shaggybaxter

Construction of a Pogo 12.50

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Still loving this thread Shaggy. Looks like the boat has really delivered the goods sailing wise. I can't believe you were getting 20 knots with the anchor still in the bow. Superb!!

Regarding the rudder issue. I feel your pain.. I will take your little scratch and up your bid to a complete rudder tip.. (The keel wasn't too flash either..)

 

 

 

 

 

Never laugh at other people's groundings. Ya just never know what's around the corner (Or in the middle of the bay...)

 

Is that Marshal Law?

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:).

So, after 6 months, we'v had a feel for the boat enough to try some things. The only things to date I can find I need to do are:

i) Tweakers for the loose luffed sails, and

ii) Inner barber hauler position for light air close hauled work..

Due to its design philosophy, the 12.50 has a sheeting angle that is quite wide. I spoke with Structures about potentially where on the cabin top I could position saddles for the barber hauler, and they suggested before drilling holes in the boat to try a lashing from the mast step. Looking at the position layout, it looks doable.

Regards the tweakers, there is a formed toe rail that is part of the deck mould, so no aluminium strip with hole positions.I checked underneath, the stanchion bases are certainly solid enough so this looks like the go.

 

During the week I got of pair of Antil rings, some Ronstan Series 40 Orbit blocks. It's the weekend, it's a nice day, so we'll head down the boat and see if we can work out the layup, on a day like this I can think of a lot of worst things to do. :)

 

More and more I find myself having to place the jib track right on the roof. The combination of a small jib and a large mainsail.

post-32003-0-55914000-1470518389_thumb.jpg

post-32003-0-47882700-1470518475_thumb.jpg

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Hi South,

The PC is from Rom-arrange, ruggedised, fanless etc etc. To date it hasn't missed a beat, it is running Adrena , AIS and Nke inputs and it is running Windows even!

Pulls nothing in the way of power.

The engine is a Volvo Penta 30 hp mate.

Cheers SB, I'll have a look at the PC, the Panasonics are a bit too pricey around here. Sounds like you should up your security a bit, judging by the last post.

 

On the engine front it looks like it's 2 - 0 to Lombardini on our build

 

Lombardini Pros:

 

Light weight

Cheap

Electronic stop

Economical

Reliable

 

Cons:

NVH is bad due to alloy head, not as smooth as a Yanmar or Volvo

Corrosion

Parts hard to find

Some quality is a bit ordinary such as motor mounts

 

Thanks for the comments Muppet. I agree with the cons, we'll have to deal with them, but for now the weight advantage is the over-riding factor.

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You are so going to regret that.

I take it you have only had Yanmars in your boats

I will have a Grandma in mine and you still have not sent me an order form!

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So, with all the pieces in place, and everyone booked, our rudder repair plan swung into action this week to enable us to commence the delivery trip to Hammo next Monday. We had the lift crane organised for Tuesday 8am lift, the hardstand booked for 5 days to enable the rudder to drain and the repair work, then refloating this Saturday for a test sail on Sunday.

 

So, on Tuesday morning all the players rolled up at RQYS, but before we even started we hit a wee problem. Sitting down with Graeme from the marina to discuss the details before the lift, I realised I had forgotten to let them know Fusion is a lift keel.

This caused some issues, of course, as in the hardstand area you normally stand the boat on its keel with props bracing the hull, which I can’t do with the keel up. The lifting dock is too shallow for me to have the keel down, and to try and lower the keel hanging in the slings is decidedly not a good idea, with 1600kgs swinging over a 3mtrs radius it is too much weight transfer to be safe.

One more lesson learnt and it was my fault, I simply forgot this important bit in the race to prep everything for Monday departure date.

 

Plan B time. RQ do have a cradle for this sort of thing, so we grabbed the tape measure and went to measure everything just to make sure she’d fit ok. The hull rests on horizontal beams in the cradle which are through bolted to 4 x vertical arms that protrude outward and upward. Cool, the wider you want to go you simply moving the horizontal beams upwards through a series of bolt holes punched all the way up the vertical arms. All sweet, except….

the cradle max setting was 4.2mtrs. We were 30cm too wide at 4.5mtrs beam to fit inside the arms.

 

Bugger. Plan B is out. Ok Shaggy, it’s time for Plan C, which was Rivergate, about 12nm away up in the Brisbane River. This is where for example Black Jack and Wedgetail come out so they could easily accommodate our size, but this meant booking the hardstand access, getting the boat up there and back, doing the repair, and do it all before Sunday’s planned test sail. Not looking good.

Then Graeme, our lift operator, jumped on the phone to the marina manager David, who turned up 15 mins later and quickly came up with a Plan D. They didn’t need the lift crane till the next morning, so he kindly offered to leave Fusion hanging in the slings the rest of Tuesday and overnight till Wednesday morning, which tied up their lift crane of course. This would give us enough time to drop the rudder out, which now would go to Amity’s workshop to drain and be repaired, whilst also grinding out and repairing some unexpected keel damage before dropping us back in this morning for the 30mtr trip back to our mooring, sans one rudder.

 

David then organized a new lift for Saturday morning free of charge to lift her again, leave her hanging in the straps for us while we madly fit the repaired rudder, then drop her back in, leaving us back in our schedule for our delivery crew test sail on Sunday. I looked around our makeshift committee meeting, heads nodding all round. This could actually work.

 

image_zpslhfems2r.jpeg

 

The boat was lifted, and we got our first look at the rudder damage, aside from the chunk it had torn out it had bent the damaged section slightly to port. After a cursory inspection it looked like a simple repair, grind out the cracked and bent section and then re-glass, epoxy and sand.

 

IMG_0430_zpsmgm1mqdd.jpg

 

The rudder was ridiculously easy to drop out of the boat, less than 5 minutes, two bolts that anchor it to the steering arm assy, a pinned bolt in the upper quadrant with nylon spacers and she was out and off to the shop.The attention then turned to the keel. When we had run aground I thought innocuously on a sand bank, we had managed to knock a chunk of the leading lower edge of the keel, exposing the lead core. Ugly, and no longer the beautiful streamlined shape she once was, no way were we going to Hammo like that, so so that had to be ground back, filled and repaired as well.

 

We were scheduled to drop back in the next morning, so Ben from Amity swung into action, working through till dark and back at 6 the next morning. Result, one repaired and reshaped keel, with only enough time for a sealing layer, no time for even antifoul. As soon as we get back I'll organise another lift and I'll get Ben to fair the keel with a layer of Kevlar or glass for some added protection before antifoul goes on. I could kiss that man.

 

image_zpszsilpd2x.jpeg

image_zpshwuoanir.jpeg

 

I have to give a big thank you to the guys in the marina at RQYS, they not only went out of their way to help us, but did so willingly and enthusiastically. So to David, Graham, Scotty and the boys, a big thank you, they make the difference from a club being just somewhere you park your ride, to really embodying what a club is about.

Props also to Ben from Amity boats, not only is his quality of work excellent and knowledge first rate, but without me even asking he was on site at 6am this morning finishing the keel to meet the thrown together plan.

image_zpsnwk8oebz.jpeg

 

It’s guys like this, in times like this, that restore your faith in the human spirit. Thanks to all for the assist. Roll on Saturday.

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Did they also agree to remove the offending rock so this never happens again?

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Some random pics.....

Rig showing the upper padeyes for the gennaker and spinnaker halyards

image_zpss20ymdgb.jpeg

 

Rudder tip protrudes out a fair way, only just shy of the beam by 8-10"

image_zpstanlhiot.jpeg

 

Pretty unique keel shape and lines.

image_zpshfm6d9kd.jpeg

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Did they also agree to remove the offending rock so this never happens again?

 

G'day Rush,

I'm going to look at moving the boat. That berth would be best suited to a stinkboat, it's just too easy to catch that bloody boat ramp. I am hoping they can find me a spot, I really don't want to be doing this every 6 months.

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Well done Shaggy on your plan D, these wide boats certainly make life interesting. We have about 5 cm play to get ours out between the building columns and will still have to remove a roller door and some structure.

 

I see your appendages were painted grey, that was just asking for trouble, I hope you'll put that to rights

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The rudder is finished! The antifoul going on today, we'll grab it tomorrow and have it ready for the lift and install Saturday morning. An interesting trait to the rudders is the trailing edge is bevelled off to one side to a fairly sharp point, this is to reduce cavitation.

IMG_2801_zpsthriigcu.jpg

IMG_2800_zpsxdhz5ewk.jpg

image_zps8v84ek1w.jpeg

image_zpsnlx1wjws.jpeg

 

3 days to go, provisioning will take place on Sunday, we're hoping to be off the dock early Monday am.

Last look the weather gods were smiling on us, the forecast looks Pogo friendly, 20-30 knots at 120TWA for the first 48 hours :). I swore I wasn't going to push it, but I am interested enough to see what distance we can cover in a 24 hour window.

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The rudder is finished! The antifoul going on today, we'll grab it tomorrow and have it ready for the lift and install Saturday morning. An interesting trait to the rudders is the trailing edge is bevelled off to one side to a fairly sharp point, this is to reduce cavitation.

IMG_2801_zpsthriigcu.jpg

IMG_2800_zpsxdhz5ewk.jpg

image_zps8v84ek1w.jpeg

image_zpsnlx1wjws.jpeg

 

3 days to go, provisioning will take place on Sunday, we're hoping to be off the dock early Monday am.

Last look the weather gods were smiling on us, the forecast looks Pogo friendly, 20-30 knots at 120TWA for the first 48 hours :). I swore I wasn't going to push it, but I am interested enough to see what distance we can cover in a 24 hour window.

way to bounce back buddy. congrats and GOOD LUCK !!!

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Saw the boat in the water at RQYS late last week (got a thirty minute pass from visiting the grandkids). It's a beautiful machine. Say, can I borrow it for the Transpacific Yacht Race (Transpac) next year? We'll take really, really good care of it!

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Hey Shagmiester I see the breeze is going a bit softer now unless you get out of the rack early Monday and chase it north...have a good trip son.

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Dear JS,

Don't you dare. I have been having a woody over the forecast for the last 2 days.

It cannot be. It simply cannot be. The gods would not be that cruel.

Thanks for the well wishes, I may need them.

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Well done Shaggy on your plan D, these wide boats certainly make life interesting. We have about 5 cm play to get ours out between the building columns and will still have to remove a roller door and some structure.

 

I see your appendages were painted grey, that was just asking for trouble, I hope you'll put that to rights

There ya go South, we put a black stripe on it for ya. Actually we had no idea what antifoul the grey was, and we didn't have the time to find out, so black it is :)

image_zpsasobgvyb.jpeg

 

I was worried about aligning the rudders correctly, but one of the bolts that connect the steering arm to the shaft is drilled straight through the shaft. Instant alignment :) took all of 10 minutes from out of the boat to job finished.

image_zpss89ucndu.jpeg

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Saw the boat in the water at RQYS late last week (got a thirty minute pass from visiting the grandkids). It's a beautiful machine. Say, can I borrow it for the Transpacific Yacht Race (Transpac) next year? We'll take really, really good care of it!

Hi Hawaiidart,

What the hell , why not? Just leave a gaggle of suitably clad nubile young Sth pacific island girls at the dock, and we'll call it evens.

Hopefully the last time I see her like this for a while.

image_zpsaw7n9xcm.jpeg

Rudder is done, keel is faired, 20 x odd cartons stacked in the technical area as we're too tight to pay Hammo prices for alcohol, we're down to the frilly bits.

We're aiming to get off early about 7am, as JS said, I don't want to miss the weather window.

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The top of the rudder shaft is stamped JP3 (as well as POGO 12.50 and something else). Does JP3 manufacture the shaft?

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The top of the rudder shaft is stamped JP3 (as well as POGO 12.50 and something else). Does JP3 manufacture the shaft?

Hi J28,

Yes mate, I think the bearing assemblies and shaft are from Jp3 in France. The rudders themselves are done in house.

I am surprised at the ease in which you can pull the rudders, 3 bolts and she's in your hands.

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Have a blast Shaggy! Will there be reports daily?

Will do our best mate, GoPro is on the rail.

Heh! Look at my poor waterline :( the 300 kgs of alcohol in the starboard stowage is a bit obvious . Lucky it's a starboard reach :)

image_zpsecoqfbze.jpeg

image_zpsssaozjuu.jpeg

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Shaggy don't get too depressed about the softer conditions in the morning...it will pick up to around 25k+ in the afternoon up the track and then your first gate is Breaksea before midnight Monday and once through that your home and hosed as it will then soften behind you all the way if your so inclined doing a drag race either for a big dick 40' 24hr number or all the way through to Hammo. Then again pull in to say Island Head Crk and get on the piss and do some fishin.

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Well, we're sitting in Gladstone to drop off one of the crew that wasn't well, and suffice to say we got our weather window, and then supersized it.

The forecast was nice but not anything too worry about as long as we got away early as we didn't want it to lighten off. The reality was oh fuck me different. Getting out of the bay was all cool, high 20's , after that, fuck all under 30, maxing out to 44 knots. The seas were confused and lumpy, and little clouds waiting to pounce just to stir the shit.

A new driver managed to crack the 22 knot barrier, penalty was we broke a door handle and a trim. She was handling like a dream, next time we'll try the third reef. .

Sails and shit everywhere, tired crew, but all is well. I'm grinning like a chesire cat. Bring it on.

More soon.

SB

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How did the alchol fair no cracked bottles ? ,Did you have to shift the ballast or try lightning the load ?

How about a selfie all sitting down below having a rumbo in that breeze

Must be a record speed for a cruiser 22kt with all that ballast.

Are you going up the inside of curtis island ?

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How did the alchol fair no cracked bottles ? ,Did you have to shift the ballast or try lightning the load ?

How about a selfie all sitting down below having a rumbo in that breeze

Must be a record speed for a cruiser 22kt with all that ballast.

Are you going up the inside of curtis island ?

Would not recommend the narrows with a boat that size if you haven't been before. it dries in spots, and you would be keel ip for a lot of the trip. North passage out of the harbour is a good bet, cuts the worst bit off the trip

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How did the alchol fair no cracked bottles ? ,Did you have to shift the ballast or try lightning the load ?

How about a selfie all sitting down below having a rumbo in that breeze

Must be a record speed for a cruiser 22kt with all that ballast.

Are you going up the inside of curtis island ?

Would not recommend the narrows with a boat that size if you haven't been before. it dries in spots, and you would be keel ip for a lot of the trip. North passage out of the harbour is a good bet, cuts the worst bit off the trip
Narrows is no big deal as it is springs right now but it is quicker in that boat just to go out the North Passage like you said and send it.

 

Don't break anything Shaggy!

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We never took the a40 through the narrows, not worth it. Less risky with the swinger on the pogo, but it doesn't sound very manoeuvrable with keel up, its windy, and there are clouds of mossies and sandies infesting the whole trip.

Plus the run up Curtis is always fun and fast.

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So, with all the pieces in place, and everyone booked, our rudder repair plan swung into action this week to enable us to commence the delivery trip to Hammo next Monday. We had the lift crane organised for Tuesday 8am lift, the hardstand booked for 5 days to enable the rudder to drain and the repair work, then refloating this Saturday for a test sail on Sunday.

 

So, on Tuesday morning all the players rolled up at RQYS, but before we even started we hit a wee problem. Sitting down with Graeme from the marina to discuss the details before the lift, I realised I had forgotten to let them know Fusion is a lift keel.

This caused some issues, of course, as in the hardstand area you normally stand the boat on its keel with props bracing the hull, which I can’t do with the keel up. The lifting dock is too shallow for me to have the keel down, and to try and lower the keel hanging in the slings is decidedly not a good idea, with 1600kgs swinging over a 3mtrs radius it is too much weight transfer to be safe.

One more lesson learnt and it was my fault, I simply forgot this important bit in the race to prep everything for Monday departure date.

 

Plan B time. RQ do have a cradle for this sort of thing, so we grabbed the tape measure and went to measure everything just to make sure she’d fit ok. The hull rests on horizontal beams in the cradle which are through bolted to 4 x vertical arms that protrude outward and upward. Cool, the wider you want to go you simply moving the horizontal beams upwards through a series of bolt holes punched all the way up the vertical arms. All sweet, except….

the cradle max setting was 4.2mtrs. We were 30cm too wide at 4.5mtrs beam to fit inside the arms.

 

Bugger. Plan B is out. Ok Shaggy, it’s time for Plan C, which was Rivergate, about 12nm away up in the Brisbane River. This is where for example Black Jack and Wedgetail come out so they could easily accommodate our size, but this meant booking the hardstand access, getting the boat up there and back, doing the repair, and do it all before Sunday’s planned test sail. Not looking good.

Then Graeme, our lift operator, jumped on the phone to the marina manager David, who turned up 15 mins later and quickly came up with a Plan D. They didn’t need the lift crane till the next morning, so he kindly offered to leave Fusion hanging in the slings the rest of Tuesday and overnight till Wednesday morning, which tied up their lift crane of course. This would give us enough time to drop the rudder out, which now would go to Amity’s workshop to drain and be repaired, whilst also grinding out and repairing some unexpected keel damage before dropping us back in this morning for the 30mtr trip back to our mooring, sans one rudder.

 

David then organized a new lift for Saturday morning free of charge to lift her again, leave her hanging in the straps for us while we madly fit the repaired rudder, then drop her back in, leaving us back in our schedule for our delivery crew test sail on Sunday. I looked around our makeshift committee meeting, heads nodding all round. This could actually work.

 

image_zpslhfems2r.jpeg

 

The boat was lifted, and we got our first look at the rudder damage, aside from the chunk it had torn out it had bent the damaged section slightly to port. After a cursory inspection it looked like a simple repair, grind out the cracked and bent section and then re-glass, epoxy and sand.

 

IMG_0430_zpsmgm1mqdd.jpg

 

The rudder was ridiculously easy to drop out of the boat, less than 5 minutes, two bolts that anchor it to the steering arm assy, a pinned bolt in the upper quadrant with nylon spacers and she was out and off to the shop.The attention then turned to the keel. When we had run aground I thought innocuously on a sand bank, we had managed to knock a chunk of the leading lower edge of the keel, exposing the lead core. Ugly, and no longer the beautiful streamlined shape she once was, no way were we going to Hammo like that, so so that had to be ground back, filled and repaired as well.

 

We were scheduled to drop back in the next morning, so Ben from Amity swung into action, working through till dark and back at 6 the next morning. Result, one repaired and reshaped keel, with only enough time for a sealing layer, no time for even antifoul. As soon as we get back I'll organise another lift and I'll get Ben to fair the keel with a layer of Kevlar or glass for some added protection before antifoul goes on. I could kiss that man.

 

image_zpszsilpd2x.jpeg

image_zpshwuoanir.jpeg

 

I have to give a big thank you to the guys in the marina at RQYS, they not only went out of their way to help us, but did so willingly and enthusiastically. So to David, Graham, Scotty and the boys, a big thank you, they make the difference from a club being just somewhere you park your ride, to really embodying what a club is about.

Props also to Ben from Amity boats, not only is his quality of work excellent and knowledge first rate, but without me even asking he was on site at 6am this morning finishing the keel to meet the thrown together plan.

image_zpsnwk8oebz.jpeg

 

It’s guys like this, in times like this, that restore your faith in the human spirit. Thanks to all for the assist. Roll on Saturday.

 

It’s good to have friends !

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Hope you are sailing tonight shaggy, looks like a stunning night for a trip north.

Hi Rant,

You were right, it was a stunning night. We elected for the North passage, then popped out sitting on 150 twa, conservative trim with one reef and staysail , and just sailing Mecca all night. I think highest speeds we saw was 17 knots, but we weren't trying to go fast, it was just a beautiful night.

One of the boys had a surface lure out on a rod and snagged something at 9 knots. Problem was I wouldn't slow down for him and he lost it 30mtrs behind the boat :)

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With a day of postponements due ro light winds, I've had a chance to take a breath.

The results aren't there yet, but I'm learning lots about the boat , we're hoping for some Pogo weather before the end of the week.

I got a chance to have a good look at a nice big scratch on the port side vinyl sticker, thankfully it looks superficial. We also stuck a GoPro under the boat and had a good look at the keel, amazingly no damage at all .

The reason was on our last night on the delivery about 8pm, there was me sitting on the stbd helm and a mate in the cockpit, having a quiet chat over a coffee. The other two guys had come off watch and were down below asleep. It was a clear night, near full moon, we're under staysail and a reefed main at 150twa doing about 10 knots. The auto helm is steering and I'm commenting on the minuscule movements it needs to steer the boat, even under an uneven sea state.

Without any warning there's an enormous crashing sound, the bow rises a good couple of feet in the air before landing only to here another crunching sound and a shudder runs through the boat. Coffee goes flying, I scramble for the helm , off the autopilot and head up to stop any accidental gybe, I take a quick look at the depth, 35mtrs.

Wtf just happened?

The boys down below are on deck in a heartbeat, looking a bit wild eyed, still throwing on pfd's and harnesses. I hand over and bolt below, expecting the worst. Check the keel, the ram head has shifted forward a good 6", the keel release valve has kicked in and the keel has folded back some 6 odd feet.

It sounded for all the world as if we'd run full tilt into a reef, the crunching sound and double hit sounded just like the keel and rudder punching into the coral. I do a thorough check from stem to stern, there's no damage anywhere. I re-engage the keel , it motors down and snugs neatly into its normal position.

Head back upstairs for a wrap up and to tell the guys were not sinking, and my mate in the cockpit sheds the much needed light, just before we hit he spotted a whale on the surface , very close to the starboard side .

We hit a fucking whale. We really hit a whale , and I hope nobody else has to live through that experience, the noise was horrific , I honestly thought we'd destroyed the keel and a rudder. There is a truckload of them around up here at the moment, and weighing in at I guess 20-40 ton makes you wonder how lucky we were.

The scratch on the side of the boat looks like it was from barnacles on its tail, the double hit we think was the initial impact then rolling over the poor sod.

I have sent a silent prayer of thanks to Christian and the team from Pogo, the keel release valve system actually works, it probably saved us from significant damage at the least.

One for the books!

More soon!

SB

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Wow Shaggy that would have been fun....not. The numbers out there in most places which are on a whale winter migration route are now getting pretty scary.

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I am lucky to have Ian from Hood Sails on board, who has been really helpful in helping me set up the boat and finding the sweet spots in both upwind and downwind modes.

As mentioned earlier , due to the design of the boat, the sheeting angle even with the barber haulers is quite wide at about 20 degrees. I've sat there, scratched my head and looked at ways you can do it without drilling through the cabin top. Lydia recently helped out with an idea, but I haven't had a chance to do anything yet.

Ian jumps onboard, looks around, mumbles a few choice words and runs a dyneema strop across the cabin top and by using the third reef jam cleat on the cabin top, voila! We now have a inner barber hauler position with a much narrower sheeting angle.

I'll be down the boat this morning to draw it all up, I'm thankful, and fortunate, to have a bunch of people with no hidden agendas sharing the experience of dialling in the new boat.

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With a day of postponements due ro light winds, I've had a chance to take a breath.

The results aren't there yet, but I'm learning lots about the boat , we're hoping for some Pogo weather before the end of the week.

I got a chance to have a good look at a nice big scratch on the port side vinyl sticker, thankfully it looks superficial. We also stuck a GoPro under the boat and had a good look at the keel, amazingly no damage at all .

The reason was on our last night on the delivery about 8pm, there was me sitting on the stbd helm and a mate in the cockpit, having a quiet chat over a coffee. The other two guys had come off watch and were down below asleep. It was a clear night, near full moon, we're under staysail and a reefed main at 150twa doing about 10 knots. The auto helm is steering and I'm commenting on the minuscule movements it needs to steer the boat, even under an uneven sea state.

Without any warning there's an enormous crashing sound, the bow rises a good couple of feet in the air before landing only to here another crunching sound and a shudder runs through the boat. Coffee goes flying, I scramble for the helm , off the autopilot and head up to stop any accidental gybe, I take a quick look at the depth, 35mtrs.

Wtf just happened?

The boys down below are on deck in a heartbeat, looking a bit wild eyed, still throwing on pfd's and harnesses. I hand over and bolt below, expecting the worst. Check the keel, the ram head has shifted forward a good 6", the keel release valve has kicked in and the keel has folded back some 6 odd feet.

It sounded for all the world as if we'd run full tilt into a reef, the crunching sound and double hit sounded just like the keel and rudder punching into the coral. I do a thorough check from stem to stern, there's no damage anywhere. I re-engage the keel , it motors down and snugs neatly into its normal position.

Head back upstairs for a wrap up and to tell the guys were not sinking, and my mate in the cockpit sheds the much needed light, just before we hit he spotted a whale on the surface , very close to the starboard side .

We hit a fucking whale. We really hit a whale , and I hope nobody else has to live through that experience, the noise was horrific , I honestly thought we'd destroyed the keel and a rudder. There is a truckload of them around up here at the moment, and weighing in at I guess 20-40 ton makes you wonder how lucky we were.

The scratch on the side of the boat looks like it was from barnacles on its tail, the double hit we think was the initial impact then rolling over the poor sod.

I have sent a silent prayer of thanks to Christian and the team from Pogo, the keel release valve system actually works, it probably saved us from significant damage at the least.

One for the books!

More soon!

SB

wow, that keel release couldn't have been more key than at that moment ! poor whale, that had to hurt .

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So your Pogo humped a whale :) Poor whale. Nice to hear the boat is okay. No damage at all ?

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We put a GoPro under the boat, and managed to dive it parked up at Whitehaven yesterday . A few nasty scratches, but that's about it. I should go and buy a lotto ticket.

We had three boats raft up together at Whitehaven beach for an impromptu lay day party. Great food and even nicer people.

I did something I hadn't tried before, we had one of the boats on the pick and we parked stern to stern with them, with a couple of fenders in between. It worked amazingly well, allowing easy passage between the boats, this was one for the books for me.

One of the boats was staying overnight, so we were asked to take a few more people back to Hammo, no big deal.

The wind was 15-18 knots behind us for the run home, so being a bit heavy we threw up a kite for the extra horsepower, and set off home. We managed to carry the kite through the corner from Whitehaven with a few gybes, and in the gusts she was planing along gamely, which is not that special aside from the fact we had 23 POB, and only 2 were kids, it looked like the beer garden at the pub :)

That was one for the books as well, this boat continues to surprise me.

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I'm glad you're enjoying your boat so much.

 

23 on board??? That sounds more like human trafficking than sailing. Can I assume it was all legit?

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Finally, a day with breeze consistently above 10 knots and after 3 days of very light airs , it was nice to see the boat able to use its chine and beam to good effect.

I find light air racing challenging on a technical and skills level, but just so frustrating. Coupled with the wetted surface are and my sail wardrobe being biased to heavy airs, it is teeth grinding slow torture. This week, admittedly with guests bringing us up to 10-12 POB, the race results have been way off for us, so at the briefing this morning it was a welcome relief to see the winds had freshened.

With a 2 lap W/L followed by a passage race, winds from 9-24 knots , we had an absolute blast, and the crew finally got a hard earned result, with a 3rd in the W/L followed by a 2nd in the passage race, we took a first for the day in the Cruiser / Racer division .

We had to work for it, chasing Sydney 38's and First 40.7's to windward in flat seas and strong winds is nor that easy. Today is forecast for heavier airs again, can't wait.

 

image_zpsvrxdziwn.jpeg

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congrats buddy !!!

Thanks Bigr!

 

3, 2, 1 for the last three races must be pleasing

Hi Rush,

I am happy for the boat we managed to show what it can do. We had the Molle Islands course today, so a downwind start north out of Dent Passage, then a nice angle of 130-140 to the NW to South Molle, the up the western side to North Molle all under kite. The run across to Sth Molle we hit a max boat speed of 19 knots in 26 odd knots true. Then of course, a long and challenging beat to windward in full main and staysail.

Fantastic fun, and we beat the2nd boat by 9 minutes on corrected.:)

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Thought I'd put up a couple of videos.

This was from day 6.

 

Hanging with Triton, a Lc60. She did get us in the end. :(

 

We had fun with these guys, a Melges 32.

 

I couldn't work out what was going on when the crew started calling "wind shadow coming" Then Scallywags appeared over my shoulder. Cool.

 

Pogo'ing downwind, the hum is the rudders , it comes in at 10-12 knots and disappears at about 16 knots. Wind was about 22 at 130-140 twa. :)

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What is the Y rope, connected to the deck and going straight up? (Last video above)

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Gybe preventer/ Vang.

 

The two lines go up to the boom & it's secured to a padeye on deck.

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Well sitting at the airport, and Hammo is over for another year. Met a bunch of great people, drank waay to much, but most importantly, we learnt a lot about the Pogo.

Some of the lessons learnt prior by looking at the way the Volvo boats and Imoca 60's set their trim we got to try and measure the result, some worked, some didn't .

One example that did work was over sheeting the boom past the centreline in light airs, it was more important to get some heel than have the lower part of the leech working. Another was the inner barber hauler position, that seemed to work well even in heavy airs when we were running the staysail, with TWA down to 29 deg, which I haven't managed to do before.

We still got pantsed in the light airs admittedly, but I opted for a heavier cloth for the first sail wardrobe, so that an be improved when we buy the next set of rags.

Breakages can be summed up pretty much by saying the lines were are only real issue. We snapped the casing on the dyneema vang, the solent halyard, and the outhaul. The inner core were still fine, but the teeth in the clutches are just too aggressive, so this needs to be looked at. Just shows the importance of pre tensioning lines before releasing a clutch.

Special thanks to the crew, and there were a couple of Anarchists amongst them, it was a frustrating first couple of days in 0-8 knots, then just stupendously fun last couple of races as the breeze came in.

We'll fly up Friday to start bringing Fusion home , as there is a window where the breeze looks to swing East then North. I'm looking forward to that as much as the regatta, it is such a fun boat to sail.

Planning now underway to lift her at home and check what the hull looks like after our whale episode, but we'll be back next year.

image_zpsqwglemys.jpeg

Photo credits to Andrea Francolini, love his work.

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Heading to the airport to fly to Hammo to bring Fusion home. I'm taking advantage of a Northerly that is estimated to hang in till early Sunday, I'd normally be driving to work at this time .

The cows are smiling, grass is greenerer, a great way to start a Friday, 3 glorious days offshore :)

image_zpsqfpwvhbw.jpeg

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Rantifarian,

Can you let me know if you see the winds swing South in your neck of the woods in the next 24 hours? If it comes in strong it would be good to know, thx.

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Clicking around through the west as we speak. Forecast is se tomorrow, maybe with a bit of puff in it.

Rundle island station is your best bet for wind readings around here, although it reads under in westerlies.

 

http://www.bom.gov.au/products/IDQ60801/IDQ60801.94378.shtml

The rest of the coastal stations in the area aren't worth a pinch of shit for accurate numbers, although they can track a change moving through.

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Thanks mate,

We're parked up in Roslyn Bay as we speak, just got in. Had to motor for most of the day (grrrr) after a spectacular start to the trip, beautiful sailing up here.

There's a bloody great trawler parked up at the fule bowser, so we slipped into a mooring while we wait. A local just said there is no 24 hour fuel here, is that true??

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Hey shaggybaxter

 

We're are you planning to get to next on your trip home ?

 

Are you planning to spend any time relaxing on the way home or are you on a time frame ?

 

Pulpit

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Hi Pulpit,

Sadly, I have to be for work commitments on early Tuesday, so we are aiming to get the boat as far as possible, then get home Monday night.

The aim for this next leg is Uraguan at the moment, and fly/drive home from there.

I'm tempted to just do the whole thing and head for Breaksea, but the wind looks on the nose, which is kind of appealing except for the time impacts.

I'll come up in the next few weeks to get her home from there.

Keen for a sail :)

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Thanks mate,

We're parked up in Roslyn Bay as we speak, just got in. Had to motor for most of the day (grrrr) after a spectacular start to the trip, beautiful sailing up here.

There's a bloody great trawler parked up at the fule bowser, so we slipped into a mooring while we wait. A local just said there is no 24 hour fuel here, is that true??

I think it is. Most people avoid the dock if they can and use jerry cans to the servo just up the road, Mario opens pretty early for the fishing crowd. We never use the fuel wharf.

 

Looks like the fuel can be had after hours if you book in advance, but I think everyone will be home or pissed by now.

Try calling 0419 756 011 it's the after hours fuel for pier one. If they don't pick up now they might be able to do you before the 8 am standard open time.

 

Where are you tied up? Dad and I are dragging our families out for a father's day sail on the gin palace, I might swing past if you are still there

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Thanks mate,

We're parked up in Roslyn Bay as we speak, just got in. Had to motor for most of the day (grrrr) after a spectacular start to the trip, beautiful sailing up here.

There's a bloody great trawler parked up at the fule bowser, so we slipped into a mooring while we wait. A local just said there is no 24 hour fuel here, is that true??

I think it is. Most people avoid the dock if they can and use jerry cans to the servo just up the road, Mario opens pretty early for the fishing crowd. We never use the fuel wharf.

 

Looks like the fuel can be had after hours if you book in advance, but I think everyone will be home or pissed by now.

Try calling 0419 756 011 it's the after hours fuel for pier one. If they don't pick up now they might be able to do you before the 8 am standard open time.

 

Where are you tied up? Dad and I are dragging our families out for a father's day sail on the gin palace, I might swing past if you are still there

 

 

Thanks Rant,

Straight across from the fuel wharf mate, R26. Look out for a fat arsed girl :)

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Hi Pulpit,

Sadly, I have to be for work commitments on early Tuesday, so we are aiming to get the boat as far as possible, then get home Monday night.

The aim for this next leg is Uraguan at the moment, and fly/drive home from there.

I'm tempted to just do the whole thing and head for Breaksea, but the wind looks on the nose, which is kind of appealing except for the time impacts.

I'll come up in the next few weeks to get her home from there.

Keen for a sail :)

Hey shaggybaxter

 

I can under stand the time problem, I'm currently in gladstone working on my own boat a old 1 toner called SeaULater and I'm moving it by truck to the marina on Tuesday morning. So much to no so little time.

 

As far as keen for a sail, you bet. I was a RQ a month or so back with the kids sailing and was baring up at the sight of the boat.

 

Pulpit

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I've been following your thread since the start ,about your thought processes and reasons for your choices for the build.

 

Now you have had some sea time and the novelty has veeery slightly worn off, I'm genuinely curious for your opinion of how you would rate this (style of ) boat for cruising.

 

You posted some great vids of trying to crack 20 knots with 'damn the torpedoes' kind of attitude and the crew having loads of shits and giggles but my questions are;

 

You and your partner are doing an offshore passage,say 1000miles,it's night and you are on your own. What sort of speed do you think would be comfortable regards to noise below and the accelerations involved. I remember an interview with Paul Cayard on a Volvo boat and he said something like ' it's comparable to being inside a 50 gallon drum being rolled down a cobble street'. You are not racing so you have dialed it down but still,upwind,reaching,whats the sweet spot ?

 

I know the open 40's go round the Horn in their races but they try to go downhill most of the time. How do you think your boat would cope with Patagonia or the Aleutions / Alaska ? The Bass Straight ?

 

And finally,how much speed do you think you would lose upgrading the rig and the storage to cope with these sort of situations ?

 

regards

 

Rob

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Saw a square top heading south as I drove into the marina this morning, looked like a nice sail.

Hope you avoided the whales, we saw upwards of 10, including two mothersnwith calves. One family trio popped up just ahead of us, and seemed like they wanted a sticky and swam up close. Getting hard to avoid the suckers. Beautiful day for it.

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Rob, I have sailed the boat and the comments are these.

Even 2 handed cruising it is a 200 mile/day plus boat

Rig is bullet proof and way over spec.

Has more storage than you would ever need remember it is 14 foot wide across the stern.

Sweet spot is anything above 10 TWS.

Build strength again is way more than it needs to be.

You want to go to Patagonia don't change the boat but get the tiller steered version and a good dodger to hide behind as everything is controlled from the companion way anyway.

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Shaggy why did you leave Hammo when you did FFS????..north south windows all the way from Whit's to Bris this time of year are delicate and require surgeon like precision...then again Hammo fees are atrocious and your in a place where you wake up with no kids in your ear...probably a good call then.

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I've been following your thread since the start ,about your thought processes and reasons for your choices for the build.

 

Now you have had some sea time and the novelty has veeery slightly worn off, I'm genuinely curious for your opinion of how you would rate this (style of ) boat for cruising.

 

You posted some great vids of trying to crack 20 knots with 'damn the torpedoes' kind of attitude and the crew having loads of shits and giggles but my questions are;

 

You and your partner are doing an offshore passage,say 1000miles,it's night and you are on your own. What sort of speed do you think would be comfortable regards to noise below and the accelerations involved. I remember an interview with Paul Cayard on a Volvo boat and he said something like ' it's comparable to being inside a 50 gallon drum being rolled down a cobble street'. You are not racing so you have dialed it down but still,upwind,reaching,whats the sweet spot ?

 

I know the open 40's go round the Horn in their races but they try to go downhill most of the time. How do you think your boat would cope with Patagonia or the Aleutions / Alaska ? The Bass Straight ?

 

And finally,how much speed do you think you would lose upgrading the rig and the storage to cope with these sort of situations ?

 

regards

 

Rob

Hi Rob,

After just doing some 1500 kms, I'll jot down some observations when I get home, give me a couple of days, there's both good and some bad .

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Shaggy why did you leave Hammo when you did FFS????..north south windows all the way from Whit's to Bris this time of year are delicate and require surgeon like precision...then again Hammo fees are atrocious and your in a place where you wake up with no kids in your ear...probably a good call then.

You got that right JS! My precision on weather routing needs some work methinks.

I'm simply being greedy, I want as much time on the boat as possible, and with the usual work/life commitments getting her home is much easier on the hip pocket than flying backwards and forwards and paying double the mooring fees .

She'll be in Gladstone for the next two weeks before I can get the time to bring her home, even that delay is frustrating.

Maybe I have an addiction problem? I honestly don't mind if it's on the nose, as long as there's some wind. Anyone keen for a sail?

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The Pogo 12.50 in Fremantle is for sale if anyone wants a boat at half price.

 

Needs a bit of love, Sun damaged halyards, Main in a Stackpack for a year etc etc. Sadly it hasn't been maintained at a high level since the owner passed away.

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I would buy it in a heartbeat......

but my guess is Lydia will buy it quicker than ....I think he knows he will get pretty sick very quickly of that old S&S Defiance lead mine thing he just stumped up for....no matter how romantic it sounds.

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I've been following your thread since the start ,about your thought processes and reasons for your choices for the build.

 

Now you have had some sea time and the novelty has veeery slightly worn off, I'm genuinely curious for your opinion of how you would rate this (style of ) boat for cruising.

 

You posted some great vids of trying to crack 20 knots with 'damn the torpedoes' kind of attitude and the crew having loads of shits and giggles but my questions are;

 

You and your partner are doing an offshore passage,say 1000miles,it's night and you are on your own. What sort of speed do you think would be comfortable regards to noise below and the accelerations involved. I remember an interview with Paul Cayard on a Volvo boat and he said something like ' it's comparable to being inside a 50 gallon drum being rolled down a cobble street'. You are not racing so you have dialed it down but still,upwind,reaching,whats the sweet spot ?

 

I know the open 40's go round the Horn in their races but they try to go downhill most of the time. How do you think your boat would cope with Patagonia or the Aleutions / Alaska ? The Bass Straight ?

 

And finally,how much speed do you think you would lose upgrading the rig and the storage to cope with these sort of situations ?

 

regards

 

Rob

 

Now you have had some sea time and the novelty has veeery slightly worn off, I'm genuinely curious for your opinion of how you would rate this (style of ) boat for cruising.

Ok.

 

You posted some great vids of trying to crack 20 knots with 'damn the torpedoes' kind of attitude and the crew having loads of shits and giggles but my questions are;

Guilty….swoon… :)

You and your partner are doing an offshore passage,say 1000miles,it's night and you are on your own.

Ok, haven’t done a 1000nm passage yet. On this trip which is the longest to date, we’ve done approx 600nm o/s on this trip, 250nm of which was dual handed.

 

What sort of speed do you think would be comfortable regards to noise below and the accelerations involved.

The following is in cruiser mode, under main and headsail. No gennaker or spinnaker and no three sail reaching..

Boat speeds.

· 4 knots feels slow and sticky. Slightly frustrating.

· 6 knots is easy, quiet, you’re gambolling about the deck. It feels slow after a while.

· 8 to10 knots. The boat speed is comfortable and sustainable, boat goes quiet. You’re still standing. Talking is normal. Mile eating, probably the average downwind.

· 12 knots. Rudder whine is kicking in, boat is sitting on the chine, we may be trimmed for cruise mode but in heavy airs under full main and headsail it digs in and accelerates. You’re sitting down now in seas. True wind would be 20knots.

· 16 knots feels fast, it’s comfortable, but now it’s getting loud, mostly rudder whine, but the sheets are loaded up, easing is loud. The boat feels solid underfoot. In flat seas you’re standing drinking coffee, but in seas, the non sailor wife is looking a bit scared, and you’ should be sitting in the cockpit now.

Wind speed.

At about 20knots tws it starts getting harder to slow the boat down. Under full white sails that is. First, you reef, then furl. Reefing is easy. The first reef at 20+kn, then at 28+ we would go for the second. The 3rd I haven’t used yet, and we’ve had a couple of 40kn t days now. The solent is fine till just before say 25 knots, then furl, and hoist the staysail. You’re back to comfortable again.

 

 

I remember an interview with Paul Cayard on a Volvo boat and he said something like ' it's comparable to being inside a 50 gallon drum being rolled down a cobble street'. You are not racing so you have dialed it down but still,upwind,reaching,whats the sweet spot ?

Heh..yes! And,no.

The Yes it is loud column,

· You’re close hauled, racing. You grind on the headsail to an inch of its life, it’s flat and powered up. Then ease. Downstairs the groan is loud.

· A low friction ring, typically the windward barber hauler, is loose, tapping on the cabin top, Downstairs it’s definitely audible.

· An audible, but sexy, hum from the rudders between 12-16, and plus 19 odd knots it’s loud, penetrating throughout below. To be fair, this will be the rudder toe-in adjustment, I need to work out a light and heavy air setting. Should be in the No column too ‘cos it sounds hot.

· Halyards slapping on the mast, or ropes/rings slapping on the cabin top at night at harbour will drive you nuts trying to sleep.

· Hitting whales. Horrible sound, don’t want to hear that ever again.

The No its not loud column.

· Trucking along in 8,15 or 25kn airs, not racing. Burble of water on the hull is audible, but it’s quiet downstairs. Reading and writing is pleasant, the Ipod/Radio volume in the cabin speakers is set to half.

· The hull when its starts planning, at 8,15 or 22kn. The hull is whisper quiet, the gurgle of the transom disappears, silence. (Blanketed by the hum from the rudders)

· The cockpit is big, but conversations are easy up to 20 knots.

 

I know the open 40's go round the Horn in their races but they try to go downhill most of the time. How do you think your boat would cope with Patagonia or the Aleutions / Alaska ? The Bass Straight ?

 

Cruising Red flags.

· Light airs combined with a medium to large swell. The boat is sticky, you can’t generate any heel to unglue, and the mainsail is slapping like a metronome. I end up strangling the leech with the vang/preventer as I can’t stand the slapping.

· Docking by yourself. The bow is light and blows off quickly. I reverse in now which is much better. If I needed to do a lot of single handed docking and predominantly cruise, I would invest in a bow thruster.

· Zippering the mainsail bag is hard. The boom is raked and high at the rear where the bag zipper is. I’m over 6’ and it’s a stretch even standing on the cockpit wall. The boom height is dictated by the lazyjacks. There is a knot in the forrard lazyjack either side, that when adjusted sets the boom height. Adjusting this needs a bit of grunt, so lowering the boom height every night to bag the main is not really practical. I can do it, but it is not something my wife could, or would, do. I just need to think of a better system for the lazyjacks.

· The boom bag fouls your view of the leach reef points. I’m going to stitch a mesh window in the rear of the boom bag. The halyard and mast work for reefing is so easy, it’s annoying when you just take up the reef not being able to see without lot’s of peering through a slit. This should be an easy fix..

· The fridge is 60l which is a bit small for two families. You can get bigger ones, I simply opted not to.

Cruising Green flags.

· Easy to transition from motoring to sailing.

· 4 x 100ah battery bank is enough for me. Fridge can run for 7 days if nothing else used.

· Easy to reef (sans view of reef points)

· NKE autohelm is awesome. Minimal movement in a lumpy following sea, I’m embarrassed to admit by watching the auothelm has helped me improve helming the boat. In a gust or on a surf, the bow will hunt to the port and starboard as a wave rolls through, let it, it will return to centre without rudder input. I was oversteering a bit in comparison, under the autohelm in medium seas, the wheel will move an inch at the start of the wave, then an inch back at the end of the wave. Rinse. Repeat.

· It’s worth noting that 5 people get swallowed on board. You certainly don’t feel like you’re living underfoot or in each others way. We’ve had a maximum of 23 on board back from Whitehaven in 20 knots true, and it was planning happily away under the kite. Saying it here sounds nuts, but I had 8 of my crew and doing the kite is easy, so again it seems to just work. We had about 10 on the foredeck, the rest scattered on top of the cockpit and side decks, in the cockpit, and below.

Part of the Pob coming back from Whitehaven.

P1000143_zpszihtwr6g.jpg

· Fatigue management. It’s nuts easy to sail when you’re in cruise mode. The sail plan is balanced, boat has a 30 degree cruising groove, you’re sitting comfortably in a cockpit with high sloped backs to offset the heel, you can sit there all day. The most tired I’ve been was race 3, a light air race at Hammo, I was standing helming for 6.5 hours, mega focussed, and at the end I was pretty sore in the lower back.

Warning, antiskid is very effective. On knees and elbows too.

 

And finally,how much speed do you think you would lose upgrading the rig and the storage to cope with these sort of situations ?

 

Speed difference. Ok. With the crew and in delivery mode, we had north of 1500kgs on board. We had 300kgs of alcohol. Food, dinghy, raft, grabbags, outboard, spare fuel, spare clothes, blankets towels, 600kgs of water etc etc. This trip was 3 weeks on the boat and we didn’t suffer for anything.

Planing speed is usually at 14 kn true. Loaded up as we were you needed 15 knots of wind. Angles are still good, you can plane with the wind still forrard of the mast in 16-20 knots.

Go forward speed suffered in light airs, at 4knots it feels heavier, but it does normally anyway due to the beam,

The maximum speeds don’t change much, if you have the wind you have the speed. The maximum on this trip was 20+ knots under main and headsail when we got caught out in a little cell, I had too much sail up.

cruising_zpsnkvc3wow.jpeg

Crew lounging around in 20-30knots tws.

 

We had some rainy patches, with some strong gusts in flat seas, sail plan was the staysail and full main at 26 knots true. Boat speed is 14-16 knots under autohelm drinking coffee and lounging in the cockpit. Gust over, back to 9-11 knots.

Average VMG under sail was 6.5 to 8 knots.

Under motor, fast cruise was 2,500 rpm for 7kn, cruise was 2000 rpm at 5.8 knots.

Summary;

Beating into a sloppy sea in light airs is the worst mode. The sail slapping in my ears sounds like tearing up dollar bills. Drop sails and motor.

The pitching over heavy seas when beating to windward is pronounced at the helm position due to the rearward helm position. The angled footrests work, but you’ll notice the boat motion.

Your kid can drive it, or say fuck it and take lessons from the autohelm.

Surprisingly, it had loads of space for everything we put on board. The transom water mark dropped a good inch after fully loaded.

 

Hope that helps answer some questions!

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shaggy, I think I saw a Doyle or Quantum video on Facebook where they did something clever with a double-ended or continuous line for a main cover zipper, with the ability to zip or unzip remotely.

 

Here is one example:

 

 

Cheers

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JS, you have no sense of history, and besides it is the right tool for the job I want it for, namely summer twilghts in Southern Tasmania.

Don't want to spill the pinot you know!

And it is coming up really well thank you.

Besides, sailing the Etchell tomorrow and the Syd 38 on Sunday.

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Does this mean we have to start calling you Admiral Lydia now you have your own fleet.

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Lydia do any of that fleet of yours do more than 10K in a blow.??..seat belts not required I'm sure....pounds to peanuts you will buy Shagmeister's Pogo when he up grades to an IMOCA 60 with a galley and a master cabin with timber trim and an Italian designed CF moulded ensquite/head.

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Scanas, no I am down to just three boats today!.

Hope I didn't miss any bargains!

 

JS not too many places to park an IMOCA round here but if you stump up for one I'll find a spot for you.

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Been offline for a while,but I want to thank you for your thoughtful and honest comments. Food for thought !

 

Rob

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I've been following your thread since the start ,about your thought processes and reasons for your choices for the build.

 

Now you have had some sea time and the novelty has veeery slightly worn off, I'm genuinely curious for your opinion of how you would rate this (style of ) boat for cruising.

 

You posted some great vids of trying to crack 20 knots with 'damn the torpedoes' kind of attitude and the crew having loads of shits and giggles but my questions are;

 

You and your partner are doing an offshore passage,say 1000miles,it's night and you are on your own. What sort of speed do you think would be comfortable regards to noise below and the accelerations involved. I remember an interview with Paul Cayard on a Volvo boat and he said something like ' it's comparable to being inside a 50 gallon drum being rolled down a cobble street'. You are not racing so you have dialed it down but still,upwind,reaching,whats the sweet spot ?

 

I know the open 40's go round the Horn in their races but they try to go downhill most of the time. How do you think your boat would cope with Patagonia or the Aleutions / Alaska ? The Bass Straight ?

 

And finally,how much speed do you think you would lose upgrading the rig and the storage to cope with these sort of situations ?

 

regards

 

Rob

 

Now you have had some sea time and the novelty has veeery slightly worn off, I'm genuinely curious for your opinion of how you would rate this (style of ) boat for cruising.

Ok.

 

You posted some great vids of trying to crack 20 knots with 'damn the torpedoes' kind of attitude and the crew having loads of shits and giggles but my questions are;

Guilty….swoon… :)

You and your partner are doing an offshore passage,say 1000miles,it's night and you are on your own.

Ok, haven’t done a 1000nm passage yet. On this trip which is the longest to date, we’ve done approx 600nm o/s on this trip, 250nm of which was dual handed.

 

What sort of speed do you think would be comfortable regards to noise below and the accelerations involved.

The following is in cruiser mode, under main and headsail. No gennaker or spinnaker and no three sail reaching..

Boat speeds.

· 4 knots feels slow and sticky. Slightly frustrating.

· 6 knots is easy, quiet, you’re gambolling about the deck. It feels slow after a while.

· 8 to10 knots. The boat speed is comfortable and sustainable, boat goes quiet. You’re still standing. Talking is normal. Mile eating, probably the average downwind.

· 12 knots. Rudder whine is kicking in, boat is sitting on the chine, we may be trimmed for cruise mode but in heavy airs under full main and headsail it digs in and accelerates. You’re sitting down now in seas. True wind would be 20knots.

· 16 knots feels fast, it’s comfortable, but now it’s getting loud, mostly rudder whine, but the sheets are loaded up, easing is loud. The boat feels solid underfoot. In flat seas you’re standing drinking coffee, but in seas, the non sailor wife is looking a bit scared, and you’ should be sitting in the cockpit now.

Wind speed.

At about 20knots tws it starts getting harder to slow the boat down. Under full white sails that is. First, you reef, then furl. Reefing is easy. The first reef at 20+kn, then at 28+ we would go for the second. The 3rd I haven’t used yet, and we’ve had a couple of 40kn t days now. The solent is fine till just before say 25 knots, then furl, and hoist the staysail. You’re back to comfortable again.

 

 

I remember an interview with Paul Cayard on a Volvo boat and he said something like ' it's comparable to being inside a 50 gallon drum being rolled down a cobble street'. You are not racing so you have dialed it down but still,upwind,reaching,whats the sweet spot ?

Heh..yes! And,no.

The Yes it is loud column,

· You’re close hauled, racing. You grind on the headsail to an inch of its life, it’s flat and powered up. Then ease. Downstairs the groan is loud.

· A low friction ring, typically the windward barber hauler, is loose, tapping on the cabin top, Downstairs it’s definitely audible.

· An audible, but sexy, hum from the rudders between 12-16, and plus 19 odd knots it’s loud, penetrating throughout below. To be fair, this will be the rudder toe-in adjustment, I need to work out a light and heavy air setting. Should be in the No column too ‘cos it sounds hot.

· Halyards slapping on the mast, or ropes/rings slapping on the cabin top at night at harbour will drive you nuts trying to sleep.

· Hitting whales. Horrible sound, don’t want to hear that ever again.

The No its not loud column.

· Trucking along in 8,15 or 25kn airs, not racing. Burble of water on the hull is audible, but it’s quiet downstairs. Reading and writing is pleasant, the Ipod/Radio volume in the cabin speakers is set to half.

· The hull when its starts planning, at 8,15 or 22kn. The hull is whisper quiet, the gurgle of the transom disappears, silence. (Blanketed by the hum from the rudders)

· The cockpit is big, but conversations are easy up to 20 knots.

 

I know the open 40's go round the Horn in their races but they try to go downhill most of the time. How do you think your boat would cope with Patagonia or the Aleutions / Alaska ? The Bass Straight ?

 

Cruising Red flags.

· Light airs combined with a medium to large swell. The boat is sticky, you can’t generate any heel to unglue, and the mainsail is slapping like a metronome. I end up strangling the leech with the vang/preventer as I can’t stand the slapping.

· Docking by yourself. The bow is light and blows off quickly. I reverse in now which is much better. If I needed to do a lot of single handed docking and predominantly cruise, I would invest in a bow thruster.

· Zippering the mainsail bag is hard. The boom is raked and high at the rear where the bag zipper is. I’m over 6’ and it’s a stretch even standing on the cockpit wall. The boom height is dictated by the lazyjacks. There is a knot in the forrard lazyjack either side, that when adjusted sets the boom height. Adjusting this needs a bit of grunt, so lowering the boom height every night to bag the main is not really practical. I can do it, but it is not something my wife could, or would, do. I just need to think of a better system for the lazyjacks.

· The boom bag fouls your view of the leach reef points. I’m going to stitch a mesh window in the rear of the boom bag. The halyard and mast work for reefing is so easy, it’s annoying when you just take up the reef not being able to see without lot’s of peering through a slit. This should be an easy fix..

· The fridge is 60l which is a bit small for two families. You can get bigger ones, I simply opted not to.

Cruising Green flags.

· Easy to transition from motoring to sailing.

· 4 x 100ah battery bank is enough for me. Fridge can run for 7 days if nothing else used.

· Easy to reef (sans view of reef points)

· NKE autohelm is awesome. Minimal movement in a lumpy following sea, I’m embarrassed to admit by watching the auothelm has helped me improve helming the boat. In a gust or on a surf, the bow will hunt to the port and starboard as a wave rolls through, let it, it will return to centre without rudder input. I was oversteering a bit in comparison, under the autohelm in medium seas, the wheel will move an inch at the start of the wave, then an inch back at the end of the wave. Rinse. Repeat.

· It’s worth noting that 5 people get swallowed on board. You certainly don’t feel like you’re living underfoot or in each others way. We’ve had a maximum of 23 on board back from Whitehaven in 20 knots true, and it was planning happily away under the kite. Saying it here sounds nuts, but I had 8 of my crew and doing the kite is easy, so again it seems to just work. We had about 10 on the foredeck, the rest scattered on top of the cockpit and side decks, in the cockpit, and below.

Part of the Pob coming back from Whitehaven.

P1000143_zpszihtwr6g.jpg

· Fatigue management. It’s nuts easy to sail when you’re in cruise mode. The sail plan is balanced, boat has a 30 degree cruising groove, you’re sitting comfortably in a cockpit with high sloped backs to offset the heel, you can sit there all day. The most tired I’ve been was race 3, a light air race at Hammo, I was standing helming for 6.5 hours, mega focussed, and at the end I was pretty sore in the lower back.

Warning, antiskid is very effective. On knees and elbows too.

 

And finally,how much speed do you think you would lose upgrading the rig and the storage to cope with these sort of situations ?

 

Speed difference. Ok. With the crew and in delivery mode, we had north of 1500kgs on board. We had 300kgs of alcohol. Food, dinghy, raft, grabbags, outboard, spare fuel, spare clothes, blankets towels, 600kgs of water etc etc. This trip was 3 weeks on the boat and we didn’t suffer for anything.

Planing speed is usually at 14 kn true. Loaded up as we were you needed 15 knots of wind. Angles are still good, you can plane with the wind still forrard of the mast in 16-20 knots.

Go forward speed suffered in light airs, at 4knots it feels heavier, but it does normally anyway due to the beam,

The maximum speeds don’t change much, if you have the wind you have the speed. The maximum on this trip was 20+ knots under main and headsail when we got caught out in a little cell, I had too much sail up.

cruising_zpsnkvc3wow.jpeg

Crew lounging around in 20-30knots tws.

 

We had some rainy patches, with some strong gusts in flat seas, sail plan was the staysail and full main at 26 knots true. Boat speed is 14-16 knots under autohelm drinking coffee and lounging in the cockpit. Gust over, back to 9-11 knots.

Average VMG under sail was 6.5 to 8 knots.

Under motor, fast cruise was 2,500 rpm for 7kn, cruise was 2000 rpm at 5.8 knots.

Summary;

Beating into a sloppy sea in light airs is the worst mode. The sail slapping in my ears sounds like tearing up dollar bills. Drop sails and motor.

The pitching over heavy seas when beating to windward is pronounced at the helm position due to the rearward helm position. The angled footrests work, but you’ll notice the boat motion.

Your kid can drive it, or say fuck it and take lessons from the autohelm.

Surprisingly, it had loads of space for everything we put on board. The transom water mark dropped a good inch after fully loaded.

 

Hope that helps answer some questions!

 

Back in the members stand as always...

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Well, Fusion is home at last, we made our home port last night just on dusk, and in true Moreton Bay style we spent the northern end babying her along in light airs fighting the tide with fumes in the tank, then with 10nm to go, the winds went to 20 kn, then 30, then just as we entered the leads it pegged to 38kn.

As the Pogo is not traditionally a ddw boat, and with the wind of course shifting to directly up our arse for the last leg, we thought we'd try it goose winged just for the hell of it.

So, on went the vang, then I ran the spare headsail sheet back to the spinnaker turning block, threw a tweaker on, check the wind, 20knots at 180 degrees and off we went.

Well bugger me if it didn't just work. The boat was planing along quite comfortably and sat as flat as a board.

The fun part though was being able to use that run to gain a better angle for a broad reach across to the bottom of Green Island. With the wind climbing slowly up to high 20's, we headed up to about 130, and the boat dug in a chine and just took off, averaging 14's with a max speed of 15.6kn, not bad for just white sails.

After spending 3 of the last 5 weeks on board, I'm getting the feel now of the various modes and trim settings that seem to work. We've had a great trip, with plenty of all round conditions , and cruising home with sunsets like this, life can't get much more rewarding.

image_zps3fecxho8.jpeg

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yeah buddy !! glad you're having so much fun ! you've definitely earned it .

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Shaggy, I just found this post and I want to thank you for it!

Construction of my new JPK38 has just started and as I go through the steps you recently passed, many of your considerations and comments are super helpful.

If possible I would be very interested to see some pictures of how Pogo handles the watertightness of the aft bulkhead for cables, wires, exhaust etc. I'm going to the yard next week (after La Rochelle boat show) and will discuss the work plan. Delivery scheduled for end January next year.

 

 

post-106179-0-79126100-1474728835_thumb.jpg

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Shaggy, I just found this post and I want to thank you for it!

 

Construction of my new JPK38 has just started and as I go through the steps you recently passed, many of your considerations and comments are super helpful.

 

If possible I would be very interested to see some pictures of how Pogo handles the watertightness of the aft bulkhead for cables, wires, exhaust etc. I'm going to the yard next week (after La Rochelle boat show) and will discuss the work plan. Delivery scheduled for end January next year.

 

 

Stu- New thread to document build of your JPK38?

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Shaggy, I just found this post and I want to thank you for it!

 

Construction of my new JPK38 has just started and as I go through the steps you recently passed, many of your considerations and comments are super helpful.

 

If possible I would be very interested to see some pictures of how Pogo handles the watertightness of the aft bulkhead for cables, wires, exhaust etc. I'm going to the yard next week (after La Rochelle boat show) and will discuss the work plan. Delivery scheduled for end January next year.

 

 

 

G'day StuartXe,

Congratulations mate on the purchase, you must be over the moon!

I'm not real comfortable with your request, I don't think its appropriate for me to post photos with the express purpose for you to take back to JPK.

You could argue I have done a blog with a shit ton of info on the Pogo already, and that is all true, however asking me for photographic evidence and then go to JPK's yard to discuss the work plan, I am sorry Stuart , but that doesn't sit well with me. Besides, JPK and Structures know each other quite well, I would prefer they ask Christian for this, not me.

I apologise in advance if I misread your intent.

SB

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