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Varan

VOR 2014-15 Leg 5 Auckland-Itajai

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Okay, So I'm humbled by y'all.

 

I did have the chance to meet Tristan Jones and get a signed book back in the late 80's. Strange how energy works. The day I met him I bought my pocket cruiser that took me on 12 years of adventures. Very cool.

 

Back to the action, 55 nm side to side, 40 nm front to back so no one is going off the grid for now. Also looks like they hit the slow zone with the leader at 12, 6th at 11 (and it is not SCA jbc). Go back 247 nm and you see them make a slight bend to the left. Head they gone right I could see they would have more pressure. I'm getting the feeling that like a surfer who didn't quite catch the curl, these guys are now going roll back on the wave, take a break and wait for the next roller. I doubt it's a calm sea, but 11-12 kts has to be a breather.

Can I just say, how the fuck did I get this reputation as the person who always plays up the boatspeed issues SCA has had? I called out one user on the delusional claim that there was no SCA boatspeed issue, and had a longer interaction with another who decided (again, on the basis of what?) that I was harboring some deep-seated misogyny that made me praise them for doing ordinary things. Which is fine; everyone gets to share their opinions.

 

But now I'm getting called out by multiple other people for being some kind of SCA hater? It's just... dumb. I'm not.

 

it's probably because you look like mr. orange .

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Frant, another book to add to your list is Pete Goss - Close to the Wind. The chapter where he turns his Open 50 round to go back 80-100 miles in storm conditions to try and find and rescue Raphael Dianelli is one that once you start reading you cant stop. An amazing piece of both human endurance and raw courage - real lump in the throat stuff

 

Cheers

 

SS

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Checking in this morning on the VOR Dashboard and blog page to find not one new report from the boats. The OBRs must have gotten thrashed I thought, but I did see SCA was able to write this:

 

 

 

We have a light winds area to negotiate before we start the race along the conveyor belt of the Southern Ocean low pressure systems. This our chance to sort ourselves out and get organized for the wet, wild ride that lies ahead. Warm clothes will need to come out of our bags and some boat housekeeping will be done while life is more comfortable, then we will hold on for the ride, happy in the knowledge that the Albatross overhead are keeping an eye on us.

 

So has VOR just stopped pasting or are the OBRs doing an end around anad reporting direct to their websites/facebook/ et al. The next report has some great insight from SCA

 

 

After a period of pretty awful, confused seas left in the trail of the big system Pam, the fleet is approaching a high pressure ridge, which is going to mean going upwind and a couple of tacks before getting into the fast reaching conditions and the next system.

Sam Davies reports this morning: "Everything is good we have good breeze and are reaching, nearly upwind. We have had a bit of everything already and have been higher and faster like Brunel for a bit. The sea state is better now, we are all recovering, it was pretty bad as soon as we left East Cape it was into higher seas, a bit tricky reaching at the time to find the sail combination that worked."
"Right now we are one half man down, Abby got thrown across the boat and has a bit of a sore bottom, so she is recovering but in a bit of pain."
"We have about 20kts of wind right now, pretty much upwind and in about four hours will tack for the ridge and do some time on port before tacking back on starboard when we will then be reaching in a lifting breeze."
Has the change to the ice-zone affected strategy? "I think it is a good decision, it makes it a bit of a moving target. A couple of boats to the south of us look like they were heading south sooner and maybe affected more and changed their route a bit, but for us it does not change what we were going to do. There is going to be a low round there so we would rather this than racing into an ice field at 20kts."


"It is nice to be heading into the south again, it's been a while since I have been down here, the weather is chillier, a bit more what I am used to. All the girls who have been down here before have their stories coming out!"

Looking at volo it is hard to see how a tack will help for the very course look is that they could stay on the area of pressure whereas a tack would point them at a lighter area with Shattered Pam still heading east and south. Almost considering installing that open nav program, but I've never get work done.

leg5 tack

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SCA is first to tack south, followed by Dongfeng then Mapfre, apparently as SCA got in their AIS range and they saw the move... All 3 now less than 5nm apart.

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For those ancient mariners here, perhaps we return to this level of navigation and see how these kids do today?

 

csm_Skip_Novak_bd275d94c0.jpg

 

My current passion is horses and specifically I compete in Eventing, a three phase equestrian event with one being cross country. Besides navigating across fields performing up to 35 jumps, teams (rider/horse) also need to cross the finish line, not with the fastest time, but in the Optimum time or OT. It is the time that the course designer established based on distance and pace. For example, 6000M at 570 mpm is a 10:31 OT. Why say all this....

 

A problem occurring at the top level of Eventing is that with riders carrying watches on course, they can check their time and start to adjust the horses pace so they hit their minute marks and work to come in or at OT. What begins t o happen through is that with a rider tracking time, he/she may be pushing the horse too hard, pulling back to much and taking chances to try and make OT for to go above is penalty points (lower may mean a tired horse or bad riding). The point is that horsemanship starts to take a back seat, even slight, to riding for time.

 

Now I'm not going to back slide much here for I love me my OD, close racing. However, I ponder this thought that the teams are starting to race the computer, using all of that fancy technology to almost subconsciously let it make the decisions. Sure, sure there is a human mind there, but it will start to react to what it is fed. As we say in programming, GIGO. take away the nav program. Take away even the grib files and weather models, but still provide position reports, real time, how much would things change. I'm not suggesting going back to a Novak sextant moment, but all this talk about seamanship in ocean racing skirted around this issue of technology getting in the way. Like those professional riders (and amateurs) looking at the watch and not "feeling" the correct pace, could part of the soul of this type of racing get lost as little by little programs start to effect the decision making of those that sit in the fat part of the boat?

 

It is one thing to be provided information "in the moment", wind speed, direction, apparent, boat speed course, perhaps vmg to a waypoint of mark, even knowing where your competition is, but when it gets to saying "go here, then here or here, then here"....Like the watch saying slow down, speed up, you never really get it in the end, you are just along for the ride.

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If they want to hook into the next "low" they'll need to get South. Didn't Oxley say he would do this? What's he waiting for, the High to completely engulf them?

 

Maybe there's no footage coming from VOR because the current conditions are nothing like the classic Southern Ocean sailing they were hyping all week. Walker must be fuming. Pounding upwind in 20knts and getting 10.

 

When double handers rounded in IMOCA boats in 50 - 70 knts just last week unscathed, the decision to leave a day late may yet prove to be a big mistake. What could have been an epic Southern Ocean Leg may turn into The Big Stroll in the South.

 

BTW, just heard from Webb Chiles. He is two days back in New Zealand and will be continuing onto the Horn going East from New Zealand to South Africa and then on to the Falklands from where he hopes to round the Horn. This with a busted rotorary cuff and at 72 years old in a 24' ULDB. Quote: "Heard from the locals that Pam was a non event. 50knts and some rain".

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For those ancient mariners here, perhaps we return to this level of navigation and see how these kids do today?

 

csm_Skip_Novak_bd275d94c0.jpg

 

My current passion is horses and specifically I compete in Eventing, a three phase equestrian event with one being cross country. Besides navigating across fields performing up to 35 jumps, teams (rider/horse) also need to cross the finish line, not with the fastest time, but in the Optimum time or OT. It is the time that the course designer established based on distance and pace. For example, 6000M at 570 mpm is a 10:31 OT. Why say all this....

 

A problem occurring at the top level of Eventing is that with riders carrying watches on course, they can check their time and start to adjust the horses pace so they hit their minute marks and work to come in or at OT. What begins t o happen through is that with a rider tracking time, he/she may be pushing the horse too hard, pulling back to much and taking chances to try and make OT for to go above is penalty points (lower may mean a tired horse or bad riding). The point is that horsemanship starts to take a back seat, even slight, to riding for time.

 

Now I'm not going to back slide much here for I love me my OD, close racing. However, I ponder this thought that the teams are starting to race the computer, using all of that fancy technology to almost subconsciously let it make the decisions. Sure, sure there is a human mind there, but it will start to react to what it is fed. As we say in programming, GIGO. take away the nav program. Take away even the grib files and weather models, but still provide position reports, real time, how much would things change. I'm not suggesting going back to a Novak sextant moment, but all this talk about seamanship in ocean racing skirted around this issue of technology getting in the way. Like those professional riders (and amateurs) looking at the watch and not "feeling" the correct pace, could part of the soul of this type of racing get lost as little by little programs start to effect the decision making of those that sit in the fat part of the boat?

 

It is one thing to be provided information "in the moment", wind speed, direction, apparent, boat speed course, perhaps vmg to a waypoint of mark, even knowing where your competition is, but when it gets to saying "go here, then here or here, then here"....Like the watch saying slow down, speed up, you never really get it in the end, you are just along for the ride.

Perfect example and I brought up the same thing in the last Leg only to be flamed by all including Campbell and Jenny herself!

 

What I questioned in the end, was how much more accurate is the data coming in from NOAA going to get with the recent use of super computers and launching of several new sattelites?

 

I think, though, the navigators will tell you, Campbell and Expedition will argue, that the routing software is just a tool, that the navigator ultimately relies on instinct and experience. They do spend a lot of time at the screens though.

 

However, I wouldn't be surprised to see a race formed in reaction to the technology where only basic seamanship skills were allowed. Kind of like those races in the wilderness.

 

BTW, the horse racing sounds like a lot of fun. I haven't done any jumping but I used to work race horses at the track when I was younger ... and shovel a lot of manure for the privilege.

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.....and at 72 years old in a 24' ULDB.

 

If you are not so strong and alone, small and light is probably better especially in bad weather when things start not to go exactly to plan! Many events which quickly become a major issue on a 40 footer are a non event on a small boat with a small and easy to manage rig.

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Dongfeng attacked by huge flying fish:

Mutant flying fish that far south attacking boats? It's the end of the world!

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A view of the high filling in. 24 hours out.

 

post-81201-0-10407700-1426860109_thumb.jpg

 

I don't see any Low filling in behind them? Just the big Low of what was Pam ahead of the them and a long band of Low pressure further South held by the High. Seems to me, if they want to get East in a timely fashion, they'll need to get South sooner. But then there's the ice gates.

 

Below is the pressure four days out.

 

post-81201-0-13257400-1426860506_thumb.jpg

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.....and at 72 years old in a 24' ULDB.

 

If you are not so strong and alone, small and light is probably better especially in bad weather when things start not to go exactly to plan! Many events which quickly become a major issue on a 40 footer are a non event on a small boat with a small and easy to manage rig.

Definitely a good choice. Proven little boat. On the other hand, if you're fully crewed with young strong, healthy, experienced, world class sailors on brand new state - of - the - art racing machines ...

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Cape Stiff. Brush up on your Cape Horn history. Impress the young lass at the bar with your knowledge of sailing lore.

 

"Ah, yes, well, the Horn is a frightful place. Hell on Earth. Would you like to come to my place and watch a documentary about it on YouTube?"

 

"Oh, it does sound awfully frightening? But couldn't we just watch it on your phone?"

 

"I'm afraid you wouldn't get the full impact on a small sceen."

 

"Oh, ok. I suppose you're right. Would it be all right if I brought my girlfriends? They're visiting from Brazil where we were played against them in a beach volley ball contest."

 

"Of course. I hope you won't all mind squeezing into my two seater."

 

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.....and at 72 years old in a 24' ULDB.

 

If you are not so strong and alone, small and light is probably better especially in bad weather when things start not to go exactly to plan! Many events which quickly become a major issue on a 40 footer are a non event on a small boat with a small and easy to manage rig.

 

Back in the 1970s we were beaten boat-for-boat on a buoy race out of Marina del Rey by a Moore 24. We were scratch boat on a Columbia 52. Winds were really light, but still, it was embarrassing. Such a cool boat...

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^^ I have been on a couple of Pearson ensign's full keel 22' boats that have scratched beat j-22 and j-24

 

Sometimes it is skill and other times it is just luck(bands of wind/no wind which got the heavy ensign up to speed to coast through the no wind bands that the j got stuck in)

 

Also the girls turned south first. Followed shortly by a couple of others.

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^ I owned a Columbia '52 for a couple of years that I kept in MDR in the early 80's. Picked it up in San Diego where it had been seized in a drug trafficking raid. Interior gutted. Single - handed it around the islands. My first grounding, though minor, was a game changer. Heavy boat but stood up well. No match for a Moore.

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Guys' C'MON....a quick scan shows the thread is becoming ~50% non VO related. :mellow:

 

....all very interesting,,,

.....but perhaps not for someone who wants to make a read of what's going on in the race.

 

Are y'all now hired by VO to make it -look- like there's more going on than is!? :unsure:

 

ThreadPolice.jpg

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^ Hey, if the VOR provided some content or fodder, we'd have something to talk about. Or if they left a day earlier...

 

And, um, I seem to remember your snail race saga that went on for quite a bit.

 

We haven't covered what awaits them in Brazil. Maybe some more Brazilian TV show videos?

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.

...you wonder why there's not much coming off the boats?......Blogs from 2hrs ago

http://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/fromtheboats.html

 

 

BANG BANG. In the middle of night the boat was diving from one wave into the next wall of water. The men were leashed on deck and that was a good thing: a large mass of water splashed repeatedly, taking everything that wasn’t secured into the abysses. Even during the day it was dark.

A quarter of the crew was fighting seasickness. Another quarter had long lost that battle.

Our fresh recruit: "Yesterday they could put this boat up their ass."

Even skipper Bekking didn’t eat for 48 hours. "I think I will be lost if I took one bite."

In winter the boat isn't cozy. We’re barely eating. No talking. All our energy is put into survival. Some guys don’t even know what position we’re in. Fire helmet on, eyes focused on the horizon. Just give it all you got.

For my part, after two full days spent in ‘intensive care’, I prayed God on my bare knees for a brief respite. If only for a moment. Just a break from the pounding. Just not the slope of the Alpe D'Huez. Just not the stomach inside out.

....some rare eglise footage from Mapfre...

..it seems they are taking Brunel's 'drop-a-buoy' pretty seriously!

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.

...you wonder why there's not much coming off the boats?......Blogs from 2hrs ago...http://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/fromtheboats.html

 

 

BANG BANG. In the middle of night the boat was diving from one wave into the next wall of water. The men were leashed on deck and that was a good thing: a large mass of water splashed repeatedly, taking everything that wasn’t secured into the abysses. Even during the day it was dark.

A quarter of the crew was fighting seasickness. Another quarter had long lost that battle.

Our fresh recruit: "Yesterday they could put this boat up their ass."

Even skipper Bekking didn’t eat for 48 hours. "I think I will be lost if I took one bite."

In winter the boat isn't cozy. We’re barely eating. No talking. All our energy is put into survival. Some guys don’t even know what position we’re in. Fire helmet on, eyes focused on the horizon. Just give it all you got.

For my part, after two full days spent in ‘intensive care’, I prayed God on my bare knees for a brief respite. If only for a moment. Just a break from the pounding. Just not the slope of the Alpe D'Huez. Just not the stomach inside out.

Please... read what was came off the IMOCA's in worse conditions and after being at sea non stop for several weeks.

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And now SCA, Dongfend and Mapre have tacked back to the East, with Dongfeng a bit north, and SCA in Mapfre's wake.

It seems maybe they all tacked too early, as the others have been able to soak down a bit without tacking. Time will tell...

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I've got a nominally on-topic question: VO65s have two liferafts stowed on the stern, correct? Does the man-overboard procedure when running downwind in cold water include deploying one? I know the foulies they wear are basically survival suits to some degree, but I'm also pretty sure I've heard that becoming separated from the boat while they're loaded up downwind in the Southern Ocean is basically a death sentence.

 

It would be a risk to the rest of the crew to intentionally jettison one of the rafts, since they might not get it back. And depending on the time to deploy it could well be the case that it would be too far from the person in the water or would drift too fast to be reachable. And if the person in the water was injured or incapacitated all bets would be off, obviously.

 

I figure whatever the procedure is has been drilled into all of them, since anything they're going to chuck over would have to happen within three or four seconds to do any good. That factor alone might be enough to mean it's a non-starter. But it struck me that if you could deploy a liferaft that quickly, and if a swimmer could reach it with enough strength to get into it, it might significantly improve their chances. So I wondered about that, and I figure some of you know the definitive answer.

 

Disclaimer: Yes, I know that being clipped in is way more important.

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Please... read what was came off the IMOCA's in worse conditions and after being at sea non stop for several weeks.

 

 

 

...pretty different race that.....8 boats spread over 3500miles!? ....shows an advantage to this rtw 'regatta' marketing platform. I wouldn't be surprised at all if the Imoca guys would have happily taken a couple of extra days in the pub if given similar chance :mellow:

 

After seeing the conditions of the past coupla days, I'm not going to bash the fleet for the decision they made.

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I've got a nominally on-topic question: VO65s have two liferafts stowed on the stern, correct? Does the man-overboard procedure when running downwind in cold water include deploying one? I know the foulies they wear are basically survival suits to some degree, but I'm also pretty sure I've heard that becoming separated from the boat while they're loaded up downwind in the Southern Ocean is basically a death sentence.

 

It would be a risk to the rest of the crew to intentionally jettison one of the rafts, since they might not get it back. And depending on the time to deploy it could well be the case that it would be too far from the person in the water or would drift too fast to be reachable. And if the person in the water was injured or incapacitated all bets would be off, obviously.

 

I figure whatever the procedure is has been drilled into all of them, since anything they're going to chuck over would have to happen within three or four seconds to do any good. That factor alone might be enough to mean it's a non-starter. But it struck me that if you could deploy a liferaft that quickly, and if a swimmer could reach it with enough strength to get into it, it might significantly improve their chances. So I wondered about that, and I figure some of you know the definitive answer.

 

Disclaimer: Yes, I know that being clipped in is way more important.

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In between watches @ADORSkipper & Chuny Bermúdez check the latest on sailing anarchy. #InAbuDhabi #goazzam #vor



...''mann I don't believe it!...we're bashing our brains out and SC's talking 'bout the good ole days of 3knot shipboats,,and then about poppin the ducks!''




CAiDDbMVEAAVPRa.jpg


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#VOR boats 10% faster than planned since East Cape so Race Control increased polars. #SouthernOcean learnings!




CAiBMwKWYAEDk9C.jpg





@volvooceanrace: The #VOR sailors may escape the high pressure and its light airs. Full speed to the ice limits! ”




CAh8oSeWsAAaMJh.jpg





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Please... read what was came off the IMOCA's in worse conditions and after being at sea non stop for several weeks.

 

 

...pretty different race that.....8 boats spread over 3500miles!? ....shows an advantage to this rtw 'regatta' marketing platform. I wouldn't be surprised at all if the Imoca guys would have happily taken a couple of extra days in the pub if given similar chance :mellow:

 

After seeing the conditions of the past coupla days, I'm not going to bash the fleet for the decision they made.

I realize I'm being a negative nanny. But the reason they're in these conditions, remember, as some Skippers predicted, is because they left late.

 

I'll stop now.

 

VOR! VOR! The best race in the world by far!" Woo hoooo!

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jbc,

 

I am guessing they have something along these lines for the scenario you are talking about.

 

http://www.landfallnavigation.com/lifesling.html

 

Hm. Yeah, actually, one of these might be useful for conferring some of the benefit I'm talking about. I realize it's not a lot of protection, but if I had my choice of having one of those vs. not having one of those while waiting 45 minutes for my buddies to get back to me, I'd much rather have it than not.

 

https://youtu.be/XhnVcs3kIs8

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The guys on ADOR think they got it bad, we have to sit here and ponder this!!! :wacko:

leg5 morewtf

You go from 4th to 6th, you go from less than 30 dtl to close to 50 for a 38 nm jog for what? Either wxtiles is just making it up to mess with our minds and the boats get real data or this jog makes no sense.
Were they starting to get really headed so the tack was the only option, but then why did DFRT and MAPF go? How can TBRU and ALVI hold and ADOR didn't go. here I thought it was a (yawn) drag race on the screen and now this to understand.
You can't armchair navigate this way ...ARRRGGGHHHH!!!!
/rant

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jbc,

 

I am guessing they have something along these lines for the scenario you are talking about.

 

http://www.landfallnavigation.com/lifesling.html

 

Hm. Yeah, actually, one of these might be useful for conferring some of the benefit I'm talking about. I realize it's not a lot of protection, but if I had my choice of having one of those vs. not having one of those while waiting 45 minutes for my buddies to get back to me, I'd much rather have it than not.

 

https://youtu.be/XhnVcs3kIs8

 

 

.....Looks fine in dead calm, but even with a sea anchor it's likely just another lost hope to see drifting away in whatever condition might have a MOB. :mellow:

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And now SCA, Dongfend and Mapre have tacked back to the East, with Dongfeng a bit north, and SCA in Mapfre's wake.

It seems maybe they all tacked too early, as the others have been able to soak down a bit without tacking. Time will tell...

 

 

...must be a big 'Whooo-Hooo' coming from Alvi and the boys!

 

 

Upwind in the Southern Ocean for @DongfengRacing ,as @TeamAlvimedica gets nearly 70 miles east of @DongfengRacing

 

CAjdgHpUgAA2BiV.png

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It's a bit perplexing. All the boats are reporting that Pam has walked away leaving them headed in a heavy sea state. The high is growing at a rate equal or greater to their march east. But it is also moving North slightly. They're all angled Southish and the pressure will be filling in from the South.

 

I think by tacking, those boats wanted to be first to get the pressure but also didn't want to lose connection with the rest of the fleet. Maybe some of the heabie jeabies from previous flyers and corner banging going on?

 

After reading the Log below, I see that they are not headed and the sea state is reduced. Some rational for the tack South.

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VOR Watch Log.

 

MARCH 20, 2015, 0700 UTC

 

Leader: ALVI

Wind speed: 17 – 23 knots

Boat speed SOG (15 mins): 10 - 12 knots

Wind direction: 142º - 162º

Lowest boat speed: ALVI (10.3 knots)

Highest boat speed: ADOR (11.5 knots)

Lowest wind speed: DFRT (17 knots)

Highest wind speed: ALVI (23 knots)

 

As forecast, the wind has started to drop in the last 12 hours and the breeze is now between 15 and 20 knots blowing from the southwest. Average boat speeds are now in the 11-12kt range.

 

Being the boat farthest north, Team Alvimedica has been grabbing the extra knots of breeze they need to keep leading the way to the east, extending their lead in the last 12 hours.

 

So now that the teams are not anymore chasing the tail of ex-Cyclone Pam, the strategy ahead consists of dealing with the high-pressure system located southeast of New Zealand that could potentially catch them and reduce their breeze. One of the options is to tack south were they will find stronger breeze.

 

MAPFRE’s Iker Martínez mentioned this an option in a note he sent earlier.

 

“We have wind from 160-150º and it is supposed to shift to 120º, so we can start tacking and gain south. Let’s see who gets the shift first and how we do with this situation.”

 

In terms of weather, Matt Knighton on Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing describes the new conditions.

 

“The wind has died to 20 knots and downwind that means we can do between 10-15 knots of boatspeed. The sea state has decreased dramatically and is making the ride relatively comfortable – there aren’t big waves crashing over the deck like yesterday. Still, at night the temperatures are dropping further and you can feel it, we’ve all got layers on and the Gore-tex socks just started to make an appearance.”

 

Ice limit changes on March 20:

 

Leg 5 Sailing Instructions Amendment 7 has been posted and communicated to the boats, with the following changes to Ice Limits 1 to 11. Ice Limits 12 to 24 have NOT been changed.

 

55° 00.000'S 150° 00.000'W

 

55° 00.000'S 145° 00.000'W

 

55° 00.000'S 140° 00.000'W

 

54° 30.000'S 135° 00.000'W

 

54° 0 0.000'S 130° 00.000'W

 

53 ° 0 0.000'S 125° 00.000'W

 

51 ° 00.000'S 120° 00.000'W

 

51 ° 00.000'S 115o 00.000’W

 

53° 00.000'S 110o 00.000’W

 

54° 30.000'S 105o 00.000’W

 

57° 15.000'S 100o 00.000’W

 

TODAY'S WEATHER

 

1) Fleet will be in a SE flow thru tonight into 1st part of Sun, but

2) As they get more to the E of this high and ridge axis extending NE, the flow will be turning left into S-SE to S and then S-SW and SW

a) wind down to 10-15 kts or less less for a time, but

B) once into the S-SW flow, wind speeds increase and will be stronger further to the E and SE

c) could be into 20s to 30 kts by Sat night

3) Storm weakens slight and shifts more E to E of 120w by later in weekend or early next week, while high pressure resides well to W near 170w

4) Will be a very favorable S-SW flow in between systems, but

a) this S-SW to SW flow maybe on rougher side by later Sun, especially the faster the boats get to the E

B) wind speeds into 20s to 30-35 kts, w/seas building

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I've got a nominally on-topic question: VO65s have two liferafts stowed on the stern, correct? Does the man-overboard procedure when running downwind in cold water include deploying one? I know the foulies they wear are basically survival suits to some degree, but I'm also pretty sure I've heard that becoming separated from the boat while they're loaded up downwind in the Southern Ocean is basically a death sentence.

 

It would be a risk to the rest of the crew to intentionally jettison one of the rafts, since they might not get it back. And depending on the time to deploy it could well be the case that it would be too far from the person in the water or would drift too fast to be reachable. And if the person in the water was injured or incapacitated all bets would be off, obviously.

 

I figure whatever the procedure is has been drilled into all of them, since anything they're going to chuck over would have to happen within three or four seconds to do any good. That factor alone might be enough to mean it's a non-starter. But it struck me that if you could deploy a liferaft that quickly, and if a swimmer could reach it with enough strength to get into it, it might significantly improve their chances. So I wondered about that, and I figure some of you know the definitive answer.

 

Disclaimer: Yes, I know that being clipped in is way more important.

They dont deploy the raft for MOB. I believe everyone wears a personal EPIRB, so if they go over, boat electronics are immediately alerted, and they have a GPS fix on the guy so they can get back to him.

Here's the required safety list:

Safety equipment:

Inmarsat C

IsatPhone 2

Life rafts

EPIRBS, SART

H/H VHFs

Emergency radios

Aviation frequency emergency radios

Jon Buoy

Medical equipment

Flares

Horseshoe

PLB

MOB alerting and positioning system

Engines and maintenance

Safety training: life jackets

Weather information

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I've got a nominally on-topic question: VO65s have two liferafts stowed on the stern, correct? Does the man-overboard procedure when running downwind in cold water include deploying one? I know the foulies they wear are basically survival suits to some degree, but I'm also pretty sure I've heard that becoming separated from the boat while they're loaded up downwind in the Southern Ocean is basically a death sentence.

 

It would be a risk to the rest of the crew to intentionally jettison one of the rafts, since they might not get it back. And depending on the time to deploy it could well be the case that it would be too far from the person in the water or would drift too fast to be reachable. And if the person in the water was injured or incapacitated all bets would be off, obviously.

 

I figure whatever the procedure is has been drilled into all of them, since anything they're going to chuck over would have to happen within three or four seconds to do any good. That factor alone might be enough to mean it's a non-starter. But it struck me that if you could deploy a liferaft that quickly, and if a swimmer could reach it with enough strength to get into it, it might significantly improve their chances. So I wondered about that, and I figure some of you know the definitive answer.

 

Disclaimer: Yes, I know that being clipped in is way more important.

They dont deploy the raft for MOB. I believe everyone wears a personal EPIRB, so if they go over, boat electronics are immediately alerted, and they have a GPS fix on the guy so they can get back to him.

Here's the required safety list:

Safety equipment:

Inmarsat C

IsatPhone 2

Life rafts

EPIRBS, SART

H/H VHFs

Emergency radios

Aviation frequency emergency radios

Jon Buoy

Medical equipment

Flares

Horseshoe

PLB

MOB alerting and positioning system

Engines and maintenance

Safety training: life jackets

Weather information

They don't all have a personal EPIRB or PLB. In fact for MOB these would not be great options a it can take 40 minutes for an EPIRB to be picked up by satellite.

I do know that on SCA each of the lifejackets has an AIS unit that will go off automatically upon inflation. Obviously the aerial height is low so the yacht has to be relatively close for an AIS signal.

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And another dive to the South. Lead by Dongfeng it looks like. Getting interesting.

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Upwind in the Southern Ocean for @DongfengRacing ,as @TeamAlvimedica gets nearly 70 miles east of @DongfengRacing

 

CAjdgHpUgAA2BiV.png

 

Probably goes without saying here but plane sailing can misleading at higher latitudes. The initial course for the great circle route to the ice exclusion zone is close to upwind. The GC to the cape goes south of that.

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It looks like they're going to have to push hard to escape this High. Look at all that beautiful pressure to the East slipping away.

 

post-81201-0-78781700-1426880385_thumb.jpg

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An old sailing friend was my rabbit growing in the Buccaneer 18 class. He was always just that little bit faster, but my desire to get better got me finally one time where I had him dead to rights. He's to leeward , in my shadow and I'm gaining. The next moment I look back and he hit the brakes, tack right on my stern, split away and I thought "Ha Ha, got you now". On the next cross he was two boat lengths ahead and never looked back. Post race I asked him, "What the hell was that moment, I had you buried and his reply I will always remember, "Sometimes grasshopper, you have to go slow to go fast".

 

I look at this snapshot and ponder if those three are thinking we have to go slow to get to better pressure to go fast again. I sure hope so.

leg5 split

One thing I hate about these sched reports and snapshots is how little they really tell you anything. In that instance SCA was 1 knot slower, but point higher. Trend of moment. Look at the WD and are they sailing in different breezes or a moment. (sigh).... At the moment it looks like we will have two races to follow and first it will be, which group chose better, then in the group, which is sailing better.

 

Not boring.

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SCA seems to be learning from their staying in AIS range and tuning. They were a few miles behind in the wake of Dongfeng heading south earlier, and now Dongfeng is a few miles behind in SCA's wake as they head East again. It's really nice to see SCA staying competitive, and not fading back.

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.


...the south pack is down to ~7kn boatspeed,,while the north 3 are holding at ~10kts. It looks like this is quite possibly the last sched where the north is going to show advantage, and in about 18hrs the south should be looking pretty good. I can see why it's a tough call to work south versus striving drifting for the ESE :mellow:




....watch log and a handy synopsis.......http://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/watchlog.html



To adjust and reposition or make a bigger split, that’s the question.


When three boats tacked, heading south, it looked like Team SCA, MAPFRE and Dongfeng were making the move south, but shortly after 1400 UTC and only 35 nautical miles sailed, those three boats tacked back onto starboard just on the hip of Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing.


The wind had backed 12 hours ago, shifting left on the fleet as they sail up wind. Once again in the last 24 hours, this favoured the northern boats with both shift and added velocity.


The forecast is for the wind to veer and shift back right as they overtake the old high-pressure system and meet a new low moving into the fleet’s path. This would explain the repositioning by the trailing fleet, keen to get right again. We may see a few more bites at the apple as some boats take more tacks to the south.


Simon Fisher, the navigator onboard Azzam has found himself in the middle of the pack. Simon will be monitoring the distance and resulting leverage that the tacking pack manage to manoeuvre. If it does go right, his Abu Dhabi crew stands to lose a little distance but gain on Team Brunel and Team Alvimedica.


The low ahead is still more than 24 hours away, so this is a slow burner with the added gift of colder winds and dropping sea temperatures.


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Look at all that beautiful pressure to the East slipping away.

 

 

"beautiful"??? Pam is still a monster and I think any ships between it and South America are going to be pretty nervous!

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.

...the south pack is down to ~7kn boatspeed,,while the north 3 are holding at ~10kts. It looks like this is quite possibly the last sched where the north is going to show advantage, and in about 18hrs the south should be looking pretty good. I can see why it's a tough call to work south versus striving drifting for the ESE :mellow:

 

....watch log and a handy synopsis.......http://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/watchlog.html

 

To adjust and reposition or make a bigger split, thats the question.

When three boats tacked, heading south, it looked like Team SCA, MAPFRE and Dongfeng were making the move south, but shortly after 1400 UTC and only 35 nautical miles sailed, those three boats tacked back onto starboard just on the hip of Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing.

The wind had backed 12 hours ago, shifting left on the fleet as they sail up wind. Once again in the last 24 hours, this favoured the northern boats with both shift and added velocity.

The forecast is for the wind to veer and shift back right as they overtake the old high-pressure system and meet a new low moving into the fleets path. This would explain the repositioning by the trailing fleet, keen to get right again. We may see a few more bites at the apple as some boats take more tacks to the south.

Simon Fisher, the navigator onboard Azzam has found himself in the middle of the pack. Simon will be monitoring the distance and resulting leverage that the tacking pack manage to manoeuvre. If it does go right, his Abu Dhabi crew stands to lose a little distance but gain on Team Brunel and Team Alvimedica.

The low ahead is still more than 24 hours away, so this is a slow burner with the added gift of colder winds and dropping sea temperatures.

What am I missing? I don't see any overtaking of the High in the next 24 hrs or any new Low coming in? Someone have a different forecast?

 

post-81201-0-06046300-1426894915_thumb.jpg

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SCA seems to be learning from their staying in AIS range and tuning. They were a few miles behind in the wake of Dongfeng heading south earlier, and now Dongfeng is a few miles behind in SCA's wake as they head East again. It's really nice to see SCA staying competitive, and not fading back.

Seconded.

 

So there.

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.

...the south pack is down to ~7kn boatspeed,,while the north 3 are holding at ~10kts. It looks like this is quite possibly the last sched where the north is going to show advantage, and in about 18hrs the south should be looking pretty good. I can see why it's a tough call to work south versus striving drifting for the ESE :mellow:

 

....watch log and a handy synopsis.......http://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/watchlog.html

 

To adjust and reposition or make a bigger split, thats the question.

When three boats tacked, heading south, it looked like Team SCA, MAPFRE and Dongfeng were making the move south, but shortly after 1400 UTC and only 35 nautical miles sailed, those three boats tacked back onto starboard just on the hip of Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing.

The wind had backed 12 hours ago, shifting left on the fleet as they sail up wind. Once again in the last 24 hours, this favoured the northern boats with both shift and added velocity.

The forecast is for the wind to veer and shift back right as they overtake the old high-pressure system and meet a new low moving into the fleets path. This would explain the repositioning by the trailing fleet, keen to get right again. We may see a few more bites at the apple as some boats take more tacks to the south.

Simon Fisher, the navigator onboard Azzam has found himself in the middle of the pack. Simon will be monitoring the distance and resulting leverage that the tacking pack manage to manoeuvre. If it does go right, his Abu Dhabi crew stands to lose a little distance but gain on Team Brunel and Team Alvimedica.

The low ahead is still more than 24 hours away, so this is a slow burner with the added gift of colder winds and dropping sea temperatures.

What am I missing? I don't see any overtaking of the High in the next 24 hrs or any new Low coming in? Someone have a different forecast?

 

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

 

 

 

...I certainly agree that 18 hours is optimistic....it'll be a snail race for well longer than that unless the south boats get well further south.

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Alvi and Brunel did a quick tack south, but then quickly tacked back east. Brunel takes the lead after the maneuvers... Meanwhile SCA pulled ahead of Mapfre, after passing Donfeng a few hours ago... Alvi, farthest north, is starting to see less wind than everyone else, but off and on. Maybe the south will yet pay?

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jbc,

 

I am guessing they have something along these lines for the scenario you are talking about.

 

http://www.landfallnavigation.com/lifesling.html

 

Hm. Yeah, actually, one of these might be useful for conferring some of the benefit I'm talking about. I realize it's not a lot of protection, but if I had my choice of having one of those vs. not having one of those while waiting 45 minutes for my buddies to get back to me, I'd much rather have it than not.

 

https://youtu.be/XhnVcs3kIs8

 

 

.....Looks fine in dead calm, but even with a sea anchor it's likely just another lost hope to see drifting away in whatever condition might have a MOB. :mellow:

 

Further poking around shows that they've got two Jonbuoy MkV MOB recovery units mounted on either side of the aerial frame at the back of the boat. You can see one pretty well in the video from Alvimedica today just after they released the oceanographic research buoy. I see in the Vestas crash report that the crew deployed one soon after the grounding to see if the wind and current would carry it into the calmer water away from the surf zone. It was only after that succeeded that they tried launching a raft.

 

Watching this video, it looks like it's very similar to the other product in the video I linked to above. Maybe a tad less flotation, but also probably less likely to blow away (I like the big submerged ballast pocket).

 

I suppose it's the modern version of the horseshoe buoys I remember from back in the day. Kids these days with their newfangled GPSs and all... We used to navigate by the taste of the gravel that came up in the lead... and we liked it.

 

https://youtu.be/wAS-2F9UQKY

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Alvi and Brunel did a quick tack south, but then quickly tacked back east. Brunel takes the lead after the maneuvers... Meanwhile SCA pulled ahead of Mapfre, after passing Donfeng a few hours ago... Alvi, farthest north, is starting to see less wind than everyone else, but off and on. Maybe the south will yet pay?

You're right. I think SCA has legitimately passed two competitors while sailing in similar wind. I don't remember that happening on an ocean leg before.

 

Taking my gushing to the SCA thread.

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Upwind through the high pressure ridge and waiting to hook into the first Southern Ocean low pressure system, Team SCA continues to make good progress lying fourth, still holding station in a southerly group of three with MAPFRE and Dongfeng. The leaders about 80 miles to the north and east appear to have held stronger, more lifted breeze for longer. Team SCA is computed to be 51 miles behind the leader but strategy is all about positioning for the low and getting on the train first.
"It's all good right now", opens Carolijn Brouwer this morning, "it's the Southern Ocean but not like we know it. It will come". We know it will be wet and wild eventually but right now we have 12-14kts we are in 'fast upwind' mode with the FR0 (Fractional Zero) sailing 50-55TWA and are together with MAPFRE who are to leeward and Dongfeng who are pointing at our stern. They are not on AIS so we don't really know how far behind, probably about five or six miles."


"We made a few tacks yesterday to get a bit south. When the new low comes we thought we would get it in the south first, we would be into the pressure first, but right now that scenario may be changing a little, the guys in the north have held the pressure we have and have made some gain."


"We are battling nicely here. Conditions have been very tricky, we are sailing similar angles but the breeze is between seven and 18kts, so that is hard on sail choices. For two hours we had a lot of sail changes but settled with the FR0. Now it is good and we are 103% of polars most of the time, when there is a 15-16kts puff we are in survival mode for a bit, but it works."


"We should be in this for 10-12hrs, then the wind should veer and lift we will look to change from the FR0 to the J1 when it gets too windy, then the wind will keep going roiund until it is behind us. We will stay with that low for as long as we can and then it is not clear what happens, or if a secondary low develops."
"It is definitely chillier, sea temperature about 15-17 degrees, gloves, hats and layers, soon as the temperature drops.


We have seen quite a few Albatross now and we have been trying to work out which ones are male and female!"

- See more at: http://teamsca.com/watch-report/day-4-trying-to-catch-the-train#sthash.OiqGPoV7.dpuf

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Watch Log.......Most all reports from boats reminds me of a libertarian sports-day....everyone's winning! :)

 

Although Team Brunel have taken a marginal lead and, with Team Alvimedica, have been sailing in a slightly stronger breeze (1-2 knots more), Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing have positioned themselves in the best spot in the course.

They have enough leverage to cover the moves of the chasing pack in the south – Team SCA, MAPFRE and Dongfeng Race Team - and, similarly, can respond from there in case the two northern boats – Team Brunel and Team Alvimedica – transition earlier into the breeze.

Despite this, the Emirati boat has suffered the biggest loss in the past 12 hours: 15 nautical miles (nm). The reason: three hours of drifting in very light winds, precious hours that Ian Walker’s crew invested on repairing the damage in the foot of the headsail.

Onboard Reporter of Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing writes: “At almost the same time that light forecast came through down below, the wind quit up on deck – dropping down to five knots.

“Worse yet, we had just found out we put 20 nm on Dongfeng in the last sched making the miles we were bleeding extra painful.

“The only glimmer of luck came in the odd form of damage to our headsail – our dagger board had shot through the foot of the sail. Fortunately, we didn’t need it based on the conditions. We used the few hours of light breeze to our advantage performing a solid repair.”

The teams in the north are trying to escape the high behind them, while the three boats in the south, which have been sailing 1-2 knots slower on average in the last 12 hours, are trying to navigate towards where the stronger breeze is building up.

“The explanation for our being north is that it was a by-product of trying to get east,” explains Amory Ross, Onboard Reporter of Team Alvimedica.

“The fleet is outrunning a high-pressure system to the west and the faster we got east, the more in front of it we stayed.

“So yesterday we put the bow down (to the north) and sailed fast. Where that leaves us we’re not sure. There is probably another 36 hours of trying to stay in front of this high before it dissolves and the routing suggests a significant decision regarding the next set of lows.

“Sail back north to stay above them or dive south towards the ice gate to get under them. Between now and when we have to decide we should have a better idea as to what the rest of the fleet is thinking, and more up-to-date weather models, too.”

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Hi Couch,

 

You're by far the funniest, but you ever sleep or do you have a team running your Couchsurfer account?

Good roleplay as well.

 

But for the fleet it's nice and good for them they finally come in easier conditions.

There was one report on board Brunel they weren't eating, couldn't speak nor sleep.

Only pure survival.

 

Pam is gettting more and more easy but will stir the sea up until the cape.

South is king in my opinion. Simply because it's the shortest route.

post-17796-0-99366300-1426927556_thumb.jpg

So straight to the ice limits seem to be the strategy.

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Alvi and Brunel did a quick tack south, but then quickly tacked back east. Brunel takes the lead after the maneuvers... Meanwhile SCA pulled ahead of Mapfre, after passing Donfeng a few hours ago... Alvi, farthest north, is starting to see less wind than everyone else, but off and on. Maybe the south will yet pay?

You're right. I think SCA has legitimately passed two competitors while sailing in similar wind. I don't remember that happening on an ocean leg before.

 

Taking my gushing to the SCA thread.

 

+1

 

They are winning their side of the fleet against 2 boats which have already won a leg.

 

IMHO the postponment made the race really interesting, it is not often that in the South there are big tacticals calls to be made like this and we will anyway get the 20+ knots surfing videos in a couple of days.

 

I am not sure what is going onboard DF but they are clearly struggling for speed from time to time. I was thinking that the figaro experience would help a lot for heavy air OD racing on the edge. Charles said that his plan was mainly to get to the cape horn unscathed, so may be they are thinking that the others are pushing too hard.

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ADOR's interesting additional perspective on the old go/don't go issue. Dream forecast is light!

“This forecast is a dream, you never see it this good”, says Ian as he looks at the latest wind models – granted, temperature isn’t one of the metrics represented. Both the European and American models indicate we’re looking at only one day above 30 knots of wind over the next week; unprecedented in the Southern Ocean.

Asked if that meant we’d be able to sail aggressively, Ian responded, “It just means we’ll be able to get to the Horn alive.” Sobering.

[. . . . ]

Before the wind picked up again – and it did pick up – Ian was asked, “This isn’t quite the Southern Ocean we expected, huh?”

He dryly replied: “Be careful what you wish for.”

March 21, 2015 Matt Knighton OBR, Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing http://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/fromtheboats.html

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Ian's attitude in stark contrast to the day before:

 

From ADOR.

 

Now the wake of Pam has us sailing downwind in moderate breeze and many eyes are wandering through the nav station glancing at the big red parts of the map that have passed us by. Ian has been the most vocal out of all the team with his frustration regarding the decision to delay the start of this Leg further. For some of the veterans onboard, riding the back of Pam we may have seen 40+ knots of wind and had to take it easy holding the option of bearing away towards the north to bail out if to bail out if the sailing got too hairy.

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Latest weather routing from boat most northern ALVI (red), TBRU (green) and most southern boat DRFT in magenta, using 21Mar15 0640 UTC positions. The projected LP systems still block a race to the ice limits. TBRU has the quickest route of the 3 boats. The route right from the end of the GRIB file is unreliable for now and an extrapolation of latest available wind and waves.

 

I have added the great circle from the top of New Zealand to the ice barrier and from the ice barrier to Cape Horn (black dotted line).

 

Input:

  • GFS 0.5dx0.5d 21-03-15 00 UTC run up to 29Mar15 00 UTC
  • Wave model FNMOC-WW3 up to 29Mar15 00 UTC
  • OpenCPN routing time steps 3 hrs
  • Max swell 15 m

 

"DFRT in Magenta, not Pink"? :)

 

Also, is it easy to see the approx deltas of the three routes? Thanks

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If you ask me weve got a long way to go until we can claim Southern Ocean status.

- Amory Ross, #SouthernOcean pic.twitter.com/QB9RjGSfIB

6:28am - 21 Mar 15

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ADOR's interesting additional perspective on the old go/don't go issue. Dream forecast is light!

“This forecast is a dream, you never see it this good”, says Ian as he looks at the latest wind models – granted, temperature isn’t one of the metrics represented. Both the European and American models indicate we’re looking at only one day above 30 knots of wind over the next week; unprecedented in the Southern Ocean.

Asked if that meant we’d be able to sail aggressively, Ian responded, “It just means we’ll be able to get to the Horn alive.” Sobering.

[. . . . ]

Before the wind picked up again – and it did pick up – Ian was asked, “This isn’t quite the Southern Ocean we expected, huh?”

He dryly replied: “Be careful what you wish for.”

March 21, 2015 Matt Knighton OBR, Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing http://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/fromtheboats.html

 

Ian's attitude in stark contrast to the day before:

 

From ADOR.

 

Now the wake of Pam has us sailing downwind in moderate breeze and many eyes are wandering through the nav station glancing at the big red parts of the map that have passed us by. Ian has been the most vocal out of all the team with his frustration regarding the decision to delay the start of this Leg further. For some of the veterans onboard, riding the back of Pam we may have seen 40+ knots of wind and had to take it easy holding the option of bearing away towards the north to bail out if to bail out if the sailing got too hairy.

 

Yes, quite the contrast. Hard to know what Ian really thinks. For now I'll guess he's just playing the superstition card.

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Can't recall comments on yestersay's quote from DF about their lagging.

Charles Caudrelier is open about it, “this leg will be the hardest for us because we have the least total experience in the fleet.”

They have a total of seven Volvo Ocean Races onboard his red boat, but four are from new crew member Damian Foxall, versus the 20 onboard the most experienced crew of the fleet – Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing.

And that sort of practice is key.

Look at the guys on Team Alvimedica, who’ve taken the lead yesterday evening. A new sailor joined them in Auckland – Stu Bannatyne, with six Volvos under his belt, seven Cape Horn passages and the experience of coaching this team so far.

That kind of knowledge is irreplaceable in the unknowns of the Southern Ocean. But they can make up for it.

http://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/news/8620_The-virtues-of-preparation.html

 

. . . and no mention of the experience of 'Cheese, the elephant among the porcelain Brunel sailors (from today's watchlog)

The elephant in the porcelain cupboard

[. . . ]Team Brunel. Dirk de Ridder flew in at the last minute to replace the injured Laurent Pagès. Directly during the In-Port Race, the Dutch left his mark by being everywhere and nowhere at the same time.

“Not too high, Bouwe.” “Jens, do not lean on the jib sheet.” Guys who’ve been sailing this boat for a year. He was already knocking over holy houses. Dirk de Ridder: the gentle elephant in the porcelain cupboard.

“If you say something, it has to be clear,” smiles de Ridder, laughing at himself. “But good sailors expect you to come up with comments. If you say anything, you don’t add anything and they’re quickly done with you.”

De Ridder has an impressive resume. With Merit Cup and Pirates of the Caribbean, he ended second in the biggest ocean race in the world, and won it with illbruck. And he added the 2011 America’s Cup to his name.

“A fresh breeze,” that’s how Gerd-Jan Poortman announced the arrival of ‘Cheese’. “It’s good to have someone coming in, looking at it from the outside.” He giggles. “That means he spares no-one.”

Balcaen: “It’s not that we’re changing our team strategy, but it’s a person you listen to. Super cool.”

“I’ve worked with many sailors but this is a good group,” continues de Ridder. “Hard workers and nice people. I’ve also seen sailors take an airplane back home after the first day and never returned. Disastrous atmospheres. And that is absolutely not the case here.”

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Can't recall comments on yestersay's quote from DF about their lagging.

Charles Caudrelier is open about it, “this leg will be the hardest for us because we have the least total experience in the fleet.”

They have a total of seven Volvo Ocean Races onboard his red boat, but four are from new crew member Damian Foxall, versus the 20 onboard the most experienced crew of the fleet – Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing.

And that sort of practice is key.

Look at the guys on Team Alvimedica, who’ve taken the lead yesterday evening. A new sailor joined them in Auckland – Stu Bannatyne, with six Volvos under his belt, seven Cape Horn passages and the experience of coaching this team so far.

That kind of knowledge is irreplaceable in the unknowns of the Southern Ocean. But they can make up for it.

http://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/news/8620_The-virtues-of-preparation.html

 

. . . and no mention of the experience of 'Cheese, the elephant among the porcelain Brunel sailors (from today's watchlog)

The elephant in the porcelain cupboard

[. . . ]Team Brunel. Dirk de Ridder flew in at the last minute to replace the injured Laurent Pagès. Directly during the In-Port Race, the Dutch left his mark by being everywhere and nowhere at the same time.

“Not too high, Bouwe.” “Jens, do not lean on the jib sheet.” Guys who’ve been sailing this boat for a year. He was already knocking over holy houses. Dirk de Ridder: the gentle elephant in the porcelain cupboard.

“If you say something, it has to be clear,” smiles de Ridder, laughing at himself. “But good sailors expect you to come up with comments. If you say anything, you don’t add anything and they’re quickly done with you.”

De Ridder has an impressive resume. With Merit Cup and Pirates of the Caribbean, he ended second in the biggest ocean race in the world, and won it with illbruck. And he added the 2011 America’s Cup to his name.

“A fresh breeze,” that’s how Gerd-Jan Poortman announced the arrival of ‘Cheese’. “It’s good to have someone coming in, looking at it from the outside.” He giggles. “That means he spares no-one.”

Balcaen: “It’s not that we’re changing our team strategy, but it’s a person you listen to. Super cool.”

“I’ve worked with many sailors but this is a good group,” continues de Ridder. “Hard workers and nice people. I’ve also seen sailors take an airplane back home after the first day and never returned. Disastrous atmospheres. And that is absolutely not the case here.”

talk of his resume right here

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ADOR's interesting additional perspective on the old go/don't go issue. Dream forecast is light!

“This forecast is a dream, you never see it this good”, says Ian as he looks at the latest wind models – granted, temperature isn’t one of the metrics represented. Both the European and American models indicate we’re looking at only one day above 30 knots of wind over the next week; unprecedented in the Southern Ocean.

Asked if that meant we’d be able to sail aggressively, Ian responded, “It just means we’ll be able to get to the Horn alive.” Sobering.

[. . . . ]

Before the wind picked up again – and it did pick up – Ian was asked, “This isn’t quite the Southern Ocean we expected, huh?”

He dryly replied: “Be careful what you wish for.”

March 21, 2015 Matt Knighton OBR, Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing http://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/fromtheboats.html

 

Ian's attitude in stark contrast to the day before:

 

From ADOR.

 

Now the wake of Pam has us sailing downwind in moderate breeze and many eyes are wandering through the nav station glancing at the big red parts of the map that have passed us by. Ian has been the most vocal out of all the team with his frustration regarding the decision to delay the start of this Leg further. For some of the veterans onboard, riding the back of Pam we may have seen 40+ knots of wind and had to take it easy holding the option of bearing away towards the north to bail out if to bail out if the sailing got too hairy.

 

Yes, quite the contrast. Hard to know what Ian really thinks. For now I'll guess he's just playing the superstition card.

 

He's being filtered through Matt Knighton's reporting, too. Maybe Matt's playing up the contrast for dramatic effect?

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Valor, I was talking of Charles' omission of de Ridder's resume and yes, jbc, filtering the filters is fun.

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Expecting conditions to change in the next 12 hours from the filming.

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Translation please.

The 'translate captions' was a little help. Nélias spoke of a cyclone 'Laurent' but I couldn't make out if this was the high, a new low, or something else. He gives a gallic shrug at the end which seems to suggest the south route was a mistake.

 

So, yes--translation please :)

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Translation please.

The 'translate captions' was a little help. Nélias spoke of a cyclone 'Laurent' but I couldn't make out if this was the high, a new low, or something else. He gives a gallic shrug at the end which seems to suggest the south route was a mistake.

 

So, yes--translation please :)

I tried the caption and nothing?

 

Cyclone Laurent sounds like French humor. Not sure.

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Nice discussion of the northern route "feeling vulnerable".

... and the tedium of sailing upwind in the Southern Ocean.

 

When you check the meteo earth tracker offered by the VOR site and press play you see the remains of Pam disappear.

Pan will die out on Sunday 16:00 and normal wheather is expected.

Going somewhat more north like Herman proposed delivers reaching conditions all the time.

Going south is shorter, when the wind is becoming weaker the shortest route will be faster.

 

We will see!

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Translation please.

The 'translate captions' was a little help. Nélias spoke of a cyclone 'Laurent' but I couldn't make out if this was the high, a new low, or something else. He gives a gallic shrug at the end which seems to suggest the south route was a mistake.

 

So, yes--translation please :)

I tried the caption and nothing?

 

Cyclone Laurent sounds like French humor. Not sure.

Captions are tricky. Turn on "CC" then go to "settings" , then 'translate captions', then scroll through the language list to get to english. Tedious process (often takes longer than the clip), but the translations are rewarding like in the babel fish days.

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Translation please.

The 'translate captions' was a little help. Nélias spoke of a cyclone 'Laurent' but I couldn't make out if this was the high, a new low, or something else. He gives a gallic shrug at the end which seems to suggest the south route was a mistake.

 

So, yes--translation please :)

I tried the caption and nothing?

 

Cyclone Laurent sounds like French humor. Not sure.

Captions are tricky. Turn on "CC" then go to "settings" , then 'translate captions', then scroll through the language list to get to english. Tedious process (often takes longer than the clip), but the translations are rewarding like in the babel fish days.

Thanks. Who knew?

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