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Jerry Cann

What were these people thinking - Rescue off Nantucket

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BOSTON — The Coast Guard says an Australian father and son have been rescued after their oceangoing sailboat ran into trouble during Sunday's storm.


Petty Officer LaNola Stone tells WBZ-TV the men were picked up about 140 miles southeast of Nantucket by a Coast Guard Jayhawk helicopter based on Cape Cod.


Stone said the sailors called for help around 5 a.m. when their 43-foot boat lost power and had its sails torn. The helicopter reached them about 9 a.m. She said it took about two hours to pick up the men in 60 mph winds and 25-foot seas.


No one was injured but the men were taken to a hospital to be evaluated for hypothermia.


Stone told the station the men had bought their boat "Sedona" on eBay and left from Rhode Island on Friday, headed for Australia.



Bought it off E-Bay? -- nearly bought it altogether.


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They apparently spent more time in the US than they originally intended, to repair the boat and prepare for their journey. They said they wanted to get away from all the snow. Out of the frying pan and into the fire is where they went!

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Some years ago a guy from Brazil had spent about a year or so diligently fixing up an older sailboat in Little Creek. His visa was running out, and he left Norfolk with a bad weather window, to avoid the complications of overstaying the visa. As i recall the Coast Guard brought him back two days later, and the boat was lost. Sometimes the fight with the bureaucracy is the lesser evil.

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When I am king, only very experienced boaters will be allowed to purchase epirbs. If a real sailor is in trouble, let's go get em. Idiots and dreamers should have to live or die with their choices.

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Don't Australians learn about weather forecasts? Nasty time to be out.

 

But then, the same could be said of Rainmaker's owner, and he ain't Australian.

 

Well, at least the boats still floated (as of the time of crew extraction) in both today's incidents, unlike the Flyin' Hawaiian. And the abandonments didn't include any hermaphrodites.

 

How boring!

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do we have a sailing resume or any experience details about these two? I can't imagine they would do this - esp in a winter storm - unless they thought they knew something...

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Glad to hear they are ok.

 

Sad to see the boat alongside without any gelcoat on the hull - that, can not be good.

 

Sail Safe!

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Complete idiots who shouldn't be risking the lives of the USCG chopper crew by setting off in Feb in the N Atlantic...

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I like the inflatable flopping around on the bow. Maybe the weather was nice when they left, I mean who could predict it would blow a gale in February?

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The hull without any gelcoat has to be able to soak up water.

Water freeze - thaw cycle can not bode well for the hull.

 

Just crazy

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Me thinks they did it precisely because they mebbe believed they knew more than they they thought they knew. And at least in South Australian waters, there plenty of opportunity to learn a bit about how weather affects your relative comfort and safety in a sailboat. We can conclude that if they've done much sailing at all, they've been in no more than moderate conditions with no idea of how much worse things can be. For most sailors simply imagining the possibilities is enough to keep them home. Not these blokes.

:blink:

do we have a sailing resume or any experience details about these two? I can't imagine they would do this - esp in a winter storm - unless they thought they knew something...

 

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There was a substantial amount of time and money invested into the boat to make it search worthy, a lot of people say what they want and believe what they think. There is over 25 years of sailing and racing experience for Jason. There was extras on board including a wind generator, that was purchased from a local shop that ended up not working. Almost 200 miles was sailed in the first day heading to Bermuda, then problems started, the alternator on the yanmar stopped functioning properly, wind generator wasn't charging correctly, making it hard for the auto pilot to operate, which was also brand new for the trip, the sails were lowered going into the second night to resolve a remedy, whilst the sails were lowered both the main and smaller headsail were torn,they then started to motor south after around 1 hour of this the motor decided to stop working. The call was put out on the radio, it was not answered, they tried the sat phone and at the same time the epirb was set off, the conditions were only around 15-20 knots at the time the epirb was activated, around 1 hour later the storm hit and both were airlifted off for there safety. If the problems had not happened they would of been around 250 miles from Bermuda when the storm hit, most likely missing any of the storm. There is more detail but not needed for a blog

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I enjoy a good 'dust up' as much as any other SA miscreant, but that's not my objective at this point. Are those posters questioning the judgement of anyone who'd set sail off Nantuckett this time of year somehow unwarranted? Especially when the sailor (Jason) in question supposedly has "25 years of sailing and racing experience". And "extras" that have not been thoroughly tested are of little use, especially when the shit hits the fan. Just ask B.J.. :blink: Was there anything that actually worked on the e-Bay boat? Was the boat sailed or blown 200 miles in the first day? How can one know what else may have been in store if they'd been even closer than 250 n.m. from Bermuda? :ph34r:

 

There was a substantial amount of time and money invested into the boat to make it search worthy, a lot of people say what they want and believe what they think. There is over 25 years of sailing and racing experience for Jason. There was extras on board including a wind generator, that was purchased from a local shop that ended up not working. Almost 200 miles was sailed in the first day heading to Bermuda, then problems started, the alternator on the yanmar stopped functioning properly, wind generator wasn't charging correctly, making it hard for the auto pilot to operate, which was also brand new for the trip, the sails were lowered going into the second night to resolve a remedy, whilst the sails were lowered both the main and smaller headsail were torn,they then started to motor south after around 1 hour of this the motor decided to stop working. The call was put out on the radio, it was not answered, they tried the sat phone and at the same time the epirb was set off, the conditions were only around 15-20 knots at the time the epirb was activated, around 1 hour later the storm hit and both were airlifted off for there safety. If the problems had not happened they would of been around 250 miles from Bermuda when the storm hit, most likely missing any of the storm. There is more detail but not needed for a blog

 

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JMSails, me thinks you may be the only apologist for these dummies. Good luck with that.

 

With that handle (JM) most likely the lead dummy himself (?)

 

JMSails, why would you ever leave in that forecast?

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Gotta love these "sailors" that call mommie when there is no engine and they have torn sails. IT is a SAILBOAT for christ's sakes. WTF?

 

Get out your needle and sew that motherfucking sail and weather the storm.

 

Oh--wait. I forgot, you are undercrewed on an inshore raceboat, with inadequate experience and judgement, and no fucking idea of the boat or your own capabilities. Never mind. Good on the USCG for getting these morons out of a fix.

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Well they were thinking they could sail from New England to Bermuda in February, obviously they were completely wrong. Crazy this time of year even WITH a good weather window. Downright stupid based on the forecast.

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I think they watched that movie with Billybob Thorton flying around the earth too many times and thought, "Heck, if he can do that, we can do this! Those VO65 guys do it, we know as much as they do!"

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There was a substantial amount of time and money invested into the boat to make it search worthy, a lot of people say what they want and believe what they think. There is over 25 years of sailing and racing experience for Jason. There was extras on board including a wind generator, that was purchased from a local shop that ended up not working. Almost 200 miles was sailed in the first day heading to Bermuda, then problems started, the alternator on the yanmar stopped functioning properly, wind generator wasn't charging correctly, making it hard for the auto pilot to operate, which was also brand new for the trip, the sails were lowered going into the second night to resolve a remedy, whilst the sails were lowered both the main and smaller headsail were torn,they then started to motor south after around 1 hour of this the motor decided to stop working. The call was put out on the radio, it was not answered, they tried the sat phone and at the same time the epirb was set off, the conditions were only around 15-20 knots at the time the epirb was activated, around 1 hour later the storm hit and both were airlifted off for there safety. If the problems had not happened they would of been around 250 miles from Bermuda when the storm hit, most likely missing any of the storm. There is more detail but not needed for a blog

 

 

With a departure on late Friday, not bloody likely...

 

 

036_zpsencgn2cj.png

 

 

Forecast as of 4:11 am EST on February 15, 2015

 

 

Hurricane force wind warning

 

 

East Of 69w To The Hague Line Between 1000 Fm And 39n-

 

Today

 

SW winds 45 to 60 kt...becoming NW 50 to 65 kt. Seas 10 to 16 ft...building to 22 to 31 ft. Scattered showers and tstms.

Tonight

 

W to NW winds 45 to 60 kt...diminishing to 40 to 45 kt. Seas building to 25 to 36 ft. Scattered snow showers and chance of tstms early. Light freezing spray.

Mon

 

W to NW winds 35 to 45 kt. Seas subsiding to 18 to 26 ft. Light freezing spray early. Chance of snow.

Mon Night

 

NW winds 25 to 35 kt...becoming W to NW 15 to 25 kt. Seas subsiding to 10 to 15 ft.

Tue

 

E to se winds 15 to 25 kt...becoming S to SW and increasing to 35 to 45 kt. Seas 6 to 8 ft...building to 8 to 14 ft.

Tue Night

 

W to SW winds 35 to 45 kt...becoming NW and diminishing to 10 to 20 kt. Seas building to 11 to 18 ft.

Wed

 

N to NE winds 5 to 15 kt...increasing to 15 to 25 kt. Seas subsiding to 8 to 11 ft.

Wed Night

 

W winds 20 to 30 kt...increasing to 25 to 35 kt. Seas 8 to 13 ft.

Thu

 

W winds 25 to 35 kt. Seas 11 to 14 ft.

Thu Night

 

W to NW winds 20 to 30 kt. Seas 10 to 13 ft.

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Statistics show that if he's into sailing and he's australian, he reads SA...

 

...and posts, as well.

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There was a substantial amount of time and money invested into the boat to make it search worthy, a lot of people say what they want and believe what they think. There is over 25 years of sailing and racing experience for Jason. There was extras on board including a wind generator, that was purchased from a local shop that ended up not working. Almost 200 miles was sailed in the first day heading to Bermuda, then problems started, the alternator on the yanmar stopped functioning properly, wind generator wasn't charging correctly, making it hard for the auto pilot to operate, which was also brand new for the trip, the sails were lowered going into the second night to resolve a remedy, whilst the sails were lowered both the main and smaller headsail were torn,they then started to motor south after around 1 hour of this the motor decided to stop working. The call was put out on the radio, it was not answered, they tried the sat phone and at the same time the epirb was set off, the conditions were only around 15-20 knots at the time the epirb was activated, around 1 hour later the storm hit and both were airlifted off for there safety. If the problems had not happened they would of been around 250 miles from Bermuda when the storm hit, most likely missing any of the storm. There is more detail but not needed for a blog

 

That boat was rotting at the dock for near a decade at my club up the bay from Newport. And rotting for near another decade in Jamestown. I know people that have sailed on it, I've tied up near it on the dock many times and had a closeup look at it before , I know the prior owner and I motored out past the boat for years.

 

The engine, according to people I know that knew the boat well, never worked reliably even when it was new. All the gelcoat had peeled off the hull and it had delamination issues. The sails were old, the standing rigging old. The through hulls - can you imagine the condition they'd be in after 20 years of not being moved?

 

What is a "substantial amount" of money in this case? Did they buy any new sails? Did they at least drop the rig for a thorough inspection? Clean the sludge that would be in the bottom of the fuel tank and probably killed their engine? Haul it out and replace through hulls that don't open (or worse, don't close...)?

 

The "substantial amount" of money that needed to be spent on the boat was not needed just to ADD things like autopilots and wind generators, but simply to bring many things on the boat back to a minimal level of safety. Rig drop, haul out, all that stuff....costs more than adding a wind generator.

 

When a boat doesn't get used regularly Bad Things Happen. Corrosion, seizing, rot (dry and wet) all sneak into the boat. Things don't get lubricated, checked, moved or used with any regularity. Using a boat puts regular wear and tear on it, but leaving it unused for years is worse and more insidious.

 

No one that knew the boat would sail it to Block Island, never mind halfway around the world, Not unless you put "serious, serious" money into it. There is nothing you could do "in a few weeks" with a lot of visits to West Marine that would make that boat ready for that sort of trip.

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Statistics show that if he's into sailing and he's australian, he reads SA...

 

Someone dug up his FB profile over on Cruising Forums, he does "like" the SA FB page. Which of course led to poster to assume he was just playing with the reporter.

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I do want to add - to the original owner's credit - when I say "rotting" its because it wasn't used, not because the owner abandoned it. He did his due diligence hauling it in and out every year, checking on it etc. But he wasn't using it, which also means he wasn't putting a lot of money into keeping it usable and wasn't exercising things regularly.

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There was a substantial amount of time and money invested into the boat to make it search worthy, a lot of people say what they want and believe what they think. There is over 25 years of sailing and racing experience for Jason. There was extras on board including a wind generator, that was purchased from a local shop that ended up not working. Almost 200 miles was sailed in the first day heading to Bermuda, then problems started, the alternator on the yanmar stopped functioning properly, wind generator wasn't charging correctly, making it hard for the auto pilot to operate, which was also brand new for the trip, the sails were lowered going into the second night to resolve a remedy, whilst the sails were lowered both the main and smaller headsail were torn,they then started to motor south after around 1 hour of this the motor decided to stop working. The call was put out on the radio, it was not answered, they tried the sat phone and at the same time the epirb was set off, the conditions were only around 15-20 knots at the time the epirb was activated, around 1 hour later the storm hit and both were airlifted off for there safety. If the problems had not happened they would of been around 250 miles from Bermuda when the storm hit, most likely missing any of the storm. There is more detail but not needed for a blog

So what you are saying is you sailed the first 200 miles of a many thousand mile trip and many important thing broke and that was all BEFORE the weather got bad? And why did you think you were going to make it all the way to Australia if the boat was in such poor condition that important shit was breaking after only 200 miles under normal sailing conditions?

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The correct Australian term for this kind of trip is 'She'll be right mate'.

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The correct Australian term for this kind of trip is 'She'll be right mate'.

Followed by, that engine was agro..

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WHAT THE FUCK?!?!?!?

This is the SECOND TIME in a couple of weeks that the WINTER NORTH ATLANTIC was assumed to be about the same as Lake Norman :huh::ph34r:

This just isn't any winter either, we have had front after front with absolutely wicked bad weather come marching on across the continent and out to sea. From the sounds of the various equipment failures and inability to sew*, this boat was not really ready to go offshore on a warm summer day, let alone take on some of the nastiest weather you could find.

 

* I actually have had to sew up sails in an Atlantic Ocean storm. It was a PITA, it was ugly, I stabbed myself with the needle, but we did get home ^_^

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Yeah, that's a phrase you learn to respect a lot. When some anti-podean points to a piece of equipments and says"she be right" you stand clear of it forever.

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I'll give you a hot tip on this bloke

He has years of sailing experience but most of them are in the windsurfing area ....

As far as a competent yachtsman he would struggle to sail out of sight on a moonless night

But as we say here in oz give it a go whats the worst that can happen

Oh I forgot to mention this goose purchased a old thunderbird ( yacht that is not a cartoon character )

From melbourne years ago once again of eBay , jumped on a plane with his dad and sailed it back from melbourne to Lake Macquarie with the aid of a car GPS unit .....

That's right she be right what's the worst that can happen .......

I think mr jmsails should kiss himself on his very lucky arse on this one ..

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2 big clues as to why it happened,

 

1)Bought the boat from E Bay.

 

2)It's SUMMER in Australia.

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2 big clues as to why it happened,

 

1)Bought the boat from E Bay.

 

2)It's SUMMER in Australia.

 

Ah, so they thought they were getting out before it got really ugly, and it couldn't possibly get any worse than this. Wrong on both counts.

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There was a substantial amount of time and money invested into the boat to make it search worthy, a lot of people say what they want and believe what they think. There is over 25 years of sailing and racing experience for Jason. There was extras on board including a wind generator, that was purchased from a local shop that ended up not working. Almost 200 miles was sailed in the first day heading to Bermuda, then problems started, the alternator on the yanmar stopped functioning properly, wind generator wasn't charging correctly, making it hard for the auto pilot to operate, which was also brand new for the trip, the sails were lowered going into the second night to resolve a remedy, whilst the sails were lowered both the main and smaller headsail were torn,they then started to motor south after around 1 hour of this the motor decided to stop working. The call was put out on the radio, it was not answered, they tried the sat phone and at the same time the epirb was set off, the conditions were only around 15-20 knots at the time the epirb was activated, around 1 hour later the storm hit and both were airlifted off for there safety. If the problems had not happened they would of been around 250 miles from Bermuda when the storm hit, most likely missing any of the storm. There is more detail but not needed for a blog

 

Making a boat search worthy is important for ebay sales.

 

Carry a spare alternator.

 

Check your wind generator prior to departure.

 

Hand steer when your charging can't keep up with your helmbot.

 

Have a physician resolve remedies prior to departure.

 

Wad the sails up in a clump and tie them when lowered and they won't get torn. This is called "flaking."

 

If a boat has been sitting a while before becoming search worthy, take it out and motor around in waves for a while. Take LOTS of fuel filters with you.

 

Just some constructive advice for next time. Ummm... is there going to be a next time? If so, may I suggest a GoPro?

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Just some constructive advice for next time. Ummm... is there going to be a next time? If so, may I suggest a GoPro?

 

 

But ... But ... Isn't a GoPro included in every boat sale on e-Bay? The wonderful parting gift?

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Every old raceboat I've seen comes with more sails than a cruiser wants. I think this really boils down to hitting the epirb in 20 knots of wind because your fuel filter is clogged, and you don't want to be uncomfortable hand steering for days. Score another point for the dumbing down of modern society.

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Accidents are caused by a series of failures, the first here was buying an old Barley Carroll boat.

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I think they watched that movie with Billybob Thorton flying around the earth too many times and thought, "Heck, if he can do that, we can do this! Those VO65 guys do it, we know as much as they do!"

Even this guy did it!

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZNhvJjGH_4&spfreload=10

 

Can't believe I fell for this, ended up watching the entire thing, again! WTF :lol:

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There was a substantial amount of time and money invested into the boat to make it search worthy, a lot of people say what they want and believe what they think. There is over 25 years of sailing and racing experience for Jason. There was extras on board including a wind generator, that was purchased from a local shop that ended up not working. Almost 200 miles was sailed in the first day heading to Bermuda, then problems started, the alternator on the yanmar stopped functioning properly, wind generator wasn't charging correctly, making it hard for the auto pilot to operate, which was also brand new for the trip, the sails were lowered going into the second night to resolve a remedy, whilst the sails were lowered both the main and smaller headsail were torn,they then started to motor south after around 1 hour of this the motor decided to stop working. The call was put out on the radio, it was not answered, they tried the sat phone and at the same time the epirb was set off, the conditions were only around 15-20 knots at the time the epirb was activated, around 1 hour later the storm hit and both were airlifted off for there safety. If the problems had not happened they would of been around 250 miles from Bermuda when the storm hit, most likely missing any of the storm. There is more detail but not needed for a blog

 

That boat was rotting at the dock for near a decade at my club up the bay from Newport. And rotting for near another decade in Jamestown. I know people that have sailed on it, I've tied up near it on the dock many times and had a closeup look at it before , I know the prior owner and I motored out past the boat for years.

 

The engine, according to people I know that knew the boat well, never worked reliably even when it was new. All the gelcoat had peeled off the hull and it had delamination issues. The sails were old, the standing rigging old. The through hulls - can you imagine the condition they'd be in after 20 years of not being moved?

 

What is a "substantial amount" of money in this case? Did they buy any new sails? Did they at least drop the rig for a thorough inspection? Clean the sludge that would be in the bottom of the fuel tank and probably killed their engine? Haul it out and replace through hulls that don't open (or worse, don't close...)?

 

The "substantial amount" of money that needed to be spent on the boat was not needed just to ADD things like autopilots and wind generators, but simply to bring many things on the boat back to a minimal level of safety. Rig drop, haul out, all that stuff....costs more than adding a wind generator.

 

When a boat doesn't get used regularly Bad Things Happen. Corrosion, seizing, rot (dry and wet) all sneak into the boat. Things don't get lubricated, checked, moved or used with any regularity. Using a boat puts regular wear and tear on it, but leaving it unused for years is worse and more insidious.

 

No one that knew the boat would sail it to Block Island, never mind halfway around the world, Not unless you put "serious, serious" money into it. There is nothing you could do "in a few weeks" with a lot of visits to West Marine that would make that boat ready for that sort of trip.

 

My BJ, you have certainly grown up from the good old days of the cat in the hat Spin... Good on ya... :DB)

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WTF, Ohey, Void Ho, 3 minutes gone forever watching Capt. and I use the word guardedly, Stowe. What could possibly go wrong in a Carroll 43 in the middle of winter w/ dear old dad who has never been out on the big water? You can't make this shit up, as Alvin Lee (band Love) said, "the news today will be the movies of tomorrow.

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It's guys like that who give Aussies a bad name .......

 

Just as well I am a Tasmanian

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The Cheese Scow sailed back home and is/was being repainted as a pirate adventure tour boat last I heard.

Gotta give Capt. Cheese some credit - no USCG money involved in getting from point A to B. Something to be said for a lump of concrete that gradually meanders from X to Y I guess.

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Blondie Hasler preparing for the first Single Handed TransAtlantic race sailed with no radio. He said "I have the right to risk my life, I don't have the right to have other risk theirs to save me."

That was when sailors were taking responsibility for their actions, not setting off in rotting (or grossly under built) race boats and counting on various Coast Guards to save their sorry asses.

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Blondie Hasler preparing for the first Single Handed TransAtlantic race sailed with no radio. He said "I have the right to risk my life, I don't have the right to have other risk theirs to save me."

That was when sailors were taking responsibility for their actions, not setting off in rotting (or grossly under built) race boats and counting on various Coast Guards to save their sorry asses.

 

Despite the unacceptable absence of tits, I have to agree.

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WHAT THE FUCK?!?!?!?

This is the SECOND TIME in a couple of weeks that the WINTER NORTH ATLANTIC was assumed to be about the same as Lake Norman :huh::ph34r:

This just isn't any winter either, we have had front after front with absolutely wicked bad weather come marching on across the continent and out to sea. From the sounds of the various equipment failures and inability to sew*, this boat was not really ready to go offshore on a warm summer day, let alone take on some of the nastiest weather you could find.

 

* I actually have had to sew up sails in an Atlantic Ocean storm. It was a PITA, it was ugly, I stabbed myself with the needle, but we did get home ^_^

 

Actually, I've been in a blizzard on Lake Norman in a Laser. I'm not sure this boat would've survived that either. If 20 knots tore their sails, it was blowing 30 gusting 45 on the lake. Oh, and visibility was about 15 feet. I nearly ran into a cruising boat at the dock on my way in, it appeared like a ghost out of the snow. They probably would've run it onto some rocks and sunk it, judging from the millimeter thick fiberglass they had left.

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