Bob Perry

My newest project

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On the subject of "plugging" the sphincter when the line is not there, there will be no plug. There is a plastic pipe bonded to the opening at each end. Water will just drain aft and out the exit.

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The comment was made in reference to not wanting to be hit by the prod by nroose. If you want to batter something into submission, there are better materials then carbon.

For a battering ram? you need Brent Swain for that job.

 

You won't get any engineering or a drawing, but he's definitely the man for the job.

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rb8Hz11.png

Will there ever be tight luffed sails set from the sprit? It looks like a tack line might interfere with the star currently. A slightly more proud sphincter would put it clear.

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Ranti:

That is not the star design we are using. I have really enjoyed all the comments and suggestions on stars and I have had a truck load full. I post this stuff on FaceBook also. I have 1.798 friends on FB and 290 members of the Robert Perry Yacht Designer Fan Club on FB. No, I did not start it. I only learned about it two months ago. It is slightly embarrassing and at the same time it makes me feel good to be appreciated. So, I have been bombarded with star ideas, some very good, some whacky. But I still like Eric's prototype the best. It is the most unusual and fits the rectangular face of the sprit better than the more symmetrical stars do.

 

First and foremost it is a fairlead. so we will take care of that function first. Maybe some day a Code Zero but for now just an asym chute.

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Ranti:

That is not the star design we are using. I have really enjoyed all the comments and suggestions on stars and I have had a truck load full. I post this stuff on FaceBook also. I have 1.798 friends on FB and 290 members of the Robert Perry Yacht Designer Fan Club on FB. No, I did not start it. I only learned about it two months ago. It is slightly embarrassing and at the same time it makes me feel good to be appreciated. So, I have been bombarded with star ideas, some very good, some whacky. But I still like Eric's prototype the best. It is the most unusual and fits the rectangular face of the sprit better than the more symmetrical stars do.

 

First and foremost it is a fairlead. so we will take care of that function first. Maybe some day a Code Zero but for now just an asym chute.

In lay the star, I think that would look nice.

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Robert:

Inlay the star into what. The face of the sprit?

Can't do that now. Sprit is done. No. 2 sprit is almost done.

Great idea though.

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You could inlay into a separate shallow piece and glue it on. You'd only give up 1/4" or so. Sell it as a sacrificial piece so the carbon doesn't get chewed by rats.

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Mad:

I think Joli would take that comment back now if he could. As you said, there are a lot of carbon spars out there and carbon spars are no longer an "experiment". I did my first carbon mast 21 years ago. We built it at Dencho. It is still going strong.

Carbon fiber fails in compression at about 50% of tensile. It's not a good material to "run into shit with". That's where the discussion started, that's all I was saying. You guys get going and it's of to the races.

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Joli:

You fail to take into account that the sprit was not designed to "run into things.". It was designed to take the compressive load of the rig with a reasonable safety factor. That's how all sprits are designed in my experience. There is a short section in Skenes.

.

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rb8Hz11.png

Will there ever be tight luffed sails set from the sprit? It looks like a tack line might interfere with the star currently. A slightly more proud sphincter would put it clear.

 

make it 50 cal, and get the rifling right. :lol:

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Joli:

You fail to take into account that the sprit was not designed to "run into things.". It was designed to take the compressive load of the rig with a reasonable safety factor. That's how all sprits are designed in my experience. There is a short section in Skenes.

.

We're kind of splitting hairs here. My comment was related to the previous comment about "running into things ". Let's leave it at that.

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Ranti:

That is not the star design we are using. I have really enjoyed all the comments and suggestions on stars and I have had a truck load full. I post this stuff on FaceBook also. I have 1.798 friends on FB and 290 members of the Robert Perry Yacht Designer Fan Club on FB. No, I did not start it. I only learned about it two months ago. It is slightly embarrassing and at the same time it makes me feel good to be appreciated. So, I have been bombarded with star ideas, some very good, some whacky. But I still like Eric's prototype the best. It is the most unusual and fits the rectangular face of the sprit better than the more symmetrical stars do.

 

First and foremost it is a fairlead. so we will take care of that function first. Maybe some day a Code Zero but for now just an asym chute.

1.798 friends???

 

What does the .798 one look like?

 

😜

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Do the cutters also have a dolphin striker? If so, continue the star theme to help distinctly brand Mr Lucky's local pod(s).

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HFC:

No dolphin striker. I don't think headstay tension will be a problem.

 

I used dolphin strikers on some of my boats. AIRLOOM and NIGHT RUNNER have dolphin strikers. All the big CT ketches have dolphin strikers.

 

Crash:

Typo. 1,798

Airloombowon_zps84c27aef.jpg

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Ranti:

That is not the star design we are using. I have really enjoyed all the comments and suggestions on stars and I have had a truck load full. I post this stuff on FaceBook also. I have 1.798 friends on FB and 290 members of the Robert Perry Yacht Designer Fan Club on FB. No, I did not start it. I only learned about it two months ago. It is slightly embarrassing and at the same time it makes me feel good to be appreciated. So, I have been bombarded with star ideas, some very good, some whacky. But I still like Eric's prototype the best. It is the most unusual and fits the rectangular face of the sprit better than the more symmetrical stars do.

 

First and foremost it is a fairlead. so we will take care of that function first. Maybe some day a Code Zero but for now just an asym chute.

1.798 friends???

 

What does the .798 one look like?

 

 

 

That's one is me. I'm a tall glass of water with some comprehension issues.

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plus or minus the poodles?

Ranti:

That is not the star design we are using. I have really enjoyed all the comments and suggestions on stars and I have had a truck load full. I post this stuff on FaceBook also. I have 1.798 friends on FB and 290 members of the Robert Perry Yacht Designer Fan Club on FB. No, I did not start it. I only learned about it two months ago. It is slightly embarrassing and at the same time it makes me feel good to be appreciated. So, I have been bombarded with star ideas, some very good, some whacky. But I still like Eric's prototype the best. It is the most unusual and fits the rectangular face of the sprit better than the more symmetrical stars do.

 

First and foremost it is a fairlead. so we will take care of that function first. Maybe some day a Code Zero but for now just an asym chute.

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Today marked a kind of milestone in my yard visits. Ruby, my dog, has been climbing the scaffolding since the second week it was up. If I go up, she goes up. Today she was up the scaffolding ahead of me. The dog just plain loves being at the boatyard.

 

Here she is meeting with Jim and Dave Cooper.

rubyard_zpsya5zq0nk.jpg

Ruby working her way up the scaffold ladder.

rubtool_zpsdlknozpy.jpg

 

Dave admires the Jefa upper rudder bearing. This bearing sits flush on the cockpit sole and self aligns to the rudder stock angle.

052_zpszhhyhuly.jpg

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Bulwark is now finished with the bonding procedure and now is being faired.

chainplates_zpsys4smo4f.jpg

 

deck_zpsp0iriqkn.jpg

 

Rudder for no. 2 along with chastity struts for no. 1 and 2.

019_zpszeaij6uz.jpg

 

I have more pics but Boomer was up this morning and I am sure he will have much better pics to post than I have. Give him time to edit.

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Core foam is having the radii added and faired.

013_zpsfonrknwp.jpg

Ruby approves of the fairing.

014_zpsh2hibpbl.jpg

The brown strip at the sheer is where the bulwark lap bond is being faired in.

041_zpsbfr3opsl.jpg

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One cannot help but admire good BOG (Carumba and I discussed BOG generally at your June get-together). Do you know what the recipe is in the case of the bulwark here?

 

Kiwanda

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Kiwanda:

I know Jim uses the same epoxy throughout but other than that I don't know and I am reluctant to post his recipe. Some hings with the build have to remain Jim 's. Jim had been very generous so far allowing me to post all the details. I don;t want to push it. If you visited the yard I know Jim would tell you.

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Message received no prying into secrets was intended. One would not expect polyester - except polyester can be pretty whiz bang in the right recipe and it is a dream to sand and shape.

 

Carry on

 

Kiwanda

 

Edit I know right where the yard is - so is it really possible to obtain an appointment?

 

Personal note -- would love to discuss take apart (nesting) dingy in CF.

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Kiwanda:

The yard is pretty informal. You do not need an appointment. If you could be there on the morning I am there I could give you the cook's tour.

If not Jim would have no problem with you just wandering around. He has been getting a lot of visitors.

Jim reads this thread. Just let him know you are a CA'er.

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One cannot help but admire good BOG (Carumba and I discussed BOG generally at your June get-together). Do you know what the recipe is in the case of the bulwark here?

 

Kiwanda

It's the same color as the bog I buy from US composites, just looked, SM fairing compound.

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The structure is going into hull No. 2. Boomer took these photos yesterday.

structure_zpscecam42c.jpg

 

Struct%202_zpspm1xqpq9.jpg

 

What, no laser light show this time?

Cavernous. Made me think of Wellington, NZL Cable Car tunnel lights.

post-76289-0-11077100-1477020804_thumb.png

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Jim Betts cutting steel with oxy/acetylene torch. Didn't ask what he was fabbing.

 

Jim is always busy in the shops as well as the office. I don't think I've ever seen him sit down, other then drive the fork lift.

 

29830259314_6145b21d54_h.jpg

 

30460991025_d54e8bd4a2_h.jpg

 

30460996265_ce6b15ee63_h.jpg

 

30460983655_6a97cdea98_h.jpg

 

Removing remnants from vacuum bagging the gudgeons on hull #2

 

30374202501_b7aea6b7da_h.jpg

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Up early yesterday as usual. However had to catch the 5:00AM ferry, then after offloading, drive north for a bit over an hour to Betts Boats. Arrived in Anacortes before sunup, but the guys were still arriving for work. Not wishing to bother the crew as they started their workday; So drove up to Mount Eire, to watch the sun come up, before going down to Betts Boats to get some clicks in.

 

Looking south toward Skagit Bay and Saratoga Passage. If we were a wee bit higher, one could almost see Bob's house beyond Camano Island.

 

30460946975_c7fdf9a6bc_h.jpg

 

Fidalgo and Whidbey Islands with just a strip of Deception Pass visible and the Straits of Juan de Fuca on the right. The little guy really enjoyed the view. It was fairly windy and brisk. His fur was whipping in the wind. He was ready for the short hike back to the car, and the heater on high.

 

30374162001_57725bd320_h.jpg

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I look at Boomer's photos and I think I must have been at a different shop. It's good to have friends like Boomer.

 

I love the bowsprit shot. It makes the boat look 65' long.

 

I think I will keep Boomer busy.

 

In the interior shots note the galley counters are 40" tall. Client specified.

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What were he reasons for the height? (Other than that's what I want). Storage space? His ergonomics?

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I love the pictures where people are doing work- it really helps understanding the process and sequence. Thank you Boomer and Bob for posting the shots.

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Sailman:

During early design stages I made the offhand comment that there was no rule about counter tops having to be at 36", which is standard here. I had in mind going to 38". No decision was made. About a month later the client. after mocking things up at home, came back with 40:. Mostly an ergonomic decision.

 

Tucky:

You are welcome. At some point Boomer and I will work on a big article for PROFESSIONAL BOATBUILDER and the other mags that have expressed interest. But we need to get No. 1 in the water first.

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Bob - is there any kind of estimate of the man hours going into each boat?

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Jon:

I will tell you when we launch hull No. 1

This is a time and materials project. We are not building to a target or bid price. These boats so so unique that having a reliable bid would have been a problem. Also remember that we have a lot of tooling built so four boats can be built. That cost has to be amortized over four boats, I am not an accountant!

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Jim Betts cutting steel with oxy/acetylene torch. Didn't ask what he was fabbing.

 

Jim is always busy in the shops as well as the office. I don't think I've ever seen him sit down, other then drive the fork lift.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30460983655_6a97cdea98_h.jpg

 

Removing remnants from vacuum bagging the gudgeons on hull #2

 

 

 

I love this picture. If you just look at the bit of hull visible below the scaffolding walkway (a bit below the waterline), it could be an old 12 meter, or even a J class.

 

That didn't come out right, I meant it more along the lines of "it's a beautiful hull no matter how you look at it"

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Jim Betts cutting steel with oxy/acetylene torch. Didn't ask what he was fabbing.

 

Jim is always busy in the shops as well as the office. I don't think I've ever seen him sit down, other then drive the fork lift.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30460983655_6a97cdea98_h.jpg

 

Removing remnants from vacuum bagging the gudgeons on hull #2

 

 

I love this picture. If you just look at the bit of hull visible below the scaffolding walkway (a bit below the waterline), it could be an old 12 meter, or even a J class.

 

That didn't come out right, I meant it more along the lines of "it's a beautiful hull no matter how you look at it"

Spot on. I felt the same thing. Most unexpected.

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Thanks Ed.

 

Take my big keel off and the general hull form is close to the hull of Lass's alu boat. Not the same but similar.

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Kir:

No, I got it immediately and if you added about 15 more feet to each end you'd be spot on.

 

Thanks.

 

15' of overhangs?

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30374060181_4ca570e1ce_h.jpg

 

 

 

*****PLEASE***** make this guy wear some safety glasses while using the router. I know it's just foam, that he's a professional, that Hillary will take his gunz away if the Gov't is allowed to mandate PPE safety practices, etc.

 

But as a fellow trades professional, I really care about healthy eyesight.

 

At 23,000RPM that router can shit a carbide cutter WAY quicker than Boomer's shutter speed can catch it.

 

 

Thank you.

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Tekton:

That is Rick, an ex-Marine and one of the most skilled workers in the shop at any task. I cannot make him do anything. And, I chose not to try. I will mention it to him when I see him next week.

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And tell him to wear hearing protection with those shrieking bastards - he WILL live to regret it if he doesn't and at that point it's a life sentence..

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Eh, what's a little case of tinnitus?

 

Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!!

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It may be too late if he is an ex marine ...

The use of personal protective equipment is difficult to inculcate in someone Rick's age; you either grew up thinking PPE was for 'sissies' or you became fanatic about it. The younger generation of workers are much better about using PPE. Some feel 'naked' without their safety glasses. I am an old guy who is pretty fanatic about PPE but I still can't work on a table saw with a guard...YMMV.

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15' of more hull you knucklehead!

 

Don't make me come down there,

 

:lol: :lol:

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Yes, at the very least, try to get him to wear safety glasses. Just one small chip of resin is enough to seriously spoil your day (at a minimum) or the rest of your life, potentially.

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It can be incredibly painful trying to get some people to wear their PPE, I had a run-in with a woman once who was working in our coating area, hand spraying a urethane coating. Would not wear her mask, "oh, I don't need it Bud...". When there is toluene in it you need the frickin mask! Had to get HR to read her the riot act. Baffling - like I was making her wear it 'cause I am mean?

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Tekton:

That is Rick, an ex-Marine and one of the most skilled workers in the shop at any task. I cannot make him do anything. And, I chose not to try. I will mention it to him when I see him next week.

 

If he's an ex marine it may be wise to not mention Hillary,,,,,,

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I used a solvent based epoxy sealant once called Eposeal, which had the most compelling safety warnings I've ever seen - it managed to convey the message "No, we really mean it this time!". Solvent mask, even outdoors in a breeze. It was astonishingly volatile, and would dry before the brushstroke had finished. Very good for stablising wobbly wood. They've reformulated it now, so it's not as functional, but safer.

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There is a pick up truck in the parking lot at the yard with a bumper sticker that says something like "Hilary for prison in 2016". I think it's Rick's.

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Joking aside, the OSHA inspector that visits the yard frequently is a gal who thinks she is a bulldog. She terrorizes Jim to the point of literally threatening to have him arrested. Jim does not mess with her.. I suspect if glasses were required for that jib Rick would be wearing them. Jim can tell; Rick exactly what to do. He's grinding foam, not resin.

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Jim's arguably liable if he isn't enforcing his PPE safety rules.

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Yes, Jim is liable and very aware of it.

 

If you think I walk through the shop enforcing OSHA rules I'm sorry but you are stupid. That's is the best word I could think of.. If the foo shits wear it.

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Joking aside, the OSHA inspector that visits the yard frequently is a gal who thinks she is a bulldog. She terrorizes Jim to the point of literally threatening to have him arrested. Jim does not mess with her.. I suspect if glasses were required for that jib Rick would be wearing them. Jim can tell; Rick exactly what to do. He's grinding foam, not resin.

 

There's always a little chip of resin that can be caught by a router Bob, it happens.

 

(end of health and safety hi-jack)

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Bob, I didn't say or even imply that you should be enforcing safety rules. I didn't refer to you at all.

 

Jim graciously allows photos of the build on this forum, it'd be a shame if he got slapped for his generosity.

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Fact is Istream I was not talking to you. My comments were directed at Tekton's original comment. It got buried in the fall out. and anyone else who was confused as to my roll in the project.

 

 

Be a shame if I had to stop posting pics too.

Not sure who's going to "slap Jim". I didn't think there was anyone quite that smarmy here.

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IStream is correct.

 

I really didn't want to step into this can of worms.

 

A workplace safety training program is required by law.

 

A job hazard analysis for each specific job or task should be filled out for the employee to read and sign to verify that he understands them.

 

In all industries, as well as construction industries, such as my former industry of Marine Construction, Piledriving, Bridgebuilding, Dock and Wharf building and Diving; after training most companies have a three strikes rule. After two safety violation warnings, the employee is subject to termination.

 

In my former industry, the cost for training and PPE are billed to each contract.

 

If an OSHA inspector finds violations of the above, they can assess a $4000 or more penalty for each violation. When the inspector returns, and the said violations are not corrected the penalty for each violation is doubled to $8000. If in followup inspections, with still no response, the penalty is doubled again, with doublings of penalties again, if no corrective action is taken.

 

1915.152
General requirements
(e) Training
(1)
The employer shall provide training to each employee who is
required by this section to use PPE (Exception: Training in the
use of personal fall arrest systems and positioning device systems
is covered in Sections 1915.159 and 1915.160). Each employee
shall be trained to understand at least the following:
(i)
When PPE is necessary;
(ii)
What PPE is necessary;
(iii)
How to properly don, doff, adjust, and wear PPE;
(iv)
The limitations of the PPE; and
(v)
The proper care, maintenance, useful life, and disposal of
the PPE.
(2)
The employer shall ensure that each affected employee
demonstrates the ability to use PPE properly before being
allowed to perform work requiring the use of PPE.
(3)
The employer shall retrain any employee who does not
understand or display the skills required by paragraph (e)(2) of
this section. Circumstances where retraining is required include,

but are not limited to, situations where:

(i)
Changes in occupation or work render previous
training obsolete; or
(ii)
Changes in the types of PPE to be used render previous
training obsolete; or
(iii)
Inadequacies in an affected employee’s knowledge or use of
assigned PPE indicate that the employee has not retained
the requisite understanding or skill.

OSHA General Requirements - 190.132

https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=9777

 

Training requirements in OSHA Standards

https://www.osha.gov/Publications/osha2254.pdf

 

Resource for Developement and Delivery of Training to Workers

https://www.osha.gov/Publications/osha3824.pdf

 

PPE Assessment

https://www.osha.gov/dte/library/ppe_assessment/ppe_assessment.html

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Oh god. People must be really bored today.

 

I think I'll work on the NZ client's boat.

Do I need any protective gear besides a snorkel?

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Oh god. People must be really bored today.

 

I think I'll work on the NZ client's boat.

Do I need any protective gear besides a snorkel?

Seems like OSHA and Anarchy don't play well together. To be fair to Jim Betts, in most of the photos in this thread, his staff are using a lot of PPE. The Rick on the router photo just stands out like a sore thumb.

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Fact is Istream I was not talking to you. My comments were directed at Tekton's original comment. It got buried in the fall out. and anyone else who was confused as to my roll in the project.

 

 

Be a shame if I had to stop posting pics too.

Not sure who's going to "slap Jim". I didn't think there was anyone quite that smarmy here.

 

I don't think that word means what you think it means. You're right though, I hear OSHA doesn't get hooked up to the internet until 2018.

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Oh god. People must be really bored today.

 

I think I'll work on the NZ client's boat.

Do I need any protective gear besides a snorkel?

 

 

Yeah. Wear a safety harness attached to your floor. NZ is upside down from your shack. You can't be too careful.

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Veegs:

That wasn't exactly what had in mind.. I'll let it go at that.

 

When I was working in Taiwan with the Ta Chaio the yard was on the banks of the Tamsui ( pronounced Dan Sway) river. That was one funky river. Taiwan was in the very early stages of cleaning up the environment. One day the river, and it's a big river, was running purple. I asked about it and all I got was a shrug. "Hen cho!" "It stinks". Shrug.

 

The problem was we were finishing two CT65's and they were launched and tied up to the dock. To get on the boats you had to walk up a plank leaving you over the river for about ten feet. Not a big deal for someone like Boomer but for me with my fear of heights a bit terrifying. On top of that, the plank was about 10" wide at its widest spot and split in several places. It bounced. I weighed about 220 lbs at the time compared to the 135 lbs. of the typical Taiwanese worker.

I hated that plank. I really feared that I would not survive a dunk in that putrid, microbe redolent (I imagined) river. OSHA would not have known where to start in Taiwan. Still, I loved it.

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I haven't seen an OSHA inspector in many years, maybe the fact we have never had an injury helps - not long ago a guy was killed not far away when the trench collapsed. That was stupid and I was ready to walk off a job when the owner insisted we didn't need to wait for the trench box and said he was going in the hole. I said you go in and I am leaving and afterwards told him I didn't want his 3 year old calling me years from now asking why I killed his dad. Big stuff is important, micromanaging everyone is just annoying. Don't fuck with Jim. Just finished courses to qualify doing disaster work for FEMA again. That was mind numbing. Can't talk on the phone while driving even with hands free. I have towed boats across the country using a lap top for navigation while talking on the phone and smoking to stay awake. (pre smartphones). Always some dumbass that runs it for the rest of us.

 

Loving the build process, the pictures are terrific and it all just makes me want to find a way to move the PNW. Keep up the great work.

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A problem with osha and pipe enforcement is it diminishes our natural avoidance and reflex reactions. I only ever get stuff in my eyes when wearing safety glasses, without them I position myself out of the firing line and the air stream of the motor cooling, can't sense that with glasses on. A lot of workplace requirements are supposed to help idiots from getting hurt, however most just help make better class idiots.

 

Flame away.

Ppe not pipe, damn autocorrect.

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Alcy:

I'm not sure if it's true but I heard that most pedestrian/car accidents happened in crosswalks.

People think they are safe and don't pay attention to what is around them.

 

One Christmas when I worked at Carter's I had no money and I wanted to make some toys for kids. I wanted to make little sail boats out of wood. I had very few tools but I had a circular saw and some scraps of wood.

I sat down, turned the saw upside down and clamped it between my thighs, blade up. The blade was aimed right at my crotch. I used it like a mini table saw and it worked quite well. When I told Chuck Paine about what I had done he was incredulous that I had not injured myself. The toys came out very well.

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Oh god. People must be really bored today.

 

I think I'll work on the NZ client's boat.

Do I need any protective gear besides a snorkel?

 

A wetsuit might be useful while you work on that run aft, Bob. :)

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Sailbye:

Thanks. I am just finished with the latest round of interior changes. My client apologizes about "going round in circles" but I explain that it's OK and just the way the design spiral always works.

 

But I'm done working for the day and now I can walk the dog and settle down for Saturday Afternoon at the Opera on CBC2 and some muted college footy on the telly.

Nothing like listening to La Traviata while watching 300 lb. men crash itno each other.

 

Now there's an idea!!!!!!!

Why don't I write an opera about professional football? I could get some sopranos to play offensive line men.

It would be a hit I'm sure.

 

Picture this:

Back in the huddle, quarter back, a tenor, singing an aria, his two girl friends in the stands, head raised above the other guys, backed up by the rest of the team as the chorus.

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Sailbye:

Thanks. I am just finished with the latest round of interior changes. My client apologizes about "going round in circles" but I explain that it's OK and just the way the design spiral always works.

 

But I'm done working for the day and now I can walk the dog and settle down for Saturday Afternoon at the Opera on CBC2 and some muted college footy on the telly.

Nothing like listening to La Traviata while watching 300 lb. men crash itno each other.

 

Now there's an idea!!!!!!!

Why don't I write an opera about professional football? I could get some sopranos to play offensive line men.

It would be a hit I'm sure.

 

Picture this:

Back in the huddle, quarter back, a tenor, singing an aria, head raised above the other guys, backed up by the rest of the team as the chorus.

 

Can't say I understand American football (gridiron, is it?) at all. I mean, all those forward passes!

But Rugby - now there is a game to cherish.

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Sailbye:

You'll understand after you see my opera.

 

When I came to the US I was baffled by American football and baseball. "What do you mean, I have to drop the bat?"

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Alcy:

I'm not sure if it's true but I heard that most pedestrian/car accidents happened in crosswalks.

People think they are safe and don't pay attention to what is around them.

 

One Christmas when I worked at Carter's I had no money and I wanted to make some toys for kids. I wanted to make little sail boats out of wood. I had very few tools but I had a circular saw and some scraps of wood.

I sat down, turned the saw upside down and clamped it between my thighs, blade up. The blade was aimed right at my crotch. I used it like a mini table saw and it worked quite well. When I told Chuck Paine about what I had done he was incredulous that I had not injured myself. The toys came out very well.

 

Saw one of those "Seconds before death" vids of a guy who had a chainsaw between his legs, clamped by the bar while he yanked on the start cord.

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Taking risks is an essential (and fun) part of life, good to think about the upside and downside when deciding what risks to take.

 

Many people do stupid and risky things for little benefit, or they could have minimised or eradicated the risk with a bit of extra effort (like the down side of putting on safety glasses v. the risk of eye injury or blindness).

 

Because the bad outcome from taking a risk didn't occur doesn't mean:

  • there was not much risk or the risk was less than might first appear
  • that it wasn't a stupid thing to do in the first place

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Alcy:

I'm not sure if it's true but I heard that most pedestrian/car accidents happened in crosswalks.

People think they are safe and don't pay attention to what is around them.

 

One Christmas when I worked at Carter's I had no money and I wanted to make some toys for kids. I wanted to make little sail boats out of wood. I had very few tools but I had a circular saw and some scraps of wood.

I sat down, turned the saw upside down and clamped it between my thighs, blade up. The blade was aimed right at my crotch. I used it like a mini table saw and it worked quite well. When I told Chuck Paine about what I had done he was incredulous that I had not injured myself. The toys came out very well.

 

Saw one of those "Seconds before death" vids of a guy who had a chainsaw between his legs, clamped by the bar while he yanked on the start cord.

 

 

One of those happened last night in Nanaimo. 4 foreign students tried to run a crosswalk against a red light. 2 made it, 2 are critical.

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Darwin is a harsh instructor.

 

I heard they were crossing the Island Highway.

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Geez can we get back on track with the Boat stuff! Stop bothering the DESIGNER.....Any of these safety issues should be sent to the Perry and Associates Chief of Safety and Public Relations. She has numerous political contacts with two cousins working in the White House. So don't mess with her....

post-195-0-20219600-1477194370_thumb.jpg

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There used to be a time when safety training didn’t even exist. Employees could walk beams without fall protection, little to no protective equipment and gear was used when performing specific tasks, and even if there was a safety training program in place, it was rarely adhered to or it was simply a name, not something that was actually practiced or enforced on construction and job sites. Of course, nowadays this has all changed. OSHA has been in existence since 1970 and several other safety programs exist to not only protect workers, but also to protect companies. In fact, there are a number of reasons OSHA Safety Training, and just safety training in general, is important. A lot of people throughout industries tend to forget the multiple reasons why safety training programs matter.

 

First of all, let’s point out the fact that a lot of workers can become lethargic or immune to safety requirements simply because they experience it day in and day out. They go through the same routine everyday, for the most part, and some will see it as unimportant because they’ve “been doing it forever” and don’t need to be reminded of standard safety procedures. This can obviously result in accidents, injury, or even death due to ignorance of safety procedures that are designed to protect multiple parties, especially the workers on the job site. Over the years I've witnesses numerous accidents and even deaths. Because of this, it is EXTREMELY important to constantly be reminding employees of not only the fact that safety requirements must be adhered to, but also WHY they need to be followed.

 

That's all I'm going to say on the subject. I didn't want to go here, but it is important for a myriad of reasons.

 

Yep it is. However, too much of it is generated by insurance companies trying to protect their ass. I have to send every one of my crew to a safety meeting for every General Contr. that I work for. That starts to add up to a lot of lost labor. Not saying it isn't good to have a safety meeting, but it has run amok. All to get a sticker for the hard hat. My favorite is the "any hole 2" or bigger must be filled in if you are not working on it." Nail a board over a hole in the floor so you can trip on it instead of stubbing you toe on it.

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