Bob Perry

My newest project

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Nice shots Bob! That! is a a very good looking mast, the attention to detail is exemplary. Rick does some fine work, bravo!

 

Savior - I'm not going to handle or touch their finished work. I shoot what I see, and try to make something out of it later. I wasn't bothered by the reflections of the lights, actually I wanted them in the shot. I could've moved the bubble wrap so I didn't get a reflection of it on tiller; but was shooting on the fly while moving about the joiner shop, trying to keep up with Bob. Believe me: Trying to keep up with Bob, even at his age, is no easy task, unless he sits down; and even then he's always doing something. - And if he looks like he's not doing something, he's thinking, he's always thinking and pondering. Here's a pic, almost as shot before cropping, but after removal of blemishes and air bubbles in the finish.

 

28694184941_6c49584f7f_o.jpg

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Tommy:

Yes, that's what I was thinking. It belong in a fancy hotel lobby laying down so everyone can see the details. There are little thin pads below the exit holes for the rod rigging so it can

t rub on the CF. You can hardly see them. Tomorrow I'll call Steve at Offshore and start complaining about cheek block alignment. I'll wind him up good and tight before I tell him how much I like the stick.,

 

Boomer:

Thanks. You have me thinking more about my photos now.

Yes, I tend to ponder a lot.

Kids think about the future. I have to ponder the future and the past.

I am omni-ponderous.

 

Here is Alberto wearing his peripatetic ORACLE T shirt working on a thingy He said it was for the bowsprit. I nodded knowingly and walked away.

8-4-%20edwardo_zpskcfamaga.jpg

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Tommy:

Yes, that's what I was thinking. It belong in a fancy hotel lobby laying down so everyone can see the details. There are little thin pads below the exit holes for the rod rigging so it can

t rub on the CF. You can hardly see them. Tomorrow I'll call Steve at Offshore and start complaining about cheek block alignment. I'll wind him up good and tight before I tell him how much I like the stick.,

 

Boomer:

Thanks. You have me thinking more about my photos now.

Yes, I tend to ponder a lot.

Kids think about the future. I have to ponder the future and the past.

I am omni-ponderous.

 

Here is Alberto wearing his peripatetic ORACLE T shirt working on a thingy He said it was for the bowsprit. I nodded knowingly and walked away.

8-4-%20edwardo_zpskcfamaga.jpg

Knowing when to nod knowingly and walk away is the sign of a true professional.

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Joli:

 

That is the trysail track.

Pretty nice huh?

 

If there had not been a few guys around I would have fondled some of the details.while making Tom Waits noises.

 

"Knowing when to nod knowingly and walk away is the sign of a true professional. "

Thanks Ed. Truth be told, I sauntered over to the bowsprit to see where that benson would fit. I did not see the spot so I shuffled off to look at something else I did not understand.

 

I bet when I'm not at the yard they refer to me as Mr. What's This?.

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I'm feeling spar envy.

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Thanks Olaf:

I ta;k about LOON in my book. It was a beautifully built boat. I remember one day looking at the laminated backbone and thinking what a shame it was to cover this up with a boat. It was pure sculpture.

During the early stages of the design work I was working on the hull lines on my compouter when in walked Laurie Davidson. Laurie had not done any computer hull lines and he was fascinated by the process.

Laurie sat down next to me and we "fiddled" with the hull shape. Laurie was responsible for the bow sections and probably more. I forget. It was almost 30 years ago. This means that at that time :Laurie would have been ten years younger than I am now! Holy cow.

I did two wood boats with that builder.

Loon%20close%20up_zps35cln64o.jpg[/uR

Loon-DECK%20PLAN-PROFILE_zpsau6su1d4.jpg

Mmmmmmmmmmm........ Loon. :)

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Pretty freakin' epic and yay for MI!

 

Bob, you cannot change the past. It's only for information and reference.

Maybe that's why you said 'ponder'.

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How many used Farr 40 rigs would that mast have paid for?

 

Sweet work and really goes with the rugged nature of this boat.

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How many used Farr 40's would that mast have paid for?

 

Sweet work and really goes with the rugged nature of this boat.

 

Fixed.

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For some reason it puts me in mind of the last line of this quatrain: we at any rate do reckon your rod, Bob. Lovely.

 

The world is charged with the grandeur of God.
It will flame out, like shining from shook foil;
It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil
Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod

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Ed:

Yep, three slab reefs. Lots of strings.

I lost the battle for in boom furling. Burt that does not mean I was wrong. Just outvoted. The owner has more votes than I have.

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Thanks Olaf:

I ta;k about LOON in my book. It was a beautifully built boat. I remember one day looking at the laminated backbone and thinking what a shame it was to cover this up with a boat. It was pure sculpture.

During the early stages of the design work I was working on the hull lines on my compouter when in walked Laurie Davidson. Laurie had not done any computer hull lines and he was fascinated by the process.

Laurie sat down next to me and we "fiddled" with the hull shape. Laurie was responsible for the bow sections and probably more. I forget. It was almost 30 years ago. This means that at that time :Laurie would have been ten years younger than I am now! Holy cow.

I did two wood boats with that builder.

Loon%20close%20up_zps35cln64o.jpg[/uR

Loon-DECK%20PLAN-PROFILE_zpsau6su1d4.jpg

Mmmmmmmmmmm........ Loon. :)

 

Amazing to me that designers can get the boat to land right smack dab on her lines like that.

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What is that track on the side of the mast for? A reaching strut? I don't understand the adjustment lines though. I just have fixed attachments for my struts.

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What is that track on the side of the mast for?

 

Vallis, I was confused too, I couldn't see the mainsail track, it blends into the photo so well but it is there. Go back and take another look.

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Dog:

 

"Amazing to me that designers can get the boat to land right smack dab on her lines like that."

 

That's where the magic is. Magic and math.

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What is that track on the side of the mast for?

 

Vallis, I was confused too, I couldn't see the mainsail track, it blends into the photo so well but it is there. Go back and take another look.

 

Trysail ( at a guess. Would be the standard answer)

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There is another short piece of track, about 2 to 3 feet long, with a car on it ...

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There is another short piece of track, about 2 to 3 feet long, with a car on it ...

Yes, that's the one. It's between the trysail track and the clutches. It has numbers on it.http://s950.photobucket.com/user/rhpbob/media/8-4%20gooseneck_zpspzpyfta5.jpg.html

I believe that is the Harken halyard tensioner. Somewhere, there was an explanation and a link to Harken.

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crum_zpsc1ylr1g0.jpg

Bob, what are the round holes in the aft ends of the coatings for?

 

Are they vents, or for some sort of removable davits?

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Great White wins the prize. That is the Harken halyard tensioner ( page 112 2016 Harken catalog).

 

Olaf:

Those are engine room vents. We are using the coaming to make a "dorade box" with baffles. I took a pic of the vent baffles but they have miraculously disappeared.

We are using the coaming for the engine room intake vents also. Here is a pic of Andrew making the mold for the coaming side vents.

616%20andrew%20vent_zps9v2yjqhy.jpg

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Tod:

Yep, boom vang.

 

I have to tell you. I look at that spar and I'm sure as hell glad I don;t have to put it all together. I know boats and sticks pretty well but there is a lot to this rig. It would take me a while.

It sure would be fun to have the CA crew assemble and put the rig together. I'm certain we could do it.

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Why on a cruising boat with outboard chainplates was there a need for a mast ram?

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Sorry, you've lost me. Is this meaning all the spar options choices were checked off in a clean sweep, you're going to try composite rigging with short throw T/B's, or? I don not see that rig needing the tensions that normally call for jacks.

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Longy:

I'll do my best to give you a straight answer for a change.

 

This boat is a conundrum to many very experienced sailors. And that is by design We are doing a boat that is unique as far as I know. I can't think of a single boat that has the unique combination offeatures the Bulletproof Cutters have. The boat is unique because our vision for the four boats is unique and based upon extensively laid out client requirements combined with my years of design experience and Jim Betts' years of build experience. If you "don;t get it" that's fine and I honestly understand.

 

In this four boat project we have the budget to consider every option and I think we have. We have certainly had more long meetings over details than I have ever experienced before on one project. Each member of the team has chipped in with their best ideas. Some of my ideas were dropped and replaced by other good ideas, just different. I'm fine with that. So, without going into details I will say that considering exactly how these boats will be used, a mast jack is the best way to go. It's best for performance and best for the way in which the boats will be used. Composite rigging was discussed but it was not to the client's liking. FRANKIE has a mast jack and rod rigging. Many race boats in the PNW have mast jacks and rod rigging. There is nothing unusual in this other that in our case the boat is a cruising boat. Our whole project is unusual.

 

This project continues to be an exciting ride. Why do you think I visit the yard at least once a week. I wanted to live in a tent in the corner of the shop but Jim's insurance won't allow it.

 

Wow! Not one smart ass comment.

Griot%20deck_zpsctnidgbv.jpg

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Longy:

Maybe in time I'll be able to flesh out my answer a bit more. But for now that's the best I can do respecting the privacy of the client. I'm lucky he lets me post progress here.

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Best answer yet - client constraints must be observed. Jacks are great if the rigs come out a lot - you can pull spar without moving T/B's. Put the rig back in, connect shrouds, done! no need for re-tuning.

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We're ALL lucky the customer lets you post in here.

 

The whole thing is amazing to watch, thanks for letting us 'look over your shoulder'.

 

For my part, any questions are not 'gotchas', but rather "I know you've done it this way for a reason, I just wonder what it is"

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There is another short piece of track, about 2 to 3 feet long, with a car on it ...

Yes, that's the one. It's between the trysail track and the clutches. It has numbers on it.http://s950.photobucket.com/user/rhpbob/media/8-4%20gooseneck_zpspzpyfta5.jpg.html
I believe that is the Harken halyard tensioner. Somewhere, there was an explanation and a link to Harken.

It is, you can tell by the ramps in each hole, nice for sails living on a furler.

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It makes you wonder why no one else thought of it, simple and effective. Why have a tail laying on deck collecting bugs and dirt. Bet it's patented.

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It makes you wonder why no one else thought of it, simple and effective. Why have a tail laying on deck collecting bugs and dirt. Bet it's patented.

This system has been around quite a while. Antal makes a version also. Only trick is it's a little finicky getting the pin stop in/out of it's hole. If you force it, or it doesnt go in all the way, the hole gets beveled, then the pin won't hold in that hole. Careful work on the winch to line it up correctly. But for the average dude who adjusts tension twice a year it's great. The "tail" of the halyard can be smaller, since it only hoists sail. It gets a soft eye, then is lashed to halyard eye to drop sail. Small eyes make it easier to get the joint thru mast exit slot.

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Longy:

You are on the right track.

 

Kir:

That's good advice. I'll keep it in mind.

OK, pushing the boundaries now: are the boats to be laid up mast out when not in use?

 

I'm available as the traveling wrench to keep the fleet ready to go!

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Bob,

 

Thanks to you as always for posting all that you and others do on this very special project.

 

But, this time, I would like to personally thank "Mr. Lucky" for allowing you to do so.

 

Thank you Mr. Lucky...!!!!

 

fs

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Look!

 

A crude 'Chastity Strut'!

 

Too bad they didn't work some balance area into it though. On a boat this size it might not be a problem. That round shaft just ahead of the rudder blade is going to play hell with waterflow over the rudder too.

 

GKrudderWeb.jpg

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Longy:

You are on the right track.

 

Kir:

That's good advice. I'll keep it in mind.

OK, pushing the boundaries now: are the boats to be laid up mast out when not in use?

 

I'm available as the traveling wrench to keep the fleet ready to go!

 

 

 

OK, since Mr. Bulletproof needs a boat for each ocean (why wouldn't you?), that means that Team Perry will need a team of testers in each major cruising region of the world.

 

I am willing to sacrifice myself (for I am all heart) for a season in the Hebrides, West of Ireland and the Scandinavian Atlantic. I undertake to test the boat thoroughly in all conditions.

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Ed:

Yep, three slab reefs. Lots of strings.

I lost the battle for in boom furling. Burt that does not mean I was wrong. Just outvoted. The owner has more votes than I have.

 

As much as many here don't seem to agree with you on this, I think you're right.

 

My Offshore Spars boom furler is the bees knees. Light, simple operation, one reefing line rather than a zillion, neat stowing of the sail, simple ability to flatten the foot.

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Longy:

You are on the right track.

 

Kir:

That's good advice. I'll keep it in mind.

OK, pushing the boundaries now: are the boats to be laid up mast out when not in use?

 

I'm available as the traveling wrench to keep the fleet ready to go!

 

 

 

OK, since Mr. Bulletproof needs a boat for each ocean (why wouldn't you?), that means that Team Perry will need a team of testers in each major cruising region of the world.

 

I am willing to sacrifice myself (for I am all heart) for a season in the Hebrides, West of Ireland and the Scandinavian Atlantic. I undertake to test the boat thoroughly in all conditions.

 

I will reluctantly volunteer to sit in the cockpit and offer endless useless advice to the crew should they venture into the Baltic sea.

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kdh:

just being in the majority doesn't mean you are right. I was making my very best recommendation for the client in suggesting in boom furling. I lost that argument against a group that had zero experience with in boom furling.

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Longy:

You are on the right track.

 

Kir:

That's good advice. I'll keep it in mind.

 

OK, pushing the boundaries now: are the boats to be laid up mast out when not in use?

 

I'm available as the traveling wrench to keep the fleet ready to go!

 

OK, since Mr. Bulletproof needs a boat for each ocean (why wouldn't you?), that means that Team Perry will need a team of testers in each major cruising region of the world.

 

I am willing to sacrifice myself (for I am all heart) for a season in the Hebrides, West of Ireland and the Scandinavian Atlantic. I undertake to test the boat thoroughly in all conditions.

I'm quite certain that Mr Ed will need some assistance in this mission (e.g. one to sail the boat one to observe the performance) for which services I also will be willing to sacrifice, all for the good cause of course...

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OK, since Mr. Bulletproof needs a boat for each ocean...

 

"Mr. Bulletproof" is a much better handle. "Mr. Lucky" implies that the client somehow just fell into it rather than having spent most of his life working hard and contributing to society. Of course I don't know anything about the client -- trust fund child? developer of a vaccine? lottery winner? inventor of a new technology? -- so I'll forego the possibly insulting handle.

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I've got a buddy that invented something, then sold it for crazy money at age 34.

He's pretty damn lucky.

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I've got a buddy that invented something, then sold it for crazy money at age 34.

He's pretty damn lucky.

I do believe any success no matter how hard one works still involves a modicum of luck. I also believe that doesn't diminish the success at all, just recognizes reality. To use an extreme example, would Michaelangelo have created some of his masterworks had he not been born in the time of the Medicis and wealthy popes?

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Luck is preparation meeting opportunity.

 

Mostly anyway.

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Ed:

Yep, three slab reefs. Lots of strings.

I lost the battle for in boom furling. Burt that does not mean I was wrong. Just outvoted. The owner has more votes than I have.

 

As much as many here don't seem to agree with you on this, I think you're right.

 

My Offshore Spars boom furler is the bees knees. Light, simple operation, one reefing line rather than a zillion, neat stowing of the sail, simple ability to flatten the foot.

 

 

How does it differ from a Schafer?

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Ed:

Yep, three slab reefs. Lots of strings.

I lost the battle for in boom furling. Burt that does not mean I was wrong. Just outvoted. The owner has more votes than I have.

 

As much as many here don't seem to agree with you on this, I think you're right.

 

My Offshore Spars boom furler is the bees knees. Light, simple operation, one reefing line rather than a zillion, neat stowing of the sail, simple ability to flatten the foot.

 

 

How does it differ from a Schafer?

 

 

The central issue with a boom furler is how to roll the mandrel. The options are 1) electric or hydraulic drive contained in the mandrel, 2) a spool just aft of the mast, 3) a spool forward of the mast attached to the mandrel using a universal-jointed drive shaft, 4) a spool at the end of the boom.

 

The Leisure Furl design uses option 3, the Schaefer uses option 4. Offshore and most others use option 1 for their standard boom. Option 2 has been done, but the problem is it moves the luff where it rolls onto the mandrel far away from the mast, and that angle makes it want to bind.

 

Aesthetics is an issue. These things can easily look like a big log attached to the mast. The Schaefer boom, being an aluminum extrusion, is not a pretty sight.

 

Weight is an issue. In light air in a seaway these things can tend to swing around. When the wind isn't sufficient to keep the sail to leeward the swinging dumps air out of the sail. Managing the boom generally also favors a light boom. A spool or anything at the end of the boom is bad because of the big moment arm.

 

After a lot of consideration and trial and error here's what I have. A carbon fiber boom that has some shape with the spool forward of the mast. I went with the Hinckley approach of making it functional first using good craftsmanship and materials and letting the aesthetics follow. Aesthetically, the boom is big, but the shell is a sail cover--it has to be. The spool says "unusual rig" but to me it is part of the mast-mounted winch aesthetic. "Unusual" takes getting used to but if it's functional all is forgiven to me.

 

The cost was firmly in the "if you have to ask" category.

 

 

20160514_162250_zps17otnnv5.jpg

 

unnamed%201_zpsjdalmck6.jpg

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Here's a Schaefer on a Bermuda 40. The black thing at the end of the boom is the spool.

 

3989577_2_20120606102456_0_0_zpshiyywnjj

 

3989577_2_20120606102456_11_0_zpsnq7ilsu

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I have never heard anyone complain at all about the Schaefer system. I agree that the boom is a bit clunky looking.

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Sailboats are covered with all sorts of bumps & clumps of stuff. We are so used to them we even use them as decorative accents: hatches, Dorade boxes. ventilation scoops, crash bars, winches, coils of line, cleats/clutches. radar on poles, anchors on bows, anchor line capstans, etc, etc. Because we accept their utility, we accept their intrusion on the visual esthetic. I don't see why boom furling gear should be any different.

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Here's a Schaefer on a Bermuda 40. The black thing at the end of the boom is the spool.

 

3989577_2_20120606102456_0_0_zpshiyywnjj

 

3989577_2_20120606102456_11_0_zpsnq7ilsu

 

This Bermuda is 100 yards down the dock from my boat and is kept in Bristol condition. The boom doesn't look out of place in real life and would be even more aesthetically integrated if they painted the spar the same color as the mast.

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Sailboats are covered with all sorts of bumps & clumps of stuff. We are so used to them we even use them as decorative accents: hatches, Dorade boxes. ventilation scoops, crash bars, winches, coils of line, cleats/clutches. radar on poles, anchors on bows, anchor line capstans, etc, etc. Because we accept their utility, we accept their intrusion on the visual esthetic. I don't see why boom furling gear should be any different.

 

Semi - We call that "Harley -Davidson Engineering".

There are only 2 rules:

1. If it breaks, make it bigger.

2. If it sticks out, put chrome on it.

 

Probably needs a slight modification for boats, but for some, the method works.

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I've got a buddy that invented something, then sold it for crazy money at age 34.

He's pretty damn lucky.

I do believe any success no matter how hard one works still involves a modicum of luck. I also believe that doesn't diminish the success at all, just recognizes reality. To use an extreme example, would Michaelangelo have created some of his masterworks had he not been born in the time of the Medicis and wealthy popes?

 

 

 

Right place, right time, right idea was his luck. He was building 5th wheel RVs in Indiana when he got a bright idea.

Don't get me wrong. I'm super happy for him. I love seeing people succeed.

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I've got a buddy that invented something, then sold it for crazy money at age 34.

He's pretty damn lucky.

I do believe any success no matter how hard one works still involves a modicum of luck. I also believe that doesn't diminish the success at all, just recognizes reality. To use an extreme example, would Michaelangelo have created some of his masterworks had he not been born in the time of the Medicis and wealthy popes?

 

Right place, right time, right idea was his luck. He was building 5th wheel RVs in Indiana when he got a bright idea.

Don't get me wrong. I'm super happy for him. I love seeing people succeed.

 

"The harder I work, the luckier I get"

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I have never heard anyone complain at all about the Schaefer system. I agree that the boom is a bit clunky looking.

 

I have a friend who has one that experiences continuing issues. Using the Schaefer specification tapered furling line is critical. Always carry a spare.

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Why not just design a park avenue carbon boom attachment to go around the sides and bottom of the roller boom and buy the Leisure furl. Now this is not going to look right for the Hinckley but depending on the boat and customer I think it is a biggie, winning idea....

 

The spool would be on the front so much more wiggle room for weight on the boom....who doesn't like wiggle room?

 

Can you make carbon fiber look like wood? If so how about a big strong square wooden boom?

 

Personally I think the Hinckley's rig doesn't look right without yellowing cotton sails, tarred iron fittings on a wood mast and boom with hemp lines..... adds to the retro look...

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Some day I am going to do it. Its a big investment, but on the up side, I do need a new main within the next five years. So, I may have to time it together since a boom furler needs a new main to go with it. I do love the look of the park avenue booms but will probably end up with the Schafer as its the most cost effective one. However, I would want it in ALL white to match my mast.

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The external track on the Schaefer allows easier furling/reefing with the sheet eased.

 

The tricky part of the Schaefer design is getting the furling line out to the end of the boom where the spool is. My sense is that it's a well thought out boom at a good price.

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The problem is BS that you have zero experience with any of these systems. You are just blowing smoke. I have sailed a dozen boats with stow booms. As my wife said the first time she sailed one, "I like this!"

My wife has far more experience with stow booms than you have.

 

Bottom line is you will never be able to afford a stow boom system. You will never know how they work. Zero experience.

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So do you eat the Spam then play or play then eat the Spam ?

 

 

I'm guessing that after eating 3 cans of Spam anything would sound good.

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I like Spam.

 

Maybe so but you also like Vegemite so your opinion is suspect to say the least. ;)

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Brand name Spam is for suckers who buy into the marketing. Only off label canned meat for real sailors like Brent!

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Only home killed elk for Brent.

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I like Spam.

 

Maybe so but you also like Vegemite so your opinion is suspect to say the least. ;)

 

Bob is right on Spam.

 

Favorite snack (on the boat only, for obvious reasons) is Spam on a Ritz topped with spray cheeze. Mighty fine! I wonder if it would be good with vegemite?

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I like Spam.

 

Maybe so but you also like Vegemite so your opinion is suspect to say the least. ;)

 

 

:)