shaggybaxter

Construction of a Pogo 12.50

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Fantastic news. Very close now. Best wishes sb.

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Hi IB,

Aaah....the anarchist spies are everywhere! Thanks mate, good to know.

The devil is in the detail. I rang my Freight Forwarder today JUST to confirm when the crane was being made available., as we have two solid days of work to do before the lift. His response was "I just assumed you unwrap it and stand it up." They were going to come back a few hours after handover to lift her into the water, mast stepped and all!

So we are still trying to negotiate for the rebooking of the crane and get access for 2 days works.

 

Perseverance , do not give up shaggy....

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Just a thought... Could you unwrap the hull, lay the mast along the hull, lift into the water and start motoring?

 

Mast stepping to be done later at the yacht club.

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^ That sounds like a winner. Remove the boat from the problem area entirely, get it back under your control.

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Hi Rush/Longy,

Did you jinx me? I got told today we have no chance of playing prepping masts for a couple of days, so now our only option is this.

So, the new plan is get it out of the wrapping, get the mast securely anchored on the deck, drop her in and go.

This delays the mast step till the 4th at the earliest .

Still have to get the crane confirmed.....anybody got a chopper? Skyhook? Fabulous idea?

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Hi Rush/Longy,

Did you jinx me? I got told today we have no chance of playing prepping masts for a couple of days, so now our only option is this.

So, the new plan is get it out of the wrapping, get the mast securely anchored on the deck, drop her in and go.

This delays the mast step till the 4th at the earliest .

Still have to get the crane confirmed.....anybody got a chopper? Skyhook? Fabulous idea?

The rig on the 1250 is not too heavy and is deck stepped, if you can gett your boat between two similarly sized sailboats you could use their halyards to put the rig up. I would be surprised if Antoine from Structures has not done it before

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Hi Rush/Longy,

Did you jinx me? I got told today we have no chance of playing prepping masts for a couple of days, so now our only option is this.

So, the new plan is get it out of the wrapping, get the mast securely anchored on the deck, drop her in and go.

This delays the mast step till the 4th at the earliest .

Still have to get the crane confirmed.....anybody got a chopper? Skyhook? Fabulous idea?

I was thinking practical alternatives rather than jinx

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I can just see standing at the bar in a few years, telling all the starry eyed youngsters "Yep, in 2015 Fusion beat WOXI through the heads on Boxing Day....(on a fuck off great ro/ro)"

post-28484-0-19406400-1450988779_thumb.png

Merry Xmas Anarchists, here's to a fantastic 2016 for all.

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Thanks Rant, tomorrow morning first thing I'm down at Bunnings to buy a heap of 1.5mtr planks and foam to make a cradle for the mast.

The deck of the boat isn't really suited to just dropping the mast directly on the deck, with a 5mtr overhang you can imagine trying to get a flat area the whole length of the deck and strapped down tight just doesn't equate.

Trying to think of a footpad so the wood doesn't scratch the deck...

 

Hi IB, No is the answer! It feels like fucking chinese water torture at the mo, but the good news is she's almost here.

Tomorrow morning I'm on the phone, now it is just unloading and the quarantine inspection to go.

:)

post-28484-0-22183900-1451212346_thumb.png

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Doh! As in for the feet? Why didn't I think of that? Considering I'm going there for the rubber for the mast bed.

Ferk, I think I seriously need some sleep. I was thinking of screwing furniture foam pelts on....bugger me..too much domestic duties.

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Some lengths of framing timber, nail gun and some foam... Frame to hold mast shouldn't take more than 10 minutes to construct

 

It is not like you will be travelling down the highway at 100kmh

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Yes for the feet, my mate has used it to secure things on deck - jerry cans & other hardware & it has good grip, colour didn't run or mark the deck either (cream) up to Airlie & back. It would be 10mm thick & blue in colour. Not as much weight as a mast but should be ok 😎

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mast is carbon, right?. buy the strongest saw stool you can from Bunnings and add foam feet for the front. Get a few lengths of 150x50 to bridge the companionway and lift it up far enough to clear the front of the cabin top. Sit the existing shaped mast cradles on the timber and saw stool. Strap it down using proper ratchet straps. Bobs your mums brother.

I have done this many times for trucking and will use the same technique when Alcatraz goes back to the water.

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Checklist numbers 1426-1434.

Boots. Check

Hi Vis. Check

Tools. Check.

Wallett. Check

Keys. Check

Paperwork. Check.

Bits for cradle......Next.

Phone call to let us know we've cleared Quarantine............................fingers crossed we get it today.

I can't believe she is actually sitting in Brisbane.

 

post-28484-0-67321800-1451251711_thumb.png

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Sydney Hobart for your pogo next year?

 

HI JL,

24 months from now is the plan mate. After watching the carnage from that southerly has made me question whether backstays would be a mandatory upgrade....

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Shaggy

 

Any registration need to be displayed? Seems a favorite trick of the Natural Resources police here is to watch you launch in the spring and book you for out of date Rego during the 5 minute motor to the pen.

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Pay my airfare and I'll come help :)

 

New boats are exciting times. Thank you for sharing. It has been fun to watch from afar. Hope the new year treats you well.

 

Cheers.

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Checklist numbers 1426-1434.

Boots. Check

Hi Vis. Check

Tools. Check.

Wallett. Check

Keys. Check

Paperwork. Check.

Bits for cradle......Next.

Phone call to let us know we've cleared Quarantine............................fingers crossed we get it today.

I can't believe she is actually sitting in Brisbane.

 

attachicon.gifTopeka location.PNG

 

 

 

20140129cnsbr3862.jpg

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Wow. Just got onto this thread.

 

Shaggy thanks for all the work updating us and all the pics. Awesome effort. I have long been a Pogo fan and the 1250 is one of my dream boats, behind the RP53 and Pogo 50.... :P (In my dreams!!) For now, the Ross 40 will have to do, and to be fair, it's not too slow.

 

Really interesting to read about all the hurdles you have had to jump and the way you have gone about the purchase. I think I would have been screaming down the phone by now if I were you. I look forward to the launch and your first race report!

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Shaggy

 

Any registration need to be displayed? Seems a favorite trick of the Natural Resources police here is to watch you launch in the spring and book you for out of date Rego during the 5 minute motor to the pen.

HI IB, Yeah, I was thinking about that. I have the rego papers with our number, but the new regs require you only to display your own numbers, no rego sticker anymore for verification. So I had a look at the local chandlery this morning but they didn't have small enough letters for my liking, I'll keep an eye out. Tape may have to suffice!

 

 

Wow. Just got onto this thread.

 

Shaggy thanks for all the work updating us and all the pics. Awesome effort. I have long been a Pogo fan and the 1250 is one of my dream boats, behind the RP53 and Pogo 50.... :P (In my dreams!!) For now, the Ross 40 will have to do, and to be fair, it's not too slow.

 

Really interesting to read about all the hurdles you have had to jump and the way you have gone about the purchase. I think I would have been screaming down the phone by now if I were you. I look forward to the launch and your first race report!

 

Thx Smithy, and I reckon Ross 40's are great boats! I found out this morning they are not unloading today, as it is a public holiday from Boxing Day?? Grrr.....

 

We managed to get all the wood, saw horses and rubber today for the cradle, so now if we get a call we're good to go..

Add that to the flares, V Sheet, fire extinguishers, fire blanket, the pile is growing!

Even though it is only a short trip, I don't want to make the news because I was too rushed and I burn it to the waterline.....not much point being unsinkable then.

 

post-28484-0-80704400-1451279260_thumb.jpg

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If you need to borrow any safety equipment to be legal... PM me and I'll raid our boat.

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Thanks Rossman, I appreciate it!

Some-one might be able to do me a favour though...... :):wacko::unsure:

 

I just got an email from our freight forwarders advising we will only have access to the boat once it is slipped into the river...wait for it.... from the water.

So, it appears I cannot board from the Port.

Whilst I understand from an OH&S point of view (maybe the dock has no ladder access), what annoys me is the timing.

We are looking at slipping on Wednesday/Thursday this week, this leaves little time to try and organise.

 

So, if any Anarchists from Brisbane are out there that have a power boat, want to pick me up from say Rivergate and take a leisurely drive over to Port of Brisbane to kiss a Pogo, I will offer them my undying love, wife, wallett and children, ( not necessarily in that order).

 

I'm not letting it get to me, no plan survives contact with reality :) Thanks in advance to anyone that can help out.

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They are really putting you through the wringer aren't they? How frustrating.. Aussie ports can be very much like this. Completely over the top with security and OH&S but the reality is quite different once you are inside... I can't believe they are so unhelpful. Hopefully someone can give you a ride to your boat. You have more patience than I do!! I'm really looking forward to what you think of the boat on the water after a good long sail. great thread! Good luck with the bloody port!

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You looked at the weather lately shaggy? I would be trying to beg, borrow or steal a rib to transfer to your boat, or a poly boat if you can't get a rib. I see the boat hire place has poly boats, they are pretty gentle on glass if you accidentally bump the new girl

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Just jump in the drink off the wharf and swim to her you girl :-)

 

Can I borrow your hat?? I'd just have to keep nodding and I could do a man from Atlantis.....

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You looked at the weather lately shaggy? I would be trying to beg, borrow or steal a rib to transfer to your boat, or a poly boat if you can't get a rib. I see the boat hire place has poly boats, they are pretty gentle on glass if you accidentally bump the new girl

 

HI Rant,

Yep, what Sydney had we have. Madly working some angles as we speak. Forecast is for 20+ kn for a few days.

Bring it on...just wish I had the mast up.

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Hi Anarchists,

Firstly, I'd like to say thanks very much to all of you that PM'ed me with offers of assistance in getting onto the boat from the water, I was overwhelmed at the generous and selfless offers from everyone.

Thank you to each of you , I hope I can return the favour one day.

 

Unwanted surprise no 1 for the day. We seem to be getting these daily :angry:

Had an email from the broker this morning. We were supposed to be getting access today to start work, but he'd forgotten we needed to submit the following before we could gain access to the site:

  • SWMS (Site Workplace Methodology Statement, OH&S thing Australia has adopted with an evangelistic passion the last few years).
  • JSA (Job Safety Analysis, same as above)
  • Proof of Public liability insurance
  • Proof of WorkCover insurance

For those of you that deal in this, you know it is not the sort of thing you can write on the back of a beer coaster. We were supposed to work under our broker's safety plan, until it transpired they hadn't done it. However, genius brother dearest, who happens to be a OHaS guru, had pre-empted we may need a SWMS and took in upon himself to write one. Just in case.

If he wasn't related, I would still be dry-humping his leg right now, talk about a recovery strategy.

 

We tweaked the SWMS a bit after discussing options with AAT, then I flew into work, grabbed my companies PI and Workers comp paperwork, added a working from heights methodology statement, another for power tools, grabbed the MSDS (material safety data sheets) we had to supply for the diesel we were bringing onto the dock, and bolted down there to submit all the paperwork.

I made it an hour before closing and 30 mins later we got the approval. Phew!

They took me down to have a look at the boat, and finally, here she is standing on Australian soil at last. Edit: We're the little one in the foreground :)

IMG_0081_zps6681dx8u.jpg

 

IMG_0078_zpssnqeqs7r.jpg

 

So, we start tomorrow at 6am, our job list looks like this:

  • Unwrap the boat and mast
  • Make some cradles
  • Get the mast lifted onto the cradle and strapped down.
  • Refit the bowsprit. (removed for protection in transit)
  • Ensure the boat is watertight
  • Fluids. Bleed injectors.
  • Electrics. Safe the mast wiring, ensure all nav and safety is functional.

The lift into the water will be Thursday at 10am. Brisbane Port Launches will take us up to meet the boat, and stand off in case we need a tow.

 

We can't cradle the mast in its packaging, she has to come out, so I can see I'll be fussing like an old mother hen over getting the mast snug down tight.

 

IMG_0083_zpsv6ous6od.jpg

 

Thursday I expect I'll either be crying or deliriously happy, but she'll be in her own berth on Thursday, come hell or high water. As an added incentive, the Port closes at 1PM, as it is New Years Eve!

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Congrats on getting to this stage and dealing with the last minute hassles.

 

Suggest you attempt to rig cooling water on the hard and start the engine. If no water, start and run for 5 seconds and shut down. Yanmar? If so, would't think you would need to bleed unless it was run dry before transit.

 

Will they move the skid to quayside for the lift?

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Do you know how they wrapped the mast? Last one I unpacked came with a thick fiberglass shel that had to be cut away not a terrible job but it was so stiff it couldn't be cracked open so we has to split it on both sides. A pair of electric nibblers would have made short work of it, instead we were forced to use a pair of metal snips and spent hours on it.

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Fantastic stuff. Congratulations SB. Hope it all goes well.

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Looks good SB.

 

Are you sure you can't transport the mast in its case. Seems like the best way to do it. Could run out of time half way through unwrapping it. Gusting 30 inside the bay tomorrow still. Maybe hold up a couple of days at Rivergate if you're pushed for time. I know it's only a few miles, depends on how thoroughly you can get everything secured but I think you're going to be pushed for time.

 

How tall is the mast could it go on a low loader or is it oversize.

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That's a decent looking trailer compared to what we see around here. You don't need no stinking lights. Just hook it up to you 4 runner and you are good to go :)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nice new years present, but in a few days its a year old boat :(

 

Looks like a fun ride.. Enjoy!

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holy smokes this is as entertaining as S2H ! get some buddy , cant wait for the pics of the new owner in action !

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That's a decent looking trailer compared to what we see around here. You don't need no stinking lights. Just hook it up to you 4 runner and you are good to go :)

 

Bit short on wheels.

A box trailer should work, right?

 

https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSGc-SqXFYb3BoHTATOG-5PEmpMDkhgCxopE3Apyp_AMDrDdHcr

 

Nice work on the paper trail shaggy, good luck with the trip!

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Congrats on getting to this stage and dealing with the last minute hassles.

 

Suggest you attempt to rig cooling water on the hard and start the engine. If no water, start and run for 5 seconds and shut down. Yanmar? If so, would't think you would need to bleed unless it was run dry before transit.

 

Will they move the skid to quayside for the lift?

 

HI IB,

Thankfully the Volvo uses a heat exchanger, so yes I can run it for long enough to check operation without having her in the water.

Yep, they keep it on the low loader till launching, then we launch directly from the cradle which is still chained to it. The cradle has to come and ship to us next week, the low loader disappears without me involved.

 

 

Do you know how they wrapped the mast? Last one I unpacked came with a thick fiberglass shel that had to be cut away not a terrible job but it was so stiff it couldn't be cracked open so we has to split it on both sides. A pair of electric nibblers would have made short work of it, instead we were forced to use a pair of metal snips and spent hours on it.

 

SN, Well would be the answer! Black wrap over a large grey PVC conduit, but thankfully cut into half sleeves, then more wrap and foam, then halyards, then more wrap and foam, then mast. Foam everywhere. We took off the outer layers and conduit off, the rest is still on to protect from chafe.

This is a shot of the PVC conduit still on.

 

IMG_0096_zpsybywkquy.jpg

 

The aftermath, ready for lifting onto the boat.

 

IMG_0114_zps9kskaiqj.jpg

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Looks good SB.

 

Are you sure you can't transport the mast in its case. Seems like the best way to do it. Could run out of time half way through unwrapping it. Gusting 30 inside the bay tomorrow still. Maybe hold up a couple of days at Rivergate if you're pushed for time. I know it's only a few miles, depends on how thoroughly you can get everything secured but I think you're going to be pushed for time.

 

How tall is the mast could it go on a low loader or is it oversize.

 

HI Scanas,

Antoine was not keen on leaving the outer layers on, it easily added another 50% bulk, so we ended up halfway with the outer layers off.

 

IMG_0095_zpshvje7okr.jpg

 

I'm seriously considering Rivergate, I am worried of the cause and effect any major swell will have on the cradle and mast. . The forecast still looks like shit, and once I'm out of the Port I've bought some time before the next scheduled event, being the mast step on the 4th, so this is definitely an option.

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That's a decent looking trailer compared to what we see around here. You don't need no stinking lights. Just hook it up to you 4 runner and you are good to go :)

Bit short on wheels.

A box trailer should work, right?

 

https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSGc-SqXFYb3BoHTATOG-5PEmpMDkhgCxopE3Apyp_AMDrDdHcr

 

Nice work on the paper trail shaggy, good luck with the trip!

 

 

Hi guys, one of the cool parts was the size of the toys we had on offer. This is the container tractor we used to sling the mast on the deck.

 

IMG_0127_zpsev2tvlzf.jpg

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Yep IB, today was a big day! The lift into the water went well overall. The not so good part was that even after repeated requests, the guys didn't put padding under the slings, and as a result the adhesive vinyl sticker on the sides of the boat was abraded slightly from the slings. Nothing that can't be patched, but annoying none the less.

The good part was the lift went very well otherwise. In the vein of big boys toys, the guys used this yellow monster, a 452 ton mobile crane. The head alone was 10 ton, nearly twice the weight of the boat :)

 

145_zpswk5vo3r3.jpg

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What the above pic doesn't show is the wind strength, Scanas, you were right, it was everything I hoped it wasn't going to be. Max gusts were 30 knots, I don't think we saw below 20. That wasn't the issue per se, it was what it did to the swell, it was messy and sloppy, and I cringed every time we hit a big wave. I kept looking at the mast looking for any sign of it moving, but thankfully it was rock solid.

 

160_zpss1735tpl.jpg

 

The other interesting point was it was a surprisingly smooth ride! I had conditioned myself to expecting horrific cracks as we fell off a steep wave, but it is more rounded and actually more comfortable than my current IOR hull shape (which is a fairly flat bottom forrard of the keel admittedly).

 

IMG_0106_zpsedffx1wa.jpg

 

The current 12.50 shares the same mould as the 40 S2, which has more volume in the bow than the S1, and the current Pogo Open 40 hull (S3) is extremely full, so much so that Structures won't use this for a 12.50 as it is a bit toto radical. So pig conditions, lots of stress, but a welcome surprise summed up the delivery.

 

The upshot was we made it! Woohoo! She is filthy, the boat is still full with the boom,spreaders, shrouds, forestays and all sorts, but she is in her mooring and the mast is safely on the hardstand. We have her in her new home in time on new year's eve, what better way to start the new year!

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So happy to have followed such a good story! Keep the updates rolling. All the best from the old world.

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Ditto. Thanks for sharing Shaggy. Al the best with commissioning.

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What the above pic doesn't show is the wind strength, Scanas, you were right, it was everything I hoped it wasn't going to be. Max gusts were 30 knots, I don't think we saw below 20. That wasn't the issue per se, it was what it did to the swell, it was messy and sloppy, and I cringed every time we hit a big wave. I kept looking at the mast looking for any sign of it moving, but thankfully it was rock solid.

 

160_zpss1735tpl.jpg

 

The other interesting point was it was a surprisingly smooth ride! I had conditioned myself to expecting horrific cracks as we fell off a steep wave, but it is more rounded and actually more comfortable than my current IOR hull shape (which is a fairly flat bottom forrard of the keel admittedly).

 

IMG_0106_zpsedffx1wa.jpg

 

The current 12.50 shares the same mould as the 40 S2, which has more volume in the bow than the S1, and the current Pogo Open 40 hull (S3) is extremely full, so much so that Structures won't use this for a 12.50 as it is a bit toto radical. So pig conditions, lots of stress, but a welcome surprise summed up the delivery.

 

The upshot was we made it! Woohoo! She is filthy, the boat is still full with the boom,spreaders, shrouds, forestays and all sorts, but she is in her mooring and the mast is safely on the hardstand. We have her in her new home in time on new year's eve, what better way to start the new year!

Took the dog for walk along the front yesterday & thought of you. It wasnt nice - but the swell wasn't as bad as the day before (gusted 51 knots wed cape Moreton) Glad it worked out & X2 thanks for sharing.

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After some needed sleep, today was mast prep day. We had some help from a couple of really nice gents in getting the mast up to the hardstand yesterday, so first thing this morning we pulled the shrouds and forestay out of the spinnaker well, and the headsail furler out of the rear cabin, and dragged it up to the hardstand, Antoine started on getting the spreaders bolted on, while I took some time out to scrub the boat, she really was filthy. It was great to see her in her berth, but without a mast she looks a bit lost.

 

005_zpspdftfj7k.jpg

 

We had found a pair of sturdy stands about 4' high to sit the mast on, but realised pretty quickly we needed a bit more height. The spreader rake is 27deg, and they're big, so we managed to get a bit more height by using one half of the transport boxing used for shipping giving us the clearance we needed. All good. Spreaders were fitted and pinned, then the work started on fitting all the shrouds.

 

010_zpsmeghk9ez.jpg

 

By the end of the day, the mast was finished and ready for lifting on the 4th. We then assembled the flat deck furler over the forestay, that is it in the righthand side of the pic.Thanks to Laurence, one of the members that came up for a chat, and ended up helping us for a few hours which was a big help!

Another 2 x jobs off the list!

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Today is a day off, we need to recuperate after the last week,and there is not much to do now before the mast step and test sailing .

I'll go down the boat and get the boom out , clean up inside and just generally tinker, am looking forward to a quiet day.

A good mate had a look and scratching his head turned to me and said " You can tell right away it's French".

He is no fool when it comes to yachts, and intrigued I asked him how he knew, the answer still has me grinning.

"Simple, it's a left hand drive!"

 

007_zpsexfs5wlj.jpg

 

<_<:) ...smartarse!

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Great thread Shaggy. I'm so pleased you finally got her into the Marina.

 

I'm not surprised at the Port authority with their last minute requests at all. I work on a Dive Ship and I'm in and out of Aussie ports all the time. JSAs, working at height tickets, Safety case statements, FEMEA statements, all par for the course and are ALL meaningless bureaucratic junk. I'm surprised they didn't want an MSIC card (security check, $400 please..) and working at heights ticket.. (1 day course, $800 please).

 

Good on you battling your way through this crap and getting it done yourself. You can be sure that if you had left it all to third parties, you would have ended up with a big bill, and probably damage to your boat or rig.. Well done!! Keep the photos coming. I think you have a pretty rapt audience!!

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HI Smithy,

You were right on the MSIC card and a working from heights ticket, we had the heights ticket but had to have a MSIC accredited escort! :)

 

This morning we got the boom out on the deck, the second wheel fitted, all of the packing material off the boat and all of a sudden she is starting to look like a real boat instead of a chandlery. It was so nice to get all the cushions out, in situ, and not have to step over everything to get...well...anywhere. The benefit of the week long commissioning in France is really telling now, the task list is really just the minimal assembly from decanting everything for the transport, rather than trying to work everything out for the first time.

 

021_zpsz0hnfzq0.jpg

 

Next task was to check all the mast and shroud fittings, I really don't want to step the mast and realise that we missed a split pin, grease point or Loctite on a thread. We were connecting the flat deck furler to the forestay bracket, and as the forestay is such a critical component, we used Loctitie red. We managed to tighten it, but not enough, as we didn't have the right size spanners for the nut and bolt, so there was a slight pause till we got the right tools. Wee bit too late, the red went off and it took a superhuman effort to get the nut undone. That was a good lesson, make sure I have all the right tools ready to go before starting, and I need to take down a heat gun if I am mucking around with red.

 

012_zpsnepoe5qd.jpg

 

I like the setup on the spreaders, everything looks suitably oversized and tough enough to handle everything I can throw at it. The lower spreaders use big pins through stainless steel eyes on the end of the wire, and looks like you could lift the boat off them. The uppers have a recess that take a c clip that is threaded on one side and are tightened to allow the wire to run freely, but tight enough that the wire is captured snugly, ie: it can't move laterally through the spreader assy. One thing about putting the rig together is the gain in confidence knowing what is going on above your head. Fiddly and time consuming, but it was enjoyable to do, not a chore at all.

 

005_zpst7f2hifo.jpg

 

006_zpsxfk2diml.jpg

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Congratulations, Shaggy, this thread is a great read. I'm so glad it's all coming together so well. Have fun playing with your new toy

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Altho you seem to be doing it already - take pictures of everything aloft!! makes it much easier to plan a repair when you know exactly what's up there BEFORE you go up there!

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Congrats shaggy, I got texted a sneaky spy shot of the boat fresh in her pen the other day, taken from another French built boat heading south. Looks fast sitting still without a rig, can't wait to see it powered up with the big asso

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Hi Guys,

Sorry, been a bit busy the last few days. Thanks for all the well wishes, they must have worked, the task list is down to a single page. It feels a bit surreal, we might actually be sailing instead of working on her, I'm not sure I have made the mental shift between the two just yet.

 

JL92S, I went with Incidence, which is a French sail loft that work a lot with Pogo. The main reason was to ensure I could mitigate the sails being a factor in getting our head around the boat tuning, no disrespect at all to the local lofts, but the backstayless mast is exotic enough for me to stick with the loft that have done something like 90% of all the 12.50 sail wardrobes. That reminds me, I've received the Sailect file from Incidence but I haven't uploaded this into Adrena, another job for tomorrow.

 

Rant, I saw some activity over there, has she departed? Congrats mate, but also a bit sad, I was hoping to do some boat testing with her :( .

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The mast step was today, and never a truer word was spoken than preparation is 90% of a successful outcome.

 

We'd had a wee accident at the port of Brisbane, when we were removing the outer packaging, the top of the mast fell off the wooden blocks it was resting on (we were getting ready to put the mast on the deck) and she hit the bitumen. There is a small 200mm x 100mm carbon fibre plate that is screwed to the top of the mast protruding forward to take the anemometer and tricolour LED, and thankfully (??) it took the brunt of the hit and snapped clean in half. I almost cried, it was the only time we didn't have it properly supported. This is with the plate removed, if we couldn't find a solution, we would have to redrill the top of the mast, not something I was really thrilled with.

 

009_zps7oigsxu5.jpg

 

We couldn't step the mast without finding a replacement, and this time of year it is not that easy to whistle up a new 5mm CF plate we could modify. So, mad panic phone call to Muir's who had carbon fibre matting and West System epoxy, so Saturday Antoine showed us how to make one from scratch which was excellent for me not having worked with CF before. We left it to cure, and this morning the trusty Dremel came out and using the old plate as a jig we cut and shaped it to suit, fitted it and voila! we had a new masthead anemometer and tri color base plate! You can just see it under the tricolor.

 

IMG_0111_zps6aksiwpy.jpg

 

Then the mast lift. I'm too tired to do anything tonight but I'll upload some pics tomorrow.

Getting closer to launching.. :)

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New year's resolution: Be less jealous.

 

Saw this.

 

Failed.

 

 

 

But I am happy for you. Both of you. No, really. I am.

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G'day all,

It's midnight, I have cleaned out the car of sodden gear, the bathroom looks like a steam room and am sitting here at the moment listening to the rain coming down in sheets.

Today was a bit of a grind, we managed to get the boat soooo close to being out on the water, but alas, we just didn't quite make it :(

Apologies, I am jumping forward, I'll go back to yesterday...the mast lift.

Overall, the mast stepping went really well. We were on site at about 8am, the crane was booked for 11am. After fitting the plate to the top of the mast, the next step was to fit the Facnor flat deck furler to the mast. As it is in about 20 individual pieces, you have to be careful that you don't bend or kink the whole assembly, so three of us carefully lifted it and placed it on top of the mast for fitting to the mast. It protrudes a good 6' past the base of the mast, so once fitted we all took turns to stand there with it sitting on your shoulder, whilst the truck got into position to prep for the lift. The next step was to go over the whole mast checking all the split pins and taping all the fittings to ensure no sharp edges could bring undone all the hard work.

 

006_zpsvddr017e.jpg

 

The crane operator was excellent but sloooow, it took a good hour for him to be in situ and ready for the lift, but I would prefer that to a cowboy that was only interested in getting it done and pissing off, so I can't complain. Antoine fashioned a rope sling for the mast to connect to the hook, and some raised eyebrows from the crane operator ensued as he pulled out a wad of big padded slings, with Antoine on one side waving them all off and the crane guy staring at our lovely shiny cf mast, shaking his head and I am sure thinking "oh well, if these guys don't care not my problem". We did a test where the crane boom was positioned over the boat, max weights were read and noted down (at the range of the boom and boat position, the crane could handle a max of 2.3 tonne. Eyeyrows raised again when I told him the mast and shrouds totalled 170kgs, so tolerance checks completed, we were ready for the lift.

 

With one guy holding the furler base to keep it banging on the mast through the lift, and a simple tether to the base of the mast , we raised it to the point where you could still grip the base of the mast and the guys with the furler had sufficient height to not having it drag across the concrete if he lost control, the boom swung through 180 degrees and we walked her around, passing off to a guy on the deck as we all scrambled on board to ready the pins for the shrouds and forestay.

 

014_zpswue18qqy.jpg

 

 

The mast was positioned over the step and a hold position at 2', while we connected the wiring to the pre-run mouse and one of the guys slipped below and pulled all the wiring through as we carefully lowered it down to meet the step. The wiring runs through double conduits inside the boat for added protection, so it was a slow process as we teased the wiring out underneath. The mast finally resting on its base, the process from here was simple.

The forestay and furler connects first, this was as simple as pushing through a large stainless steel pin and split pinned.

 

020_zpsbkfpthc6.jpg

 

Once the forestay was on, the diagonals were next, same setup as the forestay, big pin pushed through the chain plate and split pin dropped in. The verticals followed, same connection, then the big shifters came out for the tensioning .Antoine on the port side was counting aloud, every one was a half turn, and the starboard side simply followed his count. Diagonals first, then the verticals, 36 turns later the mast was sitting proudly and tensioned enough for the crane to ease off the weight, disconnect the sling and voila! the crane was no longer required.

 

023_zps5lnennsh.jpg

 

We brought the boat back to the mooring for the rig tensioning, the tide was low and I was having slight palpitations on rudders hitting the bottom being parked up next to the quay.

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The final rig tensioning was an eye opener for me.

We lifted Antoine up to the lower spreaders, then to the uppers, then back to the lowers before back to the deck for tensioning on the turnbuckles connected to the chain plates. This is where the decision on having the manufacturer's chief commissioning guy on site really showed it's worth. The final half a dozen turns on the verticals were done with two big shifters, a 3ft long chunk of stainless steel pipe slipped over the shifter handle, and a huge physical effort hanging off the pipe as an extension handle, the tension applied was unbelievable. Antoine calmly stated that unlike a "classique" hull design, this is mandatory for this style boat, if it had of been a normal rigger I would have probably beaten him to death for trying to overstress the rig.

Up the mast again to check the tension, and we had completed the tensioning. We all stepped back and took a breather, finally she looked complete! The spreaders still catch my eye, they look enormous when you look around at the neighboring yachts. It is easy to spot a Pogo in a harbour full of boats, just look up. :)

 

025_zpsvrmzmmvo.jpg

024_zpsy2ugzsw2.jpg

 

I've got to get to bed and some sleep, we aim to be sailing tomorrow, I am hoping to be uploading some video of her finally sailing. We're all stuffed, dehydrated, soaked, sunburnt, banged up and bloodied, the forecast looks like shit and I can't keep the grin off my face.

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It's a fantastic looking boat! Wow! Congrats! I hope someday, at least a Pogo 30.

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The shroud tension surprised me as well, last year i raced on an Owen Clarke class 40 and that had unbelievable cap tension too, it was quite funny/frustrating at times when the owner insisted there was always tension on the runners even in 6kts of wind. I tried telling him that the mast was going nowhere fast but he insisted. Going back to what you said about fitting back stays for the Hobart race, I've never heard of a pogo dismasting because of the backstay less rig, I imagine it's probably massively over engineered, but saying that most pogos don't race in that sort of sea state but I'd have a word with pogo. The 30s that race in the transquadra have a pin head main and a single backstay. Personally I'd have a pair of pbo or even coated dyneema topmast backstay with check stays (do you have a smaller heavy airs jib set inside the forestay?) that could be stowed at the mast or even completely removed when not racing and lead through a pair of karver jammers

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The shroud tension surprised me as well, last year i raced on an Owen Clarke class 40 and that had unbelievable cap tension too, it was quite funny/frustrating at times when the owner insisted there was always tension on the runners even in 6kts of wind. I tried telling him that the mast was going nowhere fast but he insisted. Going back to what you said about fitting back stays for the Hobart race, I've never heard of a pogo dismasting because of the backstay less rig, I imagine it's probably massively over engineered, but saying that most pogos don't race in that sort of sea state but I'd have a word with pogo. The 30s that race in the transquadra have a pin head main and a single backstay. Personally I'd have a pair of pbo or even coated dyneema topmast backstay with check stays (do you have a smaller heavy airs jib set inside the forestay?) that could be stowed at the mast or even completely removed when not racing and lead through a pair of karver jammers

They do a removable topmast set of backstays for the 30 with the carbon backstayless rig. These are just for tuning forestay tension though, not to provide structural strength (hence no checkstays). They may well do similar for the 40.

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The shroud tension surprised me as well, last year i raced on an Owen Clarke class 40 and that had unbelievable cap tension too, it was quite funny/frustrating at times when the owner insisted there was always tension on the runners even in 6kts of wind. I tried telling him that the mast was going nowhere fast but he insisted. Going back to what you said about fitting back stays for the Hobart race, I've never heard of a pogo dismasting because of the backstay less rig, I imagine it's probably massively over engineered, but saying that most pogos don't race in that sort of sea state but I'd have a word with pogo. The 30s that race in the transquadra have a pin head main and a single backstay. Personally I'd have a pair of pbo or even coated dyneema topmast backstay with check stays (do you have a smaller heavy airs jib set inside the forestay?) that could be stowed at the mast or even completely removed when not racing and lead through a pair of karver jammers

 

 

Agreed. I would feel much more comfortable going across oceans with runners/checks, like Jinja here in Transatlantic race.

post-57849-0-37195400-1452022330_thumb.jpg

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The shroud tension surprised me as well, last year i raced on an Owen Clarke class 40 and that had unbelievable cap tension too, it was quite funny/frustrating at times when the owner insisted there was always tension on the runners even in 6kts of wind. I tried telling him that the mast was going nowhere fast but he insisted. Going back to what you said about fitting back stays for the Hobart race, I've never heard of a pogo dismasting because of the backstay less rig, I imagine it's probably massively over engineered, but saying that most pogos don't race in that sort of sea state but I'd have a word with pogo. The 30s that race in the transquadra have a pin head main and a single backstay. Personally I'd have a pair of pbo or even coated dyneema topmast backstay with check stays (do you have a smaller heavy airs jib set inside the forestay?) that could be stowed at the mast or even completely removed when not racing and lead through a pair of karver jammers

 

 

Agreed. I would feel much more comfortable going across oceans with runners/checks, like Jinja here in Transatlantic race.

 

 

there was a pogo 12.50 listed on yachworld maybe a year ago with runners/checkstays fitted.

 

interestingly, it also had the twin wheel setup rather than tillers.

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There is also a pogo 12.50 that measures as a class 40 but can't remember which bow number it is, will probably have backstays. I still love the idea of removing them for chilled sailing

 

Edit: the boat is number 114, pictured here

post-42706-0-05159100-1452035292_thumb.jpeg

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I love the 12.50. Thanks Shaggy for sharing everything.

 

This is Lupi, i think it had a taller rig than standard 12.50 and some internal modifications for class 40 box rule.

 

 

post-57849-0-07464300-1452054461_thumb.jpg

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I don't know how to link video, so I hope this works!
The forecast was for a 5-10 westerly in the morning, trending to a 10-15 northerly in the afternoon. We're east coast, so all good. We were still half an hour from low tide, so we kept the keel up and measured the depth through the leads and east to head outside the inner islands. The marina channel looked ominous in spots, and I mentally ticked for future reference to lift the keel before entering the outer leads. The boat feels nimble, even with the keel up. More roll in seas, of course, and more leeward movement in a crosswind when docking, but not bad if you know what you're doing, which I don't yet.

We did have a good run with all the sails except the staysail, and hence no reefing of the staysail. We simply ran out of time, but we had a good solid 4 odd hours on the water snuffing, furling, reefing, tacking, gybing, in short, having an absolutely fat time.

 

https://youtu.be/I1mUo0VaPMg

 

Some surprises:
-6knt boat speed in 7knt true. :)
-Points comfortably in flat water up to 38 TWA :). Slower VMG, but nice to absorb gusts when you're on the edge of the sail max wind speed.45-49 is good VMG.
-Planes at 14kn TWS with 8pob. :)
-Setting a reef I can only describe as a hot knife through butter. In 16-20 knots, it is smooth and easy, ease mainsheet and halyard, (there was noticeably no leach flogging), dedicated hanks on the mast connect to the reef ring, and you take up. Then take up the reef line, There was one issue here, I felt more comfortable adjusting the lazy jacks prior to lower the boom bag to see the reef line. It is only one knot to undo, so it is not a big deal.
-You don't luff up to reef, you bear away, but if you blow the halyard the sail will be on the boom in seemingly seconds.

Overall, I have a lot of learning which is the fun part, but the first outing is ticked off without damage, injuries or any maintenance tasks. That's as good a start as I can hope for.

Edit: Sorry, there was an outstanding task, there's a slight hum from the rudders, when the windward is still in the water, so I need to look at the toe-in.

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Must be a good feeling to know EVERY line, sail, hose, wire etc is brand spanking new.

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What a magnificent boat.

 

Thanks for sharing the process here, it's been a joy to follow this thread.

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Shaggy, congrat.

 

Maybe some mesh panels in hte bag to see the reefline ?

 

Its fun way of reefing bearing down. I am used to see some frowns if I start the process. WTF is he doing...

But when sailing upwinnd I still reef upwind LOL.,

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i can't friggin believe it ! congrats buddy !!

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