Peter Johnstone

PLEASE SAY A PRAYER FOR RAINMAKER'S CREW

Recommended Posts

ROFLMAO :lol:

Memories of trying to get a fire out while the on-deck crew would not let us get at the shutoff valve for the stove because they were doing a dip pole jibe or some other sailor type stuff.

 

 

 

On the '84 Bermuda race, our hyd drive reservoir tank decided to split, dumping 15 gallons of hyd oil into the bilges. Since we was a crack IOR race boat, oil saturated & filled every sail bag. Sails went up/down really easily after that, but foredeck wore a harness for all events up there, It washed itself off the deck in 20 minutes or so, left it no worse than worn non skid. Dammit, we sailed that mess to the finish, everyone left in minutes & I got to clean it all up. Just another day in the life.
If that fantastic bail out kit had included a set of large (3' handles) Felco wire cutters, cutting things away would have been a lot easier. Those would easily cut halyards, standing rigging, hyd hoses, almost anything one can get into the jaws.

Secret Love? That whole hydraulic drive was a cluster fuck.

Aaaaarrrgggghhh, fucking hydraulic drives, hate them with a vengeance.
The only thing worse I've seen is multiple driveshafts. Yes, really. Dazzle Dazzle had the engine fed of the DB trunk. Propellor was in normal aft location. Connecting the two were several drive shafts that snaked around the DB trunk and on aft. Shafts rode in pillow blocks, and were connected by U-joints. Seriously. This required carefull alignment, difficult to maintain. On a regular basis, a u-joint would fail, flailing driveshaft would tear out the pillow blocks, and knock the floorboards all over the cabin. Good stuff. Fortunately no one ever got hurt, crew was usually outside rigging a jury rudder or in galley putting out a fire.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's the consensus about the rocket still floating?

 

Speed = Storm Avoidance

The ultimate safety feature is pure speed. Sail around storms. If a storm is unavoidable, safety is derived from the ability to surf sideways. With daggerboards up, the round bottom hulls will skate sideways along waves, and the long high bows offer tremendous reserve buoyancy. We believe mega catamarans are the safest platform for surviving the worst weather.

Ultimate Buoyancy

Six water-tight bulkheads, and a carbon reinforced underbody make flooding very unlikely. The composite laminate’s foam core acts as the ultimate reserve buoyancy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know that cameras make any sea look smaller, but 20 ft? Like I said on the other list, it looks like a typical Summer's day in the Gulf of the Farallones, minus the white caps.

 

 

How big are those seas folks? 10 feet?

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/iwaybuyeryfrtdb/IMG_0553.jpg?dl=0

 

Crew said 6 meters (19.7 ft). Cameras are really deceptive when it comes to wave height.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

How big are those seas folks? 10 feet?

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/iwaybuyeryfrtdb/IMG_0553.jpg?dl=0

 

Crew said 6 meters (19.7 ft). Cameras are really deceptive when it comes to wave height.

 

 

Captain said "seas around 15": http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=163514&page=11#entry4856232

 

Whats the height from water level to top of the pilot house

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*cruising so calmly at 18-20knts*

 

On any sail powered vessel that’s an oxymoron surely?

 

That and running fishing tackle off the boat at night while sailing too...!

 

During delivery passages...night sailing for me denotes ultra-conservatism of boat, rig and crew… During main day daylight hours with the team all on deck, well fed and rested - tis a different set-up - and a time to push on again.

 

Dusk+ 1hr I run minimal red or green light only topside as/when… and all nav/tech help lowest light level only. Once outside of the cockpit its crew attached to safety lines in any level of swell. (Usually me as I’m fully alone)

 

Recreational distraction isn’t high on the agenda. Keeping a keen eye down track and on the rig is....till jmy 4 hours is up.

 

Getting a fishing line wrap on a prop can indeed be a Cat progress killer when you need those engines to do their stuff. Losing one motor bad, losing two? Either you’re very, very unlucky… or perhaps just a wee bit to cavalier.

 

@ Fromtas agreed. I always thought that ‘Storm Avoidance' marketing soundbite on Gunboat’s website arrogant beyond sensible credulity.

 

Let’s hope they modify it as a point of some urgency.

 

Finally, glad all the SC Rainmaker crew made it to shore safely, all in one piece and once more top marks to the (USCG) and how they tirelessly risk all to get mariners out of trouble. Just goes to show trying to get help from a commercial vessel not always a given...best policy.

 

If in doubt don’t. There is no shame to sticking well within your skill set zone.

 

“Gung Ho” has no place on my deck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TwoLegged, You missed 2 other helm positions on cats.

4. Flybridge

5. Semi-flybridge

 

Actually all helm positions in all the sailboats end up in undesirable places. The trick is to find the least undesirable to you. Boats are compromises.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nautitech and Catana have dual helm positions aft, Catana 39 has tiller steering fairly aftward, and Outremer has a tiller option

 

 

I'm torn between which is more desirable on a cat - outside helm which puts your more in tune with local conditions, but exposes you to more weather and potentially greater chance of fatigue, MOB, etc, OR inside which may isolate you somewhat but keeps crew warm, dry, rested, and no chance of MOB. Also, if a rig is going to come down, I guess Id prefer to have a solid pilot-house roof over my head .. - remember the Mousetrap dismasting? Giant cat (110ft?), engineer was driving from the flybridge, cap shroud killed him as rig went over…. There's a good argument that close attention to wind, speed, and radar instruments inside a pilot-house are a fairly close/safe alternative to being outside as far as spotting and feeling conditions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the bulkhead helm position with bimini if it works but some have limited visibility or access to the gear.

On the other hand I like Catanas. :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Florida, a pilot house is pretty much a solar oven. I can see why they're popular in the PNW, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice inside on a hot day with the AC on.

Adlard Coles back in the 70s had a pertinent chapter or two on some these issues, I am sure the body of knowledge since has only grown.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Going to sea in any conditions inside the living room (as in GB 55) seems like a recipe for disaster. How can a deck watch possibly be expected to have any feel for the real wind and sea condition from inside the enclosure, likely on autopilot with sheets cleated or in self tailers? The Nantucket rescue is attracting much deserved criticism, and it seems to me these "experienced" sailors took the same risks, albeit, in what is claimed to be an unsinkable catamaran that may well have sunk. And we now have criticism discouraged.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, just can't resist reposting (again, I know) the greatest transocean cat video ever. It seems the original (what's the opposite of "disruptive"?) cat designers new a thing or two after all about open water sailing - hulls you can close, open-deck working space, simple and reliable tech, and open-air sailing stations - who new?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice inside on a hot day with the AC on.

Adlard Coles back in the 70s had a pertinent chapter or two on some these issues, I am sure the body of knowledge since has only grown.

how many BTUs can the A/C make with the generator running continuously? Fine if you're plugged into shore power... on the water, not so likely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, just can't resist reposting (again, I know) the greatest transocean cat video ever. It seems the original (what's the opposite of "disruptive"?) cat designers new a thing or two after all about open water sailing - hulls you can close, open-deck working space, simple and reliable tech, and open-air sailing stations - who new?

 

Somehow, I think they spent less than two million dollars - yet still had a better time of it than the PaneBreaker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Privilege 39 I sailed had two helm stations all the way aft. I really liked that setup - I had a good feel for wind and sea, I could see the sails, I could see the waves, and I could see the crew. The cars with steering right at the aft end of the cabin have all crew work going on behind you. Also easy to dock.

Privilege39_nsyv1.jpg

 

Nautitech and Catana have dual helm positions aft, Catana 39 has tiller steering fairly aftward, and Outremer has a tiller option

 

 

I'm torn between which is more desirable on a cat - outside helm which puts your more in tune with local conditions, but exposes you to more weather and potentially greater chance of fatigue, MOB, etc, OR inside which may isolate you somewhat but keeps crew warm, dry, rested, and no chance of MOB. Also, if a rig is going to come down, I guess Id prefer to have a solid pilot-house roof over my head .. - remember the Mousetrap dismasting? Giant cat (110ft?), engineer was driving from the flybridge, cap shroud killed him as rig went over…. There's a good argument that close attention to wind, speed, and radar instruments inside a pilot-house are a fairly close/safe alternative to being outside as far as spotting and feeling conditions?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like the Maine Cat 41. It has a full length bridgedeck bimini but really it's a hardtop. All the controls lead to the sheltered helm. It has strataglass windows so you can have the elements in the cockpit or not. Really cool. It's a bit like the GB 55 but not quite. Daggerboards too! They are supposed to be better than average boats.

So is that 8 undesireable helm locations? :D

post-99161-0-29879300-1425173945_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like open bridge deck cats myself. But that implies open - as in being able to look up at the luff of your sail. The entire luff.

 

Steering from under a ceiling - just don't get it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just need a camera on the sails, p.i.p. with the tv while driving, easy, can be twittering away same time about how cool it is

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I loved sailing my Mainecat most of the time. The overhead hatch permitted sighting the luff. The shelter enabled a comfortable and alert watch. The steering was very good via draglink and no cables or hydraulics (a highly attractive feature that is head and shoulders over any other method). The hardtop is a great sun protection and highly appreciated as one who has had the dermatologist carve on my face a few times. Even in hot weather, the ability to get flow through ventilation eliminates any real need for AC.

 

I did occasionally miss being outside while sailing but not most of the time either offshore or in the PNW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The Privilege 39 I sailed had two helm stations all the way aft. I really liked that setup - I had a good feel for wind and sea, I could see the sails, I could see the waves, and I could see the crew. The cars with steering right at the aft end of the cabin have all crew work going on behind you. Also easy to dock.

Privilege39_nsyv1.jpg

 

I personally think this is one of the best helm arrangements for a cruising catamaran, but none of the manufacturers seem to agree any more. The older Catanas like our 48 have a similar helm arrangement. The newer Catanas have the helms further outboard up on the deck, which seems a little exposed to me.

 

I like the dual helms. In snotty weather, the leeward one is relatively sheltered if you have a decent bimini. Certainly as sheltered and more stable than on the average mono-hull. The leeward one also gives you a reasonable view and weather feel and good access to the sheet winch and main sheet winch (depending on main sheet layout). And as pointed out above, everything is happening in front of you where you can easily see it (well except maybe the windward bow depending on your height and the cabin roof height).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

The Privilege 39 I sailed had two helm stations all the way aft. I really liked that setup - I had a good feel for wind and sea, I could see the sails, I could see the waves, and I could see the crew. The cars with steering right at the aft end of the cabin have all crew work going on behind you. Also easy to dock.

Privilege39_nsyv1.jpg

 

I personally think this is one of the best helm arrangements for a cruising catamaran, but none of the manufacturers seem to agree any more. The older Catanas like our 48 have a similar helm arrangement. The newer Catanas have the helms further outboard up on the deck, which seems a little exposed to me.

 

I like the dual helms. In snotty weather, the leeward one is relatively sheltered if you have a decent bimini. Certainly as sheltered and more stable than on the average mono-hull. The leeward one also gives you a reasonable view and weather feel and good access to the sheet winch and main sheet winch (depending on main sheet layout). And as pointed out above, everything is happening in front of you where you can easily see it (well except maybe the windward bow depending on your height and the cabin roof height).

 

 

it looks good, but the forward cockpit on the bigger GB's also works very nicely - it might be a little bit harder to see the main, but forward visibility and general situational awareness is excellent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't subscibe to the notion that one has to be lashed to the tiller, gazing steely eyed into the elements while ones chest hair ripples in the breeze in order to sense a change in the weather and I don't believe there is any evidence that the inside steering station, insulating the crew from the elements, contributed to Rainmaker's dismasting. If I recall, the on-deck crew saw the squall approaching but did not believe it would be any different from the previous squalls, which the boat was handling well, and so did not feel the need to shorten sail. That the squall was a white-out was not the fault of the crew being dry and comfortable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am I doing something wrong??,...or explain why I can not post a webpage link??

When I 'paste' it to the reply it does not show up, and when I try to link the blank posting I get a dialog box that gets stuck and does let you escape??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

don't know about your specific problems.., but there is a button specifically for inserting a URL - it looks like a chain

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am I doing something wrong??,...or explain why I can not post a webpage link??

 

When I 'paste' it to the reply it does not show up, and when I try to link the blank posting I get a dialog box that gets stuck and does let you escape??

 

you are trying to post something from a stupid page

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am I doing something wrong??,...or explain why I can not post a webpage link??

 

When I 'paste' it to the reply it does not show up, and when I try to link the blank posting I get a dialog box that gets stuck and does let you escape??

 

Posting a web page link is as easy as using the 'Paste' feature (CTRL-v or right click/Paste in Windows). Sounds like you didn't copy the url you think you did? Can you paste it into an email or text message? Like this:

 

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=163512&p=4862896

 

The chain/link icon is used when you want to highlight a word or phrase and make it a link. A URL is supplied (pasted) in a dialog box but is otherwise hidden from view.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Weird.
I was trying to present some discussion about the forward cockpit feature. One of the links I had hoped to enter was a gallery page from Gold Coast Yachts on the 57' catamaran "Shearwater", a vessel that was built and owned by a friend of mine.

When I clicked to copy the link page, then clicked to paste it into the forum discussion, I got no indication that the link had been added,...just a blank spot. When I subsequently clicked on the link icon, a window popped up inviting me to enter a webpage link. I did so, then tried to move on,..BUT no other option on that little window would let me move on. I could not even cancel the operation, nothing at all. Everything I tried to do on my computer at that point was now FROZEN !! I could not get off that window, nor move onto anything else. I utimately had to physically hit the off button on my laptop and shut the computer down.

So I began to think it must have something to do with my computer. I subsequentlt decided to run Malwarebytes and my AVG programs, even while I had run both only days ago. They brought up NO PROBLEMS. I waited for a day, then tried again this morning to do a simple operation like post the webpage link, BUT same thing happened??

Sorry I am no computer techie, so I don't understand what is happening. BTW I have been posting on a number of boating forums for the past 15 years, and never ran across a problem like this. I've even posted a number of postings to this forum, and i believe without any similar problems??

 

BTW, this particular posting went very smoothly,....as long as I didn't have some sort of weblink i was trying to enter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Experiment with posting a link

http://www.goldcoastyachts.com/

 

http://www.goldcoastyachts.com/Yachts-Sailing/GC57C/GC57C-gallery.htm

 

 

Interesting,...I just utilized Firefox rather the IE as my browser, and the links posted correctly??....fucking Microsoft crap

 

Sometimes pages use scripts that paste links with code, and that code gets interpreted by the board in a way that makes the link or quote all wonky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Experiment with posting a link

http://www.goldcoastyachts.com/

 

http://www.goldcoastyachts.com/Yachts-Sailing/GC57C/GC57C-gallery.htm

 

 

Interesting,...I just utilized Firefox rather the IE as my browser, and the links posted correctly??....fucking Microsoft crap

 

Try Google Chrome. I have ditched IE and Firefox now; Chrome is light years faster, and no more problems like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was trying to paste text here before and it was a nogo. I can do it on other forums. Maybe IE and SA are not friends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another option for steering a big cat is a pop top, a sliding hatch in the center of the aft cockpit roof.

 

img_4502.jpg

 

This is a photo of Garuça, a cat designed and built by a couple in Brazil who have made it to Bali on their circumnavigation. No professional crew, just a dog. They entered the Pacific via the Beagle Channel. Very cool boat. You can see more at http://svsophie.com/2014/11/08/guruca-a-very-cool-cat/

 

There is an Ozzie family currently cruising on the other side of Papua on the aluminum cat Nalukai, and the original owner of that boat circumnavigated with a similar pop top arrangement.

 

I'm out circumnavigating (Seattle to Indonesia so far) with my wife and kids on a Lagoon 500, which has a flybridge. The positives: 360° visibility, direct access to all sail controls, great feel for weather conditions, and believe it or not you are actually protected from most waves up there. The downside (I guess now) is the risk of getting killed if the rig comes down and the fact that you are isolated from the cabin. Which isn't a downside when the kids are loud.

 

We can drive the boat from the main salon, but we NEVER do that if it's blowing. You get no feel for the boat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I.E. is a nightmare and totally useless. Now has less than 15% market share and for very good reasons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm partial to the Gold Coast helm location, centerline on the back beam. Easy to run all lines to one central location, good all around visibility, decent protection, close to the cockpit action. I haven't seen it executed on a nice cat but I'd love to. The trailing edge of the deckhouse makes for a great team sailing location too. It's sorta like maxi tri/mod/ORMA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if this thread went as Peter expected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*I wonder if this thread went as Peter expected*

One is assuming he has the time/inclination to read it fully…. I doubt it. Though there is a lot of blather in many of the posts on SA, much of it (for me) is highly entertaining during my coffee breaks, when shore side.… The flip side being smart thoughts of pure gold lurk in here too, in amongst the waffle.

I wonder if there is a ‘pan-handling-browser-algo’ for that?

To date I’ve crewed/sailed four big cats, all offshore… mucho nautical miles across the Mediterranean, Indian Ocean, Atlantic and the Caribbean seas.

In no particular order, a bespoke one-off G-51 alloy monster, looked like a hummer (a real pig)…. A Switch 51, (well founded circumnav’er), an R&C Moorings 4600 (a caravan dog) and then this year/last year extensive time on a Fountaine Pajot Belize - a tough boat that sailed very nicely, the owners mods carefully thought through all adding operational value.

I’ve had look-sees, and social time on Catanas mainly owned by krauts, a Lagoon also…. and another hard-core circumnav’er yacht, a St. Francis 50, which I had a fun evening on. Below decks she was a tad HMS Dreadnought not much natural light at all, but heck in heavy weather she’ll likely get you through. A chum of mine is currently crewing on ‘TANG’ a hybrid TAG60 currently in NZ, she likes/rates it muchly. So if I can get a ride offer for that I'll take it like a shot.

All of them had different takes/shakes on the helm position dilemma, mostly single stations, and with the newer boats doubling up wheels would seem to be in fashion… I have yet to come across something that is perfect, but being inside only… with no wheel function outside…apart from flipping a hatch? Not sure at all about that, then again I’ve never been on a Gunboat55. Maybe it’s brilliant in practice.

 

I'm sensing compromise being part of the deal, and what an owner/users main use brief is. The issue with seeing the complete front of the boat is only vital for docking tricky/tight marina sides and mooring buoy anchorages, or tight natural harbour entry/exit points… Height of viewing station then quickly comes into play, the higher the better.

The Belize has a step-up platform and a zip through panel pop/top in the Bimini structure. However if its bad weather or uber beating scorchio sun, you tend not to leave it pop’d for too long. It’s a bad step height with the panel closed… If you be tall, at 5’9” I have to stoop, so a strapping six foot plus chap, you’re gonnna be compressed even more. Not a good look.

When underway getting eyes on the rig is never going to be a make/break design issue as long as you get off your arse and move out of the cockpit if need be. If the weather is bad, with the right offshore clothing no problem being out there at all. Though hull structure wind dynamic protection is smart if its built in.

None of the large Cat’s I’ve driven have had bow-thrusters on. Yes I know and do use two throttles but trying to hold a large high-sided, heavy cruising cat, 90° on pre getting the warps locked in a 20knt+ direct crosswind, with a small gap betwixt you and two other vessels front/back is not easy. Especially with no shore help at all, or a pontoon monkey that knows not the deal with mooring lines pdq, and only understands Spanish which you don’t speak.

My other thoughts…? Fly bridges, appendages, accoutrements, widgets, panels anything in fact that sits proud of the main saloon superstructure height within easy swing smash reach of the boom would be a no go for me. We ran a preventer on the Belize boom as a matter of course. The main on most Cats being the power house, the loads are considerable. The newer designs are starting to get the rig ratio more akin to monohulls with equally large draw jibs.

However for a 50-60s retired couple or 30-40s cruisng family speed isn’t going to be the main driver… getting there safely is. So are the designers whom are creating these extreme speed boats truly in tune with their market buyers? The racing crowd tis a totally different ball game.

In churning big seas it’s a given, you’ll head into it or run it… quite a feeling on a 50ft cat when behind you is just a wall of water of breaking above head height… and you start scooting down the rollers, as we did heading for the apex off Cape Agulhas. (yes the camera is flatening this out)

3yp9cpo.jpg

Keeping good control progress on… means a lot of water bounce up-flow into the front face core structure is the result. A large amount of open exposed glass at this stress point, to the full force of weather is not going to end well at all, defo if things break loose. On the back in the protected lower pressure zones no problem having the big panel glazing.

I like the thinking on the yet to launch Le Breton SIG60…. and also thought the older design more trad’ looking Gunboat60 set-up seemed better founded. The more a Cat looks like an exposed high-superstructure, large window caravan in big seas… in the words of McEnroe…

“YOU CANNOT BE SERIOUS..”

Ditto this new-fond obsession with de-masting them and turning them into motor-cruisers?

The minute we can get any main sail up we do. Why? It instantly eases the shake, twist, rattle and roll of the vessel. The wind driven energy pushing through the hulls makes the transit immediately far more safe/comfortable… Who in their right mind messes with that?

A good overview of current cruising cats here, test pdf’s too if you pay for them.

http://www.multihulls-world.com/us/001020-New-reviews/11-The-boat-reviews.htm

Happy huntin’ if you’re looking for a new Cat, or have recently lost one…;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Sorry, just can't resist reposting (again, I know) the greatest transocean cat video ever. It seems the original (what's the opposite of "disruptive"?) cat designers new a thing or two after all about open water sailing - hulls you can close, open-deck working space, simple and reliable tech, and open-air sailing stations - who new?

 

Somehow, I think they spent less than two million dollars - yet still had a better time of it than the PaneBreaker.

 

photo3.JPG

It did last longer than RM, but did end up with a problem. Seems there was a weak point in the original design, has happened to at least two Tiki 38's. Design has since been reinforced.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't call the Tiki 38 the definitive cat or that vid the "greatest transocean cat video ever". Lots of other cats have done passages and many have circumnavigated and most are very different designs than this one. And there are many vids out there of many different cats in heavy weather. If you want an open bridgedeck cat then buy one. I would prefer just a little protection from the elements and most mono sailors agree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't call the Tiki 38 the definitive cat or that vid the "greatest transocean cat video ever". Lots of other cats have done passages and many have circumnavigated and most are very different designs than this one. And there are many vids out there of many different cats in heavy weather. If you want an open bridgedeck cat then buy one. I would prefer just a little protection from the elements and most mono sailors agree.

Most monohull sailors agree on what ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"a little protection from the elements"

Cool, so multihull or monohull, we all agree, its a good thing, to have protection, from the weather when offshore...

 

Agreed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Bobby Perry! E.D. Here

 

Hope you haven't blocked me.

 

I wished you would have weighed in on the Rainmaker thread. I know you keenly watched it.

 

Design brief versus marketing claims, etc. pretty interesting stuff.

 

Let's say you designed a Cat for Bvis chartering and then your customer marketed it as a blue water circumnavigator.

I mean a serious blue water high latitudes short crew circumnavigator.

One day your design blows up in spectacular fashion on a routine mid latitudes delivery and it's splashed all over the internet on a half assed website.

WTF? You would be pissed, no?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a rumor floating around that Rainmaker has been located. I give it high confidence that it's true, but no idea of her state or whether any salvage assets have been called in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry about that half assed comment Mr Clean. That was uncalled for and I regret it and apologize.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you're a good something edith....was gonna say man, sorry. 3 hail marys should do it.

 

Hope the RainMaker is in Ireland. Helluva place, great grazin.

 

Thinking Spanish Point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can we stop praying now? No one gave the signal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a rumor floating around that Rainmaker has been located. I give it high confidence that it's true, but no idea of her state or whether any salvage assets have been called in.

 

 

and???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw a picture. Was told it was taken from a passing ship. Bridge deck top is gone. Sides also look like they were gone but hard to see. Boat was almost awash.

 

 

That's all I got right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I saw a picture. Was told it was taken from a passing ship. Bridge deck top is gone. Sides also look like they were gone but hard to see. Boat was almost awash.

 

 

That's all I got right now.

 

 

 

I saw a picture. Was told it was taken from a passing ship. Bridge deck top is gone. Sides also look like they were gone but hard to see. Boat was almost awash.

 

 

That's all I got right now.

 

Where? Can we see it too?!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not my picture I just saw it. And to clarify I was saying the sides to the bridge deck top looked like they were missing. Hull looked like it was all there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not my picture I just saw it. And to clarify I was saying the sides to the bridge deck top looked like they were missing. Hull looked like it was all there.

 

So... the mast falling down broke a support for the bridge deck top and later, after abandonment, the entire salon was ripped off the boat by waves and wind.

 

Sounds like a vulnerable, weak structure to begin with? And if the cascade of damage from the mast also prevented closing the hatch to one of the hulls, it could have been unpleasant as a life raft (though not as unpleasant as a real life raft!). Wonder how long it took before the top came off? After the men bailed out, the boat apparently saw much worse weather, bigger seas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Warm fuzzies all around. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

There's a rumor floating around that Rainmaker has been located. I give it high confidence that it's true, but no idea of her state or whether any salvage assets have been called in.

Pics or it did not happen....another damn Clean tease !!!!!!!!!...........Anyone follow up on this statement !!. C'mon Clean ..did they find ( i'm guessing she was scuttled).... OH LOOK A BRIGHT SHINY ORANGE THING !!!!! THAT FLIES........

 

I just read in Latitude 38 that PJ stated in an interview in St Barts that Rainmaker was spotted 150 miles south of her last known position two months ago . They did a search of the area but could not find her.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the latest Gunboat Newsletter:

 

RAINMAKER AT LARGE

c6ad1167-4a0d-418a-ad2c-126b740227a8.jpg

RAINMAKER as last seen off the coast of Georgia

Nearly four months after GUNBOAT 5501 was abandoned off the coast of North Carolina, RAINMAKER remains afloat and tending to herself in nearly the same location she was left. Last spotted by a passing mariner 200 miles off the coast of Savannah, the sleek silver hull has withstood everything the severe winter weather dished out. Help us find her, and we'll be happy to make RAINMAKER your perfect fixer-upper. After a full review of design and safety parameters, production on the award winning 55 Series continues to roll. For further details on the incident, including remarks from Peter Johnstone, check out Yachting World'srecent update.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No Mad, it is still floating around aimlessly and hiding from rescuers.

 

It will go bump one night soon :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The pictures has surfaced. Picture GB used in their newsletter was same picture I saw about a month ago.

Not my picture I just saw it. And to clarify I was saying the sides to the bridge deck top looked like they were missing. Hull looked like it was all there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marketing team now smoking crack on a regular basis? The spin is now out of control!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The pictures has surfaced. Picture GB used in their newsletter was same picture I saw about a month ago.

 

Not my picture I just saw it. And to clarify I was saying the sides to the bridge deck top looked like they were missing. Hull looked like it was all there.

The photo is now over two months old. I'm surprised it hasn't been seen again. Traffic in those parts is picking up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marketing team now smoking crack on a regular basis? The spin is now out of control!

 

link?

 

i want to read this out of control spin....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Marketing team now smoking crack on a regular basis? The spin is now out of control!

 

link?

 

i want to read this out of control spin....

 

 

I Presume he was referencing the quote in post #783, the one with 'From the latest Gunboat Newsletter:' at the top.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Marketing team now smoking crack on a regular basis? The spin is now out of control!

 

link?

 

i want to read this out of control spin....

 

 

I Presume he was referencing the quote in post #783, the one with 'From the latest Gunboat Newsletter:' at the top.

 

 

i think the "fixer-upper" part is a joke...

 

the boat _is_ still floating.., and i don't think pointing that out constitutes "out of control spin"...

 

PJ says they have reviewed the design and build - no surprise there...

 

then he says they are continuing to build them - and there is a photo of a new one on the FB page.., so i guess that's true too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was that recorded before or after Rainmaker's "issue". Really that was a piss poor review regardless: camera didn't go anywhere in the boat, no description of the systems other than the winch/wheel area, seems like posh boy got an all-expenses paid vac for 6 minutes of nothing. Come on, was there really nothing he didn't like about the boat?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Main review is in the mag.

Do you have a subscription?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course it is.

Being unsinkable, it will be out there forever unless it gets towed out of the environment, all the way to DFG.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites