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    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

      Sailing Anarchy is a very lightly moderated site. This is by design, to afford a more free atmosphere for discussion. There are plenty of sailing forums you can go to where swearing isn't allowed, confrontation is squelched and, and you can have a moderator finger-wag at you for your attitude. SA tries to avoid that and allow for more adult behavior without moderators editing your posts and whacking knuckles with rulers. We don't have a long list of published "thou shalt nots" either, and this is by design. Too many absolute rules paints us into too many corners. So check the Terms of Service - there IS language there about certain types of behavior that is not permitted. We interpret that lightly and permit a lot of latitude, but we DO reserve the right to take action when something is too extreme to tolerate (too racist, graphic, violent, misogynistic, etc.). Yes, that is subjective, but it allows us discretion. Avoiding a laundry list of rules allows for freedom; don't abuse it. However there ARE a few basic rules that will earn you a suspension, and apparently a brief refresher is in order. 1) Allegations of pedophilia - there is no tolerance for this. So if you make allegations, jokes, innuendo or suggestions about child molestation, child pornography, abuse or inappropriate behavior with minors etc. about someone on this board you will get a time out. This is pretty much automatic; this behavior can have real world effect and is not acceptable. Obviously the subject is not banned when discussion of it is apropos, e.g. talking about an item in the news for instance. But allegations or references directed at or about another poster is verboten. 2) Outing people - providing real world identifiable information about users on the forums who prefer to remain anonymous. Yes, some of us post with our real names - not a problem to use them. However many do NOT, and if you find out someone's name keep it to yourself, first or last. This also goes for other identifying information too - employer information etc. You don't need too many pieces of data to figure out who someone really is these days. Depending on severity you might get anything from a scolding to a suspension - so don't do it. I know it can be confusing sometimes for newcomers, as SA has been around almost twenty years and there are some people that throw their real names around and their current Display Name may not match the name they have out in the public. But if in doubt, you don't want to accidentally out some one so use caution, even if it's a personal friend of yours in real life. 3) Posting While Suspended - If you've earned a timeout (these are fairly rare and hard to get), please observe the suspension. If you create a new account (a "Sock Puppet") and return to the forums to post with it before your suspension is up you WILL get more time added to your original suspension and lose your Socks. This behavior may result a permanent ban, since it shows you have zero respect for the few rules we have and the moderating team that is tasked with supporting them. Check the Terms of Service you agreed to; they apply to the individual agreeing, not the account you created, so don't try to Sea Lawyer us if you get caught. Just don't do it. Those are the three that will almost certainly get you into some trouble. IF YOU SEE SOMEONE DO ONE OF THESE THINGS, please do the following: Refrain from quoting the offending text, it makes the thread cleanup a pain in the rear Press the Report button; it is by far the best way to notify Admins as we will get e-mails. Calling out for Admins in the middle of threads, sending us PM's, etc. - there is no guarantee we will get those in a timely fashion. There are multiple Moderators in multiple time zones around the world, and anyone one of us can handle the Report and all of us will be notified about it. But if you PM one Mod directly and he's off line, the problem will get dealt with much more slowly. Other behaviors that you might want to think twice before doing include: Intentionally disrupting threads and discussions repeatedly. Off topic/content free trolling in threads to disrupt dialog Stalking users around the forums with the intent to disrupt content and discussion Repeated posting of overly graphic or scatological porn content. There are plenty web sites for you to get your freak on, don't do it here. And a brief note to Newbies... No, we will not ban people or censor them for dropping F-bombs on you, using foul language, etc. so please don't report it when one of our members gives you a greeting you may find shocking. We do our best not to censor content here and playing swearword police is not in our job descriptions. Sailing Anarchy is more like a bar than a classroom, so handle it like you would meeting someone a little coarse - don't look for the teacher. Thanks.
JeronimoII

VOR 2017-18

2,049 posts in this topic

Scuttlebutt has published an interview with KF about the next edition of the VOR. There is a press conference scheduled this Saturday May 16th in Newport to go into more details.

 

Take aways / comments from the article

- stopovers confirmed: Alicante, Cape Town, Auckland, Lisbon, Cardiff and Gothenburg.

- stopovers TBA: North & South America, China, and potentially Middle East. A bit of a surprise that VOR is considering not to stop in the Middle East. Abu Dhabi must not be willing to keep spending big bucks despite their likely win and nice stopover. Oman was the other option rumored, especially if OmanSail has a team next time around.

- target team numbers: 7-10. A pity KF thinks more teams would not receive enough (media/fan) attention. For a B2B platform like the VOR, not really the right argument. My take is since VOR is not willing to underwrite the construction of the new boats, KF is just being both cautious and realistic. 10 boats would be a 40% increase from this time around. A great success if achieved.

- current teams: no current team is fully committed to 2017-18. Alvimedica was rumored to be repeating. The Dutch as well. SCA wanted, too, but maybe its new management has different plans.

- boat: some refitting to be done in the autumn.

- activation during dull years. No comment in the article. Surely something shall be mentioned on the 16th.

 

http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/2015/05/13/volvo-ocean-race-already-planning-for-the-next-edition/

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i disagree with his sentiments about number of teams. I think if there are over 10 teams, the fleet will open out and some teams will take a riskier routing strategy. It becomes harder for the leader to cover the fleet and you will see more anomalous results over the course of the race, whilst still allowing the best teams to get consistently to the front.

 

interesting that there are 300,000 app users. Not sure if that is a high or low number? What KF seems to be saying about splitting the content onto more than one app / platform to allow more detailed and technical sailing coverage is an interesting development and suggests that they want to make sure they keep sailors (the core fan?) interested.

 

I personally think the VOR in its current form lends itself to an owner / driver entrant. be great if someone like a Niklas Zennstrom or George David entered a RAN or a Rambler...

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Charleston would be a great east coast stopover point. Set the time/route to try to match the Charleston Race Week.

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Oman Sail will be in with a team. Much more logical stopover too.

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Good thread Jero

 

I like KF's attitude on fairness

 

What have you been most pleased about in this edition?

On a very personal level, this is the first race in a long time that I wish I had been a competitor. I’m a big fan of fair sports. Sailing is always struggling with fairness. There’s a lot of sailing races around the world where you just have a faster boat, or a bigger boat or a better rating. You may just be the unlucky guy that has a less rich owner, and for me that is not really good sport.

That’s why I like the Olympic sailing, because it’s the fairest competition in our sport. And to me this is the fairest offshore race I’ve seen, as long as I can remember, and I like that. It’s pure racing, it’s pure decision making, it’s pure keeping the crew together down in the boat. There’s no discussion about choosing the wrong designer, or not having enough money in the preparation period.

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Blah. Nothing about the tracker and AIS, which IMHO is much more important than the OBRs for "engaging the race fan." Good to hear he recognized that the initial media strategy "alienated" some (like SA posters). The pics may be great, but because we couldn't post them easily (unless they were tweeted), they didn't get the buzz they deserved on these forums.

 

Still, there's hope in the "two platform" approach. Will be watching to see if one of those "platforms" will be a paid tracker with an 'always on' data feed. Let the non-sailors ooh and ah over the "what's on my iPod" approach.

What has been learned on engaging the race fans?

The onboard reporter has again had a huge impact. The onboard reporter has a much bigger impact than anything else we do. This is the third time we have done this, and I think this time we made a quantum leaping in quality. The state of pictures and the quality of the content they produce on board has been amazing.

Early in the race we had a strategy that broke some of the rules in how sailing is normally communicated, which worked very well for us with a non-sailing audience, but probably alienated some of the sailing audience who want more technical detail. That’s one of the lessons to apply for the next race in how we need to have two different platforms. We cannot try to speak to everyone through the same channel.

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Oman Sail will be in with a team. Much more logical stopover too.

Hmmm. Although I dislike the media control that a Middle East stopover seems to involve, the routing through the conditions of the Indian ocean and then the Malacca straits are quite interesting and still novel, relative to the routing through the Atlantic or Southern. I'll be glad to hear of a Middle East stopover.

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Key info on the OD aspect. I think he's right that this is "unprecedented," and for the better.

 

Have you been surprised that despite the boat’s being one design, their complexity has led to speed differences within the fleet?

First, one of the biggest challenges that doesn’t get spoken about much is what it took to make these boats identical. What has been accomplished is unprecedented. We did a control measurement in Brazil of the tacking board angles, and they’re all inside one millimeter! You won’t find that on a Laser dinghy. No way. We spent money, time, and resources like no one has done before to make them identical. And because of that, no one talks about boat differences. You know we would be hammered if they found out that the keel was one degree different on a boat, or the mast wasn’t in the right place. We would be absolutely hammered, because it would kill the fleet.

As for the boats themselves, there are so many variables. Their tracking boards, keels, and water tanks, and all the sail combinations and how to use the outriggers. These have all resulted in speed differences. There’s lots of speed differences. In some conditions, the fleet is still struggling to keep up with Dongfeng in how they are able to sail lower downwind angles. No one can figure out, and they have been trying for seven months. Even when they are inside AIS range, and they’re looking at the date [sic; data], they still can’t figure it out. There are other teams that have an edge in other conditions. It’s been much clearer for everyone when you have a one design fleet, because now they know it is not the boat that is better, but rather the crew.

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Two aspects from a previous interview (IIRC the NZ delay press conference) I did not see in the article. Knut said one of the factors limiting limit fleet size are the stop over venues. Some are not big enough for more boats.

Another reason to limit the amount of new boats is to make most teams use old boats. Everyone with money buying new boats for the perceived performance advantage does not help the race at all.

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"this race has gone from really good racing to really bad racing"... Bouwe dixit. It took longer than I had expected, but the bitching from the ones not in the front has started. Another good piece on scuttlebutt. AIS sucks and the VO65 are bloody slow are the two other main messages. (potentially not the right thread for this, but as it might have consequences for the next edition, why not).

 

Article:

After competing in seven editions of the Volvo Ocean Race, Brunel skipper Bouwe Bekking (NED) has earned the right to have an opinion. Here he shares it with Scuttlebutt editor Craig Leweck…
The Volvo Ocean Race has gone from really good racing to really bad racing. The one design format is great but all the rules and restrictions now have removed much of the adventure. The course constraints and event enforcements, much of it directed by commercial demands, has changed what used to be a pure test. It is now so complex. From a sailing point of view, it would be nice to just let everything go and have them send us around the world. While the race is now safer, it has lost some of its soul.
From a strategic standpoint, the AIS sucks. You can’t make impactful decisions without someone following you. You can’t drift out of AIS range without someone sliding along with you. It is rare when you can make a navigational decision without someone immediately reacting to it. It might be great for the public watching the race, as it has kept us close, but it is a frustrating environment to be competing within.
As for the boat, we are all equal, but when we first stepped on it we all said the same thing. It’s bloody slow. You can moan and complain about it, but it is what it is. They may have presented the Volvo Ocean 65 as having somewhat similar performance as the 70 footer we used in the three previous races, but the truth is they are quite a bit slower on all points of sail. There’s less sail area, less stability, less length…all the elements that typically contribute to performance.
There have been discussions to improve the boat for the next race, but that’s not what I would do. Maybe you could increase displacement, because the boat needs it, but any change is going to cost money, and it remains hard to find the money. If we all make the same changes, and we all come together again to sail against each other, what have we accomplished other than spent money?
So like I said, it is what it is. If we had stayed with the Volvo Ocean 70, this edition probably would have had only two teams: Abu Dhabi and SCA. The VO65 allowed the rest of to get included, albeit at a much later stage than those two teams. So the decision for one design was extremely good, and the boat has given us all a level platform for the competition.

 

http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/2015/05/14/volvo-ocean-race-not-what-it-used-to-be/

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^ Couldn't agree more with BB. Probably the most vocal of the high profile so far But I would suspect it is a sentiment shared by many who knew the race as it was.

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I am only familiar with the VOR from 2005 onwards... it would be great to hear from crew/spectators of the races in the 80s/90s to know if safety and $ have always been the paramount considerations. Does the race need to be as bubble-wrapped and "vanilla" as it is today to be viable? The race has lost its personality. Don't we want the skippers to have to decide how far south they should go, when to transmit an AIS signal, when they should leave port etc. etc.? Don't certain businesses (i.e., owners of private companies with huge egos) want to be associated with a more extreme competition that is not so highly regulated and micro-managed. Does the "casual fan" enjoy watching underpowered boats follow each other around for 3 weeks in 12 kts of breeze?

 

Bouwe is always a breath of fresh air---speaking (somewhat) freely and not necessarily toeing the company line. Perhaps the opinions of Pascal, Xabi etc. are as colorful, but do not make it into english print.

 

2017-2018 could be a very dull affair... VO65s will be dinosaurs in 2017. KF should step aside and be replaced by somebody who knows how to get deep pockets to commit to a less risk-averse "life at the extreme".

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[...] Does the "casual fan" enjoy watching underpowered boats follow each other around for 3 weeks in 12 kts of breeze? [...]

 

 

 

great phrase to portrait the biggest issue of todays' VOR

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[...] Does the "casual fan" enjoy watching underpowered boats follow each other around for 3 weeks in 12 kts of breeze? [...]

 

 

 

great phrase to portrait the biggest issue of todays' VOR

 

 

On the underpowered boat issue, let me disagree.

The Whitbread was raced on 9-knot-shitboxes, with "comfortable" bunks and no carbon or pendular keels, yet has that undefined je-ne-sais-quoi that you guys are missing.

 

I'm afraid these days are just gone, and the current VOR makes a lot of sense from many angles (ability to attract sponsors, high level racing, etc).

But yes i somehow miss those days when a boat could be called L'Esprit d'Equipe (team spirit), when trimming was something that happened every half hour, once everybody had enjoyed a good meal, a good nap and a good cigarette, but at the same time the guys were going for an adventure that could last for three or five weeks, nobody knew as there were no routing softwares...

On the other hand, we surely wouldn't get 3-hour tracker updates!!!

 

C.

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[...] Does the "casual fan" enjoy watching underpowered boats follow each other around for 3 weeks in 12 kts of breeze? [...]

 

 

 

great phrase to portrait the biggest issue of todays' VOR

 

 

On the underpowered boat issue, let me disagree.

The Whitbread was raced on 9-knot-shitboxes, with "comfortable" bunks and no carbon or pendular keels, yet has that undefined je-ne-sais-quoi that you guys are missing.

 

I'm afraid these days are just gone, and the current VOR makes a lot of sense from many angles (ability to attract sponsors, high level racing, etc).

But yes i somehow miss those days when a boat could be called L'Esprit d'Equipe (team spirit), when trimming was something that happened every half hour, once everybody had enjoyed a good meal, a good nap and a good cigarette, but at the same time the guys were going for an adventure that could last for three or five weeks, nobody knew as there were no routing softwares...

On the other hand, we surely wouldn't get 3-hour tracker updates!!!

 

C.

 

 

Ha! Of course the Whitbread had that "je ne sais quoi". Boat speed and creature comforts have nothing to do with whether the boats are relatively powerful, unruly and a challenge to handle/sail. I bet doing those peels and dip pole gybes in the roaring 40s while dodging growlers was a fucking rush! So what if you were able to hack a dart and take a slug of rum afterwards--well deserved.

 

I'm not convinced that the current VOR is the best way to attract sponsors for the same reason that it is not the best way to attract fans... as for the high level of racing, yes, it is impressive, but i think the general sentiment is that something needs to be done about AIS to encourage risk taking and independent decision making. Otherwise, we watch "follow the leader" and listen to how "one cloud" makes/breaks a team's entire leg. There is no easy solution, but I think that restoring the "je ne sais quoi" (adventure, VO70-type horsepower, no guts - no glory type decisions from skipper and navigator) should be a paramount consideration for the future.

 

As for technology and coverage of the race, my interest lies in having a 3 hour tracker, live video at start and finish and the occasional video sent from the boat showing maneuvers and hearing the crew talk about tricky situations that they just sorted out, or, for example, hearing someone speak honestly about "a heinous graveyard shift driving in zero visibility with three sail changes, reef-in, reef-out and a couple of fuck-ups along the way." Honest chatter would be nice. Most importantly, I want top sailing journalists to put thoughtful and sophisticated questions to the teams during and after each leg. There has been a lot of fluff this time around.

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"but the truth is they are quite a bit slower on all points of sail."

 

And yet one of these slow boats broke the 24 speed record. :) I wonder how much of the energy of his comments are a little colored by his current position in this race. His team has had less than stellar performances and it is really hard to blame the boat when teams like DFRT and ADOR are figuring out how to make them go fast.

 

Just as the past VOR is nothing like the original Whitbread, this current VOR and future events will be different from before the 65. To say it is a dinosaur even before this race ends makes no sense. It is a one design boat just like a Lightning, Thistle, 505 etc. Folks who sail them would not feel they are ancient mariners and if they don't have the same speed as modern foiling boats, there are a lot of sailors who love sailing them.

Overall I have enjoyed this approach to team ocean racing. I like the close fleets and I like the sameness of the boats and sails. As KS pointed out it puts everything on the team's ability to make a boat go fast and some get that better than others. having ten boats would be fantastic, but I don't see how that might change the overall approach to performing in this race.

 

The one biggest factor in keeping these boats together has not been AIS, it has been the routing software which takes all this data and churns out a best possible route. Every boat has the same software so every boat sees the same thing. Other than the one leg that split the fleet from Sanya to NZ, almost every leg has been plotted and followed even before they leave the dock. BB wants AIS to go away, but if you want the navigator to really take center stage, drop the predictive software and just give them the raw weather data in 6 hour reports. Campbell put out a very detailed review of leg 7 and while not as accurate as his, just stepping through windyty for the week I was able to see a similar route. Predictive software, more than any other technology has been what keeps these fleets together.

 

I second the Charleston stop over (as it is not that far away). Newport has history with the AC, but Charleston has three things going for it, a great sea port that could handle more boats, a large sailing community just around Charleston, but also in the region, and it is much easier to get to for much of the east coast (driving through NYC an the metro area is just plain hell). I'll add that the costs may be a little easier on the pocket. I'd time it for just before or just after CSW so the two don't clash, but feed each other. Given the state of conflicts in the Middle East, I would worry about having a stop over there. By 2017 it could be a land of peace, but it seems to be trending towards more chaos. An alternate to me would be India, maybe Mumbai for I bet they would throw one heck of a welcome (and might interest more Indian to get into sailing).

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the VO65 did not break the 24hr record. 550nm of VO65 ADOR vs 597nm of VO70 Ericsson 4 in 2008.

 

But I agree that speed difference is not considerable, and does not change the interest in the race. The drag race is my main issue.

 

A stopover in India... go and ask Knut if he would like to repeat the one from 2009... it was apparently a chaos to organize. I don't think he wants to go back. Muscat is the likely one next time around (especially if Oman Sail has a team)

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bucc:

 

Bouwe is unimpressed with the boats. The VO70 was a different beast. Enough said. Can you think of any sailor in the world who can provide a more credible opinion? VO65 v VO70 has nothing to do with squeezing the most boatspeed out of either, it is the challenge of managing the raw power that is at issue.

 

Trying to draw some parallel between the VOR and your local 1D fleet of Thistles is absurd.

 

"Predictive software, more than any other technology has been what keeps these fleets together." You're wrong. Have you done any offshore sailing? Do I recall that you are a lake sailor with limited (no) experience on the ocean? Being able to watch your competition's position, SOG and COG at ALL times is vaaaaaaaaaaaastly different than employing the same routing software. I understand that the Atlantic crossing is often straightforward, and (the links to) Campbell's analysis is one of the things I have been enjoying most in these forums, but it is rarely the case that routes do not disagree/change leading up to and over the course of the leg thereby presenting options--regardless, my point is to eliminate the easy choice to just hang with the group. Force a decision to be made.

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bucc:

 

Bouwe is unimpressed with the boats. The VO70 was a different beast. Enough said. Can you think of any sailor in the world who can provide a more credible opinion? VO65 v VO70 has nothing to do with squeezing the most boatspeed out of either, it is the challenge of managing the raw power that is at issue.

 

Trying to draw some parallel between the VOR and your local 1D fleet of Thistles is absurd.

 

"Predictive software, more than any other technology has been what keeps these fleets together." You're wrong. Have you done any offshore sailing? Do I recall that you are a lake sailor with limited (no) experience on the ocean? Being able to watch your competition's position, SOG and COG at ALL times is vaaaaaaaaaaaastly different than employing the same routing software. I understand that the Atlantic crossing is often straightforward, and (the links to) Campbell's analysis is one of the things I have been enjoying most in these forums, but it is rarely the case that routes do not disagree/change leading up to and over the course of the leg thereby presenting options--regardless, my point is to eliminate the easy choice to just hang with the group. Force a decision to be made.

Sounded like Knut was impressed and I think he has some sailing experience. So BB doesn't like the boat, that does not mean it is a bad boat, it is just his opinion.

 

Why is drawing a parallel between two one design fleets absurd? Clearly I was not comparing the performance envelopes, but responding to some thought that the VOR65 is already a dinosaur when there are boats that have a decades long history as a one design class and have had long term success. Nothing says that the VOR65 cannot have the same long term success, but it certainly is a paradigm shift in thinking and sailing an ocean race. How about this, it is a sailboat. BB is not required to sail on it if he does not like it. Someone certainly will. By his own words he noted that staying with the 70 would have basically killed the race, so Knut found a compromise that seems to be working, given the tight racing which makes it exciting for spectators and sailors.

 

While I have no off shore experience, I can see and think and what I see is that when folks like Campbell put up their analysis of a leg, the fleet has followed along. It does not matter that a predictive program may show alternate routes, it will show them as possibilities and teams would want to choose the best possible route. Leg 2, MAPF splits out and look what happens, leg 3, they all take the optimum route, no major deviations, leg 4, BB and SD split, sail a long distance and wind up next to the fleet in the ITCZ, leg 5, they all take the same route even though models showed that going more north and down the SA coast could also work but was longer distance, leg 6 the followed the optimum route with only ALVI splitting out and look what happened to them. Leg 7 is practically a straight shot and none of those lines show any major deviation so where is a flyer going to take a team?

 

I don't need ocean experience to observe that with this VOR it is a OD race over long distances. The boats are the same, the teams are fairly close in ability so anyone who tries to "take off" will, according to past moments, get spit out the back. Since every boat has the same program, the same general experience level and the same notion to win, I really doubt they are willing or able to split off from the fleet in the macro sense and make it work for if one sees it, so will the others. If you split by hundreds of miles and the chaos of weather decides to change on your path for the worse, you are done. The only thing AIS does is extent the reach of eye balls past the horizon for an extra distance which other skippers/sailors have indicated they like. There is a simple solution for Bekking, don't use it if you hate it so much. Ah, but he won't for as much as he might not like it, it is a useful tool to see when his competition makes a change or tacks away.

 

The man has sailed 7 VORs and I respect the hell out of that. Yet because he sailed 7 VORs in conditions that do not relate to what the VOR is today, he does not like it and I understand that, even as I would disagree. The best competitor is the one that adapts to change the fastest and this VOR has changed much from the past (for good or bad is left to the individual)

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the VO65 did not break the 24hr record. 550nm of VO65 ADOR vs 597nm of VO70 Ericsson 4 in 2008.

 

But I agree that speed difference is not considerable, and does not change the interest in the race. The drag race is my main issue.

 

A stopover in India... go and ask Knut if he would like to repeat the one from 2009... it was apparently a chaos to organize. I don't think he wants to go back. Muscat is the likely one next time around (especially if Oman Sail has a team)

Thank you, I had been confused by all the news noise

 

 

 

In fact, the Emirati boat covered 550.842nm in 24 hours on March 30. This is the record so far in this race, and one that makes Azzam the winner of Leg 5 IWC speed challenge record.

Off by 40 miles? That's almost margin of error :)

 

I did not know they stopped in India so again, thank you. Given how well contained the support village is this time around I wonder if there would be the same circus. Walking around Newport, seeing how everything was in containers just made me think that they could set up shop in the Arctic and make it work :)

 

Let's hope by 2017 things have settled down, but currently there has been a shooting conflict right next door to Oman and trying to do long term planning, I would think stable geopolitical areas would give less adaga then hoping things don't go south real fast. UAE was a cool stop over and too bad it may not be again....hmmmm...Iran has a nice coast line ;)

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bucc:

 

Your lack of understanding of offshore racing is such that you have zero grasp on the decisions that are made every hour---think micro, not macro (overall leg strategy). Tack/gybe on this 5 degree shift? No, hold, none of the other boats have changed course, cover. We like what we see over the next 24 hours, we should hold this course... oops, other boats have tacked, let's follow... AIS changes this dramatically. It can be easy to slip away at night from the fleet when position reports are generated infrequently. As the skippers have previously said, such infrequent reports/no AIS allows you to sail your own race. This is undeniable. The "AIS just extends the horizon" argument is complete shit. EXACT SOG, COG and position in the middle of the night...

 

KF cannot comment on the VO65, he hasn't done a leg on one. If the sailors don't like the boat, aren't impressed by the challenge, why should we be? If somebody wants to find out how to make the VOR as appealing as possible to offshore sailors, they should ask Bouwe!

 

What you want is a one-design around the bouys race played out over 3k nm. Fine. What I propose is an ocean race that actually is "life at the extreme" in which skippers, navigators and crew are pushed to the limits of their skill sets and have to exercise the judgment and decision-making that is so integral to offshore sailing.

 

EDIT:

 

I love one design (not sold on the sail framework, though) - just juice up the ride.

 

"Yet because he sailed 7 VORs in conditions that do not relate to what the VOR is today, he does not like it and I understand that, even as I would disagree." You are not allowed to disagree! You are like a child wandering into a theatre in the middle of a movie... you have no frame of reference.

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muscat is far enough from the yemen border in the south to be safe. there are a few places they could berth the fleet - mussanah or the wave (both oman sail bases) although both quite far from old muscat centre. or mutrah, now they have boosted all the container ships off to sohar...

 

the wave is better for facilities, for crew and visitors and close to the airport - it's where the extreme 40s race.

 

having been to both abu dhabi stopovers, I would say they are much better prepared both with space and facilities than we are in muscat. having said that, oman sail is growing every year and I think it would be cool to have the volvo fleet here.

 

I *think* there are licensed places in the wave, although I'm sure the municipality would licence a temporary venue for the stopover.

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bucc:

 

Your lack of understanding of offshore racing is such that you have zero grasp on the decisions that are made every hour---think micro, not macro (overall leg strategy). Tack/gybe on this 5 degree shift? No, hold, none of the other boats have changed course, cover. We like what we see over the next 24 hours, we should hold this course... oops, other boats have tacked, let's follow... AIS changes this dramatically. It can be easy to slip away at night from the fleet when position reports are generated infrequently. As the skippers have previously said, such infrequent reports/no AIS allows you to sail your own race. This is undeniable. The "AIS just extends the horizon" argument is complete shit. EXACT SOG, COG and position in the middle of the night...

 

KF cannot comment on the VO65, he hasn't done a leg on one. If the sailors don't like the boat, aren't impressed by the challenge, why should we be? If somebody wants to find out how to make the VOR as appealing as possible to offshore sailors, they should ask Bouwe!

 

What you want is a one-design around the bouys race played out over 3k nm. Fine. What I propose is an ocean race that actually is "life at the extreme" in which skippers, navigators and crew are pushed to the limits of their skill sets and have to exercise the judgment and decision-making that is so integral to offshore sailing.

 

EDIT:

 

I love one design (not sold on the sail framework, though) - just juice up the ride.

 

"Yet because he sailed 7 VORs in conditions that do not relate to what the VOR is today, he does not like it and I understand that, even as I would disagree." You are not allowed to disagree! You are like a child wandering into a theatre in the middle of a movie... you have no frame of reference.

Just for clarity sake, and this is an honest question, which VOR race were you in? You write like someone that was in the pits, grinding away or working the nav station. Given you experience I would not attempt to go toe to toe with such an advanced sailor, so I'd have to ask how you would have done differently what has been done in this race? You got the chops to replace Bekking so put us in the mind of a VOR skipper and tell me how you would have sailed differently any one of the legs?

 

Knut is the CEO of the VOR and I think is very qualified to render a comment on not only the boat, but the overall race. As I mentioned, bouwe is but one voice of a few top sailors who've skippered a VOR65 in a ocean race so while he is entitled to his opinion, his is not the word of God. If he finds the boat not to his liking then I would figure he won't be racing on it again. Choice, it is a beautiful thing.

 

What I want is not even relevant since I'm not Knut with the power to set rules and decide what type of boat sails in a race. I am a spectator, a sailor who happens to like his format, but could see it tweaked some. Even if Knut kept things the same it would be a great race. Perhaps what you want is a roll back to the Whitbread times when boats left port and at some point found there way to the finish line. Maybe you'd like to drop the AIS and predictive software and let sponsors build their own boats and sail them anywhere on the leg and hey, that's cool too, but currently, Knut would not agree with that either (and he does have some off shore experience).

 

Perhaps I'm not as much the kid wandering into the movie as the boy who points to the king and says "but he's not wearing any clothes". It's all a a matter of perspective.

 

Peace.

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muscat is far enough from the yemen border in the south to be safe. there are a few places they could berth the fleet - mussanah or the wave (both oman sail bases) although both quite far from old muscat centre. or mutrah, now they have boosted all the container ships off to sohar...

 

the wave is better for facilities, for crew and visitors and close to the airport - it's where the extreme 40s race.

 

having been to both abu dhabi stopovers, I would say they are much better prepared both with space and facilities than we are in muscat. having said that, oman sail is growing every year and I think it would be cool to have the volvo fleet here.

 

I *think* there are licensed places in the wave, although I'm sure the municipality would licence a temporary venue for the stopover.

I take it the Palace would be out for that looks like a nice place to dock a boat. From Google Earth the Wave looks pretty cool. Why do they have a street named November 18th st? I see you point regards to distance, and it would keep them out of the Straits. This is why I enjoy the VOR so much, you discover places not normally known.

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Perhaps I'm not as much the kid wandering into the movie as the boy who points to the king and says "but he's not wearing any clothes". It's all a a matter of perspective.

 

Peace.

 

 

Someone with no offshore experience calling Bouwe Bekking the emperor with no clothes, that's just something else. Come on man.

 

Beyond that, of course Knut is only going to have good things to say about the race, as you point out he's the damned CEO. Could you imagine of Microsoft started walking around saying, yeah, some of our products are kind of shit, but hey look at the Xbox. That's never gonna happen.

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Perhaps I'm not as much the kid wandering into the movie as the boy who points to the king and says "but he's not wearing any clothes". It's all a a matter of perspective.

 

Peace.

 

 

Someone with no offshore experience calling Bouwe Bekking the emperor with no clothes, that's just something else. Come on man.

 

Beyond that, of course Knut is only going to have good things to say about the race, as you point out he's the damned CEO. Could you imagine of Microsoft started walking around saying, yeah, some of our products are kind of shit, but hey look at the Xbox. That's never gonna happen.

 

Who says I was referring to Bouwe Bekking? I'm glad you got the reference though. Y'all let me know when Bouwe Bekking becomes a God and I will will bow down before him, till then I think that one can disagree. Bear in mind that what I disagreed with is that I like the VOR65 and I like this race, it seems he does not. One does not need offshore sailing experience to express an emotion such as I like the VOR65 because it is really cool to watch. really, I'm not challenging his talents and I can admire a boat just like I can admire anything.

 

Your second point I am confused about for are you disagreeing with Knut, that you see the VOR as a shit product produced by Knut? I'd hope that even if he felt somethings needed work, publicly he would be proud of his organization and event even as he privately works to improve it. If 2017 sees more boats on the line, if he picks good venues to stop, if he engages the general public more with better trackers, more live streaming, better social media that promote the sport then I'd say he's doing his job well for from what I've read here and elsewhere, it was going the route of the Dodo bird quickly.

 

From the initial reading it seems he has a good handle on that tiller. Mr. Bekking can decide to join in or not and rest assured, I wont try to advise him in anyway, but will enjoy watching who ever comes to play.

 

Enjoy.

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My point is that given he's the CEO of the organization, you should really take any opinions he expresses with a grain of salt. Just about any source is going to be more objective than race's CEO.

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The more cynical view is of course that Brunel and Abu Dhabi were seen a favorites. There was also a good dose of "This edition is probably the last chance for Bouwe to finally win a VOR." drama. Looking at the scoreboard he needs massive help to do that. No wonder that he does not like the current boat.

 

As far as the race and AIS goes...

I guess taking a good look at the lesson form sailplane racing is necessary. There were some reports that they had similar problems and now suppress competitors on their ADS-B displays. Since aviation is much more regulated than the marine world, so it can't be that hard. That said, at the end of the day the question is always: What do you want to achieve? Tight racing and opening up tactical options are not necessarily compatible.

If you want to add a layer of complexity maybe the comeback of ghost mode? (AIS only, don't let them get too far away.)

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I take it the Palace would be out for that looks like a nice place to dock a boat. From Google Earth the Wave looks pretty cool. Why do they have a street named November 18th st? I see you point regards to distance, and it would keep them out of the Straits. This is why I enjoy the VOR so much, you discover places not normally known.

 

 

haha yeah I'm pretty sure the palaces are out of the picture ;)

 

the wave is pretty good. they have built it up loads since I got here in 2011. now there are restaurants and cafes and a decent wee supermarket. and a lot of accommodation, although no hotels yet.

 

18th november is national day, and HM's birthday. there is also 23rd july street, named for renaissance day - the first day of HM's reign.

 

even if the race doesn't stop here, Oman is an incredibly beautiful and (for the moment) unspoiled country and worth visiting. we don't have huge high rises as it is not allowed to build any structure taller than the minarets of the grand mosque :)

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The more cynical view is of course that Brunel and Abu Dhabi were seen a favorites. There was also a good dose of "This edition is probably the last chance for Bouwe to finally win a VOR." drama. Looking at the scoreboard he needs massive help to do that. No wonder that he does not like the current boat.

 

As far as the race and AIS goes...

I guess taking a good look at the lesson form sailplane racing is necessary. There were some reports that they had similar problems and now suppress competitors on their ADS-B displays. Since aviation is much more regulated than the marine world, so it can't be that hard. That said, at the end of the day the question is always: What do you want to achieve? Tight racing and opening up tactical options are not necessarily compatible.

If you want to add a layer of complexity maybe the comeback of ghost mode? (AIS only, don't let them get too far away.)

I think ghost mode was fantastic and would be great to see return. Give each boat say 36 hours they can use however they like where they will disappear from AIS and the tracker.

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The more cynical view is of course that Brunel and Abu Dhabi were seen a favorites. There was also a good dose of "This edition is probably the last chance for Bouwe to finally win a VOR." drama. Looking at the scoreboard he needs massive help to do that. No wonder that he does not like the current boat.

 

As far as the race and AIS goes...

I guess taking a good look at the lesson form sailplane racing is necessary. There were some reports that they had similar problems and now suppress competitors on their ADS-B displays. Since aviation is much more regulated than the marine world, so it can't be that hard. That said, at the end of the day the question is always: What do you want to achieve? Tight racing and opening up tactical options are not necessarily compatible.

If you want to add a layer of complexity maybe the comeback of ghost mode? (AIS only, don't let them get too far away.)

I think ghost mode was fantastic and would be great to see return. Give each boat say 36 hours they can use however they like where they will disappear from AIS and the tracker.

Yes!

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Sheesh. Stealth mode is the worst for the fans. Remember not knowing how close Camper and Telefonica were leadiing up to the 2A finish? Or the silly redress in the last BWR?

 

Anyway, Clean got Knut to talk about multis for the VOR (8:00), and how if the Mod 70s were RTW Vovlo seaworthy, they would have been in Newport.

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Pretty much any monohull is slow compared to a VO70, and if the sailors are going to make a comparison, that is going to be the case. The only reason that VOR moved across to the VO65s is that these same sailors couldn't persuade sponsors to pony up the money needed for them to play in 70s and push the design so hard that they kept breaking. Sorry, but the sailors have to accept a large chunk of the blame for premature death of the VO70s and the arrival of the 65s. Without these boats none of them would have jobs and none of us would have the VOR.

If the boats were 10% quicker that wouldn't make the race anymore exciting for anyone but the sailors, and let's be honest, this race is not there for the sailors, they are employees.

I was very sad to see the end of the 70s, but it is time to move on and look at the race. I am sure Bouwe woudl much rather a VO65 than the VO60 he sailed on.

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just found out through Clean's comment on his in-port dock walk that the sailing fanatic CEO Bozkurt of Alvimedica has been replaced last March. Bozkurt had stated that he wanted to do two editions, but we could assume now that his plans are being put on hold and reevaluated.

 

Same situation with SCA, with a new CEO since February.

 

Let's hope Knut can convince the new decision makers to stay for 2017-18. Brisius didn't seem very positive on the panel with Clean.

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Charleston would be a great east coast stopover point. Set the time/route to try to match the Charleston Race Week.

Good Luck.

473799186-in-this-handout-image-provided

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Pretty much any monohull is slow compared to a VO70, and if the sailors are going to make a comparison, that is going to be the case. The only reason that VOR moved across to the VO65s is that these same sailors couldn't persuade sponsors to pony up the money needed for them to play in 70s and push the design so hard that they kept breaking. Sorry, but the sailors have to accept a large chunk of the blame for premature death of the VO70s and the arrival of the 65s. Without these boats none of them would have jobs and none of us would have the VOR.

If the boats were 10% quicker that wouldn't make the race anymore exciting for anyone but the sailors, and let's be honest, this race is not there for the sailors, they are employees.

I was very sad to see the end of the 70s, but it is time to move on and look at the race. I am sure Bouwe woudl much rather a VO65 than the VO60 he sailed on.

I wouldn't argue with most of your points here wyd, but for me the 65s still look under-powered and plain slow. The VO70s were spectacular, and far more exciting. The boats somehow just looked "right" and this one doesnt. Maybe only 10% faster (?), but it looked like a whole lot more! Does anyone have any documented short term absolute maximum speeds to compare? Say maximum average over a minute or something similar?

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The 65s have a fair bit of freeboard, especially when shown relative to other cutting edge big monos. Thats always stood out to me, they don't look sleek, instead they look a little chubby.

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Charleston would be a great east coast stopover point. Set the time/route to try to match the Charleston Race Week.

Too shallow until they go multihull. VOR draw 15 feet, and having brought a Open 60 through Charleston Harbor before (drawing 14 feet), you won't be doing a Charleston stopover.

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just found out through Clean's comment on his in-port dock walk that the sailing fanatic CEO Bozkurt of Alvimedica has been replaced last March. Bozkurt had stated that he wanted to do two editions, but we could assume now that his plans are being put on hold and reevaluated.

 

Same situation with SCA, with a new CEO since February.

 

Let's hope Knut can convince the new decision makers to stay for 2017-18. Brisius didn't seem very positive on the panel with Clean.

 

Alvi and SCA corporate are both officially evaluating, but have said they prefer to not clutter things by making an announcement earlier than the end of the race.

 

If I had to put money down on probability to compete next race, based entirely on personal interaction with teams, corporate executives, and race insiders, I'd guess it like this:

 

Brunel: 80%

SCA: 85%

Alvimedica: 50%

Vestas: 90%

Dongfeng: 70%

MAPFRE: 15%

Abu Dhabi: 65%

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Not sure if anyone has mention this yet, but why would they not return to Newport, it seemed incredibly successful.

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just found out through Clean's comment on his in-port dock walk that the sailing fanatic CEO Bozkurt of Alvimedica has been replaced last March. Bozkurt had stated that he wanted to do two editions, but we could assume now that his plans are being put on hold and reevaluated.

 

Same situation with SCA, with a new CEO since February.

 

Let's hope Knut can convince the new decision makers to stay for 2017-18. Brisius didn't seem very positive on the panel with Clean.

 

Alvi and SCA corporate are both officially evaluating, but have said they prefer to not clutter things by making an announcement earlier than the end of the race.

 

If I had to put money down on probability to compete next race, based entirely on personal interaction with teams, corporate executives, and race insiders, I'd guess it like this:

 

Brunel: 80%

SCA: 85%

Alvimedica: 50%

Vestas: 90%

Dongfeng: 70%

MAPFRE: 15%

Abu Dhabi: 65%

 

 

Out of curiosity, why do you have Mapfre and Dongfeng so low?

 

I can understand Mapfre being low, but that low surprises me.

Dongfeng would also be pretty much a shoe-in would they not? Pretty much guaranteed 2nd place and they have put quite a few Chinese sailors on the water. Then again, none of the China teams has a track record of committing past a first run on anything sailing related.

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Maybe a differently named/sponsored Chinese team.

 

I would be astonished if the Chinese did not sign up in some form for next time around.

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My take is, that its a shame that Auckland has been locked in so early as it rules out an Australian port (from what people have beet told since the 2005 race Australia will only get a stop over if they have a team, which kind of is a chicken and egg thing as the stopovers seem to get locked in way before a team gets funded, and even if that were to happen then it would likely be a 'pit-stop') and that rules out an Australian team. (patriotic gripe over)

 

If no new boats are launched then the situation is dire, perhaps to encourage new teams they should require that all tuning notes are released at the end of this race. I don't see more than 10 teams competing next time around but I think the fan base could support at least 12, especially if they from more 'countries' (I know the teams are all multinational and the the sponsors are similarly multinational but the still all have home ports right? If having more teams requires more ports due to a particular sponsors need then I say go for it. And whoever said that some of the stopovers could handle many more entrants, It should be a requirement that any stopover is actually capable of handling the number of entrants to limit the number of entrants because a port can't handle them seems insane, I hope they are lucky enough sometime in the future to be in the situation of saying now we can't go there they can'd fit us all in.

 

While i see little point in structurally modifying the boats to make them faster (adding bulb weight for example), especially on a cost benefit point of view, I think the sail types should be changed, at the very least adding normal asymmetric kites for the import together with the associated take down lines, that can be removed for the offshore legs (it just looks better) but it could go so far as having an inshore set and an offshore set of sails.

 

Which brings me to another point, these inshore races that just turn into a parade due to wind being from the wrong direction have to end, stadium sailing is one thing but if you can't lay a proper course then its not really worth it. The inshore course of the leg 7 start would have made for a better inshore race given Saturdays conditions. So i could be prepared to accept some sort of course other than a windward-leeward/Olympic-Triangle/Trapezoid etc. if it made use of the ports features like rounding islands or whatever. I also want longer races (1 1/2 hrs at least not the under 1 hr limit we seem to have now, so it is still worth getting up at 3 or 4 am to watch them) or for at least not to have races shortened when you can see from the Helo shots that there is clearly more wind coming no more than 10 min away (Auckland inport for example). I think that the inports should get points for the actual race but only 1/10 of an offshore leg (i.e 1 point for a win inshore 10 points for a win offshore and so on).

 

I have other coverage gripes but that's on another thread lol.

 

Then we have the legs themselves, I want racing from A to B with no gates in between, while its you could maybe make an argument for ice gates in the southern ocean there were far to many on leg 5 and they were way to far north (and having worked on a trawler in the southern ocean I couldn't believe how far north the gates were) but its also gates like Fernando de Noronha that they have to round for some reason. I do think they should have to abide by things like Traffic Separation Schemes and other local rules as that's good seamanship, and the only other exclusion zones should be for wildlife/environment protection. I have no problems with AIS but I agree it has changed the racing at least as much as going one design has, to alleviate that you could allow a stealth mode like suggested above but so as not to ruin it for us spectators not allow stealth mode within 100 Nm or so of the finnish. But most of all more teams as that means someone might be more willing to take a risk.

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Good thread Jero

 

+1

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From the Leg 7 thread (translation from Dutch courtesy Herman):

 

Next edition: 7 up to 10 VO65’s

At the end of 2016 the seven boats shall be going back to the Boat Yard, for an update to new specifications. It is the intention to have all 7 boats, including a maximum of 3 new ones, to start in the next edition. “It is not an option to renew the whole fleet. We should be starting right now with the build of the first boat in order to do that. For the next race the maximum amount of boats from a logistic point of view is ten boats. More boats is not an option during the current stopovers.”

Disappointing to see, but not especially surprising.

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Coming toward the end of the current edition are we any closer to knowing who's going to be involved in the next? or are we still just guessing?

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The stupidest thing in ocean racing is this progressive trend toward tactical racing. Given that the VOR has such control over what equipment goes on the boats it should be possible for the viewing audience to always know where boats are while the boats never (or as frequently as desired) know where the others are. The idea of matching tacks around the world just makes the race artificially close and takes away strategy.

 

Not sure why there should be a limit to the number of boats in the next race. I understand more boats = more cost but surely that's proportional and in some cases there would be economies of scale - or are VOR over-paying for services. As someone pointed out the VOR as it stands now could be an opportunity for the old fashioned rich owner to run a team

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just found out through Clean's comment on his in-port dock walk that the sailing fanatic CEO Bozkurt of Alvimedica has been replaced last March. Bozkurt had stated that he wanted to do two editions, but we could assume now that his plans are being put on hold and reevaluated.

 

Same situation with SCA, with a new CEO since February.

 

Let's hope Knut can convince the new decision makers to stay for 2017-18. Brisius didn't seem very positive on the panel with Clean.

Maybe he's just not very positive due the mess he made of the latest campaign that he's managed.

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just found out through Clean's comment on his in-port dock walk that the sailing fanatic CEO Bozkurt of Alvimedica has been replaced last March. Bozkurt had stated that he wanted to do two editions, but we could assume now that his plans are being put on hold and reevaluated.

 

Same situation with SCA, with a new CEO since February.

 

Let's hope Knut can convince the new decision makers to stay for 2017-18. Brisius didn't seem very positive on the panel with Clean.

Alvimedica may win that Final Leg of this years Edition. If they do, they're pretty much a lock for 2017/18 IMO.

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Remove provision that makes AIS activation mandatory. Encourages ballzy moves and discourages the boring as bat shit mid-ocean conga line.

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just found out through Clean's comment on his in-port dock walk that the sailing fanatic CEO Bozkurt of Alvimedica has been replaced last March. Bozkurt had stated that he wanted to do two editions, but we could assume now that his plans are being put on hold and reevaluated.

 

Same situation with SCA, with a new CEO since February.

 

Let's hope Knut can convince the new decision makers to stay for 2017-18. Brisius didn't seem very positive on the panel with Clean.

Alvimedica may win that Final Leg of this years Edition. If they do, they're pretty much a lock for 2017/18 IMO.
How do you figure that? Since the change of CEO the had been little or no activation of the VOR by them.

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Memo to Knut & your Decision Makers on VOR:

 

1) First of all having the Tracker LIVE for Leg 9 is fanstastic.

2) We, the fans want Live Racing 24/7.

3) It would be really glorious having it Live for 2017-18.

4) An upgraded Tracker would be cool too.

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ill say one thing, the VOR 70's looked a whole hell of a lot more powered up at many points in the last edition. some say 10% , i say more. they saw boat speeds of 40+ ( not smart but still ) , from a VOR life at the extreme view, the 70's looked way more entertaining. But ohey , the boats are a lot stronger and way less carnage. The match racing part , at sometimes sucks alot more , other times make it more exciting.

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Memo to Knut & your Decision Makers on VOR:

 

1) First of all having the Tracker LIVE for Leg 9 is fanstastic.

2) We, the fans want Live Racing 24/7.

3) It would be really glorious having it Live for 2017-18.

4) An upgraded Tracker would be cool too.

 

Further note. When you put supplying a tracker out to tender make sure the suppliers can show you a race ready product that can be viewed on all platforms without downloads.

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It was formally announced in The Hague that there will be a Dutch campaign for the next race. Bekking also said he himself would like to do an eighth round. So pretty sure Bouwe (and probably Brunel) will be back.

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VOR emailed me the video

attachicon.gifvideo-1434797258.mp4.mp4

8 seconds of a crowd. WTF??? Thats what VOR emailed you?

 

Very, very sorry. I should have checked what was sent. Yes, that was emailed after I asked for the unbroken link.

 

My bad: I'll keep trying to get the correct link.

 

Elisa, do you have a link?

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VOR emailed me the video

attachicon.gifvideo-1434797258.mp4.mp4

8 seconds of a crowd. WTF??? Thats what VOR emailed you?

 

Very, very sorry. I should have checked what was sent. Yes, that was emailed after I asked for the unbroken link.

 

My bad: I'll keep trying to get the correct link.

 

Elisa, do you have a link?

 

 

What video is it supposed to be?

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That was Bouwes announcement that Sailing Holland [the non profit organization running Team Brunel] will take part in the next edition. From the top of my head.

 

There is still a bit of money left over, so there will be more sailing. Events in the Caribbean, possible in the US, also corporate sailing. More if they can find more money. Keeping the momentum going is the goal.

All contracts including Bouwes end with the VOR, the only exception is the treasurer(?) of the NPO. So there will be new contracts, but that will be decided after the race.

 

Doing it as an NPO seems crazy in todays time but worked well, sponsors can be sure that all money goes into the campaign. Having many sponsors also worked out. Easier to find many than a single one. But he would also take a single sponsor.

 

Will he do it again? - Basically Bouwe said why not. But lets wait and see. Capey in the background was much more vocal about Bouwes ambitions. :D

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Memo to Knut & your Decision Makers on VOR:

 

1) First of all having the Tracker LIVE for Leg 9 is fanstastic.

2) We, the fans want Live Racing 24/7.

3) It would be really glorious having it Live for 2017-18.

4) An upgraded Tracker would be cool too.

 

Further note. When you put supplying a tracker out to tender make sure the suppliers can show you a race ready product that can be viewed on all platforms without downloads.

 

 

Interesting to note that on this edition, the VOR is using some geovoile software for some "back office" stuff, but not the geovoile tracker for the users (see NB note at the bottom) :

http://www.geovoile.com/actualites-141016_rms_geovoile_pour_la_volvo_ocean_race.asp

(the geovoile tracker being the one used on almost all French ocean races, Jules Vernes trophies or other records attempts, and on the figaro as well).

For me they thought the 3D stuff would be a big hit, when people (at least sailors) are more interested in a good fast tracker with usable wind data, etc.

And probably as well some contractual stuff regarding using this virtual eye thingy.

(because of which I need to kill my browser due to the fans screaming after a couple of minutes, everytime I use it)

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VOR emailed me the video

attachicon.gifvideo-1434797258.mp4.mp4

8 seconds of a crowd. WTF??? Thats what VOR emailed you?

 

Very, very sorry. I should have checked what was sent. Yes, that was emailed after I asked for the unbroken link.

 

My bad: I'll keep trying to get the correct link.

 

Elisa, do you have a link?

 

 

What video is it supposed to be?

 

Hi Renny. As Chasm said, it was a video of Bouwe speaking in both Dutch and English about the continuation of Team Brunel, perhaps after the skipper's presser. VOR sent a link to the Dutch press release http://www.nauticlink.com/nieuwsdienst/2015/06/20/111134740/stichting-sailing-holland-koopt-licentie-bij-volvo-ocean-race-organisatie-voor-deelname-vor-2017-2018/ Here's the bit of the Google translation about this winter's plan:

 

Sailing Foundation Holland buys license from Volvo Ocean Race organization to participate VOR 2017-2018

PRESS RELEASE
Enkhuizen, Scheveningen - The Foundation Sailing Holland is going to buy a racing license at the Volvo Ocean Race organization and is currently looking for sponsors to enable participation in the Volvo Ocean Race 2017-18. . . .
"The proposed license purchase is Holland Sailing by the race organization recognized as an official sailing team," says director Sailing Holland Gideon Messink. "However, this does not say whether you actually going to participate in the race. You do have a say in the stopovers, the boat and the race rules. Along with other potential teams actually how do you determine the next race will look like. Of course, we first give our current sponsors the opportunity to continue with us. So EY has already pledged that they will support us again. Bouwe Bekking will remain involved with the team. His exact role is currently unknown. "" In order to maintain momentum in both existing and new sponsors, we remain active with the boat which now rises Team Brunel. So we're going to sail a few matches in the Caribbean, such as the RORC Caribbean 600 and the St. Maarten Heineken Regatta.

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VO65, first edition with them is pretty much done. Some thoughts.


Making the boat faster?

That seems to be a recurring theme. I'd say mostly BS, can't make the boat faster in any meaningful way. Rather concentrate on making it even more reliable. Remove gremlins and nagging issues, increase comfort and crew safety. Instead of doing major boat mods work hard on the sail inventory, those get replaced anyway.


Fun stats: 40000 hours of maintenance -per boat- during this edition. [via VDI news]


Sails

Huge potential for change. All of them will be replaced for the next round so changes are relatively cheap.

There were some voices along the line that the A3 is pretty much never used, even bordering on unusable compared to the wide range of other sails.

Then there was the idea of having a bigger inventory than allowed on a leg. Hmm... probably not the best idea. Cost go up, buying, airfreight to stopovers. The chance of having a dud sail in the inventory goes up. Then there is the question if they have to be close enough so that a wrong choice does not end in an automatic last place. Maybe an additional sail on board but less spares? That would keep the cost the same.

Rules for replacements need a bit of work. Even if its just better wording to remove ambiguity.


Rules

Overall they seemed to have worked ok. Sail replacements and TSS stick in my mind. Why write pages of TSS Q&A and then make them all exclusion zones the next week. If that is the goal put it in the NOR with the explicit option to white list specific TSS in the SI.

Something like: The RC reviews the recorded tracks of all boats against cmap (version x.y.z provided to all boats as part of the mandatory equipment) and protests every boat that enters a restricted zone or drives against the direction of a TSS. The IJ reviews the track using all available means including on board recorders. Minimum penalty is one point per infraction unless there is exigency. The goal is to prevent problems with local authorities. If a boat gets fined by local authorities? Double penalties. Because they caused bad press.


Route

The best way to make the VOR faster, no matter which boat gets used, is to avoid low wind areas. Equator crossing drift fests get lame real soon. Yeah, sponsors...



AIS

AIS has been a major equalizer in this edition. Depending on how VOR wants the race to be this could be THE change.

There have been various reports that in sail plane competitions the competitors can't see each other, it gave them too much of an advantage in the past. So the competition gets blocked out on their ADB systems. Air is certainly heavily regulated, so why not also do the same on water.


Stopover vs pit stop

Not too bad. Better than 10 stopovers. I'd try put a pit stop in the longer legs, esp when there is routing to a far coast like in leg 1. Say start in Alicante, stop at the corner of Brazil, end Cape Town.

Score it or resume with time difference. No preference there.

Do keep the no repair rules. Depending on the utility maybe have one hardstand in the travel kit in case of emergencies. One container more is not that expensive.



Other stuff:

Have an UTC clock!

Both on the site and during long streams where everything is in UTC time.

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VO65, first edition with them is pretty much done. Some thoughts.
Making the boat faster?
That seems to be a recurring theme. I'd say mostly BS, can't make the boat faster in any meaningful way. Rather concentrate on making it even more reliable. Remove gremlins and nagging issues, increase comfort and crew safety. Instead of doing major boat mods work hard on the sail inventory, those get replaced anyway.
Fun stats: 40000 hours of maintenance -per boat- during this edition. [via VDI news]
Sails
Huge potential for change. All of them will be replaced for the next round so changes are relatively cheap.
There were some voices along the line that the A3 is pretty much never used, even bordering on unusable compared to the wide range of other sails.
Then there was the idea of having a bigger inventory than allowed on a leg. Hmm... probably not the best idea. Cost go up, buying, airfreight to stopovers. The chance of having a dud sail in the inventory goes up. Then there is the question if they have to be close enough so that a wrong choice does not end in an automatic last place. Maybe an additional sail on board but less spares? That would keep the cost the same.
Rules for replacements need a bit of work. Even if its just better wording to remove ambiguity.
Rules
Overall they seemed to have worked ok. Sail replacements and TSS stick in my mind. Why write pages of TSS Q&A and then make them all exclusion zones the next week. If that is the goal put it in the NOR with the explicit option to white list specific TSS in the SI.
Something like: The RC reviews the recorded tracks of all boats against cmap (version x.y.z provided to all boats as part of the mandatory equipment) and protests every boat that enters a restricted zone or drives against the direction of a TSS. The IJ reviews the track using all available means including on board recorders. Minimum penalty is one point per infraction unless there is exigency. The goal is to prevent problems with local authorities. If a boat gets fined by local authorities? Double penalties. Because they caused bad press.
Route
The best way to make the VOR faster, no matter which boat gets used, is to avoid low wind areas. Equator crossing drift fests get lame real soon. Yeah, sponsors...
AIS
AIS has been a major equalizer in this edition. Depending on how VOR wants the race to be this could be THE change.
There have been various reports that in sail plane competitions the competitors can't see each other, it gave them too much of an advantage in the past. So the competition gets blocked out on their ADB systems. Air is certainly heavily regulated, so why not also do the same on water.
Stopover vs pit stop
Not too bad. Better than 10 stopovers. I'd try put a pit stop in the longer legs, esp when there is routing to a far coast like in leg 1. Say start in Alicante, stop at the corner of Brazil, end Cape Town.
Score it or resume with time difference. No preference there.
Do keep the no repair rules. Depending on the utility maybe have one hardstand in the travel kit in case of emergencies. One container more is not that expensive.
Other stuff:
Have an UTC clock!
Both on the site and during long streams where everything is in UTC time.

 

Good summary.

 

Can't get my head around why they would try and mod the VOR 65 OD boats to make them faster. Compared to what? That's the obvious question. They're racing themselves, so more speed potential isn't necessary. And less reliability is DEFINITELY not a benefit.

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Good summary.

 

Can't get my head around why they would try and mod the VOR 65 OD boats to make them faster. Compared to what? That's the obvious question. They're racing themselves, so more speed potential isn't necessary. And less reliability is DEFINITELY not a benefit.

 

 

And even worse there is quite a bit of noise to make them faster by removing structure. WTF!

Finally they have a boat that does not fall apart and they want to remove structure? And not just a little bit either. Nuts.

The only achievement is the instant removal of resale value.

 

Remove problems, improve sail design. Given the high amount of drift action perhaps add a specialist light wind sail. Another potentially big change: different outriggers.

They have a huge amount of data on the VO65 fleet. I'd say more than on any other current design. There should be tons of small and inexpensive changes that improve the boat for the next round.

 

But removing structure? Total BS in OD racing.

 

If the VOR really changes the design for the 2021(?) edition you could sell the ~ten VO65 off as a nice package. Or do something yourself with them, say a classic edition VOR in the off years using the first route.

Or how about this: A non stop crewed race. About ten boats should definitely be enough. Vendee rules would be cool but probably too much for sponsors to swallow. So modified BWR rules. The race is non stop around the world, crewed. If something comes apart and you need assistance you may stop in pre arranged pit stops supplied by the organizers. (There are after all 2 boatyard sets. Say Cape Town and Cape Horn.) There is a time penalty, say a minimum of 24h stopped. No new crew. Additional food only with additional time penalties.

 

IF you have a set of proven boats without gremlins that could work out really well.

 

 

Endless possibilities beyond the VOR, but none with a boat that falls apart like most if not all VO70.

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Good summary.

 

Can't get my head around why they would try and mod the VOR 65 OD boats to make them faster. Compared to what? That's the obvious question. They're racing themselves, so more speed potential isn't necessary. And less reliability is DEFINITELY not a benefit.

 

 

And even worse there is quite a bit of noise to make them faster by removing structure. WTF!

Finally they have a boat that does not fall apart and they want to remove structure? And not just a little bit either. Nuts.

The only achievement is the instant removal of resale value.

 

Remove problems, improve sail design. Given the high amount of drift action perhaps add a specialist light wind sail. Another potentially big change: different outriggers.

They have a huge amount of data on the VO65 fleet. I'd say more than on any other current design. There should be tons of small and inexpensive changes that improve the boat for the next round.

 

But removing structure? Total BS in OD racing.

 

If the VOR really changes the design for the 2021(?) edition you could sell the ~ten VO65 off as a nice package. Or do something yourself with them, say a classic edition VOR in the off years using the first route.

Or how about this: A non stop crewed race. About ten boats should definitely be enough. Vendee rules would be cool but probably too much for sponsors to swallow. So modified BWR rules. The race is non stop around the world, crewed. If something comes apart and you need assistance you may stop in pre arranged pit stops supplied by the organizers. (There are after all 2 boatyard sets. Say Cape Town and Cape Horn.) There is a time penalty, say a minimum of 24h stopped. No new crew. Additional food only with additional time penalties.

 

IF you have a set of proven boats without gremlins that could work out really well.

 

 

Endless possibilities beyond the VOR, but none with a boat that falls apart like most if not all VO70.

 

Again, a fine summary and outline of the possibilities. I especially like the idea of an off-season RTW race like the BWR as a chance for YOUNG crews to get the experience necessary to do the 'real' VOR.

 

As Bouwe said and as Charles has proven, there's lots to be gained from an under-25 rule.

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I also like that. Maybe play the age aspect even more: 2 under 25, 2 under 30, 2 over 50 *g*

Got to have someone to learn from. (OBR can be one of the under. Or rest two OBR, old and young. *g*)

 

The need to keep the momentum going was a HUGE aspect in virtually all recent team interviews. Doing something major in off years, even with older boats, could be the ticket. There was IIRC also some talk about a series of organized VOR events between editions, somewhat modeled after the IMOCA Ocean Masters series. (Which has its own problems.)

Crewed non stop RTW races don't exist, a ready made market niche. I think it could be relatively cheap as costs go away. No stopovers, no villages, no shipping, no hospitality crew, no airline tickets and hotels, also much shorter crew contracts and next to zip shore crew. Maintenance both pre and post race could be done in a centralized manner. Basically more mandatory Boatyard services to get the boats into verified OD before the race and to force repairs to OD standard after it in order to maintain the fleet. Preposition parts of the BY as pit stops along the route. A problem I see is creating your own competition with the main event, with a move to multis you'll loose fans. But OTOH you loose them to yourself instead to another organizer and you don't flog the new fast boats to death prematurely. (If they are also OD I'd say they have to last 2+ editions again.)

 

in the end the VO65 fleet has exactly two advantages, strict OD and proven robustness.

I just don't get why anyone would want to piss away a key aspect. They are not VO70 and never will be. They can't be as fast, but with a bit of luck you can flog them around the globe quite a few more times after the next edition. Some of the much flimsier IMOCA went around the globe how often? Kingfisher 5 times. Fonica 4 times, Sobedo 4 times. Plus the trans Atlantic races, plus many thousands of training miles for each RTW race.

 

As long as the fleet stays close together in mileage - and avoids the hard stuff ;) - there shouldn't be a problem. With 10 boats there would even be some room for attrition in case of crew malfunction.

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....

 

in the end the VO65 fleet has exactly two advantages, strict OD and proven robustness.

I just don't get why anyone would want to piss away a key aspect.

 

....

 

+1.

 

Remembering that 5(?) of the 6 VO70 2012-13 entries had major malfunctions on the way to Itajai.

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What I liked was the Round Britain Race - use that as a mandatory prologue to the main event.

 

I would speed up the boats - a big element of the race is knowing when to back off. With the VO60's and the VO70's, you had to slow the boat down to get it to the end of the race. With the V065's the crews are flat out most of the time - pedal to the metal. Not as fun to watch.

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For tanks they had a lot breakages.

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This is worth a listen re whats going through the Knutsters mind for setting up the next one. I think Clean is getting a vid sorted if you want to wait. Comment about preference for more national teams than just more teams interesting. That preference not compatible with getting rid of mono's I suggest. https://www.mixcloud.com/sailinganarchy/knut-frostads-media-round-table-at-the-finish-of-the-volvooceanrace-with-a-few-tough-questions/?utm_source=widget&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=base_links&utm_term=resource_link

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Boat

The changes to the boats look more sensible. There was no time to get the boats right. There is a long list of small things. Say the head not working on one tack. Sailors will be asked for input, and will be asked again at a meeting.
There are some major ideas like lifting foils (like the new IMOCA?) but cost is an issue. Also many sailors want to keep the boat as is. The overall goal is making it more practical
New sails.
Another area is more renewable energy. It's big for everyone and won't go away.
OBR
OBR got better individually and much better overall, but there is still room for improvement.
There will be OBR training now that they have boats. There will be changes to the media equipment as result of the race and the training. (No time to get that right before the race either.) Several current OBR want to mentor the next ones.
Quite a bit of talk about a different on board setup, going away from expensive fixed cams. 90% of the content was hand held.
Mobile solutions (4G/LTE) became available, more will be available for the next edition. A problem is that the stuff has to work worldwide, including CN. Can't change quality just because you go somewhere else.
(That answer was btw a nice spin form Knut, Clean asked something entirely different. :D )
Number of Boats
A setup to build 3 more boats is in the works, more boats are possible if there is very early commitment.
Simplifying the rules
Nobody understands them. Not the public, not the sponsors. (And given various the penalties not the sailors either. :D ) A blank sheet rewrite has started, on all levels.
Continuity
Much much much needed. Short term VOR goes with most teams to Cowes week, then Genua. After that evaluation and new plans for the next events.
Long term a change to the VOR system, teams (rather the management companies behind teams) buy a license. They own part of the VOR and have a say but also have to deliver.
And other stuff too. Quite a bit of new content.

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Matt Knighton wins OBR award. Deserved.

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So I skimmed a bit, stuff about boat performance, sponsors, crews, enzo, enzo.....

Suggestion for making it interesting, get the navigators going 'mini' style. Only pre-race routing analysis, no nav computer just charts and weather maps/basic forecasts.
Simple AIS transponders for safety requirements.

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Continuity of teams needed. Last minute campaigns have been shown as not viable and possibly unsafe... Although create news... If reported

 

Opportunity for Sam d to lead a campaign attempting to win needs to be created

 

Obrs need to have the balls to report what is actually going on and empowered to do so. E.g. The total failure to report the melt down on mapfre while it happened. Obrs removed from team influence. Not tied to a single team for the race.

Minimum screen time requirements for nav and all watch captains. On shore analysis of how the crews are sailing the boats. On board cameras a total let down in that regard. If the volvo doesn't have the resource to sit watch and provide content then open the content to the community to add this value.

 

Technical infringements like tss need to be called in real time with stop go penalties. Smaller penalties for grey area infringements.

 

More visability and transparency for sailing as a clean sport. Sailing is sleep walking it's way into eventually a cycling level problem in my opinion and we need events like the volvo to lead the way whether they believe it's an actual problem right now or not.

 

The boats need to be transparently the fastest offshore fleet racing for the volvo to be the pinicle if the offshore sport. Not sure that is the case right now.

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Remove all the nav equipment but for safety needs from the boats and allow shore based routing with navs all at volvo hq so they can be interviewed. But with limited frequency to communicate routing. Possibly only twice a day with a new of free opportunities a leg out side that.

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Remove all the nav equipment but for safety needs from the boats and allow shore based routing with navs all at volvo hq so they can be interviewed. But with limited frequency to communicate routing. Possibly only twice a day with a new of free opportunities a leg out side that.

Could you please expain further:

 

1. What nav equipment can be removed because it has no safety function?

 

2. How do you intend stopping this twice daily televised intellectual knowledge from each teams shore based router not ending up in the hands of their competitor routers. Do you lock them all in a box for duration of each leg?

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Also, what would you to to mitigate loss of comms? Without being able to communicate with your shoreside man, it'd be at best end of competition for that leg, and at worst bloody dangerous.

 

Not to mention, why?

 

 

 

Minimum 'screen time': what nonsense. How in any way would that make things safer? It sure as heck wouldn't have helped Vestas, and I could imagine it could increase fatigue because some nav who's knackered from the hard bit can't sleep during the easy bit as he's chained to the chart table.

 

 

As to OBRs not having the 'balls', I think it is a two-way street. If the OBR reports something the crew would prefer they didn't, then they'll just shut up for the rest of the leg, and that OBR's output will be pretty crap.

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Don't bother, he's not the sharpest knife in the kitchen.

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Pah! No navigator. Simple drag race. Teams get sent the next day's route from VOR headquarters, and must stay within +/- 2nm of the route. Totally avoids any thinking, and makes the race trivial to understand. Removes one team member for even more cost cutting and so long as the sailors can work a GPS and steer a bearing, removes all risk of navigational stuff ups. (Unless the VOR sends the entire fleet onto the bricks.) AIS ceases to be an issue, and indeed any notion of telling the teams where the others are ceases to matter. What's not to like? :P

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Oman Sail will be in with a team. Much more logical stopover too.

 

Not sure I understand the logic. What makes them a better stopover than Abu Dhabi? Oman is much harder to get to from most places and they don't have anywhere near the infrastructure that the UAE does. Don't get me wrong, I would love to see an Oman team enter, but just not seeing what makes them a "more logical stopover".

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Good thread Jero

 

I like KF's attitude on fairness

 

What have you been most pleased about in this edition?

On a very personal level, this is the first race in a long time that I wish I had been a competitor. I’m a big fan of fair sports. Sailing is always struggling with fairness. There’s a lot of sailing races around the world where you just have a faster boat, or a bigger boat or a better rating. You may just be the unlucky guy that has a less rich owner, and for me that is not really good sport.

That’s why I like the Olympic sailing, because it’s the fairest competition in our sport. And to me this is the fairest offshore race I’ve seen, as long as I can remember, and I like that. It’s pure racing, it’s pure decision making, it’s pure keeping the crew together down in the boat. There’s no discussion about choosing the wrong designer, or not having enough money in the preparation period.

 

 

1 Billion % agree^^

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^ Couldn't agree more with BB. Probably the most vocal of the high profile so far But I would suspect it is a sentiment shared by many who knew the race as it was.

 

I agree with BB on the AIS aspect. I would find a way to block that info to the other racing boats while still having it on for safety.

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Remove all the nav equipment but for safety needs from the boats and allow shore based routing with navs all at volvo hq so they can be interviewed. But with limited frequency to communicate routing. Possibly only twice a day with a new of free opportunities a leg out side that.

Could you please expain further:

 

1. What nav equipment can be removed because it has no safety function?

 

2. How do you intend stopping this twice daily televised intellectual knowledge from each teams shore based router not ending up in the hands of their competitor routers. Do you lock them all in a box for duration of each leg?

how about stripping it down to gps location, chars and ais? Essentially no routing on board. Sail by what you see back to basics.

 

 

No need to put them in a box if they are communicating at an interval the same or longer than the current shedules.

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Remove all the nav equipment but for safety needs from the boats and allow shore based routing with navs all at volvo hq so they can be interviewed. But with limited frequency to communicate routing. Possibly only twice a day with a new of free opportunities a leg out side that.

Could you please expain further:

 

1. What nav equipment can be removed because it has no safety function?

 

2. How do you intend stopping this twice daily televised intellectual knowledge from each teams shore based router not ending up in the hands of their competitor routers. Do you lock them all in a box for duration of each leg?

how about stripping it down to gps location, chars and ais? Essentially no routing on board. Sail by what you see back to basics.

 

 

No need to put them in a box if they are communicating at an interval the same or longer than the current shedules.

Interesting, clearly new nav skills required here.

 

What piece of equipment am I left with that gives me AIS collision avoidance data but it can't be a screen showing a chart with AIS GPS position, COG and SOG derived information of vessels including my own because I might use it for something else?

 

Does the other vessel have to break out their morse lamp and signaling flags, smoke signals etc or do I just get a race penalty for any crew, heaven forbid looking at the screen at times other than for avoiding a collision?

 

If I'm one of the land based routers and after I have revealed my routing instructions and ideas to the VOR TV interviewer and the public, and I'm not locked in a box for the duration of the leg, what do I do when I go home for dinner and watch the other routers TV interviews? Do I cover my ears and talk loudly, place special VOR bag over my head? Is there a opening now for routers who are deaf and blind mutes, though maybe not as it does beg the question about their interview capability and on the job off land expertise.

 

Sorry I'm a bit lost as to what you are trying to achieve? Have you thought this through?

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"Have you thought this through?"

 

I fear the answer to that is 'no, not even slightly'.

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I'd prefer more visual penalties than what seemed to be randomly decided docking of points. Instead of docking points for something like sailing through a TSS, change the penalty to something like "each minute spent inside a TSS earns a penalty of one hour without the use of head sails once clear of the TSS, to be assessed at the start of the next leg." Final leg would be assessed immediately.

 

It would be just as harsh, but amusing to us couch sailors.

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With the closeness of the finishes in this go-around, that would most likely be much harsher than a point. 20 mins inside a TSS would be nearly a day under main only (I assume that kites would also be verboten during that penalty).

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With the closeness of the finishes in this go-around, that would most likely be much harsher than a point. 20 mins inside a TSS would be nearly a day under main only (I assume that kites would also be verboten during that penalty).

The scale of penalty would obviously need to be worked out. I was just tossing out vague numbers as a concept. I think it would be more entertaining to us spectators to actually watch the suffering as opposed to reading about a couple points being docked.

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The overall objective of the nav suggestion was to reintroduce human judgement omboard.

 

Even out of ais range after a sched the other navs know what your strategy is anyway. If they can't coms with the boat for another 12hrs it wouldn't matter if they where all sat I'm the same room. The result would be the same.

 

I've no issue with them having full ais on board.

 

(if I'd thought this through this would be a boring discussion)

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at last... Frostad steps down as Volvo Ocean Race CEO. For family reasons, unlikely....

 

 

official press release:

Knut Frostad, CEO of the Volvo Ocean Race, is stepping down at the end of 2015 after eight years at the helm for family reasons.
- Chief to leave after three editions at the helm
- ‘I want to dedicate time to my family now’
- Search is underway for new Race CEO
ALICANTE, Spain, September 11, 2015 - Knut Frostad, CEO of the Volvo Ocean Race, is stepping down at the end of 2015 after eight years at the helm for family reasons.
The 48-year-old Norwegian has guided the event over three editions in 2008-09, 2011-12 and 2014-15 after taking over as chief executive in March 2008.
Frostad said it had been a journey he was very proud of, transforming the race into a high-level professional organisation as well as making significant and key changes to the race format while retaining a strong focus on the history and legacy of the 42-year-old race.
“With almost half of my life and a lot of passion invested in the race, it has been one of the most difficult decisions I have ever had to make,” he said.
“I am an ‘all-or-nothing’ person and this is an ‘all-or-nothing’ race. I now want to dedicate more of my time to my young family.
“The Volvo Ocean Race is in a strong position for the future with a proven one-design format, a great team at our Alicante headquarters and ambitious and committed owners in Volvo Car Group and Volvo Group.”
Senior members of the Race’s board have paid tribute to Frostad.
“Knut has done a fantastic job in leading and developing the Volvo Ocean Race. We could not have had a more passionate leader and we understand and respect his wish to spend more time with his family. We will all miss him a lot,” said Henry Sténson, Senior Vice President, Corporate Communications and Sustainability Affairs, Volvo Group, and Per Löjdquist, Chairman of the Volvo Ocean Race Board, in a joint statement.
“Knut has been the face and the driving force behind what is the most challenging and prestigious ocean race in the world. We regret but, at the same time, respect his decision and we can only wish him and his family the best of all winds,” added Alain Visser, Senior Vice President, Marketing, Sales and Customer Service, Volvo Car Group.
Frostad, who competed in four editions of sailing’s leading offshore race dating back to 1993-94, including twice as a skipper and founder of teams, continued: “The late Sir Peter Blake once said about the race: ‘There’s nothing like it - it gets in your blood and you can’t get rid of it!’
“I know that will be my challenge too. The Volvo Ocean Race is such a unique life experience and I am truly grateful for my time as head of the organisation, but also for all the friendships I have formed during this time.
“It’s been a privilege to work for Volvo and all the other stakeholders in the race, many of whom have become personal friends.”
Frostad will remain in the position as CEO until the end of 2015, while the search for his replacement has started.

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