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mad

Boat sinking over the weekend.

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Report was they got hit by a powerboat. Thinking about salvaging but it's getting pushed into deeper water by the tide.

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I thought it said they got hit by the 'raised anchor'. Got to love the mainstream press the way they explain sailing.

Wait! It wasn't the raised anchor Ian was wielding in the other thread was it? No wonder they sank.

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Why the hell didn't the "yacht Valkyrie" pick them up?

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Anyone got any more news. The Corby 36 sank (which boat ?), it was struck by a power boat ? I believe any sunk yachts are typically recovered pretty quickly

 

Will ask a friend who's an IOW RNLI volunteer

 

We were out walking on the Hill Head shore on Saturday and it was blowing a good 20 knots, lovely day for sailing under blue skies but very few boats out.

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Almost can't blame the powerboat for trying to take out that ugly graphic. What were they thinking?

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Almost can't blame the powerboat for trying to take out that ugly graphic. What were they thinking?

 

When I saw that graphic, it reminded me of this one

post-106106-0-01024400-1433864074_thumb.jpg

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I thought it said they got hit by the 'raised anchor'. Got to love the mainstream press the way they explain sailing.

Wait! It wasn't the raised anchor Ian was wielding in the other thread was it? No wonder they sank.

That anchor is about the only thing he can raise without the help of a ladyboy.

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I'm guessing that both boats had rudders. That size hole says that no one on board either boat was looking where they were going. glad no one was hurt. they will be looking next time.

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I'm guessing that both boats had rudders. That size hole says that no one on board either boat was looking where they were going. glad no one was hurt. they will be looking next time.

 

Now, that's fine. Just from the hole OB knows what happened, in detail. And is able to tell that both are to be blamed. No need for a hearing then. That's good. Saves time and money.

Maybe OB should offer his services to both parts, as he already have full knowledge.

 

/J

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Hi all, I'm the boat captain and it's looking a lot worse then we all think, Its not just a hole in a boat there's a big list that follows it!

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That comes as a complete surprise. I think I can safely speak for all of us here, we figured it was just a hole.

 

Personally, I offer my condolences.

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God bless the RNLI!

 

These lads (and lasses) are unbelievable in the risks they will take to save a life. Anytime anyone asks what makes (made) England great, I just point to them.

 

The thin red line of the sea.

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Almost can't blame the powerboat for trying to take out that ugly graphic. What were they thinking?

 

When I saw that graphic, it reminded me of this one

 

Is that the "Whomper" from "WIND"?

 

A totally predictable plot, but GAWD, what great photography of racing!

 

(Besides, Ms. Grey [before the nose job] was just SO edible!)

 

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So RPSY, Any details on exactly what happened?

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God bless the RNLI!

 

These lads (and lasses) are unbelievable in the risks they will take to save a life. Anytime anyone asks what makes (made) England great, I just point to them.

 

The thin red line of the sea.

Don't forget your cricket teams Aussie coach. That might make England great.

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Another recent 'powerboat incident', approx 1nm north of the yacht strike....

 

J64Uvxcg.jpg

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Another recent 'powerboat incident', approx 1nm north of the yacht strike....

 

J64Uvxcg.jpg

A bent cardinal. The Catholic Church is full of them.

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A bent cardinal. The Catholic Church is full of them.

 

:) :)

 

It's pointing south, an old bent cardinal !

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Eternal vigilance is the price of safety.

 

Was a Bavaria cruising yacht, on port. Owner couldn't see over the top of his rum and coke glass. Drink G&T at sea, its safer, you can see through the glass.

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That sounds a bit extreme. Any more details?

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No more detail I'm afraid, just chatting to a friend dockside during the JCup. But he's pretty in the know generally.

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That's the insurance companies way of saying that they don't want to risk any repairs which may fail later forcing them to pay out again.

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Almost can't blame the powerboat for trying to take out that ugly graphic. What were they thinking?

When I saw that graphic, it reminded me of this one

Is that the "Whomper" from "WIND"?

 

A totally predictable plot, but GAWD, what great photography of racing!

 

(Besides, Ms. Grey [before the nose job] was just SO edible!)

Yep, great photography. And I agree...Ms Grey much hotter before the nose job.

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I thought they did write it off? New owner or isurance co doing the work? I think I'd insist they write it off. Once a boat has been underwater its fucked & it'll have a bad rep & sailors are a superstitious bunch so if they go to sell it it'll be 20-30% under what it would have been.

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I thought they did write it off? New owner or isurance co doing the work? I think I'd insist they write it off. Once a boat has been underwater its fucked & it'll have a bad rep & sailors are a superstitious bunch so if they go to sell it it'll be 20-30% under what it would have been.

"Once a boat has been underwater it's fucked" yeah cos they're not supposed to get wet. The electrics are obviously fucked, along with the motor if it wasn't started within about 24 hrs, but what else? Cedar core might have soaked up a little water along the grain which is why the repair is bigger than the hole, sails, rig, running and standing rigging, keel, prop, rudder, winches, will all be fine assuming it was all washed down straight away which is common sense.

Once it's repaired with some new electrics and a new engine it will be back to being a great club racer.

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If you like sailing sodden, bendy POS's jump right in. It'll never be the same. It's a yacht, not a submarine.

 

@ 50% of the normal price maybe, but it'll forever be known as the boat that went to the bottom.

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Because there is water & moisture in every possible place it shouldn't be. Is an insurance co doing the work ie. The absolute bare minimum. Who lifted it out. Where were the slings. Boats are built to have pressure on the outside pushing in not inside pushing out. How quickly did they raise it.

 

Why don't you call your surveyor & tell him you're thinking about buying a boat that's been underwater & paying full price.

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When a boat gets raced there is moisture everywhere, that's why you leave it with a dehumidifier in it. There was no pressure from the inside pushing out as it had a giant pressure relief hole in the side. If everyone was doing their job correctly, they would have pumped it out as soon as the hole is above the water, so as to not lift the boat with an extra 3 tons of water in it, therefore no problem.

 

I have salvaged yachts before, and done numerous grounding repairs, there is no problem here. It would have been written off due to the cost of the engine and electrics on top of the hull and deck repair. If someone wants to tackle those repairs the boat can be made good again.

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It's not just the water, it's the water at about 6-7 psi getting injected into the core wherever it can.

Big issue is how long at that depth.

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Finally an actual answer even though I'm not sure that's even a problem. If the water has access to the core (anywhere other than the hole which has been cut out anyway) there's already an existing problem. I don't believe that water under slight pressure for a short time is any more likely to find a way into the core than water under no pressure for as long as the boat has been around.

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At that depth, your looking at similar levels of psi to hg.for resin infusion techniques.

Fasteners inside the boat are seldom sealed, pin holes in the resin,exposed wood etc.are all susceptible to water intrusion.

 

I'm not saying that it's a problem with this particular boat due to short period at depth,but any boat that sank should be thoroughly surveyed before repairing or purchasing.

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I did major repairs to and old Erickson 46 that had been sunk on a Bahamian reef briefly. The owners who were in the salvage business just happened to have one of their workbarges in close proximity when the boat sunk in a race, go figure. Months later I found lots of saturated pockets in the skins and core. Some were still under pressure from whatever depth she sat at! I mean water squirting out of the pilot holes from when I was doing cores with a hole saw.

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Note to self:

NEVER use the image of a Trident / Trishula on any hull. Poseidon, or Neptune, or Shiva may want a close look at it!

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Look, if it was totally fucked, that dude up thread wouldn't be laying carbon on it, he'd be chainsawing it. It is probably a guy who bought it at a insurance auction as a cheap way to go racing, why knock that?

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Why would it be cheap @ an insurance auction Mr Alcatraz?

 

You said there is nothing wrong with it & it won't have any ongoing issues. It'd go straight back to the owner after repair wouldn't it? ;-)

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I did major repairs to and old Erickson 46 that had been sunk on a Bahamian reef briefly. The owners who were in the salvage business just happened to have one of their workbarges in close proximity when the boat sunk in a race, go figure. Months later I found lots of saturated pockets in the skins and core. Some were still under pressure from whatever depth she sat at! I mean water squirting out of the pilot holes from when I was doing cores with a hole saw.

 

I've seen that in new boats that have been dry sailed. :ph34r: :ph34r:

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I did major repairs to and old Erickson 46 that had been sunk on a Bahamian reef briefly. The owners who were in the salvage business just happened to have one of their workbarges in close proximity when the boat sunk in a race, go figure. Months later I found lots of saturated pockets in the skins and core. Some were still under pressure from whatever depth she sat at! I mean water squirting out of the pilot holes from when I was doing cores with a hole saw.

I've seen that in new boats that have been dry sailed. :ph34r: :ph34r:

Fresh or salt?

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Why would it be cheap @ an insurance auction Mr Alcatraz?

You said there is nothing wrong with it & it won't have any ongoing issues. It'd go straight back to the owner after repair wouldn't it? ;-)

I said up thread that the value of a new engine and electronics on top of the crash damage would make it a possible write off. Being a race yacht, It probably had fancy electronics and a yanmar or Volvo engine. All this adds to a lot and it doesn't add up for the insurance company, however, someone can buy it off the insurance company, drop in a used engine or a beta, trident s,d,w system, 2 battery's and go racing.

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Why would it be cheap @ an insurance auction Mr Alcatraz?

You said there is nothing wrong with it & it won't have any ongoing issues. It'd go straight back to the owner after repair wouldn't it? ;-)

I said up thread that the value of a new engine and electronics on top of the crash damage would make it a possible write off. Being a race yacht, It probably had fancy electronics and a yanmar or Volvo engine. All this adds to a lot and it doesn't add up for the insurance company, however, someone can buy it off the insurance company, drop in a used engine or a beta, trident s,d,w system, 2 battery's and go racing.

 

I put a Beta in my boat, a ripper motor which didn't miss a beat in 10 years. They're a marinised Kubota, so you don't have to buy expensive maintenance parts (Yanmar anyone?).

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I did major repairs to and old Erickson 46 that had been sunk on a Bahamian reef briefly. The owners who were in the salvage business just happened to have one of their workbarges in close proximity when the boat sunk in a race, go figure. Months later I found lots of saturated pockets in the skins and core. Some were still under pressure from whatever depth she sat at! I mean water squirting out of the pilot holes from when I was doing cores with a hole saw.

I've seen that in new boats that have been dry sailed. :ph34r: :ph34r:

Fresh or salt?

Salt

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God bless the RNLI!

 

These lads (and lasses) are unbelievable in the risks they will take to save a life. Anytime anyone asks what makes (made) England great, I just point to them.

 

The thin red line of the sea.

 

 

You are not wrong. Fantastic individuals and organisation.

It's not just sea rescues. These volunteers are scooping up suicides and all sorts. tough gig.

 

I have had the pleasure of their services once, many years ago.

They were not, however, a crew that "makes England Great"

This was a Scottish crew.

 

The RNLI is the Best of BRITISH.

Scrap that, the RNLI covers the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland AND the Republic of Ireland.

 

(England has roughly only 29% of Great Britain's coastline, and decreases further when you add Ireland in to the mix.)

 

Rescue_Map.jpg

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