Bob Perry

My newest project

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I use a snuffer when cruising, but its a slow solution for racing. Also, I find that, with a crew, it is actually simpler to manage the kite with a traditional set/takedown.

 

Kim - you mention using the bow roller as well. The issue that I had was that if I tried to reach, the tack line would quickly chafe through on the cheeks of the roller. I have some funny video of this. We eventually rigged a block to the pin that spans the roller, this got the tack line above the cheeks. It's not a perfect solution, but it is effective. We had the kite up for 15 hours in a distance race last year with sloppy seas and wind in the mid teens to low 20s the entire time. This is why I am thinking about the sprit. It likely wont project more than about a foot past the roller, but it will make a big difference in sail handling. If, like you, I didn't have a pulpit, I probably would not be considering this.

 

We actually have a strap around the roller to a ring which gets the tack above the cheeks. Chris Tutmark suggested it to me.

 

I know that you guys are in a different league than VALIS, but when we occasionally fly an asym, I run the tack from a block shackled to the anchor roller stainless (aft of the roller), and then up through a custom stainless ring that is lashed to the top rail of the pulpit. The ring is essentially a very large fairlead, and keeps the tack from snagging or chafing. You would need a very sturdy pulpit to avoid bending it, but ours is industrial strength and I've seen no distortion. I tried running the asym tack from the anchor roller, then outside of the pulpit, but we ended up snagging the bow bicolor. I've also tried the ATN "tacker" around the furled jib, but my custom fairlead gets the tack further forward. I've considered just having the ring welded to the pulpit, but the lashing is quick enough -- for attachment, we actually have short lines with snap clips spliced to the ring. Not as good as a prod, but better than nothing.

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I use a snuffer when cruising, but its a slow solution for racing. Also, I find that, with a crew, it is actually simpler to manage the kite with a traditional set/takedown.

 

Kim - you mention using the bow roller as well. The issue that I had was that if I tried to reach, the tack line would quickly chafe through on the cheeks of the roller. I have some funny video of this. We eventually rigged a block to the pin that spans the roller, this got the tack line above the cheeks. It's not a perfect solution, but it is effective. We had the kite up for 15 hours in a distance race last year with sloppy seas and wind in the mid teens to low 20s the entire time. This is why I am thinking about the sprit. It likely wont project more than about a foot past the roller, but it will make a big difference in sail handling. If, like you, I didn't have a pulpit, I probably would not be considering this.

 

We actually have a strap around the roller to a ring which gets the tack above the cheeks. Chris Tutmark suggested it to me.

I know that you guys are in a different league than VALIS, but when we occasionally fly an asym, I run the tack from a block shackled to the anchor roller stainless (aft of the roller), and then up through a custom stainless ring that is lashed to the top rail of the pulpit. The ring is essentially a very large fairlead, and keeps the tack from snagging or chafing. You would need a very sturdy pulpit to avoid bending it, but ours is industrial strength and I've seen no distortion. I tried running the asym tack from the anchor roller, then outside of the pulpit, but we ended up snagging the bow bicolor. I've also tried the ATN "tacker" around the furled jib, but my custom fairlead gets the tack further forward. I've considered just having the ring welded to the pulpit, but the lashing is quick enough -- for attachment, we actually have short lines with snap clips spliced to the ring. Not as good as a prod, but better than nothing.

I like that idea, thanks.

I use an ATN tracker as well, but I could reinforce the pulpit to take any loads as well.

Wonder what the loading would be? The Asym load is going to the bow fitting, not the ring.

It would be a relatively small percentage of the total load.

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I use a snuffer when cruising, but its a slow solution for racing. Also, I find that, with a crew, it is actually simpler to manage the kite with a traditional set/takedown.

 

Kim - you mention using the bow roller as well. The issue that I had was that if I tried to reach, the tack line would quickly chafe through on the cheeks of the roller. I have some funny video of this. We eventually rigged a block to the pin that spans the roller, this got the tack line above the cheeks. It's not a perfect solution, but it is effective. We had the kite up for 15 hours in a distance race last year with sloppy seas and wind in the mid teens to low 20s the entire time. This is why I am thinking about the sprit. It likely wont project more than about a foot past the roller, but it will make a big difference in sail handling. If, like you, I didn't have a pulpit, I probably would not be considering this.

We actually have a strap around the roller to a ring which gets the tack above the cheeks. Chris Tutmark suggested it to me.

I know that you guys are in a different league than VALIS, but when we occasionally fly an asym, I run the tack from a block shackled to the anchor roller stainless (aft of the roller), and then up through a custom stainless ring that is lashed to the top rail of the pulpit. The ring is essentially a very large fairlead, and keeps the tack from snagging or chafing. You would need a very sturdy pulpit to avoid bending it, but ours is industrial strength and I've seen no distortion. I tried running the asym tack from the anchor roller, then outside of the pulpit, but we ended up snagging the bow bicolor. I've also tried the ATN "tacker" around the furled jib, but my custom fairlead gets the tack further forward. I've considered just having the ring welded to the pulpit, but the lashing is quick enough -- for attachment, we actually have short lines with snap clips spliced to the ring. Not as good as a prod, but better than nothing.

I like that idea, thanks.

I use an ATN tracker as well, but I could reinforce the pulpit to take any loads as well.

Wonder what the loading would be? The Asym load is going to the bow fitting, not the ring.

It would be a relatively small percentage of the total load.

 

There's going to be significant side load on the pulpit ring. The amount will depend on the distance from (in my case) the tackline block at the anchor hardware and the pulpit ring (among other things). Still, with reinforcement it could be fine.

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We use an ATN tacker with a line to the to keep it at the desired height. In this set-up the forestay takes the side load. The vertical load is actually quite light and the pulpit seems to handle it easily.

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More from today:

 

This is Nick. Nick takes care of receiving all the parts that come in and inventorying them. Here he is holding the Gori prop. It's a thing of beauty.

 

023_zpsvqcdvzzd.jpg

 

035_zpsyjdmmjmq.jpg

 

033_zpsijyp01wm.jpg

 

All the hatches have this sand blasted finish to the s.s..

017_zpsdku9ffx5.jpg

 

009_zpscn74jngs.jpg

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I can't thank you enough for sharing all these pictures, Bob. There is so much detail to see and comprehend, and I enjoy the exercise. :)

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Thanks Tom. Unfortunately the interior is going to stay covered up to protect it while the machinery and plumbing are installed.

 

The Swedish client:

Work proceeds on my 45'er plug for the Swedish client:

Here is the top half of the keel fin.

Per%20keel_zpslbti8q5k.jpg

Here is the stern.

Per%20stern_zpseurlsvqo.jpg

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Thanks for sharing Bob. The joiner work looks very nice. I like theT&G bulkheads. Yellow cedar with teak trim? Sand blasted hatches look great!

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OAITW:

Thanks. Most of that bulkhead detail is covered in the #M protective paper. Andrew pulled this one down for me so I could photo it.

Yes, I agree. I was very skeptical about sand blasting shiny s.s. hatches to begin with. But now I like that look. They represent quite an investment.

I think they would look great on my mystery design.

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OAITW:

Thanks. Most of that bulkhead detail is covered in the #M protective paper. Andrew pulled this one down for me so I could photo it.

Yes, I agree. I was very skeptical about sand blasting shiny s.s. hatches to begin with. But now I like that look. They represent quite an investment.

I think they would look great on my mystery design.

We blasted the 316SS keel structure and mast step on FRANCIS and they still look good.

(I happened to take this picture earlier today. Handy coincidence.)

post-8115-0-81314500-1484865925_thumb.jpg

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OAITW:

Thanks. Most of that bulkhead detail is covered in the #M protective paper. Andrew pulled this one down for me so I could photo it.

Yes, I agree. I was very skeptical about sand blasting shiny s.s. hatches to begin with. But now I like that look. They represent quite an investment.

I think they would look great on my mystery design.

 

Bit of a tease there, Bob!

 

The finish on these boats is looking superb.

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I agree kdh on the beauty part. It must weigh 25 lbs. It reeks of reliability,,,,,,,,and money.

Yes, only those pretentious yachty fools would spend so much money on something like that for a marina queen. Everybody knows that a perfectly serviceable folding prop can be quickly tacked together from some old Campbell's soup cans, used universal joints from a junkyard Yugo and some empty Clorox bottles. Typical of that inexperienced, buffoon, shyster Perry to entice his clients into wasting even more money so they have to spend their time working to pay for such extravagance instead of cruising.

 

 

 

OK, OK, I am sorry, I couldn't resist. It is the Rioja talking, not me! I am going to hell for sure. I always thought I would end up in hell, but now I know I will.

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Thanks Tom. Unfortunately the interior is going to stay covered up to protect it while the machinery and plumbing are installed.

 

The Swedish client:

Work proceeds on my 45'er plug for the Swedish client:

Here is the top half of the keel fin.

Per%20keel_zpslbti8q5k.jpg

Here is the stern.

Per%20stern_zpseurlsvqo.jpg

I like the keel stub Bob, does it just have a lead "shoe" bolted to it or is there a short fin?

I assume the stub will also have transverse frames ( floors?)

Seems like a great way to have a strong external keel for a reasonable cost.

Are there tanks in the stub?

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Ed:

That was very well done. I think you nailed BS.

Thanks Bob, I think I could feel it when I was writing that. I was in the zone. I enjoy a good Rioja!

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Ed:

That was very well done. I think you nailed BS.

Thanks Bob, I think I could feel it when I was writing that. I was in the zone. I enjoy a good Rioja!

 

 

To get in the zone you really need a good whack upside the melon.

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Just back from a pleasant trip to the yard. I think the photos are self explanatory.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

019_zps0q4br9l6.jpg

 

More from today:

 

This is Nick. Nick takes care of receiving all the parts that come in and inventorying them. Here he is holding the Gori prop. It's a thing of beauty.

 

023_zpsvqcdvzzd.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

All the hatches have this sand blasted finish to the s.s..

 

 

 

Interesting how his smile feathers inversely to the prop, clearly an advanced interface design for future skippers.

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How are you going with the Tartan Dave?

Since I know I will be putting the Tartan up for sale in about 8 months I am trying not to break anything or wear anything out between now and then. My nightmare is having the old Perkins [Westerbeke] crash and burn this summer, having to spend 20k on a new Yanmar and getting almost none of that back when I sell.

What is it they call boats, "A hole in the water you throw $100 bills into?"

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I have a Gori like that. It's beautiful and completely trustworthy.

+1

We never had a single prop issue in 5 years with one. Loved it

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Yes -- Dave and anyone else too.

 

Please note well anodes protecting the sail drive unit must be carefully attended --- and that goes double if you use any propeller (Gori included;) containing copper. Else problems will ensue.

 

Follow your version of sail drive instructions (probably Volvo in your case) to the letter especially concerning aftermarket propeller installs.

 

If you do not attend to this detail galvanic trouble will attack the drive unit big time and you will much regret your inattention.

 

Kiwanda

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Does anyone here isolate their engine and drive from the negative side of their electrical system when they leave the boat?

 

I appreciate most will turn off the battery switch, which is the positive side of the system.

 

The reason I ask is some European boats with saildrives now have a negative switch as well, presumably to help with galvanic action in marinas.

 

Edit: I think some saildrives are electrically isolated from the motor in Volvo drives.

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^^ I do. Years ago I had an electrolysis problem which required I send my MaxProp back to WA. I ate 2 zincs and the one on the MaxProp every year plus some prop metal. At the suggestion of the yard manager where I keep my boat I added a negative switch that I remotely hid so it not only killed the electrolysis issue it is a theft deterrent as well (in my dreams at least). It worked great.

 

But I wanted to get to the bottom of it so I ripped a lot of wire out until I got to the Xantrex inverter, the ground strap from that was tied to both the AC & DC grounds, effectively tying them together and apparently causing a nice electrical path around the boat. The inverter is gone, I have a little plug in inverter for the little need I have for AC on the boat and now use just the zinc on the prop. I've had the same zinc on my drive shaft for over 2 years and is about 5% wasted away. I could probably reuse the one on the prop but at the cost of a new prop vs. a new zinc every year it’s cheap insurance.

 

As a shout out to PYI, the prop to my eye heavily pitted and I thought it was a goner. Anyway they gave me an estimate over the phone based on my description. It may have been $600 to fix (it was a few years ago and like most boats expenses I’ve suppressed the actual numbers so these numbers are not accurate but the ratio is pretty close). I was happy with that, a $3200 prop fixed for $600 due to someone else's stupidity, worked for me. Image my surprise when PYI called and said “from your description we thought it was a lot worse than it is, yours is nothing, your bill will be less”. A week or so later they called and the final tally was just about half of what they quoted. I was stunned. And when I got it back I could have sold it for brand new on eBay, it was that well refinished. They welded up the pits and rebalanced it and remilled or replaced one of the gears as I recall. Now that’s service, they could have taken my $600 and I would still be happy as hell. They have gained a customer for life tho.

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^^ I do. Years ago I had an electrolysis problem which required I send my MaxProp back to WA. I ate 2 zincs and the one on the MaxProp every year plus some prop metal. At the suggestion of the yard manager where I keep my boat I added a negative switch that I remotely hid so it not only killed the electrolysis issue it is a theft deterrent as well (in my dreams at least). It worked great.[/size]

 

But I wanted to get to the bottom of it so I ripped a lot of wire out until I got to the Xantrex inverter, the ground strap from that was tied to both the AC & DC grounds, effectively tying them together and apparently causing a nice electrical path around the boat. The inverter is gone, I have a little plug in inverter for the little need I have for AC on the boat and now use just the zinc on the prop. I've had the same zinc on my drive shaft for over 2 years and is about 5% wasted away. I could probably reuse the one on the prop but at the cost of a new prop vs. a new zinc every year it’s cheap insurance.

 

As a shout out to PYI, the prop to my eye heavily pitted and I thought it was a goner. Anyway they gave me an estimate over the phone based on my description. It may have been $600 to fix (it was a few years ago and like most boats expenses I’ve suppressed the actual numbers so these numbers are not accurate but the ratio is pretty close). I was happy with that, a $3200 prop fixed for $600 due to someone else's stupidity, worked for me. Image my surprise when PYI called and said “from your description we thought it was a lot worse than it is, yours is nothing, your bill will be less”. A week or so later they called and the final tally was just about half of what they quoted. I was stunned. And when I got it back I could have sold it for brand new on eBay, it was that well refinished. They welded up the pits and rebalanced it and remilled or replaced one of the gears as I recall. Now that’s service, they could have taken my $600 and I would still be happy as hell. They have gained a customer for life tho.

I have been a PYI customer for about 30 years, they have first rate customer service.

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My boat has a negative switch but like Drew mentioned there is a crossover somewhere in the system. Olaf helped me figure this out, but I have not found the source. Throwing the negative will dim the cabin lights but not shut them off so the conection must be small, I imagine this means there may be a lot of current going through a small wire on the house circuit which is not a good thing. There is no inverter.

 

With the negative off there is no power to the motor, a volvo with sail drive and max prop. The saildrive has a large anode in addition to the one on the prop which I change out every 6 months, not bad in our large public marina with lots of suspect boats plugged in to shore power 24/7. There is usually about 30-40 % left on the anodes but I don't wnat to push it given all the saildrive horror stories over the years.

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If DC stray current is the cause of anode or underwater metal wasting then there is a problem with DC wiring or a DC device - not the DC/AC safety green bonding connection. If you need 24 hour circuits (bilge pumps, refrigeration, etc.) then complete battery isolation (both DC positive and negative switch) will not work. LIkewise this connection plays no part in anode depletion if the source of stray current is a neighbor's DC electrical problem .

Typical sources of stray current are the battery charger, charger/inverter, any device or wiring connection exposed to bilge water.

In the case of inverters and generators too - AC safety green (grounding) to DC negative are bonded together for safety the same as AC shore power safety green needs to be bonded to DC negative. AC grounding does not carry any current unless something goes wrong between AC and DC system wiring. If the two are not connected together then there is no secondary path back to the AC source.

 

Plainly - defeating that connection puts the boat and persons at risk and where these are correctly bonded together there is no risk of creating any DC stray current threat. The AC/DC connection is an important safety connection that protects from fire and electrical shock. And that is why virtually every code worldwide including USCG and ABYC standards require this connection be kept intact. The connection by itself has no effect whatsoever in stray current damage cases.

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I've never plugged in at my slip for these reasons.

 

Drew, let's try to get together this season. Cuttyhunk would probably be easiest. Long time.

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An isolation transformer will keep you isolated from the neighbors galvanic and stray current mischief because safety green does not pass off the boat and so you are not connected to everyone else. Safety green still needs to be bonded onboard but that path ends at the transformer. This device also does away with polarity miswire threats and eliminates AC passing through the water to the shorepower transformer ground. Very good device indeed but one needs to make sure the install is exactly as designed and one needs to test regularly to be sure there are no internal faults that will defeat isloation.

 

An isolation transformer will not protect you from stray current or galvanic events if the source is on your own boat.

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All true, plus it keeps people in the water safe from any AC faults on your own boat. Once you've found and corrected any stray current problems on your own boat, installing an isolation transformer prevents problems on other peoples' boats from affecting yours. A 30A transformer can be had for ~$1K, which isn't astronomical by boat standards. The install must be done right, but it's not difficult and a transformer eliminates the need for a galvanic isolator, which offsets some of the expense in a new install. If you're in a hot marina, it'll cut down on the frequency of zinc replacement, which also defrays its cost over time.

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I might have a go at completely isolating my engine and drive and see how it goes, currently using up more than 50% of the zincs on the Volvo saildrive a year, half in a marina and half on a mooring.

 

Probably better to isolate the battery earth, all sorts of stray paths to the block through the engine control panel and other stuff.

 

Don't have an onboard AC system.

 

Not too sure what to do about the automatic bilge pump though.

 

Bob, the cutters are using saildrives and have a potentially conducting hull, any special consideration given to electrical isolation?

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If you've got a dry bilge, you don't have a conducting path for the bilge pump or its wiring. If your pump or wires are submerged, try to get the electrical bits up higher and out of the water.

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I have keel bolts and earth straps in a long sump that collects rainwater down the mast, the pump will sit in water electrically connected to salt water a lot of the time.

 

I only put the automatic pump on when I am away, perhaps I could design some sort of time switch relay system to turn it on and off at regular intervals. Kind of defeats the purpose though.

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Mr. Hart

 

Your anode depletion rate seems pretty normal. Doubtful there is any wiring or stray currrent based gremins afoot based on what you report. 50% wasted salt water is the right time to change out and if the anode lasted longer than one year the anode is probably passivated or loose (not working) and needs to be replaced.

 

If your drive is Volvo then the drive is already isolated from the motor and so also the rest of the boat. Check it with a multimeter. If it does not check out diagnose and replace the Volvo insulated parts that were put there to maintain isolation.

 

Generally: Keep the drive paint coatings intact - any scratches need to be recoated. The sail drive anode is sized to protect the drive itself - not the propeller (nor any other underwater metal either) so aftermarket propeller means additional anodes need to be in place. No wiring attached to the drive either - including a control cable that might come into contact other things electrical.

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Other people have not had the same experience. Photo by Ed Sherman

post-108741-0-84150500-1485038368_thumb.jpg

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Other people have not had the same experience. Photo by Ed Sherman

That may not polish out, I'm afraid.

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I've never plugged in at my slip for these reasons.

 

Drew, let's try to get together this season. Cuttyhunk would probably be easiest. Long time.

 

I'm in. Sometime in July? Only this time I buy the lobsters!

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Bob, sorry if you already covered this. Is the hull build going to be composite similar to Frankie? Thanks.

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Dave and I went to the yard yesterday. We spent time going over build ideas with Jim and costing. Steve had modelled the hull, keel and bulb so we spent some time going over that to insure that the 3D model matched my 2d drawings to an RCH. Steve is very exacting. He runs the CNC machine and knows exactly what that machine wants and what throws it into a hissy fit.

 

Dave was very excited, to say the least, at finally seeing tangible progress on his project. Of course I will keep you updated as his plug begins to take shape.

 

After our yard visit we repaired to La Conner where we indulged ourselves with a hearty lunch at the tavern. Right on the Swinomish Channel it doesn't hurt that there is a nice Valiant 40 moored right in front of the joint. I like to impress the waitresses, "See that boat, I know the kid who designed that boat." I'll take some photos of the tavern next time. There are brass plaques along the edge of the bar in memory of the old timers who made it their second home. I hope I get a plaque some day.

 

Work proceeds on hull No. 3 of the carbon cutters. Here are Javier and his laminating crew adding grp to the keel fin to help build up thickness.

029_zpst3iuwy5y.jpg[/url]

 

025_zpsetqulb0y.jpg

 

Core panels are being preliminary fitted to the skin and numbered so they can be put back in correct sequence.

003_zpsnxhttf8w.jpg

 

In this pic you can clearly see the trailing edge of the keel piece that is added.

029_zps2af2mx85.jpg

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More pics from yesterday:

 

Steve admires his 3D model:

031_zpsauvwdltb.jpg

 

Jarod, son in law of Steve the joinery captain, note the coreless rectangle where the CF chainplates will go.

009_zps9thqsiar.jpg

 

Tape holds the core in place while the panels are being fitted.

006%20-%20Copy_zpsbnxqwacz.jpg

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I really don't get this anti Bob stuff.

I do. Sadly, I think it is becoming a part of our culture that people feel they can say whatever they want to, and then when someone confronts them with a different viewpoint (or - gasp - actual facts and knowledge), it "hurts their feelings" and they feel they are justified in wrapping themselves in a cloak of victimhood and lashing out.

 

Some here seem to have brought this to an art-form: morphing from victim to holy-warrior, apparently in the belief that it is a sacred mission to point out to everyone what a meanie BP is... while blind to the facts that /A/ he speaks from a position of fact and knowledge, and [b/ they are spewing exactly the hate they claim to abhor.

 

</rant>

 

post-17143-0-85903400-1485455137_thumb.jpg

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Not that it certainly wasn't done before, but it's also common on ULDBs - especially the big ones - the headstay is well back of the stem on the SC70s, and it's even a foot aft on my little 30'.

Yup. Merlin's headstay was surprisingly far aft of the stem.

 

I'm told, too, that there are structural benefits - easier to build a solid headstay attachment when it isn't on the very pointiest part of the bow.

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Sled: I don't mind the "holy warrior" thing but can I be the Crusader? They had cool getups.

 

The way I look at it there will always be someone bitter at my perceived success. Me? I admire successful people. Do I get jealous? Maybe a little bit but it';s more of an envy mixed with admiration type of feeling. " Damn I wish that was me." Then I use that as a model to try to emulate and move myself ahead.

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Given that Bob has been a friend of mine for 30+ years now and that I know him fairly well, I have to wonder if some of the "haters" would change their tune if they knew him in person, face to face.

 

Yes, he can be blunt (and he doesn't suffer fools), but he is actually a pretty nice guy and very generous. A visit to the beach shack for an afternoon and maybe one of his dinners might convert most of the "haters" to at least realize that they only see a small sliver of Bob here on CA. (Sorry, I couldn't help myself.)

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You can judge someone by the friends they keep and Bob has the best friends. I wish I lived close enough to be part of that group but alas must just knobjob from afar. If I can't ever be great at least I know some great people. Thanks again for sharing your work Bob. The FB fan club is pretty cool too.

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Sled: I don't mind the "holy warrior" thing but can I be the Crusader? They had cool getups.

 

 

Not all of them were cool....

 

365989601_434c4ccf21_z.jpg?zz=1

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Yeah, a keyboard and an internet connection empowers some even more than putting them behind the wheel of a powerful vehicle. Mark Twain made some remark about the arrogance of the mounted rider and how he becomes insufferable when invested with his empowered perspective. Wonder what he would have made of the World Wide Web ?

 

These things all serve to make us just MORE of whatever we are, or are feeling, I guess. Like when some folks become wealthy - it doesn't really change who you are, if just amplifies it. In my own case I find frequent breaks from online engagement are recommended.

 

Man, what a great Wednesday night race last night. Nothing special, just a moderate breeze (for once), a long-time pal as crew and a six-pack. We made quick work of the competition - that little Bill Cook designed go-kart really is a model of efficiency. Underway and fully rigged to race (with kite) in less than 10 minutes from stepping aboard- I mean, - why WOULDN'T you go racing ?

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Truth is, the "haters" are not invited to the shack. I prefer to surround myself with hopeful, optimistic people that enjoy sharing a positive energy. I can be comfortable in that environment. It feeds my creative needs. I don't abide negative people. How the fuck could I sit down to design a sailboat and be all angry and pissed off at the same time?

" Fucking, piece of shit mainsheet!"

"God damn that keel all to hell!"

 

I'd probably end up cutting off one ear.

 

If someone was bitching about things at Spike, he would listen attentively and when they were done whining Spike would say, "Well,,,what's the good news?" He was always optimistic.

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Wow, that's beautiful. Me too. Funny how the eye becomes trained to recognize good foils.

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kdh:

That is a stock Jefa rudder and stock. These are not uncommon in Europe but I have never seen one over here. You get the entire Jefa set up for rudder installation including the rudder. They offer both racing and cruising profiles.

 

Works for me.

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Wow, that's beautiful. Me too. Funny how the eye becomes trained to recognize good foils.

 

+1

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These things all serve to make us just MORE of whatever we are, or are feeling, I guess. Like when some folks become wealthy - it doesn't really change who you are, if just amplifies it. In my own case I find frequent breaks from online engagement are recommended.

 

I've thought about this. Question: Have you ever considered that it's not who the rich guy is that gets amplified but instead the perception of the rich guy by others that gets amplified?

 

I don't know, but I ask myself this.

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Holy cow kdh, you sound like a Zen monk. " What is the sound of a rich guy amplifying?"

 

I try not to pay attention. It's kind of like beautiful women. The woman can be a knock out but is he's a bitch she quits looking good really quickly.

I think you might be correct in that it's the perception that get's amplified. But I might replace the word "perception" with "presumption".

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Holy cow kdh, you sound like a Zen monk. " What is the sound of a rich guy amplifying?"

 

I try not to pay attention. It's kind of like beautiful women. The woman can be a knock out but is he's a bitch she quits looking good really quickly.

I think you might be correct in that it's the perception that get's amplified. But I might replace the word "perception" with "presumption".

 

Funny, and to me you make a good point, Bob.

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I have a friend I've known forever, since fifth grade, and I haven't spent more time with anyone else in my life than with him.

 

I asked him once. "You seem like you have some ideas. How can I be a better person?" He said, "Get rid of the Porsche."

 

That made no sense to me.

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Holy cow kdh, you sound like a Zen monk. " What is the sound of a rich guy amplifying?"

 

 

 

Kaching?

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kdh:

You missed his whole point.

" Get rid of the Porsche. Give it to me."

 

I didn't want to make him a rich asshole by doing that, or make others think he's a rich asshole.

 

I wonder if he would have taken it. Probably not.

 

Actually we're trying to give someone in our family a car, trying to just buy him one by giving him money for it. It's somehow not straightforward. There are elements of making choices for him or controlling his life or not letting him be who he is.

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It's kind of like beautiful women. The woman can be a knock out but is he's a bitch she quits looking good really quickly.

lol

 

A friend of mine has been known to muse: "never forget, no matter how hot she is, somebody somewhere is tired of her shit..."

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If someone was bitching about things at Spike, he would listen attentively and when they were done whining Spike would say, "Well,,,what's the good news?" He was always optimistic.

 

Thank you, Bob. I had read that a couple years ago and had forgotten. It's good wisdom in a question: well, what's the good news.

 

Thanks.

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If someone was bitching about things at Spike, he would listen attentively and when they were done whining Spike would say, "Well,,,what's the good news?" He was always optimistic.

 

Thank you, Bob. I had read that a couple years ago and had forgotten. It's good wisdom in a question: well, what's the good news.

 

Thanks.

 

 

+1 Inspired.

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"" What is the sound of a rich guy amplifying?""

 

I have been meditating on this Koan.

 

Well, not exactly but I did think of it as I walked Ruby this evening, ORION bright in the SSE sky. I think I may have the answer.

 

"" What is the sound of a rich guy amplifying?"

 

It's the sound of a Ferrari.

 

Kwatz!

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"" What is the sound of a rich guy amplifying?""

 

I have been meditating on this Koan.

 

Well, not exactly but I did think of it as I walked Ruby this evening, ORION bright in the SSE sky. I think I may have the answer.

 

"" What is the sound of a rich guy amplifying?"

 

It's the sound of a Ferrari launching off the end of the Admiral Kuznetsov. .

 

Kwatz!

 

Modified.

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"" What is the sound of a rich guy amplifying?""

 

I have been meditating on this Koan.

 

Well, not exactly but I did think of it as I walked Ruby this evening, ORION bright in the SSE sky. I think I may have the answer.

 

"" What is the sound of a rich guy amplifying?"

 

It's the sound of a Ferrari launching off the end of the Admiral Kuznetsov. .

 

Kwatz!

 

Modified.

 

The urologist in my Town is named Kuznetsov. For real.

 

If I ever decide to get fixed, I'll go with him for sure. "Paging Dr. Cutsnutsoff......."

 

Steve

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A Doctor at a local clinic is Dr. A. Harmer.

 

Don't know how he did on the Hippocratic oath.

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I need to make a correction on that rudder.

 

That IS NOT the Jefa rudder.

Stealth spec change!

 

That is a CF rudder and stock made by a smaller Swedish company, Bjornegren, BEAR AB.

It is a step up from what Jefa offers.

 

My client corrected me.

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A Doctor at a local clinic is Dr. A. Harmer.

 

Don't know how he did on the Hippocratic oath.

Once worked with a weather forecaster named Fred Guesser.

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Heh. my stepdaughter had a classmate named Harry Wiener.

 

Why in the world would a parent do that to a kid?

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My first time in the Army, I had drill sergeant named Kostic. He lived up to his name.

 

I went to high school with a kid with the unfortunate last name, Dick. At least his parents didn't name him Richard or Harry, like the poor bastard above..

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kdh:

That is a stock Jefa rudder and stock. These are not uncommon in Europe but I have never seen one over here. You get the entire Jefa set up for rudder installation including the rudder. They offer both racing and cruising profiles.

 

Works for me.

 

I am surprised by that since PY Inc (right in WA state) offers the Jefa rudders. They seem like a bit of a no-brainer for someone who wants a relatively economical rudder re-fit.

 

The only drawbacks I see to them are that the stock sections IIRC are a bit on the thick side IMO (14.5% and 18% t/c ratios) and they have PU foam cores. I suppose 14.5% and 18% are acceptable if you are sailing primarily in a heavy air region, but in PNW, I think I would want a bit thinner.

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In had a classmate named Dick Boughner which he pronounced "Bowner" Like the bow of a boat.

Unfortunately one day someone forget to tell the substitute teacher who read the role, last name first, "Boner Dick".

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kdh:

That is a stock Jefa rudder and stock. These are not uncommon in Europe but I have never seen one over here. You get the entire Jefa set up for rudder installation including the rudder. They offer both racing and cruising profiles.

 

Works for me.

I am surprised by that since PY Inc (right in WA state) offers the Jefa rudders. They seem like a bit of a no-brainer for someone who wants a relatively economical rudder re-fit.

 

The only drawbacks I see to them are that the stock sections IIRC are a bit on the thick side IMO (14.5% and 18% t/c ratios) and they have PU foam cores. I suppose 14.5% and 18% are acceptable if you are sailing primarily in a heavy air region, but in PNW, I think I would want a bit thinner.

Probably driven by the cf post requirements. When Kiwi started building the 35 wingboat they really wanted to do a CF rudder shaft, but it was simply too big. Solid SS was all that would fit in blade and still have strength.

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Heh. my stepdaughter had a classmate named Harry Wiener.

 

Why in the world would a parent do that to a kid?

 

An old girlfriend named her kid Harry Bush.

 

 

No ironically named person can ever top Cardinal Sin in the Philippines though.

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12m: Have you checked the racing series of Jefa rudder? There are two lines.

 

Both. The cruising series uses aluminum shafts, which explains the 18% t/c on those. The racing series uses SS only so a bit thinner at 14.5% in the smaller sizes. The t/c ratios for the racing series tend to increase proportionately as you go up in size, so the one for 55 footers is 18% as well and actually looks a bit like a barn door, but the rest look decent. http://www.jefa.com/rudder.htm You have to click on the Products link on the left side of the page to get to the rudder gallery.

 

Skins are vinylester and core is pourable PU.

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Well, that's why we are far better off with the new rudder. It looks slick to me and I do prefer all CF.

 

I am in full self indulgence mode this morning and making a complete (I hope) list of all my custom designs. You would think that I would have that but I'm not a list maker. I have to admit that it's kind f fun to go back over the boats. I have over 60 custom boats. I haven't counted yet.

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