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Actor Colin Firth has been chosen to play the part of doomed round-the

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http://www.classicboat.co.uk/news/colin-firth-to-play-donald-crowhurst-in-new-film/

 

According to a recent story on guardian.co.uk, the sceen play, as yet untitled, is being written by Scott Z Burns (Bourne Ultimatum etc). It will be directed by James Marsh (The Theory of Everything) and star Colin Firth (The King’s Speech, Bridget Jones’s Diary) as Donald Crowhurst, with Kate Winslet (Titanic, Shakespeare in Love) as wife Clare Crowhurst.

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Wow! That should be an interesting flick. I read that book when I was really depressed. It cheered me up. I thought, I'm depressed but I'm not as depressed as this guy.

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Epic tragedy on a grand scale IMHO. I'm waiting for the Royal Shakespeare Company to perform it or the Opera. Great cast of characters, an impossible voyage, conquest and victory in stark contrast to the tragic, sad undoing of a man. Biased being a sailor of course, but one of the great stories in Sailing Lore.

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Since they have so little to go on (just his ramblings in his logs as he tried to keep up the fiction) I wonder how the writers are going to tell the story we never heard and weren't there to see?

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Since they have so little to go on (just his ramblings in his logs as he tried to keep up the fiction) I wonder how the writers are going to tell the story we never heard and weren't there to see?

The same way they know all about those conversations aboard ship in The Perfect Storm... They make it up. ITS THE MOVIES !
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Deep Water was one of the saddest things I have ever seen. At the end of the movie they show the boat washed up on Cayman Brac and the locals say the boat is haunted.

Can you imagine how bad it would suck to kill yourself to get off the boat and then end up right back on the boat anway :o

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Fakeing all the numbers and math for the position logs he needed to keep to document the route was a feat. Upon finishing the logs would have been all been reviewed and numbers checked so it had to be beleveable. Loss of boat and skipper without a trace was mentioned numerous times like it was fairly commen back then.

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Deep Water was one of the saddest things I have ever seen. At the end of the movie they show the boat washed up on Cayman Brac and the locals say the boat is haunted.

Can you imagine how bad it would suck to kill yourself to get off the boat and then end up right back on the boat anway :o

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From 5000 BC all the way at least into the 1980s being lost at sea with no one ever finding out what happened was not unusual.

Fakeing all the numbers and math for the position logs he needed to keep to document the route was a feat. Upon finishing the logs would have been all been reviewed and numbers checked so it had to be beleveable. Loss of boat and skipper without a trace was mentioned numerous times like it was fairly commen back then.

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Of course they are going to create some parts. They have to or, all we have for the story is the ships logs. As a writer, I'm curious how they will flesh out what happened "out there", where there were no witnesses, no one to really know the story.

 

I'm hoping they stick to what is most real, what is plausable, what most likely have happened. I don't think they have to turn this into some reality TV type movie, where they make up conflicts and problems that weren't there in the first place. From what I know of the story, from seeing the documentary, what is there should be more than enough.

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Fakeing all the numbers and math for the position logs he needed to keep to document the route was a feat. Upon finishing the logs would have been all been reviewed and numbers checked so it had to be beleveable. Loss of boat and skipper without a trace was mentioned numerous times like it was fairly commen back then.

I actually did this as my final project for my celestial navigation course in college.

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Of course they are going to create some parts. They have to or, all we have for the story is the ships logs. As a writer, I'm curious how they will flesh out what happened "out there", where there were no witnesses, no one to really know the story.

 

I'm hoping they stick to what is most real, what is plausable, what most likely have happened. I don't think they have to turn this into some reality TV type movie, where they make up conflicts and problems that weren't there in the first place. From what I know of the story, from seeing the documentary, what is there should be more than enough.

 

They have the well-documented back story, with his early career, his family, his business partners and sponsors, and the other race participants and how Crowhurst's reported position affected their strategy. This had been covered in the books "Race for Madmen" "The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst" (and others), as well as the documentary "Deep Water".

 

I would love to see this new film, and I think Firth and Winslet are well-suited to the roles.

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It just never gets less haunting every time you read the story. It's curious reading this Guardian account that Donald's death seems more of a tragedy for Clare than the loss of her son James. And maybe this isn't the case, but I wonder to what extent the extraordinary circumstances of Donald's death and the log books made it so much worse. I hope the movie covers the race well, with suitable appearances by the real RKJ, like Lauda in Rush. Moitessier is such a great angle too.

 

Crowhurst haunts us all.

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It just never gets less haunting every time you read the story. It's curious reading this Guardian account that Donald's death seems more of a tragedy for Clare than the loss of her son James. And maybe this isn't the case, but I wonder to what extent the extraordinary circumstances of Donald's death and the log books made it so much worse. I hope the movie covers the race well, with suitable appearances by the real RKJ, like Lauda in Rush. Moitessier is such a great angle too.

 

Crowhurst haunts us all.

Nah, I'd like the full motion picture experience. The rest of that stuff was covered pretty well in 'deep water'

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Two things that stuck with me from Deep Water:

1. There is film of Crowhurst sailing before the start. He looks like someone I would not let rent a Sunfish for a day without a chase boat. How the hell ANYONE thought he wasn't on a suicide mission I do not know. He looked like he knew nothing about sailing and the boat looked half finished. Kind of an early Rimas without the astounding run of good luck.

2. The footage of his wife and kids is horribly sad. I don't think any of them will ever be over this.

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Fakeing all the numbers and math for the position logs he needed to keep to document the route was a feat. Upon finishing the logs would have been all been reviewed and numbers checked so it had to be beleveable. Loss of boat and skipper without a trace was mentioned numerous times like it was fairly commen back then.

I actually did this as my final project for my celestial navigation course in college.

 

 

I think this is quite complicated.

 

First, I can conceptually understand how one might 'work backwards' from a known position and calculate what should be recorded (such as angles). Those calculations would be based on exactly correlating a position with angles measured.

 

But in the real world (having tried celestial navigation a few times) no measurement is perfect. So it would be necessary to introduce error into all the measurements. Just the right amount of error to be convincing. Humans are intrinsically very poor at that type of work.

 

The error introduced needs to be randomly distributed around some mean, in a completely random pattern but still falling within the statistical distribution for error. A plot of the error versus actual position would (almost certainly) indicate some bias in some direction, too much consistency of error or not enough consistency. In all, very, very difficult to fake actual data.

 

I recall an article in the NYTimes on how faking school test results were detected. The test scores weren't perfect (an obvious sign of fakes!) but the distribution of the errors wasn't entirely random. That was the give-away.

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i have vague memories of a james caan? film

 

where he goes mad on a drifting boat alone

 

movie ends with him diving down into the water clutching the sextant and chronograph...

 

haven't been able to find trace of the movie

 

anyone any ideas?

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Maybe he never got dead and is living as a woman somewhere in key west.

Interesting twist. Right up Hollywood :s alley.

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Maybe he never got dead and is living as a woman somewhere in key west.

Interesting twist. Right up Hollywood :s alley.

And, I would argue, make the story less interesting. Such is Hollywood.

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Two things that stuck with me from Deep Water:

1. There is film of Crowhurst sailing before the start. He looks like someone I would not let rent a Sunfish for a day without a chase boat. How the hell ANYONE thought he wasn't on a suicide mission I do not know. He looked like he knew nothing about sailing and the boat looked half finished. Kind of an early Rimas without the astounding run of good luck.

2. The footage of his wife and kids is horribly sad. I don't think any of them will ever be over this.

 

Yes, it was a very sad doco, got me.

 

As to 1, what is with the hatches not sealing that was irreparable? He was an engineer and likely somewhat more skilled than Rimas.

 

Did he not have caulk, screws, etc. on board?

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I love the irony of this post: the pics are of what was once a high-tech multihull boat, that sailed in a high profile race by a guy who may have been an inexperienced sailor but a vain self promoter TAKEN by an unassuming middle aged guy who was an experienced sailor who decided to build the smallest, simplest multihull imaginable and take it on an epic voyage with no hint of hubris or self promotion.

Teignmouth Electron, circa 2009:

 

The blog from which these are taken: http://turtleislands.net/tmc/18.html

 

te1.jpg

 

 

 

te2.jpg

 

te3.jpg

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Two things that stuck with me from Deep Water:

1. There is film of Crowhurst sailing before the start. He looks like someone I would not let rent a Sunfish for a day without a chase boat. How the hell ANYONE thought he wasn't on a suicide mission I do not know. He looked like he knew nothing about sailing and the boat looked half finished. Kind of an early Rimas without the astounding run of good luck.

2. The footage of his wife and kids is horribly sad. I don't think any of them will ever be over this.

I need to buy you a beer one of these days.

 

Pretty much sums up my thoughts exactly. Dude wasn't right from the git go.

 

Seemed far in over his head for sure, but maybe a case of Dunning-Kruger.

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I suspect that Crowhurst did what so many folks battling mental illness do- embarked on a snowballing bad decision cascade, starting with the making the decision to race too late with too little money,all his hopes pinned on the prize, in the delusion that he could finish in the money. That snowball started accelerating after the start, likely exacerbated by fatigue. I suspect his opinion of himself was very closely tied to the promises he made and the stories he told before departure, and I suspect that the greatness of failure was hugely magnified in his own mind to the point that there was no other way out with any honour.

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Fakeing all the numbers and math for the position logs he needed to keep to document the route was a feat. Upon finishing the logs would have been all been reviewed and numbers checked so it had to be beleveable. Loss of boat and skipper without a trace was mentioned numerous times like it was fairly commen back then.

I actually did this as my final project for my celestial navigation course in college.

 

I think this is quite complicated.

 

First, I can conceptually understand how one might 'work backwards' from a known position and calculate what should be recorded (such as angles). Those calculations would be based on exactly correlating a position with angles measured.

 

But in the real world (having tried celestial navigation a few times) no measurement is perfect. So it would be necessary to introduce error into all the measurements. Just the right amount of error to be convincing. Humans are intrinsically very poor at that type of work.

 

The error introduced needs to be randomly distributed around some mean, in a completely random pattern but still falling within the statistical distribution for error. A plot of the error versus actual position would (almost certainly) indicate some bias in some direction, too much consistency of error or not enough consistency. In all, very, very difficult to fake actual data.

 

I recall an article in the NYTimes on how faking school test results were detected. The test scores weren't perfect (an obvious sign of fakes!) but the distribution of the errors wasn't entirely random. That was the give-away.

Yes people are bad at making up random data. Benford's Law can be used in this situation. Calculating the perfect sights was not a bear if I recall correctly, but was a long time ago. Introducing proper "pseudo" randomness is easy with the aid of a computer. But knowledge of benford's law and using a coin-flipping heuristic to introduce randomness can work quite well in the absence of a computer.

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DQOTD

 

jaybird1111, is the wreck still there in 2015?

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DQOTD

 

jaybird1111, is the wreck still there in 2015?

Souvenir hunting. If yes bring a piece for me

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I hope they treat the story with respect.

 

'A Race Too Far' is a good read, gives some idea of how consequential it was for Lieutenant Commander

Nigel Tetly to be 'racing' a guy who wasn't really in front of him.

 

And finally, 96 years old Commander Bill King reflecting on the race.

 

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I hope they treat the story with respect.

 

'A Race Too Far' is a good read, gives some idea of how consequential it was for Lieutenant Commander

Nigel Tetly to be 'racing' a guy who wasn't really in front of him.

 

And finally, 96 years old Commander Bill King reflecting on the race.

 

 

what a great bloke - he expressed so well that feeling of sailing alone - it is all your fault when it goes wrong

 

bloody good

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He wasn't just randomly going on this race. His RDF making company was about to go out of business. This was a last-chance Hail Mary pass. There is some evidence from the book IIRC that he may have been hoping that someone would stop him. He also planned on drifting in at the back of the fleet and not getting a lot of scrutiny. He was utterly boned when he ended up "in the lead".

I suspect that Crowhurst did what so many folks battling mental illness do- embarked on a snowballing bad decision cascade, starting with the making the decision to race too late with too little money,all his hopes pinned on the prize, in the delusion that he could finish in the money. That snowball started accelerating after the start, likely exacerbated by fatigue. I suspect his opinion of himself was very closely tied to the promises he made and the stories he told before departure, and I suspect that the greatness of failure was hugely magnified in his own mind to the point that there was no other way out with any honour.

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I hope they treat the story with respect.

 

'A Race Too Far' is a good read, gives some idea of how consequential it was for Lieutenant Commander

Nigel Tetly to be 'racing' a guy who wasn't really in front of him.

 

And finally, 96 years old Commander Bill King reflecting on the race.

 

 

What a great guy and a great story. I love his boat too. It's odd, quirky but, sailing along, it's looks beautiful.

 

Thank you for sharing that.

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One other thing he was unhappy about, was the boat’s windward ability. He noted that he could not sail closer than 60o to the wind.

 

Ah, perhaps a bit less so now.

 

This is a good article.

 

http://www.junkrigassociation.org/Resources/Documents/Hall%20of%20Fame/Hall%20of%20Fame%20-%20Bill%20King%20L.pdf

 

This time her bottom was painted green to deter sea monsters

:) :) After hitting something and stoving in from waterline to deck 400nm out to sea I can understand wanting to try anything !

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One other thing he was unhappy about, was the boat’s windward ability. He noted that he could not sail closer than 60o to the wind.

 

Ah, perhaps a bit less so now.

 

This is a good article.

 

http://www.junkrigassociation.org/Resources/Documents/Hall%20of%20Fame/Hall%20of%20Fame%20-%20Bill%20King%20L.pdf

 

>This time her bottom was painted green to deter sea monsters

:) :) After hitting something and stoving in from waterline to deck 400nm out to sea I can understand wanting to try anything !

 

Got the same buzz from Bill King as I did from Chichester that first time long ago. Great stuff. Thx for hooking this up for us.

 

Dig 'Galway Blazer' on her lines hauling it. Crazy looking rig by today's norm.

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Of course cheating in this way is no longer possible now that the technology makes getting lost and out of contact (deliberately or accidentally) extremely hard

 

On my own invented epic journey around our massive and wild island I have so far managed to use a combination of CGI and box trailers trucks to persuade followers that I have done what I have claimed.

 

seven years in to the "great lie" (as I have come to think of it in my own internal monolog) and I am beginning to wonder if it might not have been easier to have just done the sailing bit and forgotten about all the dissembling

 

700 films - every one a lie - has taken a massive amount of work

 

occasionally people have rumbled me but they have been dealt with in the appropriate way

 

I have found that blowing bubbles keeps me in focus

 

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I have, do, and will maintain, that All Is Lost is not a movie about sailing. It's a movie about an alcoholic trying to escape the mistakes of his past.

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Of course cheating in this way is no longer possible now that the technology makes getting lost and out of contact (deliberately or accidentally) extremely hard

 

On my own invented epic journey around our massive and wild island I have so far managed to use a combination of CGI and box trailers trucks to persuade followers that I have done what I have claimed.

 

Yeah but Dylan, you must have had help. I mean, I was watching the episode when you went up the Ouse to York and I was like, "Jesus Christ, they built an entire fake York Minster (I imagine at Pinewood Studios cause that's where the Bond villain sets always were) and he didn't want to pay the ten quid to get in" That's serious committment.

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I don't know man, I just watched Colin Firth graphically slaughter a whole church congregation of men, women and children. Going nuts on a sailboat may be a let down after that.

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I have, do, and will maintain, that All Is Lost is not a movie about sailing. It's a movie about an alcoholic trying to escape the mistakes of his past.

Hmmm....I call that Monday.

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I don't know man, I just watched Colin Firth graphically slaughter a whole church congregation of men, women and children. Going nuts on a sailboat may be a let down after that.

 

In what movie or show was this? I as surprised to see him recently in a pic about a roman centurion who is trying to save the last emperor of Rome.

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I saw Deep Water, and was left with the impression that Crowhurst was mentally unstable well before he started...iow, his fate was pretty well written in ink.

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There was a Robert Stone novel called Outer Bridge Reach that I think was based on this. Good book but like all of his work no good guy, just differing levels of bad

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I think Colin Firth is more or less perfect to play Crowhurst. Someone like Ralph Fiennes would probably fit the bill also.

 

It's been a little while since I saw "Deep Water" but from what I recall, the way they depict things:

 

-Crowhurst wasn't necessarily expecting to win but at least to provide much needed promotion and publicity for his failing business

 

-he didn't set out initially to cheat but when his boat got into trouble early the only alternatives were cheat or limp back in shame, so he opted to cheat

 

-his cheating plan was not to win but to slide back into the pack on the final leg and come in third place or something where he'd get some publicity and glory but not have his logs subject to much scrutiny. So a very crude level of gundecking of his log would be sufficient as all the scrutiny would come to the winning boat claiming the prize. Of course a crazy set of events conspired to defeat this plan as well.

 

I'm looking forward very much to this.

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I'm not sure "Deep Water" can be improved on, but I find the story of that race and the experience of the individual racers incredibly compelling. Definitely will see.

 

Crowhurst was so smart, I think he initially fell into the trap of thinking he could overcome any obstacle by sheer intelligence and will.

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The boat for the film was built by a friend of ours (or in his yard), and surveyed by another. I think they did two boats, one with CNC cut ply and then did another (not completed) using contemporary technology for the build scenes. The surveyor was very impressed with the film maker's commitment to authenticity, for instance getting a batch of unchromed bronze turnbuckles made a cost of many hundreds of quid each rather than using stock chromed ones.

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Assuming it's well written, it a hell of a role for an actor. The slow descent into madness.

Many people believe man never stepped on the moon, and BJPorter never left Buzzards Bay

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Reminds me of a great line Melissa Leo had on the old "Homicide" show. Her character was from a wide spot in the road in West Virginia and she said "It's the kind of place where people think the Moon landings were fake and aliens are real".

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At least Firth looks a bit like Crowhurst, and the accent will be easy. I would have fully expect Hollywood to cast Denzel Washington in this role.

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Deep Water was one of the saddest things I have ever seen. At the end of the movie they show the boat washed up on Cayman Brac and the locals say the boat is haunted.

Can you imagine how bad it would suck to kill yourself to get off the boat and then end up right back on the boat anway :o

 

Just watched it the other night. It's tragic the way he allowed his naivete and inexperience paint himself into a corner between almost certain death and certain financial devastation. Heartbreaking story.

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Assuming it's well written, it a hell of a role for an actor. The slow descent into madness.

Many people believe man never stepped on the moon, and BJPorter never left Buzzards Bay

 

 

Narragansett Bay, but who's counting?

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Sorry lads, seams like I'm late to this thread. I found this article of interest on a website (https://longreads.com/) that I like for its eclectic selections.

For those like me who are unfamiliar with this epic tragedy its a good introduction:

 

 

http://www.sportsnet.ca/more/big-read-donald-crowhursts-heartbreaking-round-world-hoax/

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Just watched Deep Water, twice. Very moving and poignant film. One of the light hearted moments was in the Bonus stuff where they had interviews of some of the other racers. Chay Blyth had rowed the Atlantic with John Ridgeway and he said he made a fair amount of money from interviews and articles after this feat. So he thought a solo around the world race would be a good way to continue making a living as an adventurer. He had no sailing experience and took off in the equivalent of a Catalina 30. He described how he broached eleven times in one day, three times in one hour. He just thought that is what happened when sailing. He withdrew from the race shortly thereafter.

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Can we revive this thread?  


The movie is supposed to be released soon but I couldn't find any specific details.  IMDB says that it has been released in the UK.  Early reviews are underwhelming.  

Anyone seen it?  

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Yes I’ve seen it and I don’t regret the time spent watching it, or the money for the ticket. But something must have gone hideously wrong with making it, for it looks like an edit from left over clips and it has a very odd rhythm. The acting is good, the production values are pretty impressive - I know people involved in building the two boats used and their accounts of the no expense spared approach were impressive and the effect can be seen (occasionally). 

As often happens with films lots of good work went into something that is very flawed. It would be interesting to know what went wrong: one hears stories of films shown to preview audiences and being completely recut on the basis of negative feedback, and of studio panic. 

Anyway, to borrow a phrase from another thread the film is fractally fucked, but if you already know the story and are interested it’s worth watching.  (IMAO)

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Here is a review snip from the Guardian (UK)

Watching Crowhurst slowly crack is the cinema equivalent of filling your pockets with pebbles and chucking yourself into the Solent.

 

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12 hours ago, bugger said:

Can we revive this thread?  


The movie is supposed to be released soon but I couldn't find any specific details.  IMDB says that it has been released in the UK.  Early reviews are underwhelming.  

Anyone seen it?  

Yup, saw it last night.

A wee bit underwhelming as there was little in it I didn't already know. The theatre was practically empty.

 

I picked up a few technical errors including a yacht at the boat showing the opening scenes with a very nice tri radial cruise laminate genoa.

 

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8 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

Yes I’ve seen it and I don’t regret the time spent watching it, or the money for the ticket. But something must have gone hideously wrong with making it, for it looks like an edit from left over clips and it has a very odd rhythm. The acting is good, the production values are pretty impressive - I know people involved in building the two boats used and their accounts of the no expense spared approach were impressive and the effect can be seen (occasionally). 

As often happens with films lots of good work went into something that is very flawed. It would be interesting to know what went wrong: one hears stories of films shown to preview audiences and being completely recut on the basis of negative feedback, and of studio panic. 

Anyway, to borrow a phrase from another thread the film is fractally fucked, but if you already know the story and are interested it’s worth watching.  (IMAO)

Hey!  That's "Fractally Fucked (TM)"...

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Hi All, The bride and I saw it yesterday arvo and I also was surprised that there were not more attending, although it was "cheaparse old farts special" so I guess that could explain it.

Knowing the story I enjoyed the yarn, but also it hit home that his wife and family sure bore the brunt of the preparation and the aftermath.  Given that Sir Robin Knox Johnson passed the prize money (5kpounds) to his wife Clare I would imagine it would have been a hard slog for her and the kids.

Cheers,

Jim B)

 

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