Jerryd

Flying Tiger

Recommended Posts

10 hours ago, Mike Hunt said:

How functional is the interior of the FT10m?

(asking for my wife)

 

It's cramping - as i cramped camping - but palatial compared to the Viper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/15/2018 at 6:23 PM, SURGE said:

I’d love it if we had another boat here, sucks the FT10 Class seems to have lost steam these past few years. I’m stuck in PHRF here for now.

I have one for sale in Atlanta.  Hull #35.  It's not officially listed anywhere but is for sale if anyone is interested.  PM me for details or text/call seven seven zero - five nine seven - eight nine eight nine.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone have the part number for the engine compartment fan on the FT10M? I have #81 and when the fan starts up, it makes a screeching sound which goes away after 30 seconds or so, it's just a matter of time before it stops.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my FT10 the fan is there, it runs but is close to useless in the effect it has. Have checked to see if it is sucking from the engine box or blowing into it. It is sucking.

I put a new fan in several years ago but the result was the same, no noticeable effect.

If we motor for any distance we leave the engine box lid open. This lets plenty of air get to the engine carburettor but it is very noisy.

My boat has the Tohatsu 9.8 2 stroke engine. It runs reliably and trouble free.

Be interested to learn how other FT10 owners use their fan & engine.

RTT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the four stroke 9.8, the only problem I seem to have with the blower is if we run the motor at idle or low speed the motor will choke out with the blower not running. The four stoke is quiet but once you are at high idle the vibration and noise is a bit much. Has anyone been able to dampen the noise in the motor well?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/7/2018 at 11:40 AM, RumTumTigga said:

In my FT10 the fan is there, it runs but is close to useless in the effect it has. Have checked to see if it is sucking from the engine box or blowing into it. It is sucking.

I put a new fan in several years ago but the result was the same, no noticeable effect.

If we motor for any distance we leave the engine box lid open. This lets plenty of air get to the engine carburettor but it is very noisy.

My boat has the Tohatsu 9.8 2 stroke engine. It runs reliably and trouble free.

Be interested to learn how other FT10 owners use their fan & engine.

RTT

I had engine problems and solved it by disconnecting the hose the fan blows the air through at the motor well end. A huge amount of water came out. I then made sure no other water was stuck in the hose, and found there was a plastic bag stuck in there as well. Once hooked up the engine ran well again and the amount of air coming out the vent near the stern was huge.  Worth checking that hose to make sure nothing is in there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good thought Bill. Will do the hose check this weekend.

RTT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/7/2018 at 9:40 AM, RumTumTigga said:

In my FT10 the fan is there, it runs but is close to useless in the effect it has. Have checked to see if it is sucking from the engine box or blowing into it. It is sucking.

I put a new fan in several years ago but the result was the same, no noticeable effect.

If we motor for any distance we leave the engine box lid open. This lets plenty of air get to the engine carburettor but it is very noisy.

My boat has the Tohatsu 9.8 2 stroke engine. It runs reliably and trouble free.

Be interested to learn how other FT10 owners use their fan & engine.

RTT

We  find that if there is any water in the line normally between fan and engine box the performance drops significantly. It's difficult to stop wet sections forming given the way the line runs over bulkheads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just bought a FT10 and was thinking about adding a code 0 for distance racing. Has anyone put a bobstay on the pole to get adequate halyard tension? And if so, how do you recommend attaching it to the bow?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a code 0 with a torsion rope and use a continuous line furler on the bow sprit. It’s a nice set up for distance racing and it’s great to have the capability to roll the sail up quickly if the wind were to come up rapidly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Ricky Bobby06870 said:

Just bought a FT10 and was thinking about adding a code 0 for distance racing. Has anyone put a bobstay on the pole to get adequate halyard tension? And if so, how do you recommend attaching it to the bow?

Does your FT have a trailer ? If so you could attach bob stay to bow eyebolt used for winch rope/trailer safety chain 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/3/2018 at 1:55 PM, Ricky Bobby06870 said:

That is what I may end up doing by default, but it is only about 2 or 3 inches below the bowsprit, so does not give a strong downward vector when the pole is extended.

Getting the bobstay lower is better...but you will need some help with boat building

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We got a code zero for our FT10 in NZ 3 seasons ago. We installed  a Bobstay so that the luff of the zero could be kept tight and the roller fuller would work. We have not had any problems with this set up. Here are a few shots to show you what we did.

1) This shot is of the prod extended and the bobstay set up. Gives you an overall view of our set up.

Bobstay1.jpg

 

2) The second shot is the detail of how we fastened the bobstay on the bow.Just above the waterline and approx 2inches in from the bow we drilled a 10mm diameter hole through. Into this we inserted a piece of thick walled 10mm OD carbon tube. Them spliced the spectra loop through this.

 

Bobstay2.jpg

 

This set up has been working well for 3 seasons now.

RTT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you try to attach a strop to the trailer/bow eye you deserve what you get - that's a stupid idea.

Put a proper strop on down near the waterline as illustrated above.  All the research I did for #71 said that the strop wasn't critical, but to improve luff tension and overall sail shape the strop is a huge winner - for a very cheap investment.  

The other part is that with a strop and higher luff tensions you'll have higher loads on your tack line.  We moved our pole-out line to a 3:1 to handle the higher loads and keep a stock setup.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/6/2018 at 9:41 AM, RumTumTigga said:

We got a code zero for our FT10 in NZ 3 seasons ago. We installed  a Bobstay so that the luff of the zero could be kept tight and the roller fuller would work. We have not had any problems with this set up. Here are a few shots to show you what we did.

1) This shot is of the prod extended and the bobstay set up. Gives you an overall view of our set up.

Bobstay1.jpg

 

2) The second shot is the detail of how we fastened the bobstay on the bow.Just above the waterline and approx 2inches in from the bow we drilled a 10mm diameter hole through. Into this we inserted a piece of thick walled 10mm OD carbon tube. Them spliced the spectra loop through this.

 

Bobstay2.jpg

 

This set up has been working well for 3 seasons now.

RTT

I'm curious... given how tender the Tiger can be and how powerful a zero is, what wind range would you use it in? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/5/2018 at 5:38 PM, Dubois said:

I'm curious... given how tender the Tiger can be and how powerful a zero is, what wind range would you use it in? 

on the wind up to 5 - 7 Kts true wind speed. With sheets just cracked up to about 12Kts TWS.

The onboard discussion often goes like this......"What does it look like at the next mark?" "Eased sheets, might be a bit tight for the Gennaker tho" "Should we stay with the J2 then or peel to the Fractional Zero?" "Wind is light enough, lets go to the Zero, there is enough space in the course to lay off a bit if we need to."

So i guess the more complete answer is there is no hard and fast rule it is a judgement call when we are out there.The Fr0 has been a race winner for us in some situations.

Also when we were thinking about a zero we discussed in detail between ourselves and our local Norths guru whether we should go to a masthead zero or a Fractional zero. Taking into account that the Tiger is fairly tender and easily driven we decided on a Fractional Zero. This also meant we had the masthead halyard available for a peel to the MH Gennaker if the wind angle changed.

RTT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm certain this has been previously discussed but..............

Has an FT10 ever done the Transpac? Singlehanded, Doublehanded or fully crewed?

Downwind flyer and success in coastal races but do structural or design limitations make it unwise to consider the boat for the event?

In addition to emergency rudder, solar panels and electrical system redo,  what rig or structural modifications would be prudent?

.....or just buy a tried and true Olson 30 and work with that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always thought the FT 10 would be a great boat for the T pac . Carefully prepped. I did it on a Col 32 and did many costal runs(SF to SB) on a Hendo 30 . Flexible solar panels, lithium batteries, Maybe a 2.0 -4.0 Torqeedo and  2kw Honda for continuous running, and spare rudders. 4 crew max.Not sure where they might need to be reinforced. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a just recently former Owner who has thrashed offshore many times with our MHK, I would not hesitate on a "structural basis"  (unless you consider my advancing age part of the structure) , given final satisfaction with the Betts V4 rudder, and a custom spare rudder/cassette for serious offshore work.  Beyond what owners will naturally do - new bolts and reinforcement at stern for rudder attachment, stronger stanchions, secure keel and fill keel/hull gap, better gasket at the sprit, maybe remove the kelp cutter to solve one potential fire hose effect.  Check spreader saddles. (caveat - more work required on maybe the first 20 hulls that were still working out some kinks)  Crew of 4 would do nicely, but double handed PacCup could work too.  Only concern would be weighing her down with all the required equipment and H20 could adversely affect performance; but others have solved that a la the Melges and Columbia 32s.  Not saying I would be up for it (Maybe Cabo would be my personal limit on a Tiger) but a group of young chargers could make it work and have a ball doing it.  (Note:  Years back a Tiger Owner in Portland area was giving it serious thought for a while, but then backed off)

 

  • Like 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Not saying I would be up for it (Maybe Cabo would be my personal limit on a Tiger) but a group of young chargers could make it work and have a ball doing it.

You'll never find out now as the minimum length has been upped to 38ft.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone modified the exit sheave boxes in the mast to allow for additional halyards? I have sent emails to CST composites to see if they would give any insight but have yet to get any response. I would like to avoid using exterior halyards with a modified mast head carrier if possible. I really would like to have a spare jib and spin halyard. Have any of you done this modification?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think there is a good way to put a second sheave (2 side by side) in the mast head without doing major modifications to the masthead. There's not much room in the carbon fiber either. You could put one below the existing, but it wouldn't be as strong as the original as you wouldn't be able to tie in to the masthead structure. You also lose a few inches of height. The masthead carrier is way simpler. A second jib halyard would be nice. It would be nice for sail changes. Again though, it seems a side by side sheave would need a significant hole cutout in the mast and would really weaken it. 

The harken 51mm 310 are the sheaves currently used https://www.harken.com/productdetail.aspx?sku=310 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/23/2018 at 6:29 AM, SURGE said:

Has anyone modified the exit sheave boxes in the mast to allow for additional halyards? I have sent emails to CST composites to see if they would give any insight but have yet to get any response. I would like to avoid using exterior halyards with a modified mast head carrier if possible. I really would like to have a spare jib and spin halyard. Have any of you done this modification?

Yes we have on the A4. Works great. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/27/2018 at 3:40 PM, boyscout said:

Yes we have on the A4. Works great. 

so can you still sail One Design with that configuration?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/28/2018 at 10:32 PM, EVRaines said:

so can you still sail One Design with that configuration?

 

Sure you can We mouse out the second halyard. We had put a second halyard on USA 11 10 years ago and that's when there was a real OD fleet in San Diego with 11 boats racing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/28/2018 at 7:08 AM, DSE said:

How did you guys do it?

Had a rigger cut in a new shive at the top of the rig, cut a new exit down low. Add turning block at the base of the mast and a clutch in the pit. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/30/2018 at 11:19 AM, Mike Hunt said:

One design?  The FT10's are just PHRF boats at this point.

Seems like (?) a dead class. What is the current status? Specifically:

(1) is OD racing available anywhere in the world?

(2) when was the FT10 last manufactured?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe they still race OD in Cali, and the last hull #118 was delivered in August of 2015 as far as I know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Surge.

So: not quite dead, but comatose and without benefit of an ICU. :unsure: Too bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish it would have taken off it’s a great boat! I did ask Tom at Flying Tiger Boats about what a new build costs these days (about 90k to get it to the US) if I remember right. I was just wondering when I was looking into buying one. I have hull #26 currently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LIFTING THE KEEL ON A FT10

i have the FT10 in Auckland NZ. She lives in a Marian berth and I don't think the keel has been lifted since she was launched in 2010.

I have what looks like a Tripod arrangement that has never been used.

Does anyone in FT10 world have any photos or diagrams of how the Tripod arrangement is fitted and set up on the boat?

Thanks

RTT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/8/2019 at 1:09 AM, RumTumTigga said:

LIFTING THE KEEL ON A FT10

i have the FT10 in Auckland NZ. She lives in a Marian berth and I don't think the keel has been lifted since she was launched in 2010.

I have what looks like a Tripod arrangement that has never been used.

Does anyone in FT10 world have any photos or diagrams of how the Tripod arrangement is fitted and set up on the boat?

Thanks

RTT

Since no one else has chimed in with a response and photo, I'll give it a try.  Sorry, I do not have any photos.

1.  Remove both vang blocks near the mast on the cabin top.

2.  There are two rods - approximately 3/4" in diameter - with the tri-pod/Bi-pod.  Attach the rods with pins at the locations where the vang blocks  were previously removed .

3.  The Bi-pod has slots cut in each foot.  Slide the slot in the Bi-pod feet on the port and starboard chain plates.  As I recall there is only one way the bi-pod fits and the Bi-pod should be angle toward the stern.

4.  Attach the other end of the rods, described above, to the B-i-pod.  The Bi-pod should now be rigid and stable.

5.  Attach chain hoist to shackle on Bi-pod.

6.  The rest should be obvious.

Note:  Do not raise the keel more than necessary.  It is possible to have the keel bulb against the hull and still have room between the top of the keel and Bi-pod.  (Which makes it mechanically possible to try and pull the keel bulb up through the bottom of the boat.)  Once raised, the keel can move about in the trunk - fore, aft, and side to side. I would recommend having some foam or other packing to wedge the keel in place.  Otherwise, the keel is like a clapper in a bell and can swing about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Subterfuge for the write-up and DSE for the pics.

All is clear now.

I got the Bi-Pod thing and the rods when I took over the boat but did get a chain block. So  next weeks job when everyone is back at work is to go and buy a chain block.

RTT

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is what I'm using. I think it's 2 ton. I think the previous owner replaced the chain loop used for hoisting with SS and shortened to 2-3 feet (0.7-1.0 m) so that it doesn't snag on the cabin top. It's kind of awkward to use when hoisting and not very efficient, but does work. I thought about going to a ratcheting type, but wouldn't know which one to go with or if it would work any better.

 

image.thumb.png.98ccc1070e6ccd3cea83d23c0e47ce11.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Cazzate said:

Hey rum tum are you planning on dry sailing tigga ?

No.

As far as I know the keel has not been lifted since she was launched in 2010. So I am planning on lifting the keel to check things out, see if the process works, and make sure everything is OK.

RTT

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear FT10-ers,

I was looking for the original thread where the FT10 was designed by crowdsourcing. Can anybody give me s hint on how to find it on this forum?

cheers splashtest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Splashtestdummy said:

Dear FT10-ers,

I was looking for the original thread where the FT10 was designed by crowdsourcing. Can anybody give me s hint on how to find it on this forum?

cheers splashtest

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Splash

Someone more techy than I will chime in and provide you a link to that piece of sordid history.

I recall those days (somewhat) fondly.  Some were very productive, others just plain crazy

The low point - the weeks of discussing the shape of the cabin windows

The high point - when the group decided to bite the bullet and upgrade to carbon mast, boom, sprit.  No better decision could have been made.  Would have been a totally different boat without them.

Only regret - we didn't discuss any potential upgrade to the carbon rudder/tiller that ultimately took about 50 lbs off the butt end.  Maybe tried the "drop-sleeve" approach to the engine door.

Even though I no longer own MHK I thoroughly enjoyed my ten years with her and know that one could not have found more boat for the money at those entry level costs.  Light, fast, easy to sail, strong enough to thrash offshore if you like.

Cheers

Phillip

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Philip,

I remember reading some pages of that thread back then. At the time I owned a similar boat like the FT10, (a Cork 1720) and I did not see how the FT10 could turn out much better than that. I have since seen the yacht in person and now I am curious about the crowdsourcing yacht design process and the interaction with Bob Perry. I also read all the 144 pages of the Sliver thread (the 60 ft by 10 ft double ender yacht, also by Bob). I hope indeed that someone could give me a link or a hint to what the name of that thread was!

Splashtest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/11/2019 at 6:27 PM, Splashtestdummy said:

Hi Philip,

I remember reading some pages of that thread back then. At the time I owned a similar boat like the FT10, (a Cork 1720) and I did not see how the FT10 could turn out much better than that. I have since seen the yacht in person and now I am curious about the crowdsourcing yacht design process and the interaction with Bob Perry. I also read all the 144 pages of the Sliver thread (the 60 ft by 10 ft double ender yacht, also by Bob). I hope indeed that someone could give me a link or a hint to what the name of that thread was!

Splashtest

A 1720 and FT 10 in the same sentence ?????????????????  Sure they both are boats and float but they are so far apart in most aspects it is not even funny.  What have you been huffing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It began in the Anarchy 30 thread. I believe it was the old version of the SA forum and those posts might  have been lost in the move to the new version.  

The wikipedia entry has part of the story: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_Tiger_10_M

Good times... sometime I wonder where BIAM must be nowadays :-)

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a hunch.... I bet that Tim Chin would have it.  He was part of the early group, much more tech savvy than I and could likely track it down for you.    Try him at <tckchin@gmail.com> or <skipper-tim@sbcglobabl.et>

My first FT10 sail was with him on his first splash of USA 008. at  Silver Gate Yacht Club.  Another early adopter, then detractor, now re-adopter the ED was also aboard on that maiden voyage.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really don't know how the above got re-posted.  But Cazza has certainly provided enough historical reading for all of us

 

But I must apologize to Cazza.... my old age is warping the memory that Cazza was also aboard on the maiden voyage.  Cazza - glad to have you back.  Hope all is well with you and yours.  Ciao.  Felippo

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/16/2019 at 6:01 AM, Bulga Naba said:

Really don't know how the above got re-posted.  But Cazza has certainly provided enough historical reading for all of us

 

But I must apologize to Cazza.... my old age is warping the memory that Cazza was also aboard on the maiden voyage.  Cazza - glad to have you back.  Hope all is well with you and yours.  Ciao.  Felippo

 

All is well Filippo... 

I was indeed on board for that first sail with my camera and cheesy music too :-) 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi folks, new guy here.  Does anyone have knowledge of the condition of Tigris #72, San Diego?  

I've mostly buoy raced in Lake Michigan for 10 or so years most of them phrf racing on a Soverel 27 and which i now own.  Looking for next step.   Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first boat was a 1987 Soverel 27 - loved that boat.  But we outgrew it and bought FT10 #71 - loved owning, sailing and racing it. Sold 71 only because I ran out of time to use it, and an unused boat is not a good thing.

DM me if you want to chat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/2/2018 at 1:12 PM, SURGE said:

My blower is a TMC 12v, 4.5 amp, 122cfm

Thank you. A few folks reached out and I replaced last year. The new fan sounds much better. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/27/2019 at 12:21 PM, mercury retrograde said:

Hi folks, new guy here.  Does anyone have knowledge of the condition of Tigris #72, San Diego?  

I've mostly buoy raced in Lake Michigan for 10 or so years most of them phrf racing on a Soverel 27 and which i now own.  Looking for next step.   Thanks

If you are interested, I can tell you far more about the condition of #81 located in CT. It just went on the market last week and has a brand new Code 0 used once and a North Sails Jib still in the box. 

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2007/flying-tiger-10m-3545120/?refSource=browse listing

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a4-leeward-mark.jpg

Wicked Nice Pictah. Great shot of the FT10M coming around the mark and of the excelent crew shirts! Go Bruins and Team SA!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Everyone,

The forum has gone very quiet.

Are there any rumours or news of any new Flying Tiger 10's being built?

RTT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question for everyone, I was asked this by a customer and I can't remember. What was the stock reefing set up? Or was there one? If not have any of you come up with a good solution? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a standard system. The line for the clew goes through the boom and ultimately to a clutch and winch on the cabin top.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/11/2019 at 12:07 PM, boyscout said:

Question for everyone, I was asked this by a customer and I can't remember. What was the stock reefing set up? Or was there one? If not have any of you come up with a good solution? 

It’s a simple and reliable system, easy to operate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe there’s a diagram on the class website. But as said above there’s a sheave at the back of the boom and another one in the front. A line should be tied to the boom, then up through the reef point, through the rear sheave, then to the front sheave, down to a single block at the mast partner, through the deck organizer to the clutch  on the port side. Simple set up and works quite well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RumTumTigga

I haven’t heard of any new boats being built 10’s or 7.5’s, shame really. That said I did see a video where there were some sport boats racing in the South China Sea and I could swear they were FT 10’s they looked identical but the insignias on the main sail were not the same and where the Flying Tiger is painted on the aft quarter there is nothing. But there was still some sort of Chinese symbol on the cabin. I wonder if Hensheng Yachts sold the molds to a builder who now makes them under a new name. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

On 11/15/2019 at 1:31 PM, SURGE said:

I believe there’s a diagram on the class website. But as said above there’s a sheave at the back of the boom and another one in the front. A line should be tied to the boom, then up through the reef point, through the rear sheave, then to the front sheave, down to a single block at the mast partner, through the deck organizer to the clutch  on the port side. Simple set up and works quite well.

Just bought one in Sydney with the reefing system missing. Based on the 3 holes in the front section looks like there could have been a kind of clutch at the base of the boom (see pic -  I temporary installed a cleat but this is NOT a good setting) ???  Could anyone post photos of the original setting? Thanks!

IMG_0188.jpeg

IMG_0187.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am assuming that is your outhaul coming out in the picture. My set up has an eyelet on the starboard side of the gooseneck and a cheek block on the port side (both bolted to that piece of stainless seen in your pic), right where you have your cam cleat. My outhaul is run from the sail to a 3:1 purchase inside the boom and the blocks are tied to the eyelet with a piece of dyneema to position the blocks about mid boom. The outhaul exits through a single sheave box just ahead of the vang and then routed aft to a cam cleat on the boom. The reef line on mine has an eye splice on one end that you loop the other end of the line through the eye and tighten it around the boom positioning it directly below the reefing clew. From there it routes down to the double sheave box in the end of the boom, through the cheek block at the goose neck, down to a single block at the mast partner, through the port side deck organizer to the double clutch that is in the foreground in the first pic you posted. I do not have any extra halyards on my setup so my port clutch has the reef and main halyard. Starboard clutch has the tack line, spinnaker and jib halyards. I would have taken pictures instead of writing this novel but I’ve put mine away for the winter. Hope this helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, SURGE said:

I am assuming that is your outhaul coming out in the picture. My set up has an eyelet on the starboard side of the gooseneck and a cheek block on the port side (both bolted to that piece of stainless seen in your pic), right where you have your cam cleat. My outhaul is run from the sail to a 3:1 purchase inside the boom and the blocks are tied to the eyelet with a piece of dyneema to position the blocks about mid boom. The outhaul exits through a single sheave box just ahead of the vang and then routed aft to a cam cleat on the boom. The reef line on mine has an eye splice on one end that you loop the other end of the line through the eye and tighten it around the boom positioning it directly below the reefing clew. From there it routes down to the double sheave box in the end of the boom, through the cheek block at the goose neck, down to a single block at the mast partner, through the port side deck organizer to the double clutch that is in the foreground in the first pic you posted. I do not have any extra halyards on my setup so my port clutch has the reef and main halyard. Starboard clutch has the tack line, spinnaker and jib halyards. I would have taken pictures instead of writing this novel but I’ve put mine away for the winter. Hope this helps.

My setting seems different as the double clutch as the main and 3/4 spinnaker halyard. Looks like there are several "original" settings!:) That being said, I like your setting, simple and efficient!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fractional spinnaker halyard was probably not original and is using the reefing line clutch.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m interested in the fractional spinnaker set up. Do you use a conventional pole attached to the mast with a symmetrical chute or just using a smaller assym. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, SURGE said:

I’m interested in the fractional spinnaker set up. Do you use a conventional pole attached to the mast with a symmetrical chute or just using a smaller assym. 

the boat came with with a smaller assym. I haven't yet explored options for a symm chute.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, DSE said:

The fractional spinnaker halyard was probably not original and is using the reefing line clutch.

 

makes sense. thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now