Bob Perry

My newest project

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I was able to see the boat in person, it's a real voyaging boat, not a marina boat.

 

If you didn't change a thing I think you would be constantly surprised by the amount of thought that has gone into it.

 

The pics don't do it justice, it is a big boat.

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The ballast went in the boat about 6 months ago. Tanks are now in.

 

"The pics don't do it justice, it is a big boat. "

Yes it is. Maybe Great White will give you his impression of the interior spaces. The DWL is 38.5'. Spaces below are man sized and not designed to minimal dimensions. Good head and elbow room abound.

 

" how much faster would that boat be with a fin keel?"

 

Mizz:

​Don't know. That would be an entirely different boat. Rudder would be different. Hull would be different. Never thought about it. The client always wanted a full keel boat. His last boat was a full keel boat. I don't see how we could have accomplished the tankage required without the full keel. I needed that volume to gain the client's target tankage. None of the design features exist in a vacuum.

 

I have had the advantage of having sailed my own full keel boats, about a dozen, starting with the CT54. By the time I finished the Tashiba line, 31 and 36 and you can add the Tashiba 40 aka Baba 40, I was producing full keel boats that sail very well.I mean very well. For instance. the tall rig Baba 40 AIRLOOM is about as fast as a Valiant 40. Not a rocket but quite respectable. AIRLOOOM has been raced extensively in the PNW so you can check its race record for yourself. I would suggest doubters go and sail a Tashiba 36. I'm quite critical about my own boats but that 36 performs very well. The fly in the ointment is under power, in reverse. Any of these full keel boats can be a challenge in reverse. For my own needs a fin keel would be a better choice.

 

tashiba%2036%20%20LINES_zpsysuorafj.jpg

Tashiba%2036%20%20SAIL%20AND%20SPAR%20PL

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The ballast went in the boat about 6 months ago. Tanks are now in.

 

"The pics don't do it justice, it is a big boat. "

Yes it is. Maybe Great White will give you his impression of the interior spaces. The DWL is 38.5'. Spaces below are man sized and not designed to minimal dimensions. Good head and elbow room abound.

 

" how much faster would that boat be with a fin keel?"

 

Mizz:

​Don't know. That would be an entirely different boat. Rudder would be different. Hull would be different. Never thought about it. The client always wanted a full keel boat. His last boat was a full keel boat. I don't see how we could have accomplished the tankage required without the full keel. I needed that volume to gain the client's target tankage. None of the design features exist in a vacuum.

 

I have had the advantage of having sailed my own full keel boats, about a dozen, starting with the CT54. By the time I finished the Tashiba line, 31 and 36 and you can add the Tashiba 40 aka Baba 40, I was producing full keel boats that sail very well.I mean very well. For instance. the tall rig Baba 40 AIRLOOM is about as fast as a Valiant 40. Not a rocket but quite respectable. AIRLOOOM has been raced extensively in the PNW so you can check its race record for yourself. I would suggest doubters go and sail a Tashiba 36. I'm quite critical about my own boats but that 36 performs very well. The fly in the ointment is under power, in reverse. Any of these full keel boats can be a challenge in reverse. For my own needs a fin keel would be a better choice.

 

tashiba%2036%20%20LINES_zpsysuorafj.jpg

Tashiba%2036%20%20SAIL%20AND%20SPAR%20PL

Lovely drawings! Just lovely. Did you do your own Chinese script?

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Ed:

Yes. I sometimes wrote in characters on the drawing kind of to ,,,,oh I don't know,,,,,,,just show off I guess. I thought it looked cool. That's all. Chinese writing can be amazing art.

 

The hull, lines drawing was done by my helper at that time Paul aka "Cleat" Fredrickson. You can see that the lettering style of the two drawings is quite different.

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Just browsed over lunch to Airloom, and saw this picture:. What's going on up the leech of the main with all that string? I can't make it out at all . . .

 

air1.JPG

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It almost looks like one of those old-skool "spinnaker nets" we used to put up in the foretriangle in light air to keep the kite from collapsing inside the headstay.

 

I had first thought it was a "dutchman" flaking setup, but... too many bits.

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"It almost looks like one of those old-skool "spinnaker nets"

 

That's the first thing I thought of.

Maybe it's the boom topping lift left to flog. Looks like it comes from the end of the boom.

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Yeah, although there's some sort of weirdness at the top of the foretriangle, too. Almost looks like something is on a spin halyard, and then wraps toward the leeward side of the mast on its way aft. Dunno.

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Oh, it's the remains of a kite. The leech tapes of a spinnaker that got caught up there and flogged itself to pieces leaving only the tapes?

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Thanks guys, your welcome. Been a wee bit busy. Here are some images taken in the shops on Tuesday. Still haven't edited the rollover pics.

 

31394983121_625242dfed_h.jpg

 

31363755902_c1101bba58_h.jpg

 

31139254650_97aace9758_h.jpg

 

31363746462_2a121bd40f_h.jpg

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Thanks Boomer.

 

If this were my boat I'd leave those bhds. "raw" and just clearcoat them. I think that would look great.

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Your welcome Bob! I've weighed back and forth how I'd address the bulkheads, sometimes I feel they'd look better painted a light beige - other times leave them dark.

 

30669121634_ce83fb3158_h.jpg

 

31363473392_7727e573d2_h.jpg

 

31471766546_67e80cd6de_h.jpg

 

30700344473_c92ba6ecc7_h.jpg

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Thanks Boomer.

 

If this were my boat I'd leave those bhds. "raw" and just clearcoat them. I think that would look great.

 

It would look cool! But that would take the stealth factor away because others would understand why they're getting a horizon job pulled on them.

Gotta love a sleeper.

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Thanks Boomer.

 

If this were my boat I'd leave those bhds. "raw" and just clearcoat them. I think that would look great.

 

 

You know, I think Bob's really sick of people saying "I think I'd do this and I'd do that if it were my boat", though he's too polite to say so

 

 

 

[colon, bracket]

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Thanks Boomer.

 

If this were my boat I'd leave those bhds. "raw" and just clearcoat them. I think that would look great.

 

 

You know, I think Bob's really sick of people saying "I think I'd do this and I'd do that if it were my boat", though he's too polite to say so

 

 

Are you sure?

 

Bob is in the custom boat business. Getting people to think about how they would build their own custom boat is good marketing.

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Ed:

Legger has it.

I don't mind at all.

I think the "I would do this,,,,," is pretty much what we all do when we see a new boat. I sure as hell do it. It's what makes me a designer. It's the way our brains work as sailors. If everyone just accepted what I drew as the "ultimate solution for everyone" I'd be concerned. Then we'd be bordering on the BS approach. I make my living catering to the different needs of different sailors. I like diversity.

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"If this was my boat".... I'd sell it. Then I would commission Bob to design a 34'-er to my desires that Jim Betts could build with the proceeds....

 

Nah. If this was my boat, I'd move aboard and sail the shit out of it. I wouldn't have a blog, and I'd write occasionally to Bob and Betts thanking them for such a wonderful craft.

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Thanks Anom. It would be a very enjoyable project.

 

Remember? I did draw a 32' version of the CF cutter. My idea of the perfect boat for Bob.

Hilllayout_zpsvs5td3ej.jpg

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Your welcome Bob! I've weighed back and forth how I'd address the bulkheads, sometimes I feel they'd look better painted a light beige - other times leave them dark.

 

30669121634_ce83fb3158_h.jpg

 

31363473392_7727e573d2_h.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That's a bully pulpit, I can't wait to see it unwrapped in all its shiny SS glory.

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The knob gobblers think I'm a "bully" so I think it's safe to say the whole boat is a "bully boat". Heck, I kind of like the sound of that. "BULLY BOAT".

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The knob gobblers think I'm a "bully" so I think it's safe to say the whole boat is a "bully boat". Heck, I kind of like the sound of that. "BULLY BOAT".

BEEFY BULLY BOAT!

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"If this was my boat" I'd hunt out some storm-chasers for crew and sail the hell out of it on a bunch of heavy weather passages between Ireland, Rockall, Scotland, Norway and Iceland.

 

I'd spend a few years doing that, and then sell it to someone else who wanted to drive it hard (at whatever price they could afford). Boats like this shouldn't be left to rot in a marina or pootle around daysailing -- they need to be out in the heavy stuff

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Thanks Boomer.

 

If this were my boat I'd leave those bhds. "raw" and just clearcoat them. I think that would look great.

 

Are they to be veneered and capped, Bob?

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"If this was my boat" I'd hunt out some storm-chasers for crew and sail the hell out of it on a bunch of heavy weather passages between Ireland, Rockall, Scotland, Norway and Iceland.

 

I'd spend a few years doing that, and then sell it to someone else who wanted to drive it hard (at whatever price they could afford). Boats like this shouldn't be left to rot in a marina or pootle around daysailing -- they need to be out in the heavy stuff

 

They're like violins, they have to be played. So you'll sign up to this long discussed entirely charitable plan to provide volunteer crews to keep these boats busy?

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Thanks Anom. It would be a very enjoyable project.

 

Remember? I did draw a 32' version of the CF cutter. My idea of the perfect boat for Bob.

Hilllayout_zpsvs5td3ej.jpg

 

Perfect boat for me. Want to talk?

 

Kiwanda

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The ballast went in the boat about 6 months ago. Tanks are now in.

 

"The pics don't do it justice, it is a big boat. "

Yes it is. Maybe Great White will give you his impression of the interior spaces. The DWL is 38.5'. Spaces below are man sized and not designed to minimal dimensions. Good head and elbow room abound.

I finally have a chance to set down and write some thoughts down.

 

This was my first time visiting the carbon cutter build. #1 is well along with construction. I overall feel of the boat is stiffness. I got a better feel of the massiveness of the bulwark and the stancion installation. The decks are wide. The cockpit is simple and roomy enough. This boat is meant to go to sea.

Down below, it is very roomy. The headroom is very ample. I am 5'-11" and obviously I had no issues with overhead room. The handrails in the overhead are spaced nicely. Going forward, I was curious about the area between the two houses. To me it was a non issue. I dipped my head a little bit and I was in the head and standing straight. It was a lot like going through a archway in a bulkhead. What did surprise me was the solid bulkhead forward of the head area. I knew that there was storage in the forepeak, but did not know that you needed to go on deck to access. The foreman showed us. A large hatch in the foredeck allows access to a large storage. The hull is lined with shelves to accept milk crates.

In the main cabin, pilot berths are installed outboard of the settee bunks. The pilot berths seemed quite roomy and had a high leeboard. The galley was roomy with lots of lay down area. The counter height is high (42"?) but seemed to be a real comfortable height. The whole interior seemed to me to be well layed out for offshore sailing. Definatly not a marina queen.

The people at the yard were real helpful. I hated taking up their time, but they did not seem to mind.

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Just browsed over lunch to Airloom, and saw this picture:. What's going on up the leech of the main with all that string? I can't make it out at all . . .

 

air1.JPG

 

I think it's a kind of dutchman flaking system, but not a dutchman. A friend of ours has an older (80's) dutch-built boat that has something very similar on it - there's a series of stainless rings that run on the topping lift that are then attached to the leach with a lacing - when the sail is up it looks a lot like that picture, and when they drop the sail the rings (once you get the tension in the lacing right) pulls the leach of the sail out along the boom, essentially flaking it. The only hard part with it was on setting - think that to set the main they needed to lift the boom a bit higher than usual before hoisting so there wouldn't be too much friction on it. Wasn't a huge fan of it, but our friend really liked it.

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^^^This was I was thinking it was too, though I never knew anyone had actually designed such a flaking system

 

Seems like slot of windage back there messing with the flow off the main

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bob,

 

not sure if this has been asked or answered but when i look at the pictures of the keel, the trailing edge looks like it's missing some fairing. just wondering what the propose of this is or what's going to be attached to it? some sort of strut of sorts?

 

thanks

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I wondered the same thing and then looked at the drawings again. That design sure eliminates the most serious sinking risks that I know of. The rudder fell off ranks just behind the front fell off. Add in not catching/collecting random crap and it's a winner.

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I'm pretty sure the rudder would be fine without the strut. There is a full length carbon spar running down the middle of the blade. The strut is there to help keep things from getting i the gap after the keel and hanging on the rudder..

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is there any other boat out there with a rudder that is raked so far forward.., that isn't directly behind another surface?

 

usually, forward raked rudders are attached to, and immediately behind, part of the keel.

 

i wonder if there could be any surprises in the way it behaves, arising from this arrangement.

 

probably it doesn't matter.., but is there another example of this geometry on a sailboat.

 

forward raked fins were not a huge success on windsurfers

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I wondered the same thing and then looked at the drawings again. That design sure eliminates the most serious sinking risks that I know of. The rudder fell off ranks just behind the front fell off. Add in not catching/collecting random crap and it's a winner.

 

Rudder falling off won't sink a boat only if there is a full-height watertight bulkhead ahead of the rudder shaft. Sadly, too few boats have this cheap, simple safety measure.

 

But protecting the rudder from catching crap is still a great idea. This boat can just sail straight over a drift net

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70:

There is nothing unique to my rudder arrangement. Ted Brewer and Chuck Paine have both done very similar rudder/keel arrangements. I'm sure other designers have also. They are all slightly different but the general geometry is the same. I am confident that the boat will behave very well. This is not an experiment.

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is there any other boat out there with a rudder that is raked so far forward.., that isn't directly behind another surface?

 

usually, forward raked rudders are attached to, and immediately behind, part of the keel.

 

i wonder if there could be any surprises in the way it behaves, arising from this arrangement.

 

probably it doesn't matter.., but is there another example of this geometry on a sailboat.

 

forward raked fins were not a huge success on windsurfers

I'd bet that hydrodynamically, forward rake or aft rake is the same...shouldn't matter to the water one way or the other. Aircraft have looked at forward swept wings as a means to keep the outer wing panel from stalling at high angles of attack as the airflow tends to attach to the wing and travel in the direction of the sweep. Problem with aircraft was keeping outer wing panel from flexing and inreasing the AOA out at the wingtip negating the effect of the forward sweep.

 

On a sailboat, forward sweep might keep the bottom of the rudder unstalled while the top is stalled, but not sure it'd be enough of an effect to be notable/prevent the boat from rounding up, etc.

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70:

There is nothing unique to my rudder arrangement. Ted Brewer and Chuck Paine have both done very similar rudder/keel arrangements. I'm sure other designers have also. They are all slightly different but the general geometry is the same. I am confident that the boat will behave very well. This is not an experiment.

 

Bob, I haven't seen any of Brewer's designs in this style ... but the arrangements I saw on the drawings of Chuck Paine's boats such as Gusto were of a long keel modified only by a semi-circular cutout ahead of the rudder. It did allow a balanced rudder as you have used here, but provided nowhere near as much separation between rudder and keel. Both top and bottom of Chuck's rudder was quite close to the keel.

 

I am sure that your design will work much better

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i've seen planes (well pictures of planes ) with forward-swept wings

 

but all the boats i have seen with forward raked rudders (i own one) have had the rudder immediately behind the keel.., i have never seen a forward raked rudder with such a large empty space in front.

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Leggs:

You might check out Chuck's ANNIE design, page 31 in his book or EXPANNIE, page 250. Like I said, not exactly the same but very close. Mine will work better. I have zero interest just parroting the work of other designers. My way has worked just fine for years.

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I'm pretty sure the rudder would be fine without the strut. There is a full length carbon spar running down the middle of the blade. The strut is there to help keep things from getting i the gap after the keel and hanging on the rudder..

AKA the chastity strut, 'cause without it you're fucked.

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is there any other boat out there with a rudder that is raked so far forward.., that isn't directly behind another surface?

 

usually, forward raked rudders are attached to, and immediately behind, part of the keel.

 

i wonder if there could be any surprises in the way it behaves, arising from this arrangement.

 

probably it doesn't matter.., but is there another example of this geometry on a sailboat.

 

forward raked fins were not a huge success on windsurfers

I'd bet that hydrodynamically, forward rake or aft rake is the same...shouldn't matter to the water one way or the other. Aircraft have looked at forward swept wings as a means to keep the outer wing panel from stalling at high angles of attack as the airflow tends to attach to the wing and travel in the direction of the sweep. Problem with aircraft was keeping outer wing panel from flexing and inreasing the AOA out at the wingtip negating the effect of the forward sweep.

 

On a sailboat, forward sweep might keep the bottom of the rudder unstalled while the top is stalled, but not sure it'd be enough of an effect to be notable/prevent the boat from rounding up, etc.

 

 

 

Crash,

 

Your analogy of fwd sweep on aircraft wings is good but the spanwise flow up the fwd raked rudder will keep the tip from stalling as you say by eliminating tip vortices which would be worse if vertical or even more so raked aft. But when the upspan flow reached the water surface it acts as an endplate and will minimise any tip vortice and stall on the top. It will be interesting to watch the outflow of the rudder on a dark night with lots of bio-luminescence and see just what happens. Poor mans CFD! (Computational Fluid Dynamics)

 

I spent a good part of yesterday doing a webinar with a company that is trying to sell me a CFD plugin that works with ORCA3D and Rhino3D for doing just this thing. I have a powerboat project that might help defray the considerable expense of the software but it is the learning curve that is more daunting.

 

scr13_page7a.jpg

 

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Funny to be credited with coining such a term. Do a Goggle search and Betts Boats & Perry are the first thing to pop up!

 

This photo from that search really conveys the purpose of protecting the rudder.

 

st1_zpscml0ggqo.jpeg

 

On the other hand, so does this

 

edf5b9a0e30af965ea4592be24fc994a.jpg

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Leggs:

You might check out Chuck's ANNIE design, page 31 in his book or EXPANNIE, page 250. Like I said, not exactly the same but very close. Mine will work better. I have zero interest just parroting the work of other designers. My way has worked just fine for years.

 

Bob, here's Chuck Expannie.

 

post-51350-0-28031600-1481309192_thumb.jpg

 

It looks to me like Chuck has travelled less than a quarter of the way from the fully-attached rudder to the strut arrangement you have done on the cutters.

 

You get much better separation, and a more upright rudder. I'm glad that you don't parrot others -- yours will definitely be better

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So it's official. Rasper did it!

 

Leggs:

I did not look at any other designs when doing the CF cutter. Of course I have a lot of boats stored away in my head. I simply did what I wanted and felt was right. My method. The actual strut shape is pure Rasper.

I told him what I wanted. He came up with something totally different and I liked it.

 

It's really pretty simple. When I drew the Valiant 40 I showed the drawings to Yves-Marie Tanton and Chuck Paine. They thought I was nuts. One of them, I forget which one, said, "Do you really think a boat should be shaped like that?" I said, "Yes I do." I do not have people "vote" on my design features. The it would not be my design.

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You are welcome Dent.

 

That feature, in raw form, was part of the design from day one. I conceive the design as a whole, not a combination of components. The final result will be an evolved version of the original conception. In this specific case the result of a lot of chats and sketches with Rasper. I respect his opinion. I don't work in a vacuum. I have done little else since I was 14 years old than studying yacht designs. I have also benefited by having reviewed four, now three, new designs every month for the past 35 years for SAILING magazine. I soak up what I consider good ideas and file them away for future potential use. I don't consider myself an "innovator". I think I'm kind of mainstream. I don't think about it much.

 

12,000 lbs. of raw speed and fury!

Baba%2030%20paint%202016%2011_zpsn94phwp

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Bob and I knew we needed something to go from 'Point A' to Point B' with that strut and it needed to be as tough as the rest of the boat. It started out as a simple boxy looking beam but it bothered me that is was going to be sitting down in some pretty complex outflow off of the keel. As a sailplane pilot, I have always been intrigued by the interplay between the wings and the horizontal stabilizer. My little 12.6 meter span sailplane has a T-tail and if you don't think the shudder you suddenly feel (at a high angle of attack when the stab gets into the wake and turbulence of the wing as it nears a full stall) will get your full attention, then you better not be up there! All those sexy winglets you see on airliners and fast business planes really were developed on sailplanes and have a huge impact on performance. They tend to sit in the outflow of the wing and try and recapture energy that is being shed by the wingtip vortices.

 

I started going on about this sort of stuff to Bob and he just said 'quit talking about it and give it a go for the strut!' We talked about T-foils on the rudder but dialed all that back and the strut will most definitely do it structural thing as built in carbon by the wizards at Betts and I was able to reduce and streamline the section into an ellipse that should sit cleanly in the tip vortice and clean up some flow as it approaches the rudder. The detail of the 'ball and socket' joint that I think came from Jefa on the bottom of the rudder is a wonder too!

 

Y'all watch this!

 

 

 

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I've flown a T-tailed plane (King Air 200) and actually took it through a stall, and then a secondary stall which required very little effort due to the elevators being located up high in the smooth air. You're right about feeling the turbulence hit the elevator, especially on a plane that is otherwise super smooth.

 

The attention to such detail is a pretty cool advancement on the classic full keel with attached rudder.

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is there any other boat out there with a rudder that is raked so far forward.., that isn't directly behind another surface?

 

usually, forward raked rudders are attached to, and immediately behind, part of the keel.

 

i wonder if there could be any surprises in the way it behaves, arising from this arrangement.

 

probably it doesn't matter.., but is there another example of this geometry on a sailboat.

 

forward raked fins were not a huge success on windsurfers

I'd bet that hydrodynamically, forward rake or aft rake is the same...shouldn't matter to the water one way or the other. Aircraft have looked at forward swept wings as a means to keep the outer wing panel from stalling at high angles of attack as the airflow tends to attach to the wing and travel in the direction of the sweep. Problem with aircraft was keeping outer wing panel from flexing and inreasing the AOA out at the wingtip negating the effect of the forward sweep.

 

On a sailboat, forward sweep might keep the bottom of the rudder unstalled while the top is stalled, but not sure it'd be enough of an effect to be notable/prevent the boat from rounding up, etc.

 

 

 

Crash,

 

Your analogy of fwd sweep on aircraft wings is good but the spanwise flow up the fwd raked rudder will keep the tip from stalling as you say by eliminating tip vortices which would be worse if vertical or even more so raked aft. But when the upspan flow reached the water surface it acts as an endplate and will minimise any tip vortice and stall on the top. It will be interesting to watch the outflow of the rudder on a dark night with lots of bio-luminescence and see just what happens. Poor mans CFD! (Computational Fluid Dynamics)

 

I spent a good part of yesterday doing a webinar with a company that is trying to sell me a CFD plugin that works with ORCA3D and Rhino3D for doing just this thing. I have a powerboat project that might help defray the considerable expense of the software but it is the learning curve that is more daunting.

 

scr13_page7a.jpg

 

 

Rasper,

I'd guess you right about the endplate effect, except that the Carbon Cutters have outboard rudders...so less endplate right? I'd think that the reality is that at the speeds we are talking about, there likely isn't enough spanwise flow in the direction of sweep to really matter, but I admit to not knowing and just supposing...

 

If it really worked well, I'd imagine it'd be a feature we'd see on most raceboats. That we don't tells me that the most efficient foil is still a long skinny foil that is nearly vertical..and that to compensate for the forward sweep, you'd need to add some area (length?). But that the increase in drag outweighs the gain in control that not stalling at high AOA would provide.

Crash

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thank you bob for the clarification on that missing piece

 

Reading the thread would be a valuable exercise. This question and your next forty have already been answered several times.

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The ballast went in the boat about 6 months ago. Tanks are now in.

 

"The pics don't do it justice, it is a big boat. "

Yes it is. Maybe Great White will give you his impression of the interior spaces. The DWL is 38.5'. Spaces below are man sized and not designed to minimal dimensions. Good head and elbow room abound.

I finally have a chance to set down and write some thoughts down.

 

This was my first time visiting the carbon cutter build. #1 is well along with construction. I overall feel of the boat is stiffness. I got a better feel of the massiveness of the bulwark and the stancion installation. The decks are wide. The cockpit is simple and roomy enough. This boat is meant to go to sea.

Down below, it is very roomy. The headroom is very ample. I am 5'-11" and obviously I had no issues with overhead room. The handrails in the overhead are spaced nicely. Going forward, I was curious about the area between the two houses. To me it was a non issue. I dipped my head a little bit and I was in the head and standing straight. It was a lot like going through a archway in a bulkhead. What did surprise me was the solid bulkhead forward of the head area. I knew that there was storage in the forepeak, but did not know that you needed to go on deck to access. The foreman showed us. A large hatch in the foredeck allows access to a large storage. The hull is lined with shelves to accept milk crates.

In the main cabin, pilot berths are installed outboard of the settee bunks. The pilot berths seemed quite roomy and had a high leeboard. The galley was roomy with lots of lay down area. The counter height is high (42"?) but seemed to be a real comfortable height. The whole interior seemed to me to be well layed out for offshore sailing. Definatly not a marina queen.

The people at the yard were real helpful. I hated taking up their time, but they did not seem to mind.

 

Just for my two cents worth;

The deck has a rock solid feel to it. There does not seem to be any spring or flex, the feeling is kind of like walking across a really well done well supported hardwood floor. Not the feel of steel, which is so solid it hurts my knee joints, but a solid and comfortable feel.

The other thing I noticed was the tremendous amount of detailing on the deck and interior. You get the impression that Bob and Jim spent years working out every little detail and then Jim had a special method to build and install each little part.

It was very, very impressive from a design and build standpoint. I can't wait to start my boat next Jan.

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Merrill:

Merry Christmas.

I am here and I am fine. Thanks for asking. I spend more time on Facebook these days where I have almost 2,000 "friends". A couple of FB'ers started a Robert Perry Fan Club and it now has over 400 members. So, I can reach a lot of people when I want to promote my work on Facebook. I have also been able to make contact with a lot of owners of my boats and I like that. They seem very appreciative of the chance to talk one on one with me. It's a nice ego stroke. I have been giving the FB'ers weekly updates on the carbon cutter project along with Boomer's videos. It's far easier to post photos there so FB has been seeing more of the work than CA has. They get excited over watching the build. Here it's more like "So what". There is less grief on FB. It's a very diverse crowd eager and willing to ask questions and of course offer me countless suggestions on how to improve my work.

 

I'm off to the yard today. I'll meet a client there this afternoon to discuss a new project. I suspect I'll have a busy next year.

 

Funny you should post. Last night I was walking the dog before bedtime and remembering, for some reason, the time my Dad took me to a football field up in the Blue Mountains, near the Three Sisters, where we saw the Black Watch pipe an drum band. My Dad did not do much with me. But he did make an effort to expose me to a lot of music. It's a good memory. The pipes left quite an impression.

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We were up there two weeks ago with our son's family from Denver.

 

One of my sisters lives just down the road from the Three Sisters, but I have four sisters living in the Blue Mountains.

 

There are now gondolas, airwalks and all sorts of tourist stuff, the grandsons had a ball.

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Merrill:

Merry Christmas.

I am here and I am fine. Thanks for asking. I spend more time on Facebook these days where I have almost 2,000 "friends". A couple of FB'ers started a Robert Perry Fan Club and it now has over 400 members. So, I can reach a lot of people when I want to promote my work on Facebook. I have also been able to make contact with a lot of owners of my boats and I like that. They seem very appreciative of the chance to talk one on one with me. It's a nice ego stroke. I have been giving the FB'ers weekly updates on the carbon cutter project along with Boomer's videos. It's far easier to post photos there so FB has been seeing more of the work than CA has. They get excited over watching the build. Here it's more like "So what". There is less grief on FB. It's a very diverse crowd eager and willing to ask questions and of course offer me countless suggestions on how to improve my work.

 

I'm off to the yard today. I'll meet a client there this afternoon to discuss a new project. I suspect I'll have a busy next year.

 

Funny you should post. Last night I was walking the dog before bedtime and remembering, for some reason, the time my Dad took me to a football field up in the Blue Mountains, near the Three Sisters, where we saw the Black Watch pipe an drum band. My Dad did not do much with me. But he did make an effort to expose me to a lot of music. It's a good memory. The pipes left quite an impression.

Black Watch pipes can really leave an impression!!

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Merrill:

Merry Christmas.

I am here and I am fine. Thanks for asking. I spend more time on Facebook these days where I have almost 2,000 "friends". A couple of FB'ers started a Robert Perry Fan Club and it now has over 400 members. So, I can reach a lot of people when I want to promote my work on Facebook. I have also been able to make contact with a lot of owners of my boats and I like that. They seem very appreciative of the chance to talk one on one with me. It's a nice ego stroke. I have been giving the FB'ers weekly updates on the carbon cutter project along with Boomer's videos. It's far easier to post photos there so FB has been seeing more of the work than CA has. They get excited over watching the build. Here it's more like "So what". There is less grief on FB. It's a very diverse crowd eager and willing to ask questions and of course offer me countless suggestions on how to improve my work.

 

I'm off to the yard today. I'll meet a client there this afternoon to discuss a new project. I suspect I'll have a busy next year.

 

Funny you should post. Last night I was walking the dog before bedtime and remembering, for some reason, the time my Dad took me to a football field up in the Blue Mountains, near the Three Sisters, where we saw the Black Watch pipe an drum band. My Dad did not do much with me. But he did make an effort to expose me to a lot of music. It's a good memory. The pipes left quite an impression.

Black Watch pipes can really leave an impression!!

 

 

Especially if you swing them really hard.

 

CYBORG-2.png

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That's expert advice from the acknowledged leader in Carbon construction folks.

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I am here and I am fine. Thanks for asking. I spend more time on Facebook these days where I have almost 2,000 "friends". A couple of FB'ers started a Robert Perry Fan Club and it now has over 400 members. So, I can reach a lot of people when I want to promote my work on Facebook. I have also been able to make contact with a lot of owners of my boats and I like that. They seem very appreciative of the chance to talk one on one with me. It's a nice ego stroke. I have been giving the FB'ers weekly updates on the carbon cutter project along with Boomer's videos. It's far easier to post photos there so FB has been seeing more of the work than CA has. They get excited over watching the build. Here it's more like "So what". There is less grief on FB. It's a very diverse crowd eager and willing to ask questions and of course offer me countless suggestions on how to improve my work.

it's ok Bob, we still love the bits you throw us here.

i'm not going to do FB though, not even for you.

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I am here and I am fine. Thanks for asking. I spend more time on Facebook these days where I have almost 2,000 "friends". A couple of FB'ers started a Robert Perry Fan Club and it now has over 400 members. So, I can reach a lot of people when I want to promote my work on Facebook. I have also been able to make contact with a lot of owners of my boats and I like that. They seem very appreciative of the chance to talk one on one with me. It's a nice ego stroke. I have been giving the FB'ers weekly updates on the carbon cutter project along with Boomer's videos. It's far easier to post photos there so FB has been seeing more of the work than CA has. They get excited over watching the build. Here it's more like "So what". There is less grief on FB. It's a very diverse crowd eager and willing to ask questions and of course offer me countless suggestions on how to improve my work.

it's ok Bob, we still love the bits you throw us here.

i'm not going to do FB though, not even for you.

 

I'm afraid I prefer SA ("The Anti-Social Network", tm) too. Life feels too short for FB.

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I understand on the FB thing Simon but I have been surprised this morning to have had far more than usual friend requests overnight. I recognize one guy from CA but I won;t "out" him.. I can only think the increase is due to my mentioning it here. I can put up the weeks new photos on FB around 3pm and by 8pm I will have had over 100 looks and often more. I put up the sail plan of the Tayana 37 the other day, a drawing I did when I was 29 years old and in a couple of hours I sold five prints at $100 a print. Some people like my drawings.

 

Nice trip to the yard yesterday in sunny and cold weather past fields of flocks of Snow Geese and Trumpeter Swans. I was tempted t stop and take a picture but Ruby would have jumped out and spooked them I suspect.

Looked at two different s.s. rub rail profiles. Decided the bigger profile looked to have better proportions for the boat. Going with the smaller profile would have meant some additional time increasing the radii on the molded part of the rub rail.

002_zpsoxtgq4f6.jpg

It was not really a fair comparison. We would have had to increase the radii first to see how the small profile would have looked. But that was logistically difficult and hard to undo. I'm fine with the big profile.

006_zps3apyld9d.jpg

 

Jim talking to Javier about some details on No. 2. Jim said they have greatly sped up progress on No. 2 due to things learned on No. 1. It will be fun to have that conversation again when they get to No. 4. I went over the specs for my wife's carbon fiber Christmas present yesterday. She's going to love it. I'll take a pic when its done. It is unique.

016_zpshdcsf0c8.jpg

 

Wood bits and pieces are now going into No. 1 but I got involved with discussions on the new project and I forgot to take photos. I'll get some next week.

008_zpsraqubkj2.jpg

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Looking really good Bob!!!

 

Thanks for the update!!! Much appreciated...

 

Merry Christmas!

 

fs

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Merry Christmas to you, Bob. Thanks for the updates. Looking good.

 

Is Dave's new boat scheduled to start building in the New Year? Cheers.

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Sailbye:

Merry Christmas to you too.

Plan now is to start Dave's boat asap and that I would, guess means Feb. Dave is very anxious to get going but Jim has his hands full right now.

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Thanks for the update, Bob! BTW, I'm extremely interested in seeing the systems go into #1 as she gets finished. The big alternator setup, sea chest, sail handling hardware and electronics will be exciting to see come together--lot's of innovation from you and your team. Seeing the details of that awesome mast was cool, and it'll be a big day when it's stepped. Merry Christmas.

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Lasal:

Sea chest is in and lots of systems gear going in now. A lot of that had to wait until interior painting was complete. Painting was completed last week. What the Betts yard seems very good at is sequencing the work. Another yard I was working with recently was clueless on sequencing.

 

Drive on out Lasal. Stay at the shack and we can go to the yard and you can do a crawl through.

Merry Christmas to you and yours too.

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Thanks for the invitation! It would be fantastic to crawl through #1 while shes being built. Seriously considering that.

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Will do! I'm kayaking in the Everglades for five days in January (I know, but I love fishing and kayaking more than I hate mosquitoes and the downsides of camping) so it'll be later this winter before I can escape for an in-person carbon cutter fix. I'll be in touch via email. Cheers.

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That's expert advice from the acknowledged leader in Carbon construction folks.

 

Yeah, those Boeing guys use little carbon bits to hold commercial planes in the air. They've got the cray cray going.

 

maxresdefault.jpg

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Great pics Bob - I am sending a FB request, not hard to determine who I am. I do FB to keep up with a couple of close friends, might as well have something I am interested in too. Merry Christmas, Hanakuh, Kwanzaa and Festivuz too.

 

edit: that was quick, I am in your official fan club now. I hope it's the right place...... but I am a big fan.

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That's expert advice from the acknowledged leader in Carbon construction folks.

 

Yeah, those Boeing guys use little carbon bits to hold commercial planes in the air. They've got the cray cray going.

 

maxresdefault.jpg

 

 

I don't care what anyone says - when I see an airplanes wings bend like that I'm thinking "Oh shit".

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That is just getting started to flexing. You call that flex, now this is wing flex...

 

nimbus4hweuphrata.jpg

??? How the hell don't the ailerons bind up? Maybe doesn't have them? Wing twisting instead?

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That's expert advice from the acknowledged leader in Carbon construction folks.

 

Yeah, those Boeing guys use little carbon bits to hold commercial planes in the air. They've got the cray cray going.

 

maxresdefault.jpg

 

 

I don't care what anyone says - when I see an airplanes wings bend like that I'm thinking "Oh shit".

 

 

I took an aero structures course back in college. Prof told the story about an airliner that had the wings bent one way during a storm. A few weeks later, the wings were bent back to normal due to a rough landing. True? Who knows.

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