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wingonwing

How has sailing changed your life? Or saved your life?

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Ok, so we are (mostly) die hard sailors on this forum - curious to hear how sailing has changed people's life!! (Preferably in a good way!)

 

I have been connecting with a lot of other sailors who really feel that the sport has saved their sanity, or given them perspective, or just changed their lives for the better. It seems that we all have some great stories and lessons about what sailing has given us. Let's share some of them and get inspired by each other.

 

To start off - I wrote an article this week about how sailing helped me make a comeback after cancer. It's called Cancer, Sailing, and Living to the Limit.

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Moving aboard Brigadoon started us down a path from just living aboard to paying off all our debt, retiring earlier than I ever thought possible, and sailing around the world.

 

We don't call it the Freedom Project for nothing.

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My parents met because my father had a boat and counting boats owned by my parents when I was younger I have not been boatless for 5 seconds in my entire life. I cannot even imagine the poverty of mind of a landlocked existence where weather is what happens between the car and the house.

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Nice article Jennifer, thank you for sharing and writing that.

 

Sailing has taught and brought me every thing. Hard work, comradery, planning, strategy, team work, honor, perseverance, humility, pride, joy, sadness, friendship, love.

 

Racing and sailing teaches a person lessons for everything you need to succeed in life. I cannot think of a better sport as a primer for living a life fulfilled.

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sailing has taught me respect for nature, for others (ok most others... some others....), and myself. There is nothing like getting a boat in tune with the wind and water.

 

Racing has taught me focus, planning, determination, and pacing.

 

I have sailed with some great sailors, some great racers, and some great people. Usually they're all one and the same, but i've tried to hold onto the best of what everyone tried to teach me.

 

Some of the happiest, scariest, most peaceful, and most traumatic experiences i've ever had were on sailboats........ occasionally all at the same time.... so that's gotta count for something too.

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Among all the great reasons to sail, as a Type 1 diabetic, it's a good incentive to keep blood sugars in control. I can't sail well if my blood sugar is all over the place. Not that it is on days that I don't sail, but a little extra incentive never hurts.

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There are faster ways from point A to B over the water than sailing, but none more satisfying. Similar to bicycling over land.

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There are faster ways from point A to B over the water than sailing, but none more satisfying. Similar to bicycling over land.

 

Or riding a unicycle naked.

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My parents met because my father had a boat and counting boats owned by my parents when I was younger I have not been boatless for 5 seconds in my entire life. I cannot even imagine the poverty of mind of a landlocked existence where weather is what happens between the car and the house.

 

"Poverty of mind of a landlocked existence where weather is what happens between the car and the house" - what a gorgeous phrase!

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Guest Darryn

Sailing taught me that a pastime that had been fun for many years could change as participant numbers reduce. Unfortunately as numbers declined locally the few that remained where not nice people to be around. Rebuilding numbers is not possible as those that have taken possession of the clubs like to have plenty of room to park their cars in the rigging area and elbow room at the bar.

 

I left 35 years of sailboat racing behind and moved into a new emerging sport, the players are positive, young at heart and have fresh outlooks.

 

Don't get stuck in a rut,

Darryn

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Jesus, this place has gone to the dogs.

 

Show us your girlfriend's tits, newb.

 

How has sailing changed my life? Weirder people to hang out with.

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Jesus, this place has gone to the dogs.

 

Show us your girlfriend's tits, newb.

 

How has sailing changed my life? Weirder people to hang out with.

 

Speak for yourself, newbie; NOW GTO!

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Sailing taught me that a pastime that had been fun for many years could change as participant numbers reduce. Unfortunately as numbers declined locally the few that remained where not nice people to be around. Rebuilding numbers is not possible as those that have taken possession of the clubs like to have plenty of room to park their cars in the rigging area and elbow room at the bar.

 

I left 35 years of sailboat racing behind and moved into a new emerging sport, the players are positive, young at heart and have fresh outlooks.

 

Don't get stuck in a rut,

Darryn

 

Well shit...I'm inspired now.

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How has sailing changed my life? Hard to say as there have been boats in my life since I was in Grade 2.

 

What sailing has done is give me some focus and perspective on what is important in life. I realized early that, if I was going to spend my life with someone they better like sailing as much as I do. We now have two teenage daughters (one almost 20) who still like to go on our annual cruise with us and in that regard we are truly blessed. They have leaned to appreciate nature with all its moods and do not need to be connected all the time. Life is good.

 

My dad once gave me a sage piece of advice. He said:" If sailing is important to you and you family, then don't just dabble in it. go ahead and do it right."

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For me it's simple, no sailing,no life.

It was a choice I made and gladly accepted. No going back now.

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For me, sailing is a tangible object lesson for life in general. Sailing teaches that there are great forces and circumstances that are simply beyond our control, which we must plan for and react to.

 

Someone once said something to the effect of, "when the wind shifts, you trim your sails and carry on".

 

I try to go through life constantly trimming my sails, rather than yelling in futility at the wind.

 

I was recently boatless for a period of close to ten years, and missed it terribly the entire time. There was never a man more happy than I when I bought my little old Daysailer II last summer and ended my long miserable dry spell.

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Bob..........How about " no guitar........etc " or " no fishing equipment.......etc" or " no nice lady........etc " and many more aspects that make the next day worthwhile.......sailing etc is great but it is hopefully just a component and not the be all end all.......

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Since I started sailing I find I drink a lot more. And my wife is always pissed off because I'm never around. Win win I guess.

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Since I started sailing I find I drink a lot more. And my wife is always pissed off because I'm never around. Win win I guess.

See, now my wife is occasionally glad I have a boat again because sailing gets me out of her hair. THAT is a win-win :)

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Sailing gives me a greater sense of freedom and escapism than any other recreational activity that I've ever tried.

When I'm fed up with work, society, other people or whatever, I can disconnect out on the water, more completely than anywhere else.

 

I also appreciate the technical and physical challenge that sailing offers. No matter how long you've been sailing, you still need more practice, there's always something new to learn.

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I was playing single dad for a number of years and sailing helped keep me sane (in relative terms) The best times spent with my dad were sailing, numerous races and a couple of trips to Molokai.

 

And I have met a ton of great people and gone to places and events that I would never had dreamed of.

 

And met/sailed against mustang_1 too....among others.

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Sailing is really special. The community is beyond my ability to describe

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Sailing has opened up a huge community to me, that's probably the biggest thing. I can go almost anywhere in the world with water and find somebody I can relate to. One day I'd love to do a trip where every day I go to a different yacht club. Sailing provides a community that is universal beyond any other community that I have ever witnessed.

 

Sailing also has so many facets (racing, cruising, etc) that it can teach you any number of skills, most of which have been covered. From team work, planning/preparation, concentration, to more tangibles of being able to fix almost anything (enough to be on the water tomorrow), to social skills uncountable.

 

I can't imagine life without sailing and it amazes me that I constantly meet people who lead functional lives without ever setting foot aboard a sailboat.

 

Oh, and of course it means I can hang out here with the other degenerates and waste away my days.

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helped me get over a divorce and make some lifelong friends.

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Sailing by itself? Nothing. For me its about water. On, in and under it. I love boats. I own a sailboat because its my favorite kind of boating but I really like some powerboats as well. I especially like small boat handling in powerboats. Small cats (hobie, P, Nacra..especially nacra) beach launching....coming in through the surf....love it. Kayaks, SUP, canoes, rowing, skiffs...I love being on the water in boats. Each has its own kind of magic. I love being on our sailboat on the ocean at night....alone on watch.....the wind pushing us along...stars....moon....hiss of the water on the hull......unbelievable. Surfing? Yes! Sitting outside between sets just enjoying the water. Peaceful, rhythm of the ocean as you rise and fall with the swell. Sliding along the face of the wave....unbelievable. Scuba? Oh yes, never want to come up. I get the same rush just swimming. Sometimes when the wind isn't pushing too hard and the ocean is calm, we heave to and take turns going for a swim. I love to pull on my fins and head down about 15-20 feet then just kick along enough to stay at that depth. Bright blue above and everywhere you look becoming a deeper blue into black as you look down. Hovering mid water just being alive and very very small. Look up at our boat lying easily on the surface.......unbelievable. I can get the same thrill in a pool. When I go for a swim workout, sometimes the pool is empty or nearly so. Slip in and push off the wall underwater, arms out straight ahead, slow dolphin kick just pushing along. Bright sun, shadows of the wind on the surface just dancing on the pool walls and bottom, quiet....so quiet. Break the surface and begin a long slow stroke, wake coming off and spreading out in a vee...breaking the smooth still water like you're the only one in the world...........slip into a rhythm in the water, stroke after stroke, turn, push stroke......concentrate on efficiency and gliding. Muscles working, all negative thoughts just slide off..............

 

Sailing? Its part of the beauty of the water. Its one relationship of many with nature and water. Alone....although it is an aesthetically very pretty process.....it wouldn't be very important.

 

Its the water..............

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Thank you for sharing. Medium is my favorite source for well-written essays.

 

Cheers,

 

Jason

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Thank you for sharing. Medium is my favorite source for well-written essays.

 

Cheers,

 

Jason

I like large.

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Thank you for sharing. Medium is my favorite source for well-written essays.

 

Cheers,

 

Jason

 

Jason, thanks. It's a pretty cool site - that's the first time I used it. I am thinking of writing another essay about wooden boats (yes I am one of the crazy ones.)

 

I had a pretty stressful and packed day - it has been very nice to read a lot of these responses and think about the collective joy that we all derive from this beautiful sport.

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Sailing by itself? Nothing. For me its about water.

Thank you for this, I concur but would like to extend.

Water is a tempestuous environment, always ready to change. The smooth soft fluid you glide through with a languorous stroke when swimming early morning by your self is the same stuff that pounds you when you go over the falls surfing, impacting coarse salt laden fluid deep into your sinus cavities to flood forth later and unexpectedly. The same gentle salt bath you relax in on a hot day can turn violent when you slam into it catapulted over the top with the accelerated action caused by the elegant cam profile produced by your harness attached to the windsurfer boom, or when you skip across the top after a fall while water-skiing, knowing that next skip, or the one after, the water is going to grab you with a surge of sudden deceleration.

The otherworldly beauty of gliding silently through an underwater cave, the seemingly limitless visibility combining with the weightlessness to produce the closest sensation to flying I’m likely to experience in this life. Which quickly shinks to a universe no bigger than what you feel with your finger tips when you are silted out, and just felt line to the surface is the most beautiful thing you have ever held.

 

But you forgot water in its frozen state!

How could you leave out the sheer exhilaration of free falling down a steep gulley in fresh powder, trailing your fingers in the face as you carve your board, every bit the big wave surfer on a hollow face, where the lines of you carving will stay all day. Or the satisfaction of stringing multiple tele turns together, knee dropping onto the rear most ski, the sting of ice crystals exfoliating your exposed skin. Making it back to the lodge, well after dark, with beard and hair frozen, content with just making itback through blizzard conditions, craving / fearing the ecstasy/agony of a hot shower bringing sensation back to your extremities.

 

Or the blissful caress of sharing warm water with a lover, or is that sharing a lover with the ever present cosseting sea. Oops, I’m getting too excited now, I need a cold shower. AAhhaaa….

 

Yep, water has always been a challenge… and a comfort.

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By knowing how to sail, when moving to another country it was easy to find a boat to go sailing on.

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Sailing? Its part of the beauty of the water. Its one relationship of many with nature and water. Alone....although it is an aesthetically very pretty process.....it wouldn't be very important.

 

Its the water..............

Hear, hear! As we probably evolved from aquatic creatures, there is a primordial, mystic connection with humans to water. Some people appear to feel it more than others. Unfortunately I am landlocked now but I spent the first 30 years of my life on the shores of, in and on Lake Erie and spent a lot of time on all kinds of sail and power boats. Since that time I have managed to live in places where I had access to the Pacific Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and the Baltic sea. Due to my my physical condition I am useless on a sailboat nowadays but I have the years of memories to sustain me and thankfully I discovered SA so I can live vicariously through other folks experience here, thank you for that. Fortunately I manage to get to various large bodies of water several times a year to recharge my soul and when I swim in saltwater my body feels absolutely incredible, every ache, pain and problem just magically disappear. I don't think it is an accident that human blood and saltwater are very similar in their chemical composition.*

 

 

*Ok, there is some dispute but that in the scientific community but I like to believe it is true.

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Sailing taught me that a pastime that had been fun for many years could change as participant numbers reduce. Unfortunately as numbers declined locally the few that remained where not nice people to be around. Rebuilding numbers is not possible as those that have taken possession of the clubs like to have plenty of room to park their cars in the rigging area and elbow room at the bar.

 

I left 35 years of sailboat racing behind and moved into a new emerging sport, the players are positive, young at heart and have fresh outlooks.

 

Don't get stuck in a rut.

 

Sorry to hear of the jaded experience. Indeed, there are many differing hobbies both physical and non-physical with which one can become involved, that differ in specific sources of consternation, yet they are potentially there for you depending upon your mode of practice. Back to sailing - I've never been a member of a yacht club, have raced only as a passenger when really young, and crewed on what I think you folks call a "beer can" maybe twice in 1982 and so I have not seen the side of "sailing" that seems so off-putting in the above.

 

Those of us who enjoy our hobby as a pure sport, much like hiking on our own or with a select few friends, are having a ball at it. Nothing to prove, no rank other than "owner" or "friend of owner", and no protest room. Not that I wouldn't mind racing once in a while, just saying that this, as with any hobby or sport, is what you make of it. If owning a 30 or 50 footer that has to be kept in deep water at a club isn't working, try a less exclusive docking venue; a couple of acquaintances keep boats at state park lakes and have more fun than most.... even when racing.

 

 

 

For me, sailing is a tangible object lesson for life in general. Sailing teaches that there are great forces and circumstances that are simply beyond our control, which we must plan for and react to.

 

Someone once said something to the effect of, "when the wind shifts, you trim your sails and carry on".

 

I try to go through life constantly trimming my sails, rather than yelling in futility at the wind.

 

I was recently boatless for a period of close to ten years, and missed it terribly the entire time. There was never a man more happy than I when I bought my little old Daysailer II last summer and ended my long miserable dry spell.

 

Ditto, all of this, with emphasis upon the emboldened. RE: the quote: "The pessimist complains about the wind, the optimist looks forward to a change in the wind; the realist adjusts the sails" might be the one...

 

Between age 31 and 49 more or less, I was boat-less though only from lack of looking hard enough for a ride or a club (when it turns out there's a great little Thistle club right up the road). Anyway, when a friend bought and restored a sunfish to showroom specs and made it available to me, I (or "we") got bitten really, really hard. Those watching me launch from the beach likely saw a 17-year-old kid going out, not some middle-aged guy. That fall, I instantly found a couple of day-sailor sized boats and that's what remains today. It's a means to escape a lot of things and commune with my roots and with whatever one imagines a Creator to be. The hobby for me is hard to share with the little ones, given that the present family doesn't sail (hence, the long gap). There are exceptions who go once in a while, though, as a rule, being a step-dad there's still some butt-hurt regarding authority. And so, my dream of passing this (and sailing's unique way of demonstrating important lessons on life) on to grandkids is going more slowly that I'd like.

 

That aside and with regard to just being on the water under the power of nature, it's a lot of fun and probably the closest thing to sex in terms of overall enjoyment in which one can engage, without raising an eyebrow on any number of fronts.

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if it wasn;t for my boat, my sailing friends and the "next race", I may have offed myself when I was going through some tough times a few years ago....sailing did save me. Last night was my first race of the new season, and it felt sooooooo good. For 2 hrs. nothing else mattered....not work, not car problems, nothing....

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My dad was in the military and growing up, a couple of those years when I was in high school, we lived in the Marshall Islands. Friends of my parents had a sailboat and invited us one day for a sail around the islands we lived. Since then, I had dreams of sailing the Med/Europe and even doing a circumnavigation.

 

At work, I get bored. At the house, I get bored. Sometimes, even though I'm busy with a lot of "normal" and "mundane" tasks, I still get bored easily. I'm an introvert so I don't mind working on things myself. The boat is a release. My mind is most active when I'm working on the boat (doing a refit now) and I am hardly bored. There's so much to do and learn around the boat and I feel that I am most productive on it, no matter how much or how little I do. The boat is a release of stress. I can keep my mind and my hands busy working on something and time just flys by but at work in the office or at the house, so much work happens and time drags on for an eternity.

 

After over 17yrs in the military myself, I feel sailing is a wait to reduce stress and appreciate the little things in life. Daily life can be quick going from one thing to the next without much thought but it's so nice to slow down. It's just so much more rewarding in the long run.

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Most people get sailing passed down to them from parents but I'm a little different (depending on who you ask). My dad gave me a book on sailing for my birthday when I was about 8yo as he loves giving books to kids, and I read it cover to cover about 10 times. I became a bit obsessed apparently, and my parents gave in after a while and bought me a sailing dinghy for my birthday.

This is the cool part, we lived in a very isolated town with a small estuary, and my father bought the boat, a P class, from a classified ad, and got it shipped with a work shipment over to our town. It was the only sailboat in the area but I used to nag the olds into going sailing as often as possible, around the tiny estuary. My dog oscar would swim after me and clamber on board, which was difficult as he weighed about 25kgs.

The next summer mum and dad chartered a little yacht for a family cruise in the Marlborough sounds even neither had sailed more than a couple of hours in their life. Mum had to insist that we actually leave, as dad kept procrastinating as he was very nervous. What an awesome family holiday.

We then moved back to the big smoke where there was a dinghy club about 2 mins away where I raced for years. Meanwhile my dad bought a partnership in a 34fter with some mates. He then started racing it and cruising with the association for many more years of family holidays.

Luckily I knew all through school what I wanted to do, and left to become an apprentice boatbuilder. Weirdly, I didn't do any boating at all during this time so after I did my time, I changed careers away from boats but took up racing again. I have never been without a boat of some description since, and for a good few years had the same type of yacht as the old man which we raced a lot.

Now have my boat on the back lawn, getting it just how I want it, and I find it the most relaxing time when I'm out there working away, as I can't think of everything going on at the moment, I just have to concentrate on the job at hand.

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Nice article Jennifer, thank you for sharing and writing that.

 

Sailing has taught and brought me every thing. Hard work, comradery, planning, strategy, team work, honor, perseverance, humility, pride, joy, sadness, friendship, love.

 

Racing and sailing teaches a person lessons for everything you need to succeed in life. I cannot think of a better sport as a primer for living a life fulfilled.

Couldn't have said it better. I could have spelled camaraderie better. B)

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blah blah blah.......

 

 

For fuck's sake people, take this warm fuzzy "I want to talk about my feelings" drivel to cruisers forum.

 

Anyone have a relative haiku they'd like to share? Anyone have their inner celestial being transformed by the rhythmic dancing of the wave gods?

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Since I was three I have sailed. It has been fun, sporting and allowed me to satisfy my artistic tradesman-engineering side of my brain. The act of sailing has also given me precursors for skin cancer, drilled in dark spots and added sun wrinkles beyond my age. moreover It also has slowed my motorcycle touring passion taking away valuable time and money for other world wide passions. I sometimes think I should downsize to a small boat and try more salt and fly fishing. Then I could say when I will be home or not use my entire slush fund buying things that are designed to wear out prematurely.

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blah blah blah.......

 

 

For fuck's sake people, take this warm fuzzy "I want to talk about my feelings" drivel to cruisers forum.

 

Anyone have a relative haiku they'd like to share? Anyone have their inner celestial being transformed by the rhythmic dancing of the wave gods?

Well now that you mention it, yes, I have had my inner celestial being transformed by the rhythmic dancing of the wave gods and in a very wonderful way. I didn't mention it earlier because I didn't want you to feel any worse about your obviously impoverished life than you already do.

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No worries. Once my chi flatlined I've had no regret or remorse since. Impoverished is certainly one way to describe my existence. Thankfully we are all equal under Ra, and I can commit to my cosmic journey with an open heart.

 

 

Sailing changed my life, man! Or maybe it was just an activity and/or mode of transport rather than a religion. Could go either way.

 

 

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blah blah blah.......

 

 

For fuck's sake people, take this warm fuzzy "I want to talk about my feelings" drivel to cruisers forum.

 

Anyone have a relative haiku they'd like to share? Anyone have their inner celestial being transformed by the rhythmic dancing of the wave gods?

the boot is way big

it shall be shoved up your ass

you are a douche bag

 

 

good enough?? ;)

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blah blah blah.......

 

 

For fuck's sake people, take this warm fuzzy "I want to talk about my feelings" drivel to cruisers forum.

 

Anyone have a relative haiku they'd like to share? Anyone have their inner celestial being transformed by the rhythmic dancing of the wave gods?

the boot is way big

it shall be shoved up your ass

you are a douche bag

 

 

good enough?? ;)

 

 

No.

 

No imagery, no imagination.

 

Points for being a literal haiku - well done. Surprised someone bothered to respond in proper format - bravo.

 

However overall failure. Nothing to add to the "sailing saved my life" vibe, and also nothing to ad to my counterpoint "this is a warm touchy-feely thread that is the antithesis of Sailing Anarchy"*

 

 

*I will admit "Sailing Anarchy" seems a whole lot less anarchist now that it's kowtowing to the mighty moneyteat known as gunboat but what do I know.....

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blah blah blah.......

 

 

For fuck's sake people, take this warm fuzzy "I want to talk about my feelings" drivel to cruisers forum.

 

Anyone have a relative haiku they'd like to share? Anyone have their inner celestial being transformed by the rhythmic dancing of the wave gods?

the boot is way big

it shall be shoved up your ass

you are a douche bag

 

 

good enough?? ;)

 

Excellent.

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Nothing to add to the "sailing saved my life" vibe, and also nothing to ad to my counterpoint "this is a warm touchy-feely thread that is the antithesis of Sailing Anarchy"

 

Actually, attempting to dictate what fits or does not fit into the forum (especially as the topic is very much about sailing) is rather the antithesis of Sailing Anarchy.

 

You brought yourself to the nuisance; pick another thread if the vexing is too great.

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No worries. Once my chi flatlined I've had no regret or remorse since. Impoverished is certainly one way to describe my existence. Thankfully we are all equal under Ra, and I can commit to my cosmic journey with an open heart.

 

 

Sailing changed my life, man! Or maybe it was just an activity and/or mode of transport rather than a religion. Could go either way.

 

 

Thats cool. Ambivalence is a valid choice. Or maybe it isn't, I don't know. My moment of enlightenment occurred when my dogma got run over by my karma so I can like totally relate to where you are coming from. I have to run now, I need to feed my unicorns and water my rainbow.

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blah blah blah.......

 

 

For fuck's sake people, take this warm fuzzy "I want to talk about my feelings" drivel to cruisers forum.

 

Anyone have a relative haiku they'd like to share? Anyone have their inner celestial being transformed by the rhythmic dancing of the wave gods?

the boot is way big

it shall be shoved up your ass

you are a douche bag

 

 

good enough?? ;)

 

 

No.

 

No imagery, no imagination.

 

Points for being a literal haiku - well done. Surprised someone bothered to respond in proper format - bravo.

 

However overall failure. Nothing to add to the "sailing saved my life" vibe, and also nothing to ad to my counterpoint "this is a warm touchy-feely thread that is the antithesis of Sailing Anarchy"*

 

 

*I will admit "Sailing Anarchy" seems a whole lot less anarchist now that it's kowtowing to the mighty moneyteat known as gunboat but what do I know.....

 

Dude, if you ever thought SA was ever about real anarchy then I want some of whatever you are smoking. Don't bogart that joint!

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My dogmas routinely overrun my karmas. I can't complain they're fucking chow hounds and 100% motivated by food (and belly rubs, but don't tell them that they don't like to appear soft). I'm glad you still have a unicorn - I named mine chuck a few years ago so his remains are in the freezer. They are nice with some fresh garlic and onions though.

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Soak_Ed, how did you kumbaya unicorn? I thought they were a chiefly north-western US type deal, with migrations near the coast as far south as the Mexican border.

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My dogmas routinely overrun my karmas. I can't complain they're fucking chow hounds and 100% motivated by food (and belly rubs, but don't tell them that they don't like to appear soft). I'm glad you still have a unicorn - I named mine chuck a few years ago so his remains are in the freezer. They are nice with some fresh garlic and onions though.

I have since augmented my menagerie with a couple of Labs. They too are motivated mainly by food and belly rubs are secondary. They don't mind that anyone knows that because they are smart enough to realize that everybody in the world knows that Labs are the biggest softies in the entire canine world and there is no sense in pretending otherwise.. The up side to that is they get along fine with the unicorns.

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Soak_Ed, how did you kumbaya unicorn? I thought they were a chiefly north-western US type deal, with migrations near the coast as far south as the Mexican border.

Got a special permit to import some. It was a complex deal that all started when some bleeding heart, Birkenstock wearing, hirsute lesbian lefty from Oregon heard about my Vowels for Poland campaign. It all kind of snowballed from there.

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Hey, no problem with the orientation (as long as I get to watch....).

 

In fact, theyre making a movie where these two chicks go in kahoots - one more or less tormented by the other in the name of breaking her spirit, etc - whereupon the dominant one hides his identity and wants to recreate an earlier effort to blow up the conservative bloc of Congress (excepting that she, or they, succeed this time). People gather together with plastic Lesbo masks so they all look alike and as mirror images of the historical figure whose dream is now fulfilled.

 

It's called, "'V' for Vagina".

 

 

Edit - Sorry for the late edit.

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Hey, no problem with the orientation (as long as I get to watch....)

I hear ya. It isn't the orientation that's the problem, it's the excessive armpit hair that's a little disturbing. I mean really, braids????

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started sailing.......enjoyed it........sailed more, joined Sea Scouts.......sailed across the Atlantic in the Tall ships Race when I was 17......decided to become a Naval Architect........graduated.......moved to the USA......sailed to really cool places and met really cool people........

 

Without sailing I would probably still be living in the same town I grew up in, it would be a very different life..............I've seen a lot and had a great life (so far) because of sailing

 

So glad my grandfather sailed (my parents didn't) and taught me how to sail and respect the sea.

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hirsuite = hairepie?

 

 

Yes, and not like a hairball where it's forgivable (if one is an ocelot) - just bad in general.

 

Sorry, didn't mean to harsh your mellow. My mama always told me SA is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you're going to get. Of course she said it with a pronounced Italian accent so it sounded a little different than that. But the idea was there.

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Words on the interwebs can't harsh the mellow - no worries. Don't know that I can comprehend the Italian-esque, but if you ever translate to Foxfire southern let me know :)

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Before I found sailing I lead a very sheltered life. Never drank, never took drugs, never stayed up late, hung around with quiet reflective types and bullies kicked sand in my face. I never entered bars, spent time with loud people or had sex with farm animals.

Now my life has turned around. Thank you sailing.

 

 

What kind of thread is this?

Harden the fuck up, all of you!

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Learned to sail 40 years ago, there is nothing else I enjoy quite same as sailing. But even after 40 years, though I believe it's a combination of many factors, I'm still not sure exactly why I enjoy it so much, so I may never know...

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Learned to sail 40 years ago, there is nothing else I enjoy quite same as sailing. But even after 40 years, though I believe it's a combination of many factors, I'm still not sure exactly why I enjoy it so much, so I may never know...

 

I think Jennifer successfully explains the "why" we emjoy it, in her article which is now at the top of the front page and says:

 

"The positive impacts of sailing on mental health may be more literal than most believe; people often get “in the zone” when sailing or into what is scientifically called a “flow state”. In a flow state, focus and concentration are at their peak, to the point where a person loses feelings of self-consciousness, self-doubt, anxiety, and even physical discomfort. Repeatedly getting into flow states can help us become vastly happier, more productive, and mindful."

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Learned to sail 40 years ago, there is nothing else I enjoy quite same as sailing. But even after 40 years, though I believe it's a combination of many factors, I'm still not sure exactly why I enjoy it so much, so I may never know...

 

I think Jennifer successfully explains the "why" we emjoy it, in her article which is now at the top of the front page and says:

 

"The positive impacts of sailing on mental health may be more literal than most believe; people often get in the zone when sailing or into what is scientifically called a flow state. In a flow state, focus and concentration are at their peak, to the point where a person loses feelings of self-consciousness, self-doubt, anxiety, and even physical discomfort. Repeatedly getting into flow states can help us become vastly happier, more productive, and mindful."

At least in the broad sense, you're probably right. I've tried to pin it down further, but if I never do, that's fine too. Just curious, and knowing more might be helpful for finding more "flow states" on and off the water. Something for me to explore further...

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My dad was in the military and growing up, a couple of those years when I was in high school, we lived in the Marshall Islands. Friends of my parents had a sailboat and invited us one day for a sail around the islands we lived. Since then, I had dreams of sailing the Med/Europe and even doing a circumnavigation.

 

At work, I get bored. At the house, I get bored. Sometimes, even though I'm busy with a lot of "normal" and "mundane" tasks, I still get bored easily. I'm an introvert so I don't mind working on things myself. The boat is a release. My mind is most active when I'm working on the boat (doing a refit now) and I am hardly bored. There's so much to do and learn around the boat and I feel that I am most productive on it, no matter how much or how little I do. The boat is a release of stress. I can keep my mind and my hands busy working on something and time just flys by but at work in the office or at the house, so much work happens and time drags on for an eternity.

 

After over 17yrs in the military myself, I feel sailing is a wait to reduce stress and appreciate the little things in life. Daily life can be quick going from one thing to the next without much thought but it's so nice to slow down. It's just so much more rewarding in the long run.

Yes well that's all very well newb, but where are your girlfriends cans???? Get them out and fuck off.

And welcome to SA.

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