

Amac has said that the boat will absolutely work for bigger guys, with a price that makes it an affordable youth option.

 

There are no guarantees it will become the foiler for the masses, In fact there may never be one.

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There will definitely be a Peoples Foiler(s). Whether the Waszp is one will probably be determined in the next couple of years.

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I had an almost new Bladerider Moth set up on my front beach in Michigan all last summer, sail up most of the time but tied down. I sailed it about 25 times. I had ZERO people walk or drive down the little public front road to ask me about it. ZERO.

 

Cops/Marine patrol came by the first week because it looked like I was "Struggling" and asked me if I needed help. Despite being a "Gerifoiler", I persisted. After a while, it didn't look like "struggling" anymore.

 

see catcobbler.com

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Marketting will have to be different in different countries. In AUS we sail off public beaches or parks and most small boat clubs are built on public land so there are always people passing and some of them do show interest in the boats. I understand that such public waterfront is rare in the US, and the big clubs are behind security fences so attracting passes by is much less likely. The UK has more big dinghy clubs on their own land so it would be different again.

 

In AUS a lot of young people sail conservative boats and the majority give up sailing in their late teens. The WASP might fit their budget and keep them sailing longer. AMAC has sold nearly a thousand moths in about 8 years and has a good idea of what the market wants. He thinks halving the price will open up a new slice of the market. Good luck to him, hope it works.

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I know a teen who recently started sailing a Laser but goes back to a Sabot from time to time because the competition's better. Others are keen to sail fast boats but getting into a skiff is a bit of a leap and needs a crew.

 

A Waszp might be just what they need, especially as a fun machine that can be shared with friends.

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You will just have to wait until its ready.

AMAC is a brilliant engineer and designer but not a marketting type. With Bladerider his engineering was overwelmed by the marketting side of the business, and in the end the business failed due to cost compromised poor engineering after he left the partnership. With Mach2 the marketting side of the business has been minimal and the engineering and manufacturing has been excellent. Its been an infinately more successful venture.

I am sure he wants the WASZP to follow the Mach2 model not the Bladerider model.

We will not see it until he is happy it is right.

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Seems to me a $15k mid–fleet foiler is competing for sales with cast–off Mach2s. Current Mach2 owners might delay replacement with new if they can't get the right price. Someone may not be happy about that.

 

Clever marketting and pricing required… probably some head scratching around supply and demand curves (all hypothetical of course).

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Things that make you go mmmm......

 

Looks like there are no shrouds or forestay. Interesting wishbone boom. Is the stem really concave or is that just the angle the shot is taken.

 

Finally, where are the navigation lights..... :ph34r:

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Must be interesting to try and gybe without a bridle to hold onto...

 

hopefully see some more photos soon!

 

SW

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I have only seen the photo not the boat, just like the rest of you. The unstayed mast obviously is a different section and bends differently to other moth masts so it might take a few tests and recuts to get the sail right. But it does look light and lumpy.

 

I expect that the depth control will still be luff tension like an M2 rig. I do not expect too many controls, this is meant to be a simple budget boat for teenagers.

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Stupid question: how do you straighten the leach with a wishbone boom? I mean, what does the job of the kicker?

Well you can sometimes adjust the mast height position of the boom to result in more vertical downforce at the clew but that only has marginal range.

 

Given the lengthy gestation period and his previous projects, I'm pretty confident that amac will have some sort of solution.

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Going stayless significantly changes the structural loadings of the wings and mast stump area. I doubt you could just drop a stayless rig on an existing hull/wings and expect it to hold together.

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It still looks like a moth (at least a 21st century moth) because it is a moth. Same size. Can still be measured and raced as a moth. But its not a Mach2, same designer, same factory but different hull shape, foils, and wings and mostly different materials. A bit heavier and a lot less money.

 

If they can sell enough WAZPs to enough teenagers they might have a new class. But until then expect to see WAZPs at Moth regattas.

 

More from AMAC soon, especially at Foiling Week.

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you are right, that sounds reasonable (about what you said of the structural loadings and stuff)

 

maybe i got it wrong. i thought the Waszp should be a feeder class significantly different to a Moth, although more or less same siez, easier to handle etc. as a step to a real Moth. like this it seems to me to be the "Volks-Moth" - a "Peoples-Moth" and not a Peoples-Foiler for "masses of amateurs" who wish to foil.

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you are right, that sounds reasonable (about what you said of the structural loadings and stuff)

 

maybe i got it wrong. i thought the Waszp should be a feeder class significantly different to a Moth, although more or less same siez, easier to handle etc. as a step to a real Moth. like this it seems to me to be the "Volks-Moth" - a "Peoples-Moth" and not a Peoples-Foiler for "masses of amateurs" who wish to foil.

 

Ya, I have to agree with that. Dropping some of the strings and the making a less complicated rig it a good idea, but I doubt the boat will be any easier to sail than a Moth. It's a cool boat though, I'd buy one.

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Meanwhile in the UK the second version of the Rocket Raccoon is out again

 

Good looking boat.

 

Could someone explain how this would measure as a moth?

 

With the structure holding the wand out the front, the hull and the structure holding the rudder, does this really fit within the rules?

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Meanwhile in the UK the second version of the Rocket Raccoon is out again

 

Good looking boat.

 

Could someone explain how this would measure as a moth?

 

With the structure holding the wand out the front, the hull and the structure holding the rudder, does this really fit within the rules?

 

The class rules allow 500mm of removable fittings at either end, beyond the LOA of 3.355m, excluding the rudder, which is not measured at all.

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Meanwhile in the UK the second version of the Rocket Raccoon is out again

 

Good looking boat.

 

Could someone explain how this would measure as a moth?

 

With the structure holding the wand out the front, the hull and the structure holding the rudder, does this really fit within the rules?

 

The class rules allow 500mm of removable fittings at either end, beyond the LOA of 3.355m, excluding the rudder, which is not measured at all.

 

 

I thank you for your response.

 

So is the rudder gantry included in this 500mm allowance, and if so how does this pass as being in total less than 500mm?

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Meanwhile in the UK the second version of the Rocket Raccoon is out again

 

Good looking boat.

 

Could someone explain how this would measure as a moth?

 

With the structure holding the wand out the front, the hull and the structure holding the rudder, does this really fit within the rules?

 

The class rules allow 500mm of removable fittings at either end, beyond the LOA of 3.355m, excluding the rudder, which is not measured at all.

 

 

I thank you for your response.

 

So is the rudder gantry included in this 500mm allowance, and if so how does this pass as being in total less than 500mm?

 

 

Yes, the gantry is included, the rudder is not. 500mm is allowed at each end, though the wand counts too so it must fit within the allowance when fully extended forward (so must be restricted from over rotating forward).

 

Most Moths don't use that many strings while racing, most are used to setup for conditions and only small adjustments applied around the track. There's nothing to say a WAZP can't have just as many, even to cant the rig (though it's a more major modification than on a stayed rig stepped on a post).

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Stupid question: how do you straighten the leach with a wishbone boom? I mean, what does the job of the kicker?

short answer is because the wishbone (in a sailboard type geometry) pushes downward.

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Stupid question: how do you straighten the leach with a wishbone boom? I mean, what does the job of the kicker?

short answer is because the wishbone (in a sailboard type geometry) pushes downward.

 

 

stupid question: how so does the wishbone push downward as its main function is to pull outward? Where does it get the leverage from to push downward? How does it build the moment to push in a direction other than its alignment?

Mechanically I don't get it.

Next question: How can this downward push be controlled?

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No booms PUSH outward, esp when square to the mast, with a typical wishbone however they are not square but angled downward so they PUSH that way as well. If you haven't taken a close look/rigged a sailboard Google up some pics.

On boards mast bend varies to amount of tension via outhaul & cunno

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You are right. The mast coupling exerts minimal torque. The wishbone only exerts a force along its alignment. That alignment comprises of vertical and horizontal elements. The vertical element is what pulls the leech while the horizontal element pulls the foot. If the proportionality between these two is not right the sail looks wrong. One way to adjust the proportionality is to change the angle of the boom by raising it up or down the mast.

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I'm not very convinced by the sailboard analogies, some of which are rather out of date. Modern sailboard sails are cut with a very curved luff, to the point that considerable grunt is needed just to insert the mast into the luff tube, which it itself develops substantial mast bend. Then an epic amount of downhaul is applied; many sailors use a ratchet or crane system in order to be able to develop enough force. This has the effect of making most of the luff loose. Something like this image when at rest, The outhaul by contrast carries very little tension, unlike early sailboard sails where the outhaul needed pulling very hard indeed. The luff is then tightened during sailing by the weight of the sailor applying downward force through the harness lines. That latter wouldn't carry into a wishbone system on a boat where the sailor is sitting rather than standing. So - not the same as a sailboard.

 

 

 

 

DSC_7803.jpg

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Forget the sailboard analogy. Look at the WAZP photo. The front (round end) of the wishbone is obviously a lot higher than the back (pointy end), so the load along the wishbone is applying a lot of down loads to the sail leach.

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Hull is designed using t Splines in Rhino ( I think) .

 

Aim was supposedly to have a more natural surface shapes & curvature that in turns allows structural rigidity with lower spec materials & processes.

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What Phil sail. If your boom is at the bottom of the sail you get all foot tension and no leech tension. If you had a crazy wishbone boom that attached to the top of the mast you'd get all leech tension and no foot tension. Put it in the middle and you get a bit of both. Changing the amount of outhaul could pull both the foot and the leech, which may work fairly well.

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either way the boat in the pic clearly has some leech tension. so it must be doing something along the lines of creating leech tension.

 

what I want to know is how you carry it in and out without a boom?

 

Oh wait, you drop the foils through the hull and launch it on a trailer! I remember!

 

Can't but be reminded of what happened to the moth when the laser launched, the huge worlds turn outs disintegrated etc etc as the masses moved to the one design cheapo version.

 

i.e. if the wazp does work it will cannibalise moth sales as people will create a class they can sail that is one design (as that weirdly appeals to some people ;-) and start racing in this new version of a laser. there will be a lot more peopl sailing it than a few students.

 

Amac will sell thousands, or even hundreds of thousands vs just a few hundred and his bank account will be bigger as a result. sounds like smart business to me.

 

my biggest concern is that the folks at Mach 2 will lose focus on making high volume competitive moths, get left behind, and we'll have to go back to waiting 2 years to get decent boats from Messers Ilett and Maguire (or buy cookies crazy skate ramp that doubles as a moth, #lovecookiescrazyshizzle)

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Well the wasp,if is done properly (no reason to think otherwise),may erode a bit of mach2 market,but not that much IMHO.

 

Of the mothies I know,i guess only a couple would move to a cheaper slower one design

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What Phil sail. If your boom is at the bottom of the sail you get all foot tension and no leech tension. If you had a crazy wishbone boom that attached to the top of the mast you'd get all leech tension and no foot tension. Put it in the middle and you get a bit of both. Changing the amount of outhaul could pull both the foot and the leech, which may work fairly well.

 

ok, as I understand, one component of the outward (inline) pull is a leach tension, because the leach is not vertical (assuming a horizontal boom / whishbone).

But there still is not downward push (rectangular to the beam itself).

are we talking the same language here, or am I missing something completely?

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Can't but be reminded of what happened to the moth when the laser launched, the huge worlds turn outs disintegrated etc etc as the masses moved to the one design cheapo version.

 

i.e. if the wazp does work it will cannibalise moth sales as people will create a class they can sail that is one design (as that weirdly appeals to some people ;-) and start racing in this new version of a laser. there will be a lot more peopl sailing it than a few students.

 

 

Not sure you really understand how the Moth class works, or at least how I see it working. We have already tried to create the cheap one design out of foiling Moths and for a brief time, it looked like it might work. We even started organising the first worlds, wrote the class rules and started setting up the class structure. Then a new Moth came out that cost $10,000 more and everybody abandoned their future one design and bought that instead. I really don't see this as real competition for the Moths.

 

Amac will sell thousands, or even hundreds of thousands vs just a few hundred and his bank account will be bigger as a result. sounds like smart business to me.

 

Not sure why some people seem to believe that the demand is so big. This will not be a Laser priced boat - a lot cheaper than a Mach 2 but I don't think we are getting anywhere near mass adoption pricing levels. IIRC correctly, we are looking at something like $4000 more than a Laser (wasn't that the cost of the Laser foiling conversion kit?)

my biggest concern is that the folks at Mach 2 will lose focus on making high volume competitive moths, get left behind,

 

I don't think you know Amac very well. If he isn't working on the next Moth development right now, at the same time as playing with the Wasp, I would be very surprised. I think he is more than capable of playing with both the Wasp and Moth at the same time. And once the Wasp is in production, Amac will need to get his development fix somewhere and that will, I am sure, remain the Moth.

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What Phil sail. If your boom is at the bottom of the sail you get all foot tension and no leech tension. If you had a crazy wishbone boom that attached to the top of the mast you'd get all leech tension and no foot tension. Put it in the middle and you get a bit of both. Changing the amount of outhaul could pull both the foot and the leech, which may work fairly well.

 

In "Performance Advances in Small Boat Racing" (Walker, 1960), Walker talks about the Suicide Class. It was measured on true sail area only, and evolved to the simple wishbone rig. They could change the leech tension by moving the wishbone up the mast with a halyard. This was long before the advent of the modern windsurf rig.....

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The sprit rig as used on ancient dinghies, slow cruising boats and the biggest dinghy clkass in the world, the Opi, is effectivley a one sided wishbone working on the top of the sail. I think the idea dates way way back in sailing history. Look at the 15 century Portugese caravelles or arab dhows to see where the idea came form. Not much new gets invented without some link to the past.

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Will the Foiling Week keynote be recorded?

(Same for the other talks.)

 

Pretty sure it will be streamed, Domenico and Luca are SA lifers and will certainly keep us in the loop. We keep getting close to covering it properly, only to find life gettin' in the way.

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What Phil sail. If your boom is at the bottom of the sail you get all foot tension and no leech tension. If you had a crazy wishbone boom that attached to the top of the mast you'd get all leech tension and no foot tension. Put it in the middle and you get a bit of both. Changing the amount of outhaul could pull both the foot and the leech, which may work fairly well.

 

In "Performance Advances in Small Boat Racing" (Walker, 1960), Walker talks about the Suicide Class. It was measured on true sail area only, and evolved to the simple wishbone rig. They could change the leech tension by moving the wishbone up the mast with a halyard. This was long before the advent of the modern windsurf rig.....

 

On our 1957 Suicide #52 the wishbone attached to a track on the front of the Sitka Spruce rotating wing mast.

Pull down and it tightened foot and leach. However, with that sail area rule the mainsail was an ineffective triangle.

Modern sails would be much more effective.

Dave Ellis

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i guess all wii be revealed soon, but i will ask anyway

 

what weight range are we looking at?

 

or will there be different rig sizrs ? is this why the frrestandng rig ?

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