Bob Perry

My newest project

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BS has some deep personal issues. I really can't see that changing. He lives a very bitter life and that's a shame. I think I'll just go on doing what I do the way I like to do it. Pathetic rants from BS seem to have zero effect on reality.

 

I never really thought of spreaders as being a "style" component. It's kind of funny.

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How about some reality. Here is the Preliminary sail plan for the new 45'er. I'll have to go with three deep reefs so the main head will be at the staysail hounds for heavy air. I think the frac rig will work well for this design and the look suits the boat. There will be many changes before I call this design finished. I do enjoy the "refinement" period of a new design.

Ibold%20SP%203-14-16_zpsu0usgqkk.jpg

Genuine interest to learn here... What's the logic of having the jib and stays'il tacks so close together? Our family cutter (Roberts 36) has the tacks placed so the two luffs are effectively parallel - I assumed this was for creating slots (or is it just aesthetics?)? Does it matter not? Is it better not?

 

Fractional rigs and swept back spreaders have no place on a cruising boat. Fractional rigs put a bending load on a mast , a possible advantage for racing boats, at best an extra fractionof aknot going to windward (which is irrelevant to cruisers) at the cost of a more vulnerable rig. Swept back spreaders may be OK going towindward, but make it impossible to vang the mainsail free of the chafing of the spreaders on the main sail, when runnig dead down wind, which ocean cruisers do a hell of a lot of.

With my normal spreaders ,I can ease the main all the way out, run a preventer to the bow , then sheet her in until the main is completely off the spreaders, eliminating any chance of the spreaders chafing the main, which is impossible with swept back spreaders.

 

Brent I think the couple that had this yacht would disagree entirely with your opinion of fractional rigs not being suitable for cruising yachts.

oyHdRKC.jpg

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Do people really sail DDW? I was always taught to heat it up. Faster, no rolly polly and no chance of gybes that break stuff.

DDW is not a good idea on the ocean. You are better off selecting whichever gybe suits the waves and sailing to around 150 apparent. That angle will give the rig enough pressure to keep the boat leaning slightly one way or the other and so more stable. DDW is inherently unstable.

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Here is more of Neil's work on the engine room.

cp%204_zpsa0eekldn.jpg

So, while the idiot BS's of the world tell me why I can't do something and how it won't work. I will just continue to do it and watch it work just fine. Nice to have back up for design details like Neil.

cp%204_zpsa0eekldn.jpg[/url]

Ballast is now all installed and glassed over. Here are the ballast pieces waiting for installation.

Ballast%201_zpsnlbrg6a4.jpg

Beautiful cad detail, Bob. Might be a dumb question, but am I right in assuming the turnbuckle pins will be stainless?

 

As relates to the chainplate pics, sorry.

Edited by Sailbydate

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Here is more of Neil's work on the engine room.

 

Ballast%201_zpsnlbrg6a4.jpg

 

 

Cripes. I thought those were water and fuel tanks

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Good looking boat there Prissy. Mighty handsome. Love the spreader sweep.

Was that Beth and Evan's boat?

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Good looking boat there Prissy. Mighty handsome. Love the spreader sweep.

Was that Beth and Evan's boat?

 

Yup, would I be right in thinking that Beth and Evan would know a whole bunch more about about the pros and cons of cruising with a fractional rig than Mr BS.

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Bob, one can clearly see why Andrew is regarded as smart for wearing that mask.

 

thanks for the pictures :)

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Here is more of Neil's work on the engine room.

 

Ballast%201_zpsnlbrg6a4.jpg

 

 

Cripes. I thought those were water and fuel tanks

 

 

Only if you live in Flint.

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Do people really sail DDW? I was always taught to heat it up. Faster, no rolly polly and no chance of gybes that break stuff.

 

we had a a huge, and fairly argumentative, thread about it a few years ago...

 

my experience is: yes.., many cruising boats _do_ spend a lot of time DDW on long passages.., and yes, extreme spreader sweep is a problem in some in this situation, but the typical swept back rig is ok.

 

as i mentioned in the halberg rassy thread, the issue is that on, for example, long tradewind crossings, the angle is often very deep, and there aren't enough people on watch to set and douse a chute when it gets squally.., which can be pretty often in the tropics.

 

so most people end up going wing-on-wing a lot of the time.

 

you can't really heat it up enough to fill a jib that is set on the leeward side - typical cruising boats can pretty much hit hull speed sailing wing-on wing anyway, so there is no reason to add distance.

 

and it is pretty rolly, but people put up with it to get there sooner.

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On my new carbon cutters the polars say the best VMG downwind once you get above 10 lnots TWS is DDW. Almost all polars will "dimple" in at DDW. In our case there is a slight point at DDW. Not sure I understand and polars can be wrong. But, given that I agree totally with 7070's comments I think is probably a good thing.

DDW. wing and wing is cruisers nirvana.

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I had this idea of adding a teak overlay, much like you would see on a transom, to the inset cabin trunk section. Ten minutes later Jody has it rendered. I'm not sure yet but I think I like it. I was trying to conjur up and old "Rhodesy" look.

Thoughts? I am beginning to like this design.

[Ibold%20b_zpswsv0si2a.jpgurl=http://s950.photobucket.com/user/rhpbob/media/Ibold%20a_zpsm4s1hhlx.jpg.html]Ibold%20a_zpsm4s1hhlx.jpg[/url]

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I like the Swedish boat very much Bob. I get the feeling that you're being given a freer hand on this one!

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Works for me in profile but not so much in the stern quarter view. Maybe if it wrapped around the corner and ended where the coaming cap hits the trunk it would look ok. Maybe continue the eyebrow molding up to the companionway too?

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Ed:

I haven't given that much thought. Seems like the client is receptive to my and Jody's ideas and aesthetically we have been on the same page from the beginning.

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Jose:

I agree on continuing the eyebrow across the back of the house. Not sure of an elegant way to terminate the overly at either end. Maybe just stop it like you would on a transom.

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I had this idea of adding a teak overlay, much like you would see on a transom, to the inset cabin trunk section. Ten minutes later Jody has it rendered. I'm not sure yet but I think I like it. I was trying to conjur up and old "Rhodesy" look.

Thoughts? I am beginning to like this design.

[Ibold%20b_zpswsv0si2a.jpgurl=http://s950.photobucket.com/user/rhpbob/media/Ibold%20a_zpsm4s1hhlx.jpg.html]Ibold%20a_zpsm4s1hhlx.jpg[/url]

 

Looks like an eyepatch and detracts from the gorgeous sheer and eyebrow detail. I don't like the wood coamings either. Teak caps maybe, but not the vertical surfaces.

 

A beautiful design that doesn't need adornment.

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To my eye, the overlay is saying "this part is different" while the straight edge of the house is saying "this is all the same." If I were the client, I'd ask to see a sketch with the aft part raised a little.

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On my new carbon cutters the polars say the best VMG downwind once you get above 10 lnots TWS is DDW. Almost all polars will "dimple" in at DDW. In our case there is a slight point at DDW. Not sure I understand and polars can be wrong. But, given that I agree totally with 7070's comments I think is probably a good thing.

DDW. wing and wing is cruisers nirvana.

 

depends on the particular VPP.., but I am pretty sure that in general they don't consider a wing-on-wing configuration.

 

i discussed this with jim teeters of us sailing for the ORR VPP , and i will see if i can dig up the emails.

 

it was an issue because i was at the time doing the bermuda race on a sprit boat,

 

i was concerned, because sprit boats were not allowed to carry a conventional pole, and i was worried about a potential disadvantage in very strong wind where the course was DDW.

 

if it was too windy to cary a chute, conventional boats could pole out the jib wing-on-wing, and point right at bermuda, say, whereas we would have had to choose between heading up to fill the jib on the leeward side.., or just sailing DDW without a jib.

 

I think i read that they have changed the rules, and a sprit boat can now carry a pole, as long as it's only used with jibs.

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Will there not be more teak detailing around the butterfly hatch and/or the companionway hatch garage? That should be sufficient to give it a classic "Rhodesy look".

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I had this idea of adding a teak overlay, much like you would see on a transom, to the inset cabin trunk section. Ten minutes later Jody has it rendered. I'm not sure yet but I think I like it. I was trying to conjur up and old "Rhodesy" look.

Thoughts? I am beginning to like this design.

[Ibold%20b_zpswsv0si2a.jpgurl=http://s950.photobucket.com/user/rhpbob/media/Ibold%20a_zpsm4s1hhlx.jpg.html]Ibold%20a_zpsm4s1hhlx.jpg[/url]

Thoughts?....I think you love your work.

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To my eye, the overlay is saying "this part is different" while the straight edge of the house is saying "this is all the same." If I were the client, I'd ask to see a sketch with the aft part raised a little.

 

i kind of agree - i think to work, there has to be some kind of a change in the profile of the cabin house

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To my eye, the overlay is saying "this part is different" while the straight edge of the house is saying "this is all the same." If I were the client, I'd ask to see a sketch with the aft part raised a little.

 

i kind of agree - i think to work, there has to be some kind of a change in the profile of the cabin house

 

Dodger and/or traveller base could be used to provide accent, and be functional.

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Starkers:

That's what I was thinking. The good thing about this detail is that it can come and go without effecting anything else. In the end it will be the boss's call. Jody and I have been playing with running "teak "rails" fcrom the companionway aft end to the forward end of the b'fly hatch. I'm trying to get a Scandinavian feel to it without actually copying an existing detail. We have renderings showing this but we are changing things fast and furious at this point and updating takes time. Especially when I am throwing changes at Jody every hour. Good thing Jody is patient.

 

Dog:

Yes, I do love my work. I may have been a typically stupid 15 year old but I did make one good decision.

Iboild%20sail%20plan%203-16-16_zpsxdsnq4

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Here is more of Neil's work on the engine room.

 

Ballast%201_zpsnlbrg6a4.jpg

 

 

Cripes. I thought those were water and fuel tanks

 

 

Only if you live in Flint.

 

Bada boom.

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To my eye, the overlay is saying "this part is different" while the straight edge of the house is saying "this is all the same." If I were the client, I'd ask to see a sketch with the aft part raised a little.

 

i kind of agree - i think to work, there has to be some kind of a change in the profile of the cabin house

 

Hmmm - I actually wondered how it would look if it were lowered - like to the level of the cockpit coaming forming a winch platform. But of course that would take away height from the aft cabin.

 

The challenge is that the coachroof is sooo long.

Actually I don't think the original (as in recent) was too bad - putting the window in the cockpit coaming did most of the damage.

 

An idea would be to play with a nice sweeping geometry for recessing the sprayhood into (and zipping it closed like on the X-yachts) when not in use. I have a feeling that would go a long way to camouflage the length of the coachroof. The picture in #4674 points me in that direction.

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Silver:

I need height aft, as you surmised,for the headroom required.

 

It's a work i progress. Life is a work in progress.

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Dog:

Yes, I do love my work. I may have been a typically stupid 15 year old but I did make one good decision.

 

It shows...beautiful boat!

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Dog:

Yes, I do love my work. I may have been a typically stupid 15 year old but I did make one good decision.

 

It shows...beautiful boat!

 

+1

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I noticed a curious thing. Bob actually agreed with BS regarding cruising boats spending a lot of time DDW. So it is possible for Mr. Perry to agree with one aspect of something BS says, as long as BS isn't spouting BS. I wonder if Bob was the first to observe that cruising boats go DDW a lot, if BS could bring himself to agree with Bob?

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Shu:

Fagedaboutit!

Well, I think there have been a few times BS has agreed with some feature I have drawn. But he sees it like "Bob has finally seen the wisdom of my approach!" When no, that is not the case at all.

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I had this idea of adding a teak overlay, much like you would see on a transom, to the inset cabin trunk section. Ten minutes later Jody has it rendered. I'm not sure yet but I think I like it. I was trying to conjur up and old "Rhodesy" look.

Thoughts? I am beginning to like this design.

[Ibold%20b_zpswsv0si2a.jpgurl=http://s950.photobucket.com/user/rhpbob/media/Ibold%20a_zpsm4s1hhlx.jpg.html]Ibold%20a_zpsm4s1hhlx.jpg[/url]

That is one of the sexiest boats I have seen! Perfect lines and proportions. I hope my boat doesn't read this thread...

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There was a Cheoy Lee 41 in the 70s maybe early 80s that had that wood overlay feature around the aft window on some of the boats. It looked good on that boat, if memory serves the leading edge was slanted the other way. In this case I think I would pass.

 

This boat is much better looking with this deck than the original version.

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Schnick:

Right! I remember that. It was that weird Ray Richards design 41'er. He is one of my favorite designers. The boats weren't so great but I loved his drafting style. I went to visit him when I was a kid. He worked in an office at home. He wore a suit to work. He would not let me see any drawings. I thought he was a a bit odd (unlike me). He did some very beautiful commercial vessels.

 

Jody just made a change to the teak overlay section of the 45'er. WE are getting close.

I'm doing my reviews for SAILING today. I got half way through the third and thought I need a beer.

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Shu:

Well,,, yes, two in fact. I used to tell my editor, "See if you can tell when I started drinking." Right after Spike died there were times I needed medication to write lighthearted reviews.

 

The thing is this. It's not that the boats are so bad. Some are and some are not. It's the fact that I get such dog shit documentation to look at. I get this design from an Australian company crowing about how light they can build but they never list the boat's displacement! I check their web site. Nothing. Makes me wonder, do they even know what their own boat weighs? Then I get drawings from one of the major US builders left that look like they are drawn by a 5th grader. I sit there thinking, "What the fuck is that thing?" If you look at my drawings I try to blend technical drawing accuracy and technique with graphically descriptive techniques. If it's a stove then fucking draw it looks like what we all think of as a marine stove.

 

I'm done. All reviews finished. Tomorrow it's on to work on the most new project for the couple in New Zealand.

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OK, there is subtle change here. I think it is important but I wonder if any of you see it. I think it makes a big difference.

Thanks Jody. What would I do without you?

 

I'm looking at this.

I'm listening to Rubenstein play some Schumann and I'm thinking man can create some beautiful things.

 

I just had an idea. It is so cool. I emailed Jody to do it. That's how we work. I don't have to say much. I am like Celibidache getting the most out of his orchestra. A slight tilt of the head and whamo!

Ibold%203_zpsbl5iy8ga.jpg

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The butterfly hatch is now wood, the single loop handhold has moved from front to back on the cabin top and the coaming is no longer wood sided.

 

By the way, from a purely aesthetic standpoint I don't think it is possible to have too much teak on the topside of a boat. I love it when other people do it. On top of bright hulls is best of all. :D

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With respect,

 

While I totally like varnished teak trim in general (no way the maintenance though). This seems a bit like an affectation. I'm not as good as Ish at finding the right pics and posting them but I'm thinking of a white dog with a black fur eye patch when I see this. I just don't see the point of a 'little bit'. (yes, I get that there is a transition in the cabin trunk but....)

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Jon:

Actually the B'fly hatch has always had teak sides "rails" they just come and go as we work our way though the various revisions.

Look at the cockpit coaming.

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Veegs:

Of course it's an affectation. Kind of like the perfect pocket square on a beautiful black cashmere blazer. No one needs it. You sure as hell aren't going to blow your nose on it. But it is a nice accent. Eye heroin. I'm not after what I need. I'm after what I want.

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Alpha:

Bingo! You nailed it.

 

So, what do you think of that change.

 

I have Jody working on two more changes right now. He's probably taking my name in vain.

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Veegs:

Of course it's an affectation. Kind of like the perfect pocket square on a beautiful black cashmere blazer. No one needs it. You sure as hell aren't going to blow your nose on it. But it is a nice accent. Eye heroin. I'm not after what I need. I'm after what I want.

 

 

and THAT's why you can put it there....

 

but this boat's got some mighty sweet curves all over that will outlast the pocket square.....

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Jon:

Actually the B'fly hatch has always had teak sides "rails" they just come and go as we work our way though the various revisions.

Look at the cockpit coaming.

Almost too shy to say something on these threads as it's fun to just watch the evolution, but I like the new coaming treatment. In 2d, the prior version made it look like the cabin treatment had a weird little notch forward. It seemed a bit jarring to the eye and I didn't like the whole thing. That goes away completely now. I like it.

 

Sorry if that doesn't make sense.

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Razzy:

If I didn't want you to say anything I would not post my work here. It bothers me when no one says anything. I pay attention to what the posts say. We are the world's largest yacht design office and we have work to do.I work with Jody and he's a my right hand but I love to get feedback. It pisses me off sometimes and It feeds me other times.

 

If it was an easy task I would not be interested. I like to push past "good enough".

 

I just mowed my lawn. Now that was a true PITA. But it's good enough.

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Starkers:

That's what I was thinking. The good thing about this detail is that it can come and go without effecting anything else. In the end it will be the boss's call. Jody and I have been playing with running "teak "rails" fcrom the companionway aft end to the forward end of the b'fly hatch. I'm trying to get a Scandinavian feel to it without actually copying an existing detail. We have renderings showing this but we are changing things fast and furious at this point and updating takes time. Especially when I am throwing changes at Jody every hour. Good thing Jody is patient.

 

Dog:

Yes, I do love my work. I may have been a typically stupid 15 year old but I did make one good decision.

Iboild%20sail%20plan%203-16-16_zpsxdsnq4

Why is the staysail mounted so far forward ? The position guarantees that it cannot be a fixed mount.

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Sav:

That is correct. I want a Solent rig and not a cutter rig. As the breeze builds I want to keep the center of pressure forward for a gentle helm. Tacking the "staysail" if you must call it that, forward helps me keep the C of P forward.

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Starkers:

That's what I was thinking. The good thing about this detail is that it can come and go without effecting anything else. In the end it will be the boss's call. Jody and I have been playing with running "teak "rails" fcrom the companionway aft end to the forward end of the b'fly hatch. I'm trying to get a Scandinavian feel to it without actually copying an existing detail. We have renderings showing this but we are changing things fast and furious at this point and updating takes time. Especially when I am throwing changes at Jody every hour. Good thing Jody is patient.

 

Dog:

Yes, I do love my work. I may have been a typically stupid 15 year old but I did make one good decision.

Iboild%20sail%20plan%203-16-16_zpsxdsnq4

Why is the staysail mounted so far forward ? The position guarantees that it cannot be a fixed mount.

 

 

Solent stay, answer is several posts up.

 

I like the new cabin a lot, much better than the last one, which I never did warm to. Of course I like the notch, my C&C has the notch for exactly the same reasons.

I'm not so sure I like the teak on the inset, looks a bit fussy to me. It would be a great place to put a builder's plate. (Like C&C did).

I like the new coamings.

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Thanks Ish. It is a C&C trick. The jury is out on the teak overlay. The boss is busy right now and won;t be back until next week. He'll make the call. Right now, I'm liking the teak overlay. I'll give it a few days. Jody is still fussing with the details of it.

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I had this idea of adding a teak overlay, much like you would see on a transom, to the inset cabin trunk section. Ten minutes later Jody has it rendered. I'm not sure yet but I think I like it. I was trying to conjur up and old "Rhodesy" look.

Thoughts? I am beginning to like this design.

 

I'm sure cost isn't a factor with a boat like this - but perhaps ease of upkeep is?

Maybe you could create the same visual affect with simple paint? ..like a complimentary blue/gray color?

 

med_gallery_75266_1131_81892.jpg

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Tom:

Damn good idea. I like it. Maybe a beige instead of a grey but the idea is very good.

 

Now that's why I post here. I'll tell Jody.

 

The trick will be how to deal with the edges. I'm not so sure we can just have the paint stop. Help me Tom. It's your damn idea. Work it through.

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Ok! :)

 

med_gallery_75266_1131_1989.jpg

 

For the edges, mold in (or create if this is a one-off) a recessed area for the paint. Just a 1/8" or less - not unlike what some boats do for where non-skid and smooth areas come together.

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Can I suggest that it duplicate the bow profile? A gentle curve rather than a straight line might look better to me.

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Sav:

That is correct. I want a Solent rig and not a cutter rig. As the breeze builds I want to keep the center of pressure forward for a gentle helm. Tacking the "staysail" if you must call it that, forward helps me keep the C of P forward.

Solents don't work on boats that big. There is too much messing around getting the thing up and down. If it was my boat I would not accept that sail plan.

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Dog:

Yes, I do love my work. I may have been a typically stupid 15 year old but I did make one good decision.

 

It shows...beautiful boat!

 

+1

 

+2

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Solents don't work on boats that big. There is too much messing around getting the thing up and down. If it was my boat I would not accept that sail plan.

 

id have to agree, if it were my boat i would prefer a different sailplan and truth be told i'm not enamoured with the teak overlay otherwise a beautiful cruising boat with great proportions to my eye.

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I do appreciate all the thoughtful comments. I consider myself lucky to get them. Tomorrow I have to jump into the next project bit I'll take time to digest your comments in some depth. It will remain a work in progress for some time.

Thanks.

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Schnick:

Right! I remember that. It was that weird Ray Richards design 41'er. He is one of my favorite designers. The boats weren't so great but I loved his drafting style. I went to visit him when I was a kid. He worked in an office at home. He wore a suit to work. He would not let me see any drawings. I thought he was a a bit odd (unlike me). He did some very beautiful commercial vessels.

 

Jody just made a change to the teak overlay section of the 45'er. WE are getting close.

I'm doing my reviews for SAILING today. I got half way through the third and thought I need a beer.

The Ray Richards designed '41 was the Offshore 41. My father owned one for 27 years. I don't recall ever seeing one with an overlay, but certainly possible. Pretty boats. Pounded a bit in a sea and the teak decking was screwed into the cored deck (ugh).

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Can I suggest that it duplicate the bow profile? A gentle curve rather than a straight line might look better to me.

 

I really like the straight line as a counterpoint, the only bit I don't like about the edge of the coachroof line is the slight raise aft where the timber begins.

 

I understand that it is inboard of the forward edge so is higher to match the roof at that point, in my uneducated opinion it would look nicer in profile if it were, well probably not straight but closer to straight.

 

To me it looks much better now that you have removed the teak sides to the combing, now it looks like it has balanced teak touches, where before it looked like it had teak finishes to half the boat.

 

Fab looking boat thought, can you make one where the back splits open for a swim platform :P

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What about one of those dodger channels/coamings that starts at the corner of the teak overlay/cabin notch, and arcs in front of the ventilation hatch to the base of the butterfly hatch, then a teak deck overlay aft of that dodger channel or coaming or whatever you want to call it? That would add some of the same color to the top of the cabin top as the teak overlay/notch, and create a visual "end" of the cabin top. Plus a place to store the dodger when you don't want/need it up...

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Bob, I don't understand the problem with a long coach house, it looks OK to me and I suspect will look even better in 3D.

 

To me the teak trim looks unnecessary, the essence of true beauty is simplicity.

 

If I wanted to change the line, I would be thinking about raising the coach house roof, or changing the size of the aft window.

 

A nice dodger will do this anyhow, draw the eye away from the coach house at the right place.

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I quite like the teak, however if it's a true cruiser, it will have a dodger fitted a month after its launch which will never be removed, which might make the teak look weird.

 

Seeing as most cruisers have Dodgers fitted, mostly from new, why don't the designers draw them in? Or design a cruiser with a solid one or something.

 

Sorry, rambling.

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Alcy:

You mean like this? I think I always draw the dodger in. I like to control the look of the dodger.

 

It's interesting reading the comments that some of you are seeing things that are not there. Either that or I am misunderstanding your comment

Coach roof in profile is one fair curve. It is as high as I need it for headroom. I never, well almost never use a straight line if I can avoid it. Straight lies on the drawing never look like straight lines on the boat. A straight line is the hardest line for a builder to build. I'm not wild about a pronounced dodger "channel" base. I don't think it goes with the look I am after. I'll go for a minimal one.

Iboild%20sail%20plan%203-16-16_zpsxdsnq4

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With a dodger like that, you're gonna struggle to get this gal to the Ugly Dodger Collection thread. :)

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We are rethinking the teak panel. Seemed a hot idea yesterday. Today, seems like the consensus is no teak. I'm good with that.

Ibold%205_zps3abvsuao.jpg

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We are rethinking the teak panel. Seemed a hot idea yesterday. Today, seems like the consensus is no teak. I'm good with that.

Ibold%205_zps3abvsuao.jpg

I liked the visual heft the teak panel added. With the dodger up I think the teak panel will look even better.

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To me the teak trim looks unnecessary, the essence of true beauty is simplicity.

 

I agree with this. It looks like "We're trying to make the cabin trunk look smaller."

 

To my eye what's happened is the Hallberg-Rassey-style thick cove stripe has the usual effect of making the freeboard look lower which then makes the cabin look bigger.

 

Take all the adornment away and one might see the boat in its beautiful glory.

 

 

Ibold%203_zpsbl5iy8ga.jpg

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Fractional rigs and swept back spreaders have no place on a cruising boat.

 

 

I'll go further than that: spreaders have no place on a cruising boat! :D

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Personal opinion is that the panel gilds the lily. Handsome design doesn't require a landau roof panel grafted on - looks to me like an after-thought and distracts from the overall, cohesive form.

 

 

 

 

Opinion worth what you paid for it, your mileage may vary.

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We are rethinking the teak panel. Seemed a hot idea yesterday. Today, seems like the consensus is no teak. I'm good with that.

Ibold%205_zps3abvsuao.jpg

 

Just because the color of the cockpits bench seating caught my eye.....

 

Has the non-skid pattern for the deck and house been laid out yet?

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Shark:

 

Yep, I think that is the concensus. Jody and I are on the same page with you there. Today anyway. I don't mind being wrong with an idea but I like to see it developed before making a decision. That's why God gave us the "erase" function on acad.

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That stern quarter view is gorgeous, Bob. That said, maybe I missed it but why is the cabin inset there at all? To my (naive) eye, it just breaks up a long, graceful curve and makes it look choppy. The discontinuous eyebrow and inset handholds only emphasize the effect.

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We are rethinking the teak panel. Seemed a hot idea yesterday. Today, seems like the consensus is no teak. I'm good with that.

Ibold%205_zps3abvsuao.jpg

 

 

Please pardon my drooling, another gorgeous boat Bob. I'll take one with a tiller.

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Thanks for sharing the process Bob. Pardon me if I have missed it somewhere, but is a double ender simply a cosmetic preference or does it add to seaworthiness, sailing comfort or have some other purpose I am unaware of?

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DAK: Client asked for a double ender so I gave him a double ender. This is something that eludes some of the posters here. This is not about my choices coming first. You guys have the freedom of m aking your own chices for your boats. It's not that simple for me. Imagine going to a fancy restaurant, pondering the menu long and hard and ordering the sweetbreads. When the waiter brings your dinner it is beef Wellington. The waiter says, " I changed your order because I know this is a better dish." I'd send the steak back and ask for the sweetbreads. I love sweetbreads, crispy.

 

I work with the requirements the client gives me. I make suggestions. I may even argue a point or two or three or four. Some times I win. But I do my best to satisfy the client and give him a boat that I am confident will be strong, safe and perform well while at the same time being very beautiful. In the end I will be satisfied and the client will be satisfied. I will have done my job.

 

I can do just as good a sea boat with a transom as one without a transom. It's an aesthetic call for the client. If the client wants a double ender I'll give him the best double ender he can get. Take Frankie for example: Kim walked in my door wanting a double ender. End of discussion. I gave Kim a nice, double ender.

 

If you were to look at the new design I am working on today for the New Zealand couple it would be hard to imagine a more different boat compared the Frankie or the 45' DE'er. I have to be versatile and I am and I think that's why I continue to have work in this fragile business. I can look back over the past 43 years and say to myself, "It appears you are doing something right."

 

As Don Henley once said, " I could be wrong, but I'm not."

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I have to ask about the cockpit saddle shown in the renderings, but only because I want to sit there. Is it one size, or custom?

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lasal:

That is very funny.

 

What you are seeing is the helm seat locker lid in the hinged up position. It's not a helm saddle. There is no helm saddle. But if you want a helm saddle I'm sure you can talk Jody into coming over and "wanding" your ass so we can make a 3D model of it to insure a perfect fit.

 

There is a lot of shape in that DE cockpit and designing a large hatch that would hinge up and combining that with saddle geometry would be impossible, I think. I can tell you a story about this some day.

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Deal. A custom helm saddle sounds good. Why did Jody render the lid open? The locker already needs to be cleaned out? Sorry, that's it for today.

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We are rethinking the teak panel. Seemed a hot idea yesterday. Today, seems like the consensus is no teak. I'm good with that.

Ibold%205_zps3abvsuao.jpg

 

 

Please pardon my drooling, another gorgeous boat Bob. I'll take one with a tiller.

 

 

Have you tried making the coachroof 2 inches wider instead of 2 inches narrower ? I think it might give a better proportion to the back faces of the coachroof (lower/wider) and the outer edge of the coachroof would follow the sheerline more by being a little lower.

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lasal: we are working at this stage to make sure things work as well as look good. Jody needed to check the clearance on that locker lid. He just forgot to close it. Bad Jody.

 

Silver: No. I like side decks and the width there would not buy us any needed interior volume. I don't need the width back there. Interesting idea though. Next boat.

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I'd awlgrip the top of that rub rail. Because it gets a lot of salt and faces up into the sun it's hard to keep varnish on it.

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kdh:

Do you think sun is a problem in Sweden? Not that the boat will live there all the time. I think at this stage he plans to leave the toe rail natural and let it grey. We used you stem detail and now are adapting the same type of detail to the aft end of the toe rail. That's your dodger too. The client likes your boat.

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Bob, is that the same "placeholder" keel too?

 

Do you think that bow profile would work on the Quail design? It's exquisite to my eye.

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kdh:

At this stage any keel is a "place holder". It will remain that way until we have a weight study and a ballast target to shoot for, weight and LCG. But I have a lot of faith in my ability to predict these items early on.

 

Yes, with some fussing that bow could be adapted to QUAIL. No problem there.

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