Bob Perry

My newest project

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Bob, speaking of IOR boats, someone has to buy Mung Breath's boat. She's a complete steal.

 

We followed her refit here thanks to Mung.

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1971/Mccurdy-%26-Rhodes-Custom-Sloop-2649155/Newport/RI/United-States

 

4411711_20130924101309601_1_XLARGE.jpg

 

Whoa.

Yeah, the timing is bad but I'd be all over that if I was back by the water.

Gonna be a few years for me though.

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That sounds like an outstanding deal - gorgeous boat.

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I didn't take a lot of pictures yesterday, nor have I had a chance to review the images I shot yet. - My wife just returned from a trip, which entails wining, dining and.....

 

However I do have some video of yesterdays visit to Betts Boats and our side trip checking out WALL STREET DUCK.

 

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Thanks Boomer. Well done.

 

Near the end of the video is me talking to Robert, the guy in the Tyvex suit. Robert just got back from helping Commodore Tompkins sail his very broken boat back from Hawaii. Robert is my age and has many thousands of sea miles to his credit. I listen to him when he has an idea. Robert has been counselling the client n various details of the boat.

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Alpha:

That was a great looking steel, multi chine pinky. I'll take a photo of next week. It looks like a Colvin interpretation of a Chapelle pinky to me.

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Robert ...has many thousands of sea miles to his credit. I listen to him when he has an idea.

+1. Mr. Flowerman has an amazing array of experience, and is always worth a listen.

 

When I was a noob at racing sleds, I spent a very pleasant layover weekend in Cabo picking his brain on how to make the things go fast (he was boat-captain on Silver Bullet at the time, one of the most successful programs of that era). Great guy.

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Sled:

You sometimes have to drag the stories out of Robert but he sure has some. He sails a Wylie one tonner now that had some work done at the Betts yard. He's the guy who convinced me to go with three reefs in the main on the cutters.

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Here is a piece of the removable cabin sole getting its teak overlay by Andrew.

014_zpsvcjhmjvv.jpg

 

Here is the piece with all the teak in place

015_zpsy2eh62x2.jpg

 

I told you I had nothing exciting for you today. Here are two trash bucket liners. Note the exquisite proportions.

X%203_zpsiqprceww.jpg

 

Juan is laying out the CF tapers to make it easier for him to cut the pieces or a new Chastity Strut.

005_zps5wpxktea.jpg

The grain on that corner looks way better. Nice work.

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Thanks Boomer. Well done.

 

Near the end of the video is me talking to Robert, the guy in the Tyvex suit. Robert just got back from helping Commodore Tompkins sail his very broken boat back from Hawaii. Robert is my age and has many thousands of sea miles to his credit. I listen to him when he has an idea. Robert has been counselling the client n various details of the boat.

Kudos to Boomer, thanks. Photos are great but video really helps to visualize the scope and scale of the work.

 

I never heard your voice before Bob, your voice sounds a little gravelly which is very appropriate for a curmudgeon! ;)

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Here is a piece of the removable cabin sole getting its teak overlay by Andrew.

014_zpsvcjhmjvv.jpg

 

Here is the piece with all the teak in place

015_zpsy2eh62x2.jpg

 

I told you I had nothing exciting for you today. Here are two trash bucket liners. Note the exquisite proportions.

X%203_zpsiqprceww.jpg

 

Juan is laying out the CF tapers to make it easier for him to cut the pieces or a new Chastity Strut.

005_zps5wpxktea.jpg

The grain on that corner looks way better. Nice work.

 

 

+1

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Ed:

Yes, now you know why I don't sing.

 

Thanks for the encouragement. I think Rick does good work.

 

The part where Rick is talking to the kid in the Tyvex suit is Rick talking to Jared, his son in law.

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What's in the bin liner?

My iPhone if they don't stop fucking it up with the updates.

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Nice video Boomer, makes me really miss boatbuilding.

 

And WSD....(bad hobot! no more projects!), she's in rough condition.

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Alpha:

That was a great looking steel, multi chine pinky. I'll take a photo of next week. It looks like a Colvin interpretation of a Chapelle pinky to me.

I met an irish canadian family cruising in one of those a long time ago when I was working in Dublin. Beautiful shape! I actually ordered the study plans from Colvin to know more about the design... I wonder where those have gone to after several house moves since then? Need to dig out a few old boxes!

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Am I the only one who needs to ask what a pinky is?

 

In my world it's either

 

1. A slightly deformed small finger

2. A fictional gangster character created by Graham Greene in order to explore the nature of evil, in his novel Brighton Rock, or

3. A double entendre

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Austin:

Bingo! Good ear my friend.

 

Ed:

They were called "pink sterned schooners". They are double enders from the NE that have the gunwhale extended aft over the outboard rudder to terminate in a "tombstone transom" high above the DWL. Made even higher by the exaggerated sheer spring.

 

I'm sure someone here can dredge up a photo or drawing of one. I'll see what I can do. Damn it, I knew I should have photographed that one yesterday.

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This is a pretty good example of the pink type.

 

larevenant03.jpg

 

Better look at the 'pinked stern' which is where they got their name. The bulwark plank extends well past the rudder post and rudder and forms a bumkin of sorts for the mainsheet and was used for sanitary purposes. That last detail was a big improvement over hanging ones ass out in the stays holding the bowsprit up forward which is where the term 'head' came from.

 

4745181066_d18d316fce.jpg

 

Nice look at one under sail and the aforementioned 'crapper' aft.

 

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This is a pretty good example of the pink type.

 

larevenant03.jpg

 

Better look at the 'pinked stern' which is where they got their name. The bulwark plank extends well past the rudder post and rudder and forms a bumkin of sorts for the mainsheet and was used for sanitary purposes. That last detail was a big improvement over hanging ones ass out in the stays holding the bowsprit up forward which is where the term 'head' came from.

 

4745181066_d18d316fce.jpg

 

Lovely, thanks

 

There's a lot of pooh-ing in 'Mercan boat design, isn't there?

 

There was some other sort of stern discussed a couple of weeks ago that claimed origins in the same function, if I recall correctly.

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This is a pretty good example of the pink type.

 

larevenant03.jpg

 

Better look at the 'pinked stern' which is where they got their name. The bulwark plank extends well past the rudder post and rudder and forms a bumkin of sorts for the mainsheet and was used for sanitary purposes. That last detail was a big improvement over hanging ones ass out in the stays holding the bowsprit up forward which is where the term 'head' came from.

 

4745181066_d18d316fce.jpg

Lovely, thanks

 

There's a lot of pooh-ing in 'Mercan boat design, isn't there?

 

There was some other sort of stern discussed a couple of weeks ago that claimed origins in the same function, if I recall correctly.

Yeah, a "bombs away" stern just doesn't have the right ring to it.

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OK - a circular formula is at work and the shitting stern shape was discussed a few weeks ago in the context of the same pinkies - by the same people in fact. Does this mean we are now old?

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OK - a circular formula is at work and the shitting stern shape was discussed a few weeks ago in the context of the same pinkies - by the same people in fact. Does this mean we are now old?

 

Speak for yourself, buster.

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What's in the bin liner?

My iPhone if they don't stop fucking it up with the updates.

 

 

My fucking Samsung wouldn't go that gently - it'd be under the wheels of the Travel lift.

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Thanks for the kudos! Didn't take many pics, with all the primer, the hull was looking pretty white with little detail, so decided to shoot video instead.

 

30957379981_5a7a7c2345_h.jpg

 

31035813736_e4286f50e7_h.jpg

 

31035795866_f71619eab3_h.jpg

 

31071573965_44ee52a3f8_h.jpg

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Flowerman sails (& owns) Wylie boats - be careful!! Bought Robert & Commodore lunch at WYC the day before they left to bring "Flash Girl" home to Sausalito. FG was in good shape, still had some engine gremlins to exorcise, but that delivery crew could get any boat home.

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Nice photos Boomer, thanks. I like the headroom in the interior, I am 'Bob size' and It looks like I could stand straight in there.

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Ed:

Where the cabin trunk is split the headroom drops to 5'8" but in the main cabin headroom is 6'6".

 

For the record, the cabin trunk is not just "split" into two pieces. Each "box" has it's own shape. I tried just splitting a long cabin trunk but that did not work at all. I like the result. Not sure what I would do different the next time.

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Bob, do you use a standard value for headroom, or is that something you discuss with the clent? I'm not too tall at 5' 8" and like to have enough headroom, but not too much...

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Alpha:

Over the years I have found that people like lots of headroom, even when they don't need it. It makes the interior feel bigger. I'm 6'3" and I like to use a min headroom of 6'6". If the boat is over 45' I may use 6'9" headroom.

One of the immutable rules of yacht design is "Headroom mysteriously disappears". This probably means that designers do not account for the thickness of the overhead and laminate sufficiently. I always use 3" or more to be safe.

 

Of course this has to be balanced against the look you are after. When I did WILD HORSES thew client, Tully, was 6'3" and his two sons were close to 6'8". I gave the boat 6'9" headroom and big, spaces so elbows would not be whacked. Tully sold the boat to Tina and Dale Ingals. Dale is about 5'11" and Tina is about 5'5". They love the boat.

 

Most of the time I just do what I can with the look I am after but I would consider anything short of 6'3" headroom inadequate. I would always prefer a nice, low cabin trunk but headroom requirements don;t always play along.

 

Let's say you came to me for a custom design and you said you did not need more then 6' headroom. I would advise you to think of resale value and perhaps go with more headroom. Tony and Annie from Anchorage were both under 5'4", self admitted Munchkins and great people. I convinced them to go the more typical minimum benchmarks.

 

One boat at a time Alpha. They are all different.

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Looking at the construction photos, I have to admit I do grin slyly thinking about the inevitable wake-up call somebody is going to have when they line up with "that heavy cruiser over there", and proceed to get dropped like they are dragging the anchor.

 

As for the two, separate houses - of course some folks will think it's just one interrupted house - probably the same folks that think so many boats are another design, just with "2 feet added in the middle" - like when someone says "JUST pop a mold off it and..." - clearly demonstrating that they have never made molding tools and parts before.

 

That's the beauty of silly casual observers, - they say what ever pops into their heads, it's what makes a project in the boatyard so fun...

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Can't have too much headroom?

 

hanse-675-print-06-0001-aa346.jpg

 

I read a review of one of these sorts of boats recently where they complimented the builders' thoughtfulness in providing a footstool to allow you to reach the overhead hatch to open it.

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Brent is starting to pollute more threads.

 

Have I mentioned lately that Brent is an idiot?

 

Back on ignore.

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I'm sitting here working on a couple of things and I got this wild hair, why not give Ted Brewer a call? Ted and I go waaayyyyy back. I was moonlighting for Ted when I was working for Dick Carter. I even drove up to visit Ted in Maine when he offered me a full time job. He lived in a very small town in Maine and I was still young and I was not sure I could handle life up there in Maine so I declined his generous offer. There's more to the story than that but I'll save the details for another day. Ted was also the first recognized yacht designer to call me a "yacht designer". I figured hell, if Ted thinks I'm a yacht designer I must be one. Ted would know.

 

So I called Ted. He lives up in B.C. now and is fully retired. He used to stay busy designing "things" for model railroad builders. But now he's 84 and doesn't do that anymore. He likes to travel by car and does a lot of travelling. We talked about a number of things. I had been puzzling over a design feature of one of my new projects so I asked Ted for his opinion on it. He laughed that I was asking him but I knew better. He's had a lot of design experience in a wide range of craft. I respect that. I will take his advice to heart.

 

It was a good wild hair.

 

Ted is good first choice for plastic cruising boats ,there are none better, but his understanding of small steel boat building is extremely limited.

 

So now you are claiming you and Ted Brewer have something in common?

 

Compared to the 40 years of steel boat building experience you have, and the over 3 dozen highly successful steel boats you have put together with your own hands, and the 4 decades of steel boat cruising experience, living aboard and maintaining a steel boat experience you have?

Ya sure! Put away that bottle, and sober up.

 

 

All you did is tack the shells together with your crude welds. The owners still had 95% or more of the work left.

 

If they ever finished it. Most didn't.

 

BTW, you are not a "Full Time" boatbuilder. So your opinion doesn't count, according to your "rules".

 

Maintaining your boat? I've seen pics of the quality of your maintainence. It looked like you slopped paint on with a mop.

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Alpha:

 

Let's say you came to me for a custom design and you said you did not need more then 6' headroom. I would advise you to think of resale value and perhaps go with more headroom. Tony and Annie from Anchorage were both under 5'4", self admitted Munchkins and great people. I convinced them to go the more typical minimum benchmarks.

 

One boat at a time Alpha. They are all different.

 

Nothing like long and low...

 

Keith:

 

If you take the dimension from the top of the house to the sole line you get just over 6’4”. So, if you assume the thickness of the cabin top with core and some liner detail amounting to 2.5” then you will have 6’1” headroom on centerline in the galley and dinette areas. It drops down a bit forward.

I think the look is working quite well with that cabin trunk.

 

Bob P.

 

Jody31_zps69b5c4a6.jpg

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While living aboard, her broker told her that, if she said if she did anything to improve her stock plastic boat, like insulate it and add a heater, it would reduce the resale value.

 

:rolleyes:

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I am 6'2" and never found a boat with too much headroom.

I am just shy of 6'6", I have never found a smallish boat with enough had room. I don't run in the right circles to know about any over 50'.

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Can't have too much headroom?

 

hanse-675-print-06-0001-aa346.jpg

 

I read a review of one of these sorts of boats recently where they complimented the builders' thoughtfulness in providing a footstool to allow you to reach the overhead hatch to open it.

That bimini thingy is seriously ugly. It comes in black too. That would be fun in the tropics.

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Just more bitter talk from BS. It's all he has.

 

There is no BS boat in SAIL Magazine this month headed anywhere. Kind of says it all.

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Just more bitter talk from BS. It's all he has.

 

There is no BS boat in SAIL Magazine this month headed anywhere. Kind of says it all.

I assume the staff photographer didn't have a way to cross 300yds of coral reef to photograph a BS boat.

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Bob, speaking of IOR boats, someone has to buy Mung Breath's boat. She's a complete steal.

 

We followed her refit here thanks to Mung.

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1971/Mccurdy-%26-Rhodes-Custom-Sloop-2649155/Newport/RI/United-States

 

4411711_20130924101309601_1_XLARGE.jpg

 

 

 

James McCurdy had a really good eye. Always liked his designs,

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Thanks Leggs but it's not an unusual keel. It's a welded steel fin witha lead bulb. There is a wide steel, flange plate at the top where it bolts onto the hull. Frankie's keel is like this as are AMATI's and the Container Cruiser keels.

PIC00021_zpszx8ovzdm.jpg

bernieprofile_zpst4umobsa.jpg

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Was there ever a discussion about the orientation of the entire interior? Mirror image or handed. Just curious bob.

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...I could see the decks and cabin of one of my origami metal boats being built and detailed separately, like that one, on a work bench, by a commercial builder, before being installed in the hull, saving a lot of work and time .It could work well.

Sure, in theory. But that would require a customer willing to pay a commercial builder to build one, and a commercial builder willing to hold their nose long enough to do it. Plus the big difference is that with Bob's design work you know they will actually fit together on the first try, with your "bend it and weld it up, see how it looks" technique I don't think pre-fabbing a deck is such a great idea.

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I would also require BS being able to provide accurate working drawings and we have already seen what he passes off as "drawings". He can't post a set of lines.

I'm sure any competent builder would get a real chuckle out of BS's "design work".

 

When I take my drawings to a builder I want that builder to say, "Holy shit, this guy is good." Not, "WTF is that?"

 

In the world of CNC cutting if my drawings are not accurate it will be hard for the guy programming the CNC machine to get what I want. The transition from 2D to 3D would be difficult. It would be impossible for me to work with a +-2" tolerance.

 

cje:

I don't recall the orientation of the layout ever being discussed. It just evolved from Dave's own early sketches. That's an integral part of the way we communicate. Dave is a home developer and produces, along with his wife Bokhee, their own designs. So Dave can draw. Dave's "sketches" are acad style drawings and accurate. Dave will pick an area where we need more definition or clarity and he'll produce his own joiner sections. Then I take his drawing and verify with my own drawing that what he wants actually works. Then we fine tune.

 

On a day like today we get a lot done and have a good time doing it. If we were not having fun I would not schedule a get together for Saturday.

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Thanks Leggs but it's not an unusual keel. It's a welded steel fin witha lead bulb. There is a wide steel, flange plate at the top where it bolts onto the hull. Frankie's keel is like this as are AMATI's and the Container Cruiser keels.

PIC00021_zpszx8ovzdm.jpg

bernieprofile_zpst4umobsa.jpg

Izzat top boat Amati? I like the looks of that.

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I still like Frankie. That's a boat!

It wouldn't make it out of my channel though since the Corp of Engineers doesn't have the $$ to dredge it.

 

Francis Lee would be super fun on Lake MI. An over and back weekend to Leland would be awesome.

Too bad Lake MI loves to shoal everything off during the winter.

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Thanks Leggs but it's not an unusual keel. It's a welded steel fin witha lead bulb. There is a wide steel, flange plate at the top where it bolts onto the hull. Frankie's keel is like this as are AMATI's and the Container Cruiser keels.

 

 

Sorry Bob, maybe I should have used the sarcasm font.

 

What I was referring to was the bit I have circled in red in this clip, which looks kinda like a stubby wing angled steeply downwards:

 

post-51350-0-75188200-1479628466_thumb.png

 

Irony doesn't work well in plain ASCII. Mea culpa

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Legs:

I totally missed that. Sometimes you look at a drawing for so long you stop seeing things.

Yes, that is my "keel fin of mystery"..

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Steele:

Yes, AMATI's keel has a slight rake forward. Would I do that again? Don't think so.

 

AMATI was never raced. It's hard to get a real handle on how effective a feature is if you are not going to race the boat. AMATI sails very well. How well? We'd have to race the boat to know for sure.

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i think i read someone had to convince R. Perry that a 43' boat that will probably be sailing off shore at times, should have 3 reefs in mainsail.......

 

wow. guess Mr. Swain right about very little cruising experience.

 

last time I checked sail plan, wasn't a mizzen there for "jib and jigger"

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The decision was a little more involved that that sheep. Client, sparmaker, sailmaker, me and Mr. Flowers all had ideas. They were discussed and weighed and in the end we went with three reefs. It's a team effort. One hurdle for three reefs was running three reef lines internal in the V-boom. These decisions are not always as simple as you might guess. Depth of the third reef was the same as the depth of the 2nd reef. Mr. Flowers thought that dealing with more shallow reefs would be easier than two bigger reefs. I agreed.

 

"Jib and Jigger"? " Mizzen"? I think you may have the wrong thread. My boat is a cutter.

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Is single-line reefing used with a V-boom? Are there any advantages with the boom geometry and configuration over a standard boom when it comes to reefing? Are Hall doing it or Steve and the gang at Offshore?

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kdh:

No advantages with internal single reef lines. Maybe even the geometry of the V boom makes it more difficult. There is quite a bit if hardware to get in the boom. I'll let you know how it works when we sail it. The spars are by Offshore. Steve was very involved with the planning.

 

Unfortunately, this is the best pic I have of the boom. It's all wrapped up again now.

boom_zpsbmptgs68.jpg

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Hi Mr. Perry and faithful dog,

 

"Depth of the third reef was the same as the depth of the 2nd reef. "

 

would make sense if had a mizzen, I know it doesn't, reread last post of mine if desired.

 

three reefs at proper heights... 3rd would be up way up there....makes it easier on crew rather than setting trysail.

above third reef sail would hopefully be reinforced for high winds.

 

If fancy boom does not allow it..........got the wrong boom grasshopper

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bowsprit%203_zpslewuumul.jpg

 

star%202_zpszs9giudv.jpg

 

Look, I wasn't going to say anything, but you have all realised that the whole boat is nothing but cover (a sort of McGuffin) for Bob's covert project to design and deliver the ultimate Southern Rules (Modern) jousting stick? It's his Stealth Stick, undetectable to the radar array of the modern JDS (Jousting Defence System). The top picture shows the handle only, and he's trial mounted the plasma delivery ring on the end of it, just to give an idea.

 

If you don't get this (and who would blame you), don't worry, it's an Australian thing: Under S(M) rules there is no limit on the size of the stick, beyond what you can hold, and at 70 lbs the BPSS is well within the range of a highly trained jouster.

 

He's an ideas man, alright.

 

Arise, Sir Bob.

2 inch sch 40 stainless pipe is around 3,65 lbs per foot,. Ten feet in an A frame bowsprit would weigh around 36.5 lbs. Add the tangs, etc and you would still be under 50 lbs.

There is a "no expenses spared ", 40 ft canoe stern sloop in Gorge Harbour which has one made of 1 1/4 inch pipe, around 2 .27 lbs per foot.

So how can one justify the cost and time wasted on a carbon fibre one weighing 70 Lbs?

The potential for screwups with an unknown, like carbon, in such a complex shape, are far greater than in a well known material , like welded stainless,

The labour on the stainless one would be about 4 hours max, probably less, at $30 an hour.

How many hours were wasted on the carbon one, at what hourly rate? Enough to cruise for a year? Guess it depends on what you value.

This demonstrates what you get when you hire someone who jumps on every "state of the art" bandwagon passing by , without weighing the benefits, which in this case are zero.

The sole justification for the carbon bowsprit ate just plain, childish snobbery. I'd take more pride in having gone further for longer, than the childish;

" Haw haw on you, I have a carbon bowsprit" .Without having cruised anywhere for any serious length of time.

 

After all, what are cruising boats for, really?

You keep quoting costs? It's immaterial, the buyer has enough dosh to buy four custom carbon fiber yachts to scatter around the globe. Saving a couple pennies? Really?

 

There are some very rich people around who don't mind spending a bit to get exactly what they want even if you don't like what they want.

 

So give us the advantages of a 70 LB ugly bowsprit, over a much better looking, easier to deal with 50 lb one, you can weld gear on, anytime , quickly and easily.

 

I'll take a punt on "it's what the customer wanted" ...

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Sheep:

I can't make sense of your last post. My cutters were never considered as ketches or yawls. The weird thing is, that;'s why I call them cutters, i.e. they are cutters. With an outboard rudder the mizzen would be a problem. I woild have to move the mizzen way forward. It could be done but not on this project. Client asks for a cutter because his last boat was a cutter. Good enough. I'll give him a cutter.

 

Wayalan wins the prize!

BS: the butt ugly details that festoon your boats are not at all what we are after in this project. I know you find that hard to comprehend but I suspect you find a lot of things in life hard to comprehend. Tough.

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Don't notice much acetone or fibreglass anywhere near the metal fab area.

I do notice a very clean factory with everything in its place.

With a factory volume such as that, you'd need to spill a hell of a lot of acetone to get anywhere near a combustible atmosphere.....

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Jim Betts is a pro in every sense of the word. One of the most skilled and finest boat builders in the world.

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1) New design ratio:

 

( Number of Brent boats that have hit an "uncharted" rock or reef ) / ( Number of Brent boats in existence ) = Bash Ratio. I strongly suspect it approaches 1.0

 

 

2) Why do you think that the shop is full of acetone fumes? It's probably all vacuum bagged epoxy with the epoxy. So no styrene fumes, and the only acetone might be for cleaning the odd laminating roller.

 

Perhaps you blew yourself up once welding something while the air was quick with acetone fumes?

 

 

3) How do you know that a 2" or 1-1/4" pipe bowsprit would be strong enough to perhaps take rig loads, the load from a Code Zero if they choose to fly it from the bow or an assymetric tacked to the end. Why would you even suggest a material size without knowing anything of the loads for the item? Oh, I know, your idea of engineering is "that looks about right".... Not to mention that the aesthetics mean nothing to you?

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I would also require BS being able to provide accurate working drawings and we have already seen what he passes off as "drawings". He can't post a set of lines.

I'm sure any competent builder would get a real chuckle out of BS's "design work".

 

When I take my drawings to a builder I want that builder to say, "Holy shit, this guy is good." Not, "WTF is that?"

 

In the world of CNC cutting if my drawings are not accurate it will be hard for the guy programming the CNC machine to get what I want. The transition from 2D to 3D would be difficult. It would be impossible for me to work with a +-2" tolerance.

 

cje:

I don't recall the orientation of the layout ever being discussed. It just evolved from Dave's own early sketches. That's an integral part of the way we communicate. Dave is a home developer and produces, along with his wife Bokhee, their own designs. So Dave can draw. Dave's "sketches" are acad style drawings and accurate. Dave will pick an area where we need more definition or clarity and he'll produce his own joiner sections. Then I take his drawing and verify with my own drawing that what he wants actually works. Then we fine tune.

 

On a day like today we get a lot done and have a good time doing it. If we were not having fun I would not schedule a get together for Saturday.

Bob left out the fisticuffs over the batteries. He is a lot bigger than me so I let him do whatever he wants, and he is almost always right.

Since we had so much time before the building process starts [fingers crossed, in January next year] we have been able to spend a lot of time exploring options and different ideas. Usually the ideas are good but need several sessions to fine tune.

Actually, we have very seldom had to go back and seriously redo or undo anything. I don't know if anyone noticed the ventilation system Bob designed for the washer/dryer vent, which also vents the head and wet locker, and pumps intake air into the engine room and sucks the hot air out when the engine is turned off. The aft locker on the port side houses the propane tanks and acts as a sort of dorade box.

Another thing I really like is the anchor locker. The chain comes in through an open channel in the deck before it dives under the anchor locker hatch and runs through the capstan. Bob might be able to explain how this works better than I. We are hoping to be able to just lift up the anchor and drop it into the locker and replace it with a carbon fiber bowsprit for the asymmetrical spinnaker.

Never had so much fun in my life as working with Bob.

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What acetone fumes is BS talking about?

 

The one thing you immediately notice when you enter the Betts building is no odor, no smell. They use epoxy and not a styrene resin. Big difference I'd say the strongest smell in the shop is where the woodworking is done. You smell wood.

The epoxy gives off no odor.

 

BS is an idiot. Imagine how silly the cutters would look with a 1.25" OD pipe bowsprit, or even a 2" pipe sprit. But BS has no eye whatsoever so it matters not to him.

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Jim Betts cutting steel with oxy/acetylene torch. Didn't ask what he was fabbing.

 

Jim is always busy in the shops as well as the office. I don't think I've ever seen him sit down, other then drive the fork lift.

 

29830259314_6145b21d54_h.jpg

 

30460991025_d54e8bd4a2_h.jpg

 

30460996265_ce6b15ee63_h.jpg

 

Using a cutting torch in a shop full of fibreglass and acetone fumes can make things go bang, quickly.

Not much wisdom in that.

Has your fire marshall seen this picture?

 

 

Pretty clean looking shop if you ask me. I've spent my fair share of time on a torch and would have no issue with what he is doing. Might do things differently style wise but that's it.

 

And for what it's worth I did FD business inspections for many years. Based on the very limited scope of the photos there's no issue.

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Jim Betts cutting steel with oxy/acetylene torch. Didn't ask what he was fabbing.

 

Jim is always busy in the shops as well as the office. I don't think I've ever seen him sit down, other then drive the fork lift.

 

29830259314_6145b21d54_h.jpg

 

30460991025_d54e8bd4a2_h.jpg

 

30460996265_ce6b15ee63_h.jpg

 

Using a cutting torch in a shop full of fibreglass and acetone fumes can make things go bang, quickly.

Not much wisdom in that.

Has your fire marshall seen this picture?

 

 

Pretty clean looking shop if you ask me. I've spent my fair share of time on a torch and would have no issue with what he is doing. Might do things differently style wise but that's it.

 

And for what it's worth I did FD business inspections for many years. Based on the very limited scope of the photos there's no issue.

 

i see an issue and a pretty big one at that. maybe this is what BS is refering too..

 

that tape on his shoes is not fire rated tape which then can cause the tape to catch fire, then his shoes on fire. he will then run around looking for water with his welding glass on but he can't see. he will then run into the wood area and his shoes will catch the sawdust on fire. this fire will now spread to the area where all the chemicals are in and it will ignite that. thus creating a massive fireball. all this because the tape on his shoes was not proper fire rated tape.

 

you're right BS, crazy stuff is happening in that shop

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"crazy stuff is happening in that shop"

 

Right on Dent. Crazy good stuff!

 

Fuel tanks went in this morning. They are fuel cells built by ATL. They were made from 3d files and are form fit in the bilge and keel fin areas. I'll see if I can find a pic. These are the same kind of tanks they use in race cars.

tank_zpsjufw5j7g.jpg

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Jim Betts is a pro in every sense of the word. One of the most skilled and finest boat builders in the world.

 

But he doesn't know as much as Brent.

 

Not to worry though - nobody does.

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