Bob Perry

My newest project

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The carbon cutters will be pretty surprising performers compared to 'state of the art' cruisers. Long WL, powerful hull shape, lots of SA, and a good ballast/disp ratio. I'd be careful before betting on a Pogo.

I don't think that the cutters will be able to sail beyond hull speed. I can only see the cutters work better in very light wind and going upwind in a confused sea.

 

 

 

How the fuck would you know? Education, experience? Just by being Fraaaaaanch?

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I think the last alum boat to sail in an around the world race was Ceramco New Zealand....early 80's? The last (and only) steel boat to do so was Joshua in 1968. If either was an attractive performance/cost ratio, it would be used. And with the big money sponsors now, cost isn't a major concern.

What about British Steel?

Hmmm... He wasn't in a race, and he wasn't even breaking an existing record, he was establishing a previously vacant record. But good point....he was a couple years after Joshua.

 

3615 met was an aluminium boat and still racing in the 90s : http://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/Histoire%20des%2060'/A5.htm

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The carbon cutters will be pretty surprising performers compared to 'state of the art' cruisers. Long WL, powerful hull shape, lots of SA, and a good ballast/disp ratio. I'd be careful before betting on a Pogo.

I don't think that the cutters will be able to sail beyond hull speed. I can only see the cutters work better in very light wind and going upwind in a confused sea.

 

 

 

How the fuck would you know? Education, experience? Just by being Fraaaaaanch?

 

Being passionate about boats, racing and observing them!

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" I can only see the cutters work better in very light wind and going upwind in a confused sea.""

What an odd thing to say.

 

​I would say "very light wind" would be their Achilles's heel. The SA/D is only 17.5 and we have copious wetted surface.

As for "confused sea" I don';t get this at all. But VPP's don;t have a column for performance in a "confused sea". I have pushed hard for a big genoa for these conditions. I suspect that in a confused sea, upwind the cutters will struggle. In those conditions you want SA and power to punch through the slop. You would be better off bearing off a bit to develop some power.

 

I think their strength will be reaching along in a breeze, that's what cutters do best. How do I know? I think I have designed more cutters than any designer alive today.

 

As for not being able "to sail,beyond hull speed" that is not an educated comment. Just about every sailboat I have sailed can surpass theoretical hull speed given enough breeze and a favorable wind angle. We have all done it, in a variety of boats. It's just a matter of having the power available and being cracked off on a power reach. No the cutters will not plane. The cutters were never designed to plane. They are too heavy, short of that kind of SA and not the right shape for planing Planing was never a target of this design. I have gone over this countless times. If you don't understand it by now I doubt you are going to suddenly "get it".

 

Ballast slug being lowered into No. 2 for first fitting.

020_zps0myrq1bk.jpg

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Beyond hull speed - I remember racing once in a 36' almost DDW and breeze started building until got into the 30s, big spin up almost flat water and we climbed into 12s and 13s while sinking in the water. Big loads and weird feeling. Not the sort of activity one would want to do all day. And if I remember correctly every Perry design I have ever been on sailed better that I thought it would from looking at it.

 

Come to Political Anarchy where it's all opinions and assholes.

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The old Valiant 40, proportions about the same as the cutters, has a theoretical hull speed of 7.8 knots and can surpass that with ease in the right conditions. This is not unusual. I am confident that the Cutters will outsail the V-40. I've had 45 years to learn!

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" I can only see the cutters work better in very light wind and going upwind in a confused sea.""
What an odd thing to say.

​I would say "very light wind" would be their Achilles's heel. The SA/D is only 17.5 and we have copious wetted surface.
As for "confused sea" I don';t get this at all. But VPP's don;t have a column for performance in a "confused sea". I have pushed hard for a big genoa for these conditions. I suspect that in a confused sea, upwind the cutters will struggle. In those conditions you want SA and power to punch through the slop. You would be better off bearing off a bit to develop some power.

I think their strength will be reaching along in a breeze, that's what cutters do best. How do I know? I think I have designed more cutters than any designer alive today.

As for not being able "to sail,beyond hull speed" that is not an educated comment. Just about every sailboat I have sailed can surpass theoretical hull speed given enough breeze and a favorable wind angle. We have all done it, in a variety of boats. It's just a matter of having the power available and being cracked off on a power reach. No the cutters will not plane. The cutters were never designed to plane. They are too heavy, short of that kind of SA and not the right shape for planing Planing was never a target of this design. I have gone over this countless times. If you don't understand it by now I doubt you are going to suddenly "get it".




My comments were relative to a Pogo style boat vs heavier and rounder boats.

In light air on a wide boat, you get the feeling of being "stuck", then suddenly the boat becomes alive, IME rounder hulls don't show this behaviour, they just accelerate smoothly and thus initially are at an advantage. If you aren't convinced take part in an IRC race where there is a mix. I hadn't realised that the carbon cutters didn't have that much sail area for their weight, so yes may be it will hard to exploit their "slipperiness" in light air.

Upwind in confused seas, I've seen heavier boats of moderate beam, barely slowed as they charge upwind going "through" waves, on a lighter and wider boat it can soon become a "stop and go" scenario which obviously isn't very efficient, hence my comment.

In others conditions at a similar length, the rounder and heavier older designs can't compete. There is a reason why their TCC is lower LOA for LOA.

It is mainly observations while sitting on the rail during semi offshore races like Cowes-Dinard where you can witness stuff like a Swan, a J boat, a X a Pogo and a JPK racing each others.

I don't think that I've said or inferred somewhere that the cutters were designed to plane, VPP may not have a column for "confused sea" but when you are out on the water it matters a lot whether waves are coming from several directions or not.

Bob, you are doing a poor job at pretending to ignore me. :rolleyes:

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I'll tell you this in 15 knots our best VMG is made at 7.48 knots boat speed heeling 22.6 degs.

 

 

Bob, what is twa? Just curious.

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Joli:

45 degs.

The VPP says we can sail higher and perhaps we could with a sloop rig. But I know cutters and i order to keep all three sails drawing well you can't jam the boat up to 30 degs AWA and maintain VMG. Best to sail fat and let the boat roll.along enjoying a better motion. If you sagged off to an AWA of 32 degs you would get almost 8 knots. I think AWA 32 to 34 degs is about the best most cutters can do when three sails are up.

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My comments were relative to a Pogo style boat vs heavier and rounder boats.


In light air on a wide boat, you get the feeling of being "stuck", then suddenly the boat becomes alive, IME rounder hulls don't show this behaviour, they just accelerate smoothly and thus initially are at an advantage. If you aren't convinced take part in an IRC race where there is a mix. I hadn't realised that the carbon cutters didn't have that much sail area for their weight, so yes may be it will hard to exploit their "slipperiness" in light air.

Upwind in confused seas, I've seen heavier boats of moderate beam, barely slowed as they charge upwind going "through" waves, on a lighter and wider boat it can soon become a "stop and go" scenario which obviously isn't very efficient, hence my comment.

In others conditions at a similar length, the rounder and heavier older designs can't compete. There is a reason why their TCC is lower LOA for LOA.

It is mainly observations while sitting on the rail during semi offshore races like Cowes-Dinard where you can witness stuff like a Swan, a J boat, a X a Pogo and a JPK racing each others.

I don't think that I've said or inferred somewhere that the cutters were designed to plane, VPP may not have a column for "confused sea" but when you are out on the water it matters a lot whether waves are coming from several directions or not.

Bob, you are doing a poor job at pretending to ignore me. :rolleyes:

 

 

 

What on earth does a POGO have to do with these 50'+ cutters?? It's like comparing the handling on my new Maxima with those of the 90' Kenworth I just passed on the highway.

 

I gotta find the ignore button.

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Gate:

 

I have no idea why anyone would compare my carbon cutters to a Pogo type. Very different types designed for very different styles of sailing. Not a relevant comparison.

 

But thanks for posting. Maybe Panoramix can see now that when he is quoted I can see his post. Most of us understand that's how it works here. Then I respond. It's not complicated. The rest of the time he stays on ignore.

 

This pallet (crushed pallet) of ballast weighs more than the big Pogo. That is a 14,000 lb.+ pile of lead.

029_zpsc2t0ayuc.jpg

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What on earth does a POGO have to do with these 50'+ cutters?? It's like comparing the handling on my new Maxima with those of the 90' Kenworth I just passed on the highway.

 

I gotta find the ignore button.

 

Ask RKoch, I was replying to his comment about "being careful on betting on the Pogo" and then Bob became involved.

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There's a B-17 called "Aluminum Overcast" that tours through Seattle every summer. Amazing really is the word for that sound. I would not have wanted to be on the receiving end of their anger.

 

Aluminium Overcast was the nickname for the B-36

 

A B-17 is the middle one, the B-36 on the bottom. 6 turning and 4 burning - they must have been a mind boggling sight in the 50's.

 

 

 

4 big radials sound pretty great but if you ever get a chance to hear a Lancaster's 4 Merlins.....now there's a sound.

 

+ 1 on that, I saw the last Canadian Lanc flying at the Ottawa airshow one year, amazing sound. Would scare the shit out of me if I knew they were planning on dropping bombs...

 

 

The summer it came out here for the airshow - right after they got it flying, I was driving south in the Okanagan when I heard it coming from behind. I thought "Those are Merlins" and I looked over and saw it fly past at about 1000 feet. Prior to that I knew nothing about its completion and I'd never heard a Merlin in real life yet I immediately knew what it was - very distinctive sound.

 

 

 

I have a similar story, except I had no clue of the engines. I was backpacking in Guadalupe NP and a pair of P-38 Lightnings flew overhead. The El Capitan is a landmark used for navigation. I'll never forget that sound.

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The hull speed will be pretty good. I agree they're not planing boats. Very little cruising is done at planing speeds. The reality is that you don't set a big A-sail. Turn on the autopilot, and kick back with a cocktail while comfortably knocking off 18 knots. It's work, it's fatiguing, it's not comfortable, and it's hard on gear. The carbon cutters will knock off the miles comfortably, at a good AVERAGE speed.

 

 

And there it is, cruising ain't racing.

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Joli:

45 degs.

The VPP says we can sail higher and perhaps we could with a sloop rig. But I know cutters and i order to keep all three sails drawing well you can't jam the boat up to 30 degs AWA and maintain VMG. Best to sail fat and let the boat roll.along enjoying a better motion. If you sagged off to an AWA of 32 degs you would get almost 8 knots. I think AWA 32 to 34 degs is about the best most cutters can do when three sails are up.

Thanks Bob, +5 vmg uphill is a good number for 45 foot cruiser.

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This pallet (crushed pallet) of ballast weighs more than the big Pogo. That is a 14,000 lb.+ pile of lead.

 

029_zpsc2t0ayuc.jpg

 

Beautiful pile of lead.

 

I'm feeling a little inadequate.

 

Steve

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Wow, fin keel and spade rudder in 1897.

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Speaking of underbodies......

 

Bob, I've not found a picture of LOON's underbody. Could you post one?

 

Steve

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Joli:

45 degs.

The VPP says we can sail higher and perhaps we could with a sloop rig. But I know cutters and i order to keep all three sails drawing well you can't jam the boat up to 30 degs AWA and maintain VMG. Best to sail fat and let the boat roll.along enjoying a better motion. If you sagged off to an AWA of 32 degs you would get almost 8 knots. I think AWA 32 to 34 degs is about the best most cutters can do when three sails are up.

Thanks Bob, +5 vmg uphill is a good number for 45 foot cruiser.

 

 

Brent can do well over 6 in a 36' steel origami boat - 165 miles to windward in 24 hours.

 

He's said so.

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Beautiful pile of lead.

 

 

 

Now there is a hard core boatyard guy. :D

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Steve:

I thought of you yesterday when I saw that lead.

Here you go.

LOON%20construct_zpsaapxcvbt.jpg

 

I looked at those designs from Mellgren and he has about every rudder style covered including partial skegs, full shegs, barn doors and even one that looks exactly like a C&C scimitar profile and he did that in 1903! In fact he takes several whacks at the scimitar shape. He really knew what was going with reducing the root chord. I had never heard of the guy until this morning. He is in the ENCYCLOPEDIA OF YACHT DESIGNERS.

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Funny.

Numa:

The cutters displace 35,000 lbs. at half load. Lead ballast is close to 14,200 lb.s depending on the pour and the trimming. But very close to that.

As for the polar data,,,,let me think about how best to present that. We have worked with North Sails to develop a good inventory for the boat so I am comfortable with the polar data. That's all that concerns me.

 

I'll tell you this in 15 knots our best VMG is made at 7.48 knots boat speed heeling 22.6 degs.

 

Thank you very much. Would have expected a lower angle of heel given displacement and ballast. On my boat, also a cutter but much lighter, 7.96 kts at 45° TWA with 25° of heel.

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Mine is realistically 5.2. Table says I can do better but I don;t believe it with this rig and boat. I'd have to sail with AWA at 27.22 to get max VMG and I can't see that happening. Still at TWS 16 knots.

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I'll tell you this in 15 knots our best VMG is made at 7.48 knots boat speed heeling 22.6 degs.

 

 

Bob, what is twa? Just curious.

True wind angle

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I'll tell you this in 15 knots our best VMG is made at 7.48 knots boat speed heeling 22.6 degs.

 

 

Bob, what is twa? Just curious.

True wind angle

 

 

Yes, I'm sure Joli knows what it means. He was asking for numbers.

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Right. I gave him numbers. I was confused at first too Blitz.

 

In tabular form the VPP is a big document with a lot of information. I don't much like just putting out one line at a time. There is some interpretation required. In some areas the VPP is overly optimistic and other areas pessimistic.

But I have worked with them for 30 years and I think I have a feel for the data and the subsequent reality. You should use every tool you have available.

 

Wrapping Christmas presents this morning. 70 years old and still figuring out how to best wrap a box. Grrrrrrrrr!

How do I wrap this? It's 8' long.

032_zpsyzgzlzdh.jpg

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Bingo!

Well done Kocher.

 

My wife is a manic window cleaner. Living on the low bank beach we get a lot of spray. In the pool room it's splashing that does the damage. My wife has all commercial grade window cleaning gear. Do not get between her and her favorite squeegy. Up until now she has been using two 2 by 4's, one foot on each one, bouncing up and down as she cleans the pool windows. Technology has come to her rescue. I gave her a 4hp Honda power washer for her birthday. She loves it. If I gave her jewelry she would give me a bad look. " I told you, no more jewelry!"

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It's a confident man that gives a spouse something practical for a gift.

 

There's a movie with James Spader and Susan Sarandon ( White Palace) wherein he gives her a vacuum (a Dust-buster, IIRC) and it goes just terribly wrong for him.

 

Anyway, back to work with me - and, Merry Christmas to all

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Bob, thanks for that image. Love that boat.

 

Of all you designs, Loon one that I could see myself in - the most. Bet I could even rig up safe beaching legs.

 

I didn't know the engine was so far forward. Is the engine box part of the galley or table or ??

 

 

Steve

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Perhaps Brent could spec out a waist high safety railing? And a removable ping pong net. Just kidding...she's gonna have the highest tech window washing platform in the known universe!

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Best of luck! I've never made out giving tools to the wife. NOT appreciated. Except for kitchen tools/things.

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Steve:

It's been a while but I think that engine placement on LOON was a function of the client not wanting a V drive and sleeping requirements. He wanted to bring a gaggle of grand kids along.

Yes, the engine box is integrated into the galley counter. We can do a custom layout for you.

 

I bought my wife a Ion Lithium battery powered lawn mower for her last birthday. She picked it out. She loves it. Once and a while she lets me mow the lawn. In my house we have some of the typical gender based jobs reversed. I like to clean house, I am good at the laundry and I like to cook. It's a good arrangement.

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Steve:

It's been a while but I think that engine placement on LOON was a function of the client not wanting a V drive and sleeping requirements. He wanted to bring a gaggle of grand kids along.

Yes, the engine box is integrated into the galley counter. We can do a custom layout for you.

 

I bought my wife a Ion Lithium battery powered lawn mower for her last birthday. She picked it out. She loves it. Once and a while she lets me mow the lawn. In my house we have some of the typical gender based jobs reversed. I like to clean house, I am good at the laundry and I like to cook. It's a good arrangement.

 

Man, that woman of yours is definitely a keeper, Bob! She probably paints the shack too, right?

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No side load on sprits.

 

Huh.

 

All that time spent "engineering', and all they had to do was ask for (some) BS

 

post-17143-0-63808200-1482461131_thumb.jpg

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No side load on sprits.

 

Huh.

 

All that time spent "engineering', and all they had to do was ask for (some) BS

 

attachicon.gif696.jpg

 

That's great. I can lose the whisker stays then?

 

What a crock...

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Steve:

I thought of you yesterday when I saw that lead.

Here you go.

LOON%20construct_zpsaapxcvbt.jpg

 

I looked at those designs from Mellgren and he has about every rudder style covered including partial skegs, full shegs, barn doors and even one that looks exactly like a C&C scimitar profile and he did that in 1903! In fact he takes several whacks at the scimitar shape. He really knew what was going with reducing the root chord. I had never heard of the guy until this morning. He is in the ENCYCLOPEDIA OF YACHT DESIGNERS.

 

While there is thread drift about Loon, do you have an accommodation plan handy? I've admired photos of Loon for years, as well as the drawings you've posted here, but don't think I've ever seen anything hinting at how the interior is arranged. Until seeing this construction plan I'd not realised the engine was so far forwards so now even more intrigued regarding the interior.

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Jackett:

Yes, it's odd that I did not include the interior layout for LOON in my book either. I'll get it scanned next week and post it for you. Now I'm curious too.

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I posted that last post around 1:30 am this morning. I went back to bed and thought, "Maybe the interior drawing for LOON is lost and that's why you never see it." But I found it in the tube with the other drawings this morning. It's nothing special but I will get it scanned and posted. Maybe not today. But early next week for sure. I am also looking for the drawings of the WHITE WING 36'er. This is one of my sweetest sailing designs and it is the first time I used a pipe frame sprit 38 years ago!

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A friend bought a new dinghy . The ship swindlers assumed he wanted the oars as well . The bill for oars alone ,came to $240.He said`No way`. He stopped by a lumber yard and bought a couple of fir 2x2s , nailed a couple of blades, made from a plastic bucket to them, and had oars just as functional, and far less likely to get stolen, for a fraction the cost. High priced consumerism, carried on throughout all purchases on a boat, is typically what keeps boaters working to make payments, instead of cruising .

 

Does you friend play cricket?

 

Just wondering.

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$240 for oars is cheap. I've made at least a dozen high-end paddles, and a set of oars for a drift boat I owned. No way I would have sold those for $240. Your crap 2x2, nailed together, booger coated nonsense don't work. Nice story.

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Today's photos. Not much from me but Boomer should have a bunch later after he edits his. I think he took a video too.

007_zpshjfv1mef.jpg

Not for dumpster divers!

002_zpssqom6lcf.jpg

Middle of the deck was tented while they finish the detailing around the B'fly hatch.

008_zpsy0bx4m1j.jpg

I had lunch with my friends on the way home.

010_zps1fhgv5fs.jpg

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My aluminum kayak paddle cost $125.

 

I'm not much of a craftsman, but I'd make a better set of oars that what BS describes if the occasion arose.

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BS is not really a Luddite, he's just really dumb. The world knows that, in a pinch, we can use:

 

- plastic blocks for peddles,

- 2x2's and cardboard for oars,

- a bucket for poop,

- your sister's internet connection to communicate with the world,

- used plywood. . . and on and on.

 

We know BS. You should go to Italy and look at the crazy Cathedrals they built. No shortcuts anywhere. Crazy!

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My wife went off to buy kayak paddles. She asked me if I wanted anything special and I said no. She had picked out one in a magazine with flowers on the blades. I didn't care. She came home and handed me my generic looking paddle., I noticed a stuck on tag on the blade. it said 350. That's all, just "350" I thought WTF?. Is that some kind of measurement? Is it metric? Might be some kind of metric length of the paddle. I asked my wife ad she said, "That's the price." Time for another WTF? But that was over ten years ago and the paddle is as good as new now and I'll just keep it. It is very light. I found a "plastic" paddle on the beach a few months ago and I was amazed at how much heavier it was than mine.

 

My wife's carbon "plank" weighs less than ten pounds. It is very rigid. I see no deflection at all when I get on it.

032_zpsyzgzlzdh.jpg

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What is the carbon plank for? I'm sorry to say I missed that, been working a lot. :)

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I one saw a bloke with a couple of ladies cruising along in his boat.

I call out "Hey mate! Can I buy your oars?"

 

He replied "Nobody buys 'oars.... you rent them"

 

 

 

 

Ok.... back to discussing your carbon fibre thingamajigs....

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Lasal:

We have a 60' long 8' wide lap pool at the shack. It's covered by an all glass roof. My wife is a manic window washer. She has been standing on two 2 by 4's to wash the inside of the windows. Now she can stand on the CF plank to do the windows. She loves it.

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And she can carry it easily around the pool house. Got it.

 

I helped a guy start a window washing biz, mostly to help him escape from a religious group that was making him wear a tunic, ride a bike, give all his money to them, and ask permission to have a girlfriend.

 

He then moved away after making some good money and telling those people to f-off. Now I'm cleaning my own windows! Sucks, and they're dirty!

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Lasal:

I'll get a photo of my wife on the plank with her window washing paraphernalia. We live very close to the beach and salt spray is a problem. Inside the pool splashing is just a way of life with grandkids.

pool_zpss4mx40ot.jpg

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That's a great pool!

 

I gotta say, Doug taught me how to wash windows and screens, and it's kinda-sorta fun. You see the results, or lack of, right away. He gave me some surgical towels to get the edges where the squeegee doesn't go. The surgical towels don't leave lint. My old house had about 30 windows and his pay was, ah, big. Buck a pane he said. Inside and out.

 

He married a gal, adopted her kid, moved back east and probably never washed another window! I met him at my local bike shop and he needed work. He said he could work on cars and started doing the typical maintenance on our cars. All that car money he gave to the organization. I asked him, "Why are you wearing shoes with holes?" He told me the story and after a while we figured out a plan. I gave him a copy of Into the Wild by Krakauer and that hit home.

 

True story, and I like the plank! Paid for in one use!

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Yes, I shot a fair amount of video today, but haven't edited it yet. I'll post a video tomorrow.

 

31949773025_73fa7cea2e_h.jpg

 

31949762465_3a1f7b1e6d_h.jpg

 

31109962384_5697833390_h.jpg

 

31109911864_feb5d1bb3f_h.jpg

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Sam

HEART of GOLD was racing and hit the rock at about 7 knots. Some damage was done to the keel and floor grid. Jim is fixing it. It's a great boat. Funny that after a trouble free circumnavigation they bang it up in their backyard.

 

Re: Boomer's photos:

There has been some interest in the sea chest. If you scroll back 11 photos you see one shot looking aft, Andrew is making templates for bulkhead trim and you can see the sea chest under the companion way temporary steps between the two water tight engine room doors.

 

Note the use of toe kicks in the joinery, not an inexpensive detail but it gives a nice look.

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d'ranger:

I'm about 5 months, maybe four months into the photo taking adventure. Boomer has been coaching me but I'm a slow study.

I do think this one is pretty good. I seem to be best at small, shiny things up close.

 

I don;t have Boomer's eye for what makes a good photo. I look at one of his from yesterday and I think, "Hey! I was standing right there too but I did not see the photo." Oh well, I'm a better guitar player than Boomer.

 

002_zpssqom6lcf.jpg

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Bob, not denigrating your abilities and I really appreciate your attention to the 'bits' involved. I used to think electric winches were frivolous, now I look at that and go, that is so cool. The boat I race on once a year offshore has the same configuration and makes life so civilized. I am still strong like bull and smart like tractor but starting to appreciate the better things in life. Looking forward to the video, it's almost like getting a tour. And the geese pics are good to - I admire the outdoors now more than ever. The Whistlers fly over my house almost every evening, very enjoyable even when I can't see them.

 

Another thought - think the owner would consider a contest/lottery for a delivery spot for when they are completed? That would be a bucket list event for sure.

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d'ranger:

No, I don't mind your comments on my photographic efforts. I'm not blind. I'll get better in time now I have some good tools. I would hope.

 

Not sure what crew arrangements have been made if any for the deliveries. I think two boats will stay here and two will go South, way South.

DDW was instrument in the choice of winches with his own experience with electric Andersons as reference. I think they were a very good choice. Time will tell.

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My video skills yesterday were non-existent, and ended up trashing most of what I shot. A combination of getting up earlier then usual, and then way to much coffee on the drive up, resulted in some horrible footage. On top of that my dog Foxy, was pissed for being on a leash, then even more pissed when I left him in the car, when Bob arrived. I knew better, especially when Ruby got out of Bob's car and started barking. Though Ruby usually barks to show her excitement at arriving, she seemed a bit more vocal and persistent, "demanding, where is Foxy!" I knew Foxy's ears would be ringing, and he was expecting me to let him out. But I figured he'd forgive me, if I went inside briefly with Bob.

 

After talking with Bob briefly, I took my leave, and went back to the car. Foxy thought I was coming to let him out - to go see Ruby and Bob. So when I opened the door and told him, to get over on his seat, he sat there defiantly staring at the entry door, where Ruby and Bob had entered the shop. So I had to pick him up and put him in the other seat. I go to put the key in the ignition, and he gets right in my face, as if to say, "your not driving out of here without letting me see them!" Next time," I said, "now get off my lap and get in back." He give me a look, and wasn't to happy about it as he jumped in back, then up next to the rear window, looking at the entry door the whole time as we pulled out of the parking lot.

.

We get on the highway driving out of Anacortes and I look in the rear-view mirror, and he still didn't have a happy face. I said, "you can get in front now." I glanced back at the rear-view mirror, and by his look, I could tell, he was saying, "phuck you! I'm still pissed." So there he sat all the way out to I-5, then another 43 miles down I-5, till we approached the exit to the Edmonds Ferry Dock, which he recognized , and only then did he get in front. But he still let me know he was pissed.

 

When we arrived at the ferry dock, with just enough time, to be one of the last to make the boat; which resulted in him not getting to do his usual sniff and piss walk; he went back to being even more pissed. When we finally got home, he choose to stay downstairs, rather then come up to my office like he usually does. Finally last night a little after 8:00, he came upstairs and sat on the floor, boring holes in me with his eyes for a while, before finally coming up to say, "it's cool now, but don't piss me off like that again."

 

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Fascinating as always. With a 'mini production run', how much is done in bulk vs on demand? Do they cut all the furniture at once, then reset the jigs for the next panel, that kind of thing?

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My video skills yesterday were non-existent, and ended up trashing most of what I shot. A combination of getting up earlier then usual, and then way to much coffee on the drive up, resulted in some horrible footage. On top of that my dog Foxy, was pissed for being on a leash, then even more pissed when I left him in the car, when Bob arrived. I knew better, especially when Ruby got out of Bob's car and started barking. Though Ruby usually barks to show her excitement at arriving, she seemed a bit more vocal and persistent, "demanding, where is Foxy!" I knew Foxy's ears would be ringing, and he was expecting me to let him out. But I figured he'd forgive me, if I went inside briefly with Bob.

 

After talking with Bob briefly, I took my leave, and went back to the car. Foxy thought I was coming to let him out - to go see Ruby and Bob. So when I opened the door and told him, to get over on his seat, he sat there defiantly staring at the entry door, where Ruby and Bob had entered the shop. So I had to pick him up and put him in the other seat. I go to put the key in the ignition, and he gets right in my face, as if to say, "your not driving out of here without letting me see them!" Next time," I said, "now get off my lap and get in back." He give me a look, and wasn't to happy about it as he jumped in back, then up next to the rear window, looking at the entry door the whole time as we pulled out of the parking lot.

.

We get on the highway driving out of Anacortes and I look in the rear-view mirror, and he still didn't have a happy face. I said, "you can get in front now." I glanced back at the rear-view mirror, and by his look, I could tell, he was saying, "phuck you! I'm still pissed." So there he sat all the way out to I-5, then another 43 miles down I-5, till we approached the exit to the Edmonds Ferry Dock, which he recognized , and only then did he get in front. But he still let me know he was pissed.

 

When we arrived at the ferry dock, with just enough time, to be one of the last to make the boat; which resulted in him not getting to do his usual sniff and piss walk; he went back to being even more pissed. When we finally got home, he choose to stay downstairs, rather then come up to my office like he usually does. Finally last night a little after 8:00, he came upstairs and sat on the floor, boring holes in me with his eyes for a while, before finally coming up to say, "it's cool now, but don't piss me off like that again."

 

 

Nice work, Boomer.

 

So that 'tent' above hull one - is that a temporary spray booth of some kind?

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Fascinating as always. With a 'mini production run', how much is done in bulk vs on demand? Do they cut all the furniture at once, then reset the jigs for the next panel, that kind of thing?

 

As you'll note, some items are done as a production run. I suspect the wood parts are built individually, after patterns are made first. They may or may not reuse the same patterns for the rest of the cutters.

 

 

 

Nice work, Boomer.

 

So that 'tent' above hull one - is that a temporary spray booth of some kind?

 

 

Thanks Sailby! Yes that's a temporary spray tent.

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Lark:

They are building the bits and pieces for four boats and setting them aside for when they are needed. Work on No. 2 is going quickly from the lessons learned on No. 1. I'll give Jim Betts an "A" for scheduling the work. I'm sure the process is evolving.

 

Yes, that tent is over the B'fly hatch area where there was some paining left to be finished.

 

Next Wednesday I go up with Dave Cooper to formally get his project started.

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Foxy came sailing with us on FRANCIS when we checked out the top down A2 furler.

He was charming, but we didn't try and limit his freedom that day.

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Thank You B&B!

 

That was a very welcome distraction... I needed it!

 

Looking forward to seeing more in 2017 ;-)

 

Happy Holidays to All!

 

fs

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Foxy came sailing with us on FRANCIS when we checked out the top down A2 furler.

He was charming, but we didn't try and limit his freedom that day.

 

He was well behaved that day Kim. Though he surprised me after we had returned and were putting FRANCIS to bed; by walking on the side deck when I was forward about midships. - since he had learned his lesson about leaving the cockpit beforehand, when told to stay.

 

Shortly after I first go him, I was single-handing on a breezy day when the wind went lighter. So dropped the 110, flaked it and bricked it. Got the 150 hanked on, unrolled it, attached the sheets, then went forward to attach the halyard. I turned to return to the cockpit, just as Foxy was jumping out of the cockpit onto the side deck. Right then the boat took a lurch from a passing wake and watched Foxy go over the side. I found out what a fast and powerful swimmer he was as he tried to keep up, but to no avail. I then tacked and fell off and sailed to his left before jibing,and then heading up to him on my lee, then eased the main and let it flog for a slow approach. Fortunately I was able to snatch him up on my starboard aft quarter on the first try. Since then he usually stays in the cockpit, when told to do so.

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Who designed/built Heart of Gold?

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I'm going to the yard today and tomorrow. Today I'm going with a writer who wants to do a piece on me. I figure I'll take him to the yard and turn him loose and let my work speak for itself. Of course I will have two hours in the car with him but I can't think of anything to say I have not said yet. Reminds me of that line in the Bob Dylan song BROWNSVILLE GIRL " I'd give anything for an original thought right now." I'll take some photos.

 

Tomorrow back to the yard with Dave Cooper to finally get the project formally started. Dave and I have been working on designs for him for 25 years. I've watched his daughter grow up. That's another two hours in the car with someone who only wants to talk boats.

 

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