Bob Perry

My newest project

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It's blustery and rainy here. Dog did not get much of a walk. I fired up the Honda gen set last night to be sure I am ready for the coming storm.

Nice lull today , streets here are dry, but storminess promised for tonite. Remnants of a hurricane on Saturday nite. Hopefully Monday will give me a good sail down the strait. Winter appears to be coming early this year ( La Nina pattern)

No chance of power failure on my anchored boat. Keels will be on the sand.

Maybe fly to Cuba this winter.

 

 

Your boat flies? Do you shoot the deer from the air? Inquiring minds want to know.

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Bob, it works a lot better when I put BS on ignore and I never read any of it. Thanks for all the info. I'm buying lotto tickets with all my money so I can win and get you to build me the fifth one.

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Pano:

I imagine all the molds will be kept for a couple of years at least. You never know. I have at least one "I need to see a boat in the water" lead now. We might build more.

 

Ed and War:

Our cranse iron is CF and an integral part of the sprit. It will not be titanium.

 

What I am talking about is the opening, hole, in the front of the sprit for thew tack line of the asym. The tack line enters on the front surface of the sprit and exits about 90% of the way aft. You know, just like the fancy race boats have. We are machining a titanium fitting to fit over that hole to act as a fairlead. It looks kind of like a donut sliced through the middle. I thought the shape was less than elegant so I wondered why we could not integrate that part of the fitting with a five pointed star which would become the base on which to mount the donut. A star on the end of the sprit, usually cast bronze, is a very traditional detail. It is simply a decoration. Nothing attaches to it. I think we would weld the two pieces together. Jim calls the donut the "trumpet". When I get a 3D model of the fitting to my satisfaction I may post it.

 

See the flat end of the sprit with a hole in it. The star would go there.

616%20neil%20juan%20eric_zps6h8j9ouw.jpg

What is the final price tag on that sprit?

 

 

More than you could afford.

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There is a lot going on in the stem area, holes for the anchor chains p&s, hawse holes for mooring lines and of course the sprit itself.. It's a busy area.

 

It's blustery and rainy here. Dog did not get much of a walk. I fired up the Honda gen set last night to be sure I am ready for the coming storm.

 

My house got hit by lightning yesterday. I was just leaving the Boys Room. I jumped about 3' in the air and yelled What The F!

 

Ran outside, as well as many neighbors. "Dude, your roof is smoking."

 

Somehow, all is well. I've tested everything and crawled around the attic to the basement.

It f'ed up my neighbor across the street's electrical and killed their TV. They must not be grounded, or grounded to my house and terminating there. They watched the Hawks game here last night. They hablan Espanol only which was fun. I can get by in Spanish sorta OK.

 

That was really loud and bright. Bella the Dog spent a full day hiding in the bathtub.

 

I can't even describe how loud that strike was.

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Pano:

I imagine all the molds will be kept for a couple of years at least. You never know. I have at least one "I need to see a boat in the water" lead now. We might build more.

 

Ed and War:

Our cranse iron is CF and an integral part of the sprit. It will not be titanium.

 

What I am talking about is the opening, hole, in the front of the sprit for thew tack line of the asym. The tack line enters on the front surface of the sprit and exits about 90% of the way aft. You know, just like the fancy race boats have. We are machining a titanium fitting to fit over that hole to act as a fairlead. It looks kind of like a donut sliced through the middle. I thought the shape was less than elegant so I wondered why we could not integrate that part of the fitting with a five pointed star which would become the base on which to mount the donut. A star on the end of the sprit, usually cast bronze, is a very traditional detail. It is simply a decoration. Nothing attaches to it. I think we would weld the two pieces together. Jim calls the donut the "trumpet". When I get a 3D model of the fitting to my satisfaction I may post it.

 

See the flat end of the sprit with a hole in it. The star would go there.

616%20neil%20juan%20eric_zps6h8j9ouw.jpg

 

What is the final price tag on that sprit?

More than you could afford.

Or, as has been said, "If have to ask..."

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It's a holy star. Holey star?

543061104_258b6d3b95.jpg

 

Kocher:

Perfect although that one seems a bit big for that sprit. The right idea though.

how about something more like this:6886235-golden-kompasrose.jpg

 

sorry for the size, i'm gonna get my morning coffee now.

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Pano:

I imagine all the molds will be kept for a couple of years at least. You never know. I have at least one "I need to see a boat in the water" lead now. We might build more.

 

Ed and War:

Our cranse iron is CF and an integral part of the sprit. It will not be titanium.

 

What I am talking about is the opening, hole, in the front of the sprit for thew tack line of the asym. The tack line enters on the front surface of the sprit and exits about 90% of the way aft. You know, just like the fancy race boats have. We are machining a titanium fitting to fit over that hole to act as a fairlead. It looks kind of like a donut sliced through the middle. I thought the shape was less than elegant so I wondered why we could not integrate that part of the fitting with a five pointed star which would become the base on which to mount the donut. A star on the end of the sprit, usually cast bronze, is a very traditional detail. It is simply a decoration. Nothing attaches to it. I think we would weld the two pieces together. Jim calls the donut the "trumpet". When I get a 3D model of the fitting to my satisfaction I may post it.

 

See the flat end of the sprit with a hole in it. The star would go there.

616%20neil%20juan%20eric_zps6h8j9ouw.jpg

What is the final price tag on that sprit?

More than you could afford.

Or, as has been said, "If have to ask..."

 

You can guess...

 

70 lbs, that must be about 3 times the weight of the hull of an international moth for a similar level of "high-techness". Boats cost by the pounds (similar construction technique).

 

I will guess 10 000$ x 3 = 30 000$

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Simon:

I want a simple, five pointed start, nothing too elaborate. I suspect there will be back and forth with the yard for me to get what I want. But I will get it.

 

I have no idea what the sprit cost. There is no budget on this project. My client is a man of means and wants the best. It is a nice situation for the yard and me.

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My client is a man of means and wants the best.

 

"Man of means by no means, King of the road."

 

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Simon:

I want a simple, five pointed start, nothing too elaborate. I suspect there will be back and forth with the yard for me to get what I want. But I will get it.

 

I have no idea what the sprit cost. There is no budget on this project. My client is a man of means and wants the best. It is a nice situation for the yard and me.

Like this?

 

post-37611-0-11624000-1476456327_thumb.png

 

These guys have them on their web site, 3 different sizes. (1-3/4, 2-3/4 ,3-1/4)

 

http://www.marinedepotdirect.com/bronze-star.html

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Py:

Yes, exactly like that except our star has to fit under the titanium fairlead aka "trumpet" fitting. I want the star in titanium and welded to the fairlead to give one piece look.

My concern is that we have enough surface to get reasonable sized points protruding from the fairlead. If the points are too short I don't think the eye will recognize it as a star. It might look more like one of those Ninja throwing thingies.

Can't have that.

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CRUSOE's star on her sprit. The Charles Mower designed gaff rigged cutter CRUSOE, was built in Nyack on the Hudson, New York at the Julius Peterson Shipyard. Teak planking below waterline and Honduras Mahogany above. Steamed and sawn White Oak frames. Cabin trunk, deck, rail, and deck joiner work are all teak, and her original cast bronze hanging knees and steel angle bars are still fitted around the mast. Under her oak keel hangs 9000lbs of lead protected by a 1/2" bronze shoe running the full length of the bottom. She sets a large gaff main and tops'l, stays'l, jib, flying jib, and spinnaker. Launched in 1934 she appeared on both the cover of The Rudder; and the design pages of Yachting – quite a feat at a time when traditionally-designed boats were falling out of fashion. In modern times she's been featured in an article in Woodenboat magazine.

Length on Deck 32'2" - Length Overall 36' spared - Beam 9'8" - Draft 6'10" - Displacement 32,000

 

30285702316_dd86401598_o.jpg

 

May as well add a few more shots of her as well. That's SPARKLE in the background, a local legend here since '97, before she was Southern California ledgend since 1947.

 

SPARKLE was designed and built by a gentleman named Alex Irving in 1946, and launched in 1947, with help from friend and coworker Norman Schwartz. Both were aerodynamics engineers at the Jet Propulsion Lab in Southern California, doing work for NASA. Irving started building boats at a young age. His first was a 15-foot sailboat that he built while in high school."I graduated from boat to boat," he recalls. "I built four boats that were at least 27 feet long, including a 28-foot schooner, before building SPARKLE, which is 40 feet." Reminiscing about his younger days, Irving concludes, "I had a pretty keen life."

 

Alex owned and raced her in Southern California for the next 32 years, winning the Lipton Cup and countless other races. She was the "boat to beat" for many years in Southern California in the 50s and 60s. Today, more then half a century later, SPARKLE is still known as "the boat to beat" in Port Townsend.

 

She is owned by Guy Hupy and Brian McGinn, diehard sailors and racers who have not only restored the boat but take her out on the water every chance they get.Talking with Brian last year, after replacing the cockpit coamings he said, "With the exception of the interior, that's the last wood to be replaced, except for parts of the lazerette hatch. Over the years since 1997, they've replanked her, reframed her , pulled the house and deck as well as deck structure and rebuilt new, totally replaced and rebuilt the cockpit and built new spars.

 

SPARKLE's construction is Port Orford cedar planking on steam bent white oak frames; fir for the stem, keel, and deadwood; canvas-covered decks; and teak trim. The spars are Sitka spruce, and the box section hollow mast sported a 3⁄4 masthead sloop rig. With a 5,000-pound lead keel, the boat’s displacement is 14,000 pounds. Long and slender, the 40’ hull had a beam of 8’ and a deep 5’6” draft. A 9’6” cockpit allowed plenty of room.

 

29690272004_c5436f3936_h.jpg

 

29690228454_be8259760b_h.jpg

 

30285691066_090257c86c_h.jpg

 

30204688232_d9062e1afb_h.jpg

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Py:

Yes, exactly like that except our star has to fit under the titanium fairlead aka "trumpet" fitting. I want the star in titanium and welded to the fairlead to give one piece look.

My concern is that we have enough surface to get reasonable sized points protruding from the fairlead. If the points are too short I don't think the eye will recognize it as a star. It might look more like one of those Ninja throwing thingies.

Can't have that.

Click!! Now I get it. Like most other stuff on these boats, that's not going to be an off the shelf part.

 

Carry on

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CRUSOE has been a favorite of mine since I first saw her in '76.

 

She was finally sold a few years ago, and though always well maintained, the new owner has been systematically going over everything topside.

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Py:

Right. But given this is a rather unique custom build we are set up for non off the shelf items times four in this case. It would not have to be this way but our client is picky and he allows us the latitude to come up with custom solutions. The yard is rising to the challenges.

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CRUSOE's star on her sprit. The Charles Mower designed gaff rigged cutter CRUSOE, was built in Nyack on the Hudson, New York at the Julius Peterson Shipyard. Teak planking below waterline and Honduras Mahogany above. Steamed and sawn White Oak frames. Cabin trunk, deck, rail, and deck joiner work are all teak, and her original cast bronze hanging knees and steel angle bars are still fitted around the mast. Under her oak keel hangs 9000lbs of lead protected by a 1/2" bronze shoe running the full length of the bottom. She sets a large gaff main and tops'l, stays'l, jib, flying jib, and spinnaker. Launched in 1934 she appeared on both the cover of The Rudder; and the design pages of Yachting – quite a feat at a time when traditionally-designed boats were falling out of fashion. In modern times she's been featured in an article in Woodenboat magazine.

Length on Deck 32'2" - Length Overall 36' spared - Beam 9'8" - Draft 6'10" - Displacement 32,000

 

30285702316_dd86401598_o.jpg

 

May as well add a few more shots of her as well. That's SPARKLE in the background, a local legend here since '97, before she was Southern California ledgend since 1947.

 

SPARKLE was designed and built by a gentleman named Alex Irving in 1946, and launched in 1947, with help from friend and coworker Norman Schwartz. Both were aerodynamics engineers at the Jet Propulsion Lab in Southern California, doing work for NASA. Irving started building boats at a young age. His first was a 15-foot sailboat that he built while in high school."I graduated from boat to boat," he recalls. "I built four boats that were at least 27 feet long, including a 28-foot schooner, before building SPARKLE, which is 40 feet." Reminiscing about his younger days, Irving concludes, "I had a pretty keen life."

 

Alex owned and raced her in Southern California for the next 32 years, winning the Lipton Cup and countless other races. She was the "boat to beat" for many years in Southern California in the 50s and 60s. Today, more then half a century later, SPARKLE is still known as "the boat to beat" in Port Townsend.

 

She is owned by Guy Hupy and Brian McGinn, diehard sailors and racers who have not only restored the boat but take her out on the water every chance they get.Talking with Brian last year, after replacing the cockpit coamings he said, "With the exception of the interior, that's the last wood to be replaced, except for parts of the lazerette hatch. Over the years since 1997, they've replanked her, reframed her , pulled the house and deck as well as deck structure and rebuilt new, totally replaced and rebuilt the cockpit and built new spars.

 

SPARKLE's construction is Port Orford cedar planking on steam bent white oak frames; fir for the stem, keel, and deadwood; canvas-covered decks; and teak trim. The spars are Sitka spruce, and the box section hollow mast sported a 3⁄4 masthead sloop rig. With a 5,000-pound lead keel, the boat’s displacement is 14,000 pounds. Long and slender, the 40’ hull had a beam of 8’ and a deep 5’6” draft. A 9’6” cockpit allowed plenty of room.

 

29690272004_c5436f3936_h.jpg

 

29690228454_be8259760b_h.jpg

 

30285691066_090257c86c_h.jpg

 

30204688232_d9062e1afb_h.jpg

 

Two lovely boats.

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Py:

Right. But given this is a rather unique custom build we are set up for non off the shelf items times four in this case. It would not have to be this way but our client is picky and he allows us the latitude to come up with custom solutions. The yard is rising to the challenges.

The unique custom build aspect of this build is one aspect that makes this thread so compelling. I can't wait to see the final fitting. I am envisioning something like one of these flowers.

 

nicotiana_alata500.jpg

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Py:

Right. But given this is a rather unique custom build we are set up for non off the shelf items times four in this case. It would not have to be this way but our client is picky and he allows us the latitude to come up with custom solutions. The yard is rising to the challenges.

The unique custom build aspect of this build is one aspect that makes this thread so compelling. I can't wait to see the final fitting. I am envisioning something like one of these flowers.

 

nicotiana_alata500.jpg

Yea, that's kind of what I envision. In fact, a flower-shaped star would be quite a unique detail. I wonder how hard it would be to machine...can't be too bad with a CNC machine, especially since one setup to do four.

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30285691066_090257c86c_h.jpg

 

30204688232_d9062e1afb_h.jpg

 

This Sparkle is a beautiful boat that was ahead of its time. Obviously if you are an aerodynamic engineer for NASA, it helps!

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Sometimes I have the seed of an idea for a design detail but not the confidence to push it. Times like that as with the bowsprit for instance, I like to turn to someone like Neil and say, "This is what I have in mind. See what you can do with it." It obviously worked with the sprit. I could not be happier.

 

Eric is the machinist, a quiet and very capable guy who's work will for the most part be buried in the recesses of the boat. I talked to Eric about a star two days ago and said, "Let me see what you can do with this idea." He seemed not too excited at first. I had thrown a spanner into the already moving works.

 

I just got these images from Eric. It's not what I had in mind but I was never convinced what I had in mind would even work. I could not be happier. It is a unique solution to the star problem and very much in keeping with the "bullet proof" personality of the cutters.

 

Now, when the first cutter is launched Eric can point to the star and say, "See that star. I designed it and I built it."

 

Well done Eric.

This is not a traditional boat. It does not need a traditional star.

 

 

star_zpsfyaubcfh.jpg

star%202_zpszs9giudv.jpg

star%203_zpsb1pwzvhc.jpg

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Yep, it reminds me of a star a state trooper might wear. My idea would not have meshed with the shape of the end of the sprit at all. I love it when I get back an idea that would never have occurred to me.

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Bob,

 

You remember when you and I did the first modeling for that sprit, I put 5 sided traditional stars on the tops of the Sampson posts. They were about 3/4" thick and I started to punch a hole in one and move to the end of the sprit but my role on the Cutters had sort of faded away by that point. I'll go see what I can dig up.

 

Not sure if this link works but should go to a render of the prelim sprit.

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/3pkcjehdtkvh9wo/o87.jpg?dl=0

 

Rasp

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Rasper:

I forgot about those. They look good but we don't have Sampson posts anymore.

I like this "hard" look as I think it will work well in titanium.

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Beautiful renders Rasper. Yep, there has been considerable evolution of the details. But I like to see the various ideas come together. It would be boring for me if the finished product only reflected my imagination. I like contributions from everyone when possible. As long as I get the final call.

 

My phones are back on. Maybe the power will be next.

 

Neil is giving a talk to the CYC at SYC next month and he will use some of your renderings for his hand out booklet. Boomer is providing photos and he can use whatever drawings of mine he likes. I thought showing your renderings would show the degree that the design process has changed in the last ten years. I am giving a talk at the Wooden Boat Center next week and doing the same.

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I can ask. My Wooden Boat Center talk is a breakfast talk at 7am. Not sure I can get Boomer up for that. It's a fund raiser talk. They want me for my effervescent personality.

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My phones are back on. Maybe the power will be next.

 

 

Can bring generator if it keeps the information coming.

 

Kiwanda

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Doesn't that camera that Boomer left you have the video function? Get him to tell you how to turn it of, or we can all chip in and get you a body cam like the cops wear now...

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I'm with Rasper on the cornholio look......

 

A local artist could probably come up with a pretty cool minimalist circular haida relief incorperating the line exist that is a little more PNW. I'm a fan of the neferisou looking halibut. Made our BBQ mounts out of two halibut biting a salmon, simple relief. Met a guy from B-ham years ago who had cast a gargoyle thru hull for his engine exhauste that was about the coolest thing I have seen.

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You are projecting again.

 

Gee wizz Sassy, next you are going to get all obsessive over throw pillows and sconces and doilies and the various shades of red. And yes, those pants do make your butt look big.

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This is just the prototype.

star%202_zpszs9giudv.jpg

How about 1 star,1 crescent moon,1 sun, 1 earth.

Yeah i know the sun is a star

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No disrespect but it looks like a 'Stainless Anus'.

All I could think of too. Dirty minds think alike?

Is there any practical way to make it one piece? Having the two bits separate really highlights the orifice in the centre.

Does the radius go backwards past vertical, or is the front face of it parallel to the end of the sprit? If that were more of a bull nose/half donut shape, and the whole thing a single piece, you could start transitioning into the star at maybe 15 degrees back from parallel to the sprit end without having chafe issues. I wish I had inventor installed on something to model it up.

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I think a great NA once said "Opinions are like bowsprit fittings, every boats got one."

 

Or maybe I'm misquoting.........?

 

 

Rass started it......

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Could it be modified for a flamethrower tip?

 

That'd be cool!!

 

(sorry, been researching Iwo Jima pics again,)

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I'm with Rasper on the cornholio look......

 

A local artist could probably come up with a pretty cool minimalist circular haida relief incorperating the line exist that is a little more PNW. I'm a fan of the neferisou looking halibut. Made our BBQ mounts out of two halibut biting a salmon, simple relief. Met a guy from B-ham years ago who had cast a gargoyle thru hull for his engine exhauste that was about the coolest thing I have seen.

I was thinking Trumpmouth.

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Don't forget, a line with a stopper or a shackle will live in that opening.

 

Maybe the line should be brown. :)

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Don't forget, a line with a stopper or a shackle will live in that opening.

Maybe the line should be brown. :)

I'm right there with you. Prairie Dog.

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Line will be white more than likely.

 

Don't mind us, we're just having some fun, Bob. I think that star piece is just right.

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Don't forget, a line with a stopper or a shackle will live in that opening.

 

Well, I like it just fine. It's going to need a custom butt-plug though.

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Make the star out of localvore cast brass and fuse the anodized Ti ring inside.

 

 

 

Heat 'em up glowing-hot in a bonfire of cast-off CarbonCutter plug lumber (there you go, Ish) and give it one ping and one ping only with a proper Thor strike.

 

Whamm-o, a sprit fitting. Bespoke, and no dumpster diving involved.

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The Stainless Anus?

 

I heard them when they were in tour last summer. Very good Southern rock band.

Considering the club circuit they must play, I wouldn't want the job of Tour Manager!

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What I'm enjoying seeing on this build, is the 'interpretation of design/development' for some of the build elements, which Bob has allowed - or even encouraged.

 

I'd suggest it takes a high level of design maturity to encourage the morphing of elements into something better or improved from the initial design concepts, using the collective expertise of all those involved.

 

The CF bow sprit is a great example of this. In the initial drawings/renderings, this first appeared as a fairly typical wooden spar approach, IIRC. Others would be the chastity strut, or for example, the bulwark/stanchion construction.

 

I guess those familiar with CF construction are used to this sort of approach. On the other hand, most bow sprits I've seen on CF boats are prods.

 

I'm finding this something of a revelation.

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Sailbye:

This boat is about doing a specific job and looking good while doing it. It will be functional art. I like everyone to contribute ideas. We have a talented crew it just takes a while for them to realize that you are keen on hearing their thoughts. I've worked this way pretty much from the beginning. When I have the opportunity that is.

 

Imagine van Gogh saying, "Come on over Bob. Now just draw a shiny big start anywhere you like."

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Sailbye:

This boat is about doing a specific job and looking good while doing it. It will be functional art. I like everyone to contribute ideas. We have a talented crew it just takes a while for them to realize that you are keen on hearing their thoughts. I've worked this way pretty much from the beginning. When I have the opportunity that is.

 

Imagine van Gogh saying, "Come on over Bob. Now just draw a shiny big start anywhere you like."

 

:)

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bowsprit%203_zpslewuumul.jpg

 

star%202_zpszs9giudv.jpg

 

Look, I wasn't going to say anything, but you have all realised that the whole boat is nothing but cover (a sort of McGuffin) for Bob's covert project to design and deliver the ultimate Southern Rules (Modern) jousting stick? It's his Stealth Stick, undetectable to the radar array of the modern JDS (Jousting Defence System). The top picture shows the handle only, and he's trial mounted the plasma delivery ring on the end of it, just to give an idea.

 

If you don't get this (and who would blame you), don't worry, it's an Australian thing: Under S(M) rules there is no limit on the size of the stick, beyond what you can hold, and at 70 lbs the BPSS is well within the range of a highly trained jouster.

 

He's an ideas man, alright.

 

Arise, Sir Bob.

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Ed:

Yes, that is one of my very favorite movies. Pleasant reference.

 

I was thinking about my comments to Sailbye as I watched Cougars beat UCLA last night and the wind shake the windows. Maybe I'm a bit blinded by the current build and my ability to be at the yard at least once a week. It does lead to an unusual amount of communication. I know just about every worker's name and they call be Bob and we communicate. It will be hard to do that on the new 45'er being built in Germany

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I am reminded of my suggestion for the logo for the CA36. That seems so long ago...

 

catsass.jpg

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I can't help thinking that I wouldn't want that prod hitting a boat that I was on. Looks very sturdy and would go through anything like shit through a goose. And it will likely serve its purpose extremely well. And look great doing it.

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Joli:

We have a lot of carbon inside that sprit. It's not simply a hollow shell. On top of that we had the luxury of overbuilding it and still dramatically reducing the weight. I'll see if I can dig up a photo that shows what;'s going on inside the sprit.

 

Sorry Joli. Plenty of the rudder and C. Strut but nothing definitive of the sprit. They are building a new sprit now. It is still in two parts, as of last Wednesday. I'll try to get a photo next week.

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Jeesuz kdh, I was worried for a while that you wouldn't like it.

 

Great moon tonight.

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The comment was made in reference to not wanting to be hit by the prod by nroose. If you want to batter something into submission, there are better materials then carbon.

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Joli: My client has never mentioned that he wanted to " batter something into submission" so it would not concern me on this project.

 

If you are after something for that I'd suggest a big tree like the Vikings used. I have several in front of my house if you want one.

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The comment was made in reference to not wanting to be hit by the prod by nroose. If you want to batter something into submission, there are better materials then carbon.

 

Churchill wrote about that in regard to the transition from bronze to iron (ages)

 

"For smashing skulls there can be no doubt - iron is best" :D

 

Of course carbon wasn't a factor in either time - unless you count a partly burned chunk of firewood.

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Carbon doesn't do well in compression.

There's a lot of carbon masts doing just fine under compression.

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The comment was made in reference to not wanting to be hit by the prod by nroose. If you want to batter something into submission, there are better materials then carbon.

 

You do what you want but if I see the thing coming toward me @ 6 knots, I will take evasive action!

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I'll, alter course.

 

Depends of the situation but that will scare me enough to do a chinese gybe with the kite up in 25 knots of wind if needs be!!! I don't think that a many boat would come out nicely after an interaction with this sprit.

 

Many moons ago in a fleet that was started after mine there was an aluminium ULDB racing, they were more geared for cruising than racing and when the situation was getting tricky the guy would shout "aluminium". I can tell you that suddenly there was space around, I was on a J24 and the prospect to have a swim in February motivates the crew to forget the race for 30 seconds!!!

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A pedant writes: I think the star would look better if the arms were a bit thinner and more 'pointy'. Can they be chamfered too?

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I'll see if I can get a photo of the inside structure of the sprit on Weds. This sprit is a bit unique in that it is an integral part of the bow of the boat.

 

Maybe I can just yell, " Integral, reinforced, carbon fiber sprit!"

 

Whinger:

That is initially what I had in mind. But after seeing Eric's take on the idea I changed my mind. Sometimes I like to see something that I did not imagine. I am not always after the more obvious aesthetic solution.

Once again, this is a prototype.

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Maybe I can just yell, " Integral, reinforced, carbon fiber sprit!"

 

 

If you don't mind yell well in advance to let people the time to digest the information and then decide which side is safer.

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No intelligent boat owner that I know would be remotely interested in a "demolition derby" BS. regardless of the material of his build. They would think you are totally nuts for even suggesting it.

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We used 16 oz. in high school. My wife and I used "socker boppers" blow up "beach balls" about 11" in dia. with a socket for your fist. I got to have one and she got to have two. It was a very good way to end an argument.

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Team Ain't Brain Surgery pioneered the boxing-glove-on-a-sprit concept in this year's R2AK.

 

Team-Aint-Brain-Surgery.jpg.

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