Plenipotentiary Tom

Drug Prohibition: Still Stupid

Recommended Posts

Yeah, who knows. Two of those years he had a Republican Senate and a Republican House.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Olsonist said:

Tom will be along shortly to say that his boy Shitstain is not proposing drug prohibition and that Hillary would have been worse.

image.png.dc0eef54e6e15bc1f8ca97e933c9e8a5.png

 

https://twitter.com/atrupar/status/1226922067523768320?s=20

 

 

 

 

Nothing new there.

Trump came out in support of that lunatic Duterte's "kill 'em all" approach and I commented on it in this thread.

As usual, your guess about my opinion is exactly opposite of the truth.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like a drug warrior got Trump's attention most recently.
 

Quote

 

President Trump proposed ending an existing policy that protects state medical marijuana programs from Justice Department interference as part of his fiscal year 2021 budget plan released on Monday.

The rider, which has been renewed in appropriations legislation every year since 2014, stipulates the the Justice Department can’t use its funds to prevent states or territories “from implementing their own laws that authorize the use, distribution, possession, or cultivation of medical marijuana.”

This isn’t the first time that an administration has requested that the rider be stricken. Trump’s last two budgets omitted the medical cannabis protections language, and President Obama similarly asked for the policy to be removed. In all cases, Congress has ignored those requests and renewed the protections in spending bills....

 

I hope Congress reacts the same way they did when Obama did this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

I hope Congress reacts the same way they did when Obama did this.

What did Obama do? Exactly what did Congress do? That existing policy was put there by Obama and codified in the Ogden memo in 2009. You can read it here:

https://www.justice.gov/archives/opa/blog/memorandum-selected-united-state-attorneys-investigations-and-prosecutions-states

Who did you think did that existing policy? Did you somehow think your boy W did something? Anything?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Olsonist said:

What did Obama do? 

Continued to prosecute the stupid drug war, despite the memo suggesting that federal prosecutors might be wise to spend resources on other things.

8 hours ago, Olsonist said:

Exactly what did Congress do?

Took away the money he was using to do it in 2014 and every year since. I hope they do it again.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Obama Administration Overrides 2009 Ogden Memo, Declares Open Season on Pot Shops in States Where Medical Marijuana Is Legal

https://reason.com/2011/06/30/white-house-overrides-2009-mem/

Quote

 

The Department of Justice sent out a memo Wednesday instructing the head of the Drug Enforcement Administration and leading officials in the U.S. Attorneys Office to treat medical marijuana shops as top priorities for prosecutors and drug investigators.

"Persons who are in the business of cultivating, selling or distributing marijuana, and those who knowingly facilitate such activities, are in violation of the Controlled Substances Act, regardless of state law," the memo reads. "Consistent with resource constraints and the discretion you may exercise in your district, such persons are subject to federal enforcement action, including potential prosecution. State laws or local ordinances are not a defense to civil or criminal enforcement of federal law with respect to such conduct, including enforcement of the CSA."

The memo, authored by Deputy Attorney General James M. Cole, "clarifies" a memo released in 2009 that declared medical marijuana sales in states that have legalized it to be a low priority for law enforcement and prosecutors. The so-called "Ogden memo" first appeared to drug law reformers as evidence that President Obama was dialing back the war on drugs. The DEA and U.S. Attorneys office continued to raid and prosecute state-legal grow operations and marijuana shops after the memo was first circulated, leading reformers to conclude that Obama was lying when he said that his administration would not be doing those things. 

...

 

I guess those who stopped paying attention as soon as the Ogden memo came out might think Obama was at all helpful in ending the stupid drug war.

A few of us noticed the pattern of behavior and the Cole memo that followed and concluded he was pretty useless on this issue. As I noted in this thread, he issued some pardons on his way out of office that I liked, but that's really it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

Continued to prosecute the stupid drug war, despite the memo suggesting that federal prosecutors might be wise to spend resources on other things.

Took away the money he was using to do it in 2014 and every year since. I hope they do it again.

Yawn. The Drug War was your boy Nixon's creation. Congress passed laws, stupid laws, but Congressional laws. You can read about that here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_on_drugs

Now all you have to do is show the Kenyan usurper's proposed budget and Congress's passed budget. Since you bring up the Ogden memo, you can show how the Kenyan usurper overrode it. Helps if you read it and the big C. You'll note that Congress passes laws and Presidents, albeit Democratic Presidents only, are expected to abide and enforce those laws.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/24/2016 at 7:25 AM, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

Erlichman Says Nixon's Drug War Targeted Political Enemies

 

Quote
“You want to know what this was really all about?” he asked with the bluntness of a man who, after public disgrace and a stretch in federal prison, had little left to protect. “The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”

 

 

Of course, Nixon didn't invent lying and dividing people just to get more power for government. He was following in Anslinger's footsteps...

 

 

On 11/19/2014 at 7:39 AM, Publius Johnson said:

...

History repeats itself to this day.

 

  Quote

"There are 100,000 total marijuana smokers in the US, and most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos and entertainers. Their Satanic music, jazz and swing, result from marijuana usage. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers and any others."- Harry Anslinger, first Drug Czar.

 

 

That was 2016...

6 minutes ago, Olsonist said:

Yawn. The Drug War was your boy Nixon's creation. Congress passed laws, stupid laws, but Congressional laws. You can read about that here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_on_drugs

Now all you have to do is show the Kenyan usurper's proposed budget and Congress's passed budget. Since you bring up the Ogden memo, you can show how the Kenyan usurper overrode it. Helps if you read it and the big C. You'll note that Congress passes laws and Presidents, albeit Democratic Presidents only, are expected to abide and enforce those laws.

Thanks, I never would have figured out Nixon's role in the stupid drug war without you.

You brought up the Ogden memo, apparently unaware that Obama administration policy ignored it, continued the war on dispensaries, and issued the Cole memo that overrode the earlier Ogden memo.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

That was 2016...

Thanks, I never would have figured out Nixon's role in the stupid drug war without you.

You brought up the Ogden memo, apparently unaware that Obama administration policy ignored it, continued the war on dispensaries, and issued the Cole memo that overrode the earlier Ogden memo.

You're restating yourself as some sort of proof which is of course convincing to yourself but less so to others. Try again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

Obama Administration Overrides 2009 Ogden Memo, Declares Open Season on Pot Shops in States Where Medical Marijuana Is Legal

https://reason.com/2011/06/30/white-house-overrides-2009-mem/

I guess those who stopped paying attention as soon as the Ogden memo came out might think Obama was at all helpful in ending the stupid drug war.

A few of us noticed the pattern of behavior and the Cole memo that followed and concluded he was pretty useless on this issue. As I noted in this thread, he issued some pardons on his way out of office that I liked, but that's really it.

The Cole memo is what allowed banks to begin taking MRB money and Fincos still operate under its guidance.  Guess who rescinded it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, MR.CLEAN said:

The Cole memo is what allowed banks to begin taking MRB money and Fincos still operate under its guidance.  Guess who rescinded it?

So I'm supposed to celebrate a memo "instructing the head of the Drug Enforcement Administration and leading officials in the U.S. Attorneys Office to treat medical marijuana shops as top priorities for prosecutors and drug investigators" because it allowed cannabis businesses access to banking?

Fail. This thread is rife with stories about how they still can't bank.

Obama could have tried for rescheduling cannabis and didn't.

Now, for the first time in my life, we have several TeamD candidates saying they want to do just that, which is great news. Where it seems thin is that I notice I'm the only person here who objects to Bloomberg because of his Jeff Sessions-like views on drug prohibition. I notice that Olsonist wants to pretend that the Ogden memo represented

On 2/10/2020 at 9:09 PM, Olsonist said:

existing policy

After the Cole memo supplanted it.

So, our biggest TeamD partisan hack wants to mislead and Bloomberg's unreconstructed drug warrior views are not a problem. Meanwhile, you guys want to make up thoughts in my head and then wonder why I don't consider TeamD much more useful than TeamR on ending the stupid drug war.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you're doing that scumbag partial quote thing.  Read Cole again maybe.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

 

Fail. This thread is rife with stories about how they still can't bank.

 

Well, three of my biggest clients are banking MRB money as fast as it can be grown.  Feel free to have them contact me despite your anecdotes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

Obama could have tried for rescheduling cannabis and didn't.

 

Yet another promise he broke.  To me, unforgivable.  Point?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, MR.CLEAN said:

Yet another promise he broke.  To me, unforgivable.  Point?

Cannabis should be legalized, the government out of it completely, all non violent convictions expunged and seeds available at Home Depot....there ! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, BravoBravo said:

Cannabis should be legalized, the government out of it completely, all non violent convictions expunged and seeds available at Home Depot....there ! 

Agree with everything except number 2.  government should ensure quality of commercial weed just like every other ingestible product.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, MR.CLEAN said:

Agree with everything except number 2.  government should ensure quality of commercial weed just like every other ingestible product.

Well there is a massive 55 year sample indicating otherwise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

After the Cole memo supplanted it.

So, our biggest TeamD partisan hack wants to mislead and Bloomberg's unreconstructed drug warrior views are not a problem. Meanwhile, you guys want to make up thoughts in my head and then wonder why I don't consider TeamD much more useful than TeamR on ending the stupid drug war.

Tom, the Cole memo didn't supplant the Ogden memo. It extended it. La la la elsewhere.

Ogden memo:

Don't use your resources to go after users in medical marijuana states.

https://www.justice.gov/archives/opa/blog/memorandum-selected-united-state-attorneys-investigations-and-prosecutions-states

Cole memo:

Doesn't rescind the Ogden memo but rather extends it to "all states". It excepted impaired driving, gang activity and few other things.  

https://www.justice.gov/iso/opa/resources/3052013829132756857467.pdf

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cole_Memorandum

Sessions rescission of both:

https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/4343764-Sessions-marijuana-memo.html

Critters attempt at rescinding the rescission:

https://web.archive.org/web/20180104060955/https://www.yahoo.com/news/republicans-democrats-congress-joining-forces-defeat-sessions-war-weed-092026350.html

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's almost like he didn't read Cole at all.  I'd assume that a libertarian would be pleased at Cole and incensed by the Trumpy admin's rescission of it, and refusal to honor States' rights.  Tom, where are you on that?

Here's an excerpt from the marijuana banking policy paper I drafted for many of MI's financial institutions that explains what's going on.  Updated to the latest federal and state guidance (as of 1/30/2020).  Copyright Holzmanlaw PLLC 2020.

 

Background and Policy Statement
Despite the federal contravention against manufacture, distribution, or dispensing of marijuana under the Controlled Substances Act (“CSA”), some 34 states and the District of Columbia have legalized the use of medical and/or recreational marijuana over the past decade.  As of the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill (the “Farm Bill”), hemp – which is genetically identical to plants that produce marijuana – has been removed from schedule I of the CSA and is no longer a controlled substance.

Because of the disconnect between federal and state laws concerning marijuana and hemp manufacture, distribution, dispensary and use, former United States Deputy Attorney General James M. Cole issued a memorandum (“Cole Memo”) to all U.S. Attorneys in 2013 providing guidance to federal prosecutors concerning marijuana enforcement under the CSA.  Such guidance applied to all Department of Justice enforcement activity, including civil enforcement and criminal investigations and prosecutions, concerning marijuana in all states.  

In January 2018, the Trump administration announced its intent to reverse this policy, allowing federal prosecutors to bring forth criminal cases against marijuana manufacturers and distributors. Given the growth of the cannabis industry and the widespread public approval of cannabis and hemp legalization, the announcement caused confusion among financial institutions about how to do business with marijuana-related businesses and hemp manufacturers in states where marijuana has been legalized without running afoul of federal money laundering laws and other Bank Secrecy Act (“BSA”)-related regulations.  The threat to Marijuana-Related Businesses (“MRBs”) and the businesses that bank them never materialized despite the announcement, and both the industry and regulators have continued to rely on the Cole Memo for guidance. 

The passage of the Farm Bill further complicated cannabis’ possible legality.  The bill made so-called ‘industrial hemp’ a lawful agricultural commodity and removed it from the CSA, provided certain testing requirements are met.  Industrial hemp contains low levels of THC, the main psychoactive component of marijuana, and is used to make apparel, foods, pharmaceuticals, personal care products and building materials.

As of 2019, Michigan has legalized both adult-use recreational and medical marijuana use and production and the newly formed Marijuana Regulatory Agency (“MRA”) comprehensively administers the state regulatory scheme.  While the regulations are in a near constant state of flux, guidance from the MRA has significantly reduced the risks involved to credit unions choosing to bank Marijuana-Related Businesses (“MRBs”).  

This guidance was tempered somewhat by the language of a memorandum issued in January 2020 by the Michigan Department of Insurance and Financial Services (“DIFS”).  The memo identifies itself as a reminder, intended to “reiterate and provide additional information in light of recent changes to the regulatory environment.”  As of the date of the memo, DIFS will remain neutral regarding the provision of MRB banking services, provided the institution has a complete understanding of the associated risks prior to the provision of such services and  identifies, manages, accounts for, and provides sufficient safeguards related to the risks of providing marijuana-related financial products or services.

In August 2019, National Credit Union Administration CUA Chairman Rodney Hood also provided guidance specifically to credit unions in two announcements. The first authorized credit unions to bank hemp producers provided the producers were enrolled in the appropriate Farm Bill-authorized program run by the state.  Hood further announced that the NCUA wouldn’t ‘micro-manage’ credit unions if they chose to take the business decision to bank MRBs.  In both scenarios, the credit unions would be required to follow all appropriate Anti-Money Laundering (“AML”) rules as well as all relevant BSA laws and the Know Your Customer (“KYC”), the safety and soundness rule, and other pertinent laws and regulations. 

While the Justice Department retains authority to prosecute individuals and companies that bank proceeds from MRBs, the NCUA’s new policies are the latest indication of a growing consensus that federal action is needed to clarify the situation, and most commentators expect further relaxing of restrictions – including the likely rescheduling of marijuana to a less controlled designation under the CSA -- over the next 24 months.
 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the section that explains what banks must do to ensure that Cole Memo priorities are preserved, which means, under Cole, that prosecutors won't come after you.  As I mentioned, that orange obese asshole rescinded Cole.  Federal prosecutors are typically pretty conscientious and in lieu of any guidelines at all, they're still following Cole.  Definitions:

AML= Anti-Money Laundering

BSA= Bank Secrecy Act

MRB= Marijuana Related Business

Cole Memo Priorities

Despite the purported rescission of the Cole Memo, the memo still provides the most significant source of guidance for federal regulators and is therefore an important part of effective BSA and AML monitoring in the context of MRBs. Note also that, as of November 2019, the DOJ says it is committed to using its investigative and prosecutorial resources to address the most significant threats to Cole Memo objectives in the most effective, consistent and rational way. In furtherance of those objectives, the Cole Memo still provides guidance to DOJ attorneys and law enforcement to focus their resources on persons or organizations whose conduct interferes with one or more of the following priorities:
    Preventing the distribution of marijuana to minors.
    Preventing revenue from the sale of marijuana from going to criminal enterprises, gangs and cartels.
    Preventing the diversion of marijuana from states where it is legal under state law in some form to other states.
    Preventing state-authorized marijuana activity from being used as a cover or pretext for the trafficking of other illegal drugs or other illegal activity.
    Preventing violence and the use of firearms in the cultivation and distribution of marijuana.
    Preventing drugged driving and the exacerbation of other adverse public health consequences associated with marijuana use.
    Preventing the growing of marijuana on public lands and the attendant public safety and environmental dangers posed by marijuana production on public lands.
    Preventing marijuana possession or use on federal property.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tom isn't a libertarian. Tom is a Fakebertarian which is to say he's a Republican who likes to troll liberals with libertarian arguments but then doesn't apply those same arguments to Republicans.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, MR.CLEAN said:
23 hours ago, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

Obama could have tried for rescheduling cannabis and didn't.

 

Yet another promise he broke.  To me, unforgivable.  Point?

I didn't know he promised to do it but he could have and should have done it, or at least worked toward it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Olsonist said:

Tom, the Cole memo didn't supplant the Ogden memo. It extended it. La la la elsewhere.

Ogden memo:

Don't use your resources to go after users in medical marijuana states.

https://www.justice.gov/archives/opa/blog/memorandum-selected-united-state-attorneys-investigations-and-prosecutions-states

Cole memo:

Doesn't rescind the Ogden memo but rather extends it to "all states". It excepted impaired driving, gang activity and few other things.  

https://www.justice.gov/iso/opa/resources/3052013829132756857467.pdf

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cole_Memorandum

Sessions rescission of both:

https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/4343764-Sessions-marijuana-memo.html

Critters attempt at rescinding the rescission:

https://web.archive.org/web/20180104060955/https://www.yahoo.com/news/republicans-democrats-congress-joining-forces-defeat-sessions-war-weed-092026350.html

 

Heh. OK, so Obama was great for the drug war! Except that "a few other things" mentioned in footnote 1 includes some really elastic gems. For example, if the feds decide, as they did in the Raich case, that the state regulatory regime doesn't respect federal prohibition enough, they'll prosecute. If cannabis is somehow "directly or indirectly" getting to kids, same result. So, pretty much any operation remained at risk and the administration continued to bust them and seize assets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, MR.CLEAN said:

Well, three of my biggest clients are banking MRB money as fast as it can be grown.  Feel free to have them contact me despite your anecdotes.

Reagan allowed a few people, a couple of whom are still alive, to use cannabis when he ended the federal research program.

Are you saying the problems with banking and insurance that I have read about and heard about personally from my friends in the cannabiz don't exist?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, MR.CLEAN said:

It's almost like he didn't read Cole at all.  I'd assume that a libertarian would be pleased at Cole and incensed by the Trumpy admin's rescission of it, and refusal to honor States' rights.  Tom, where are you on that?

Thanks for the partial quote of your work, it is informative. I have mentioned two different TeamR drug war dinosaurs with the last name of Sessions in this thread and only a non-reader could conclude I have been a fan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, MR.CLEAN said:

This is the section that explains what banks must do to ensure that Cole Memo priorities are preserved, which means, under Cole, that prosecutors won't come after you. 

That should really have an asterisk for the reason mentioned above. Prosecutors who are convinced that your state regulatory regime (the one in constant flux) is stable and adequate to maintain the federal prohibition priority won't come after you, nor will prosecutors who fail to find that some of your product somehow got to a kid.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

Heh. OK, so Obama was great for the drug war! Except that "a few other things" mentioned in footnote 1 includes some really elastic gems. For example, if the feds decide, as they did in the Raich case, that the state regulatory regime doesn't respect federal prohibition enough, they'll prosecute. If cannabis is somehow "directly or indirectly" getting to kids, same result. So, pretty much any operation remained at risk and the administration continued to bust them and seize assets.

Yeah, the Kenyan usurper was so inhumane at the drug war that your boy Shitstain came along and rescinded the Ogden and Cole memos instantly making things so much better for dispensaries and users. And by the way, Congress has nothing to do with this because ... because it's easier to blame the Kenyan as a good Fakebertarian should.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Olsonist said:

Yeah, the Kenyan usurper was so inhumane at the drug war that your boy Shitstain came along and rescinded the Ogden and Cole memos instantly making things so much better for dispensaries and users. And by the way, Congress has nothing to do with this because ... because it's easier to blame the Kenyan as a good Fakebertarian should.

On 11/16/2019 at 5:24 AM, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

The stupid drug war remains mostly a TeamR project.

My statement from last November remains true. But the fact that I've taken on numerous TeamR types repeatedly in this thread (and a bunch of others) won't penetrate a non-reading mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

 

 Are you saying the problems with banking and insurance that I have read about and heard about personally from my friends in the cannabiz don't exist?

I'm saying people like me are doing something about it, and if your friends need banking services, drop me a line.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

That should really have an asterisk for the reason mentioned above. Prosecutors who are convinced that your state regulatory regime (the one in constant flux) is stable and adequate to maintain the federal prohibition priority won't come after you, nor will prosecutors who fail to find that some of your product somehow got to a kid.

 

 

  

5 hours ago, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

 if the feds decide, as they did in the Raich case, that the state regulatory regime doesn't respect federal prohibition enough, they'll prosecute. If cannabis is somehow "directly or indirectly" getting to kids, same result. 

That's why the state agencies work with federal regulators and the DOJ when promulgating their rules.  It's government doing what government is supposed to do (in lieu of congress doing what it is supposed to do), and fortunately, thus far, the feds are playing nice enough to get a bunch of large, risk-averse institutions to bite the bullet.

Here's another piece of my policy which defines the different tiers of MRB.  Some of our clients are not banking Tier I businesses.

image.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

My statement from last November remains true. But the fact that I've taken on numerous TeamR types repeatedly in this thread (and a bunch of others) won't penetrate a non-reading mind.

Yeah, this reminds me of Jeff saying he hates his boy Shitstain more than I do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

My statement from last November remains true.

dogballs ^^^  he whip it out of the ghost database

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, MR.CLEAN said:

That's why the state agencies work with federal regulators and the DOJ when promulgating their rules.  It's government doing what government is supposed to do (in lieu of congress doing what it is supposed to do), and fortunately, thus far, the feds are playing nice enough to get a bunch of large, risk-averse institutions to bite the bullet.

I hope that "playing nice" continues. Otherwise, I suspect I'll be covering them over in the Asset Forfeiture thread.

By the way, the exec or the Congress can initiate descheduling. For that reason, I blame both each year it doesn't happen.

17 hours ago, MR.CLEAN said:

Here's another piece of my policy which defines the different tiers of MRB.  Some of our clients are not banking Tier I businesses. 

A friend of mine retired and sold her nursery/garden supply store, but continued selling from her garage on eBay. She's typical for around here, being a conservative merchant from the midwest. Very grandmotherly.

Some of her better customers were California cannabis growers who tended to call her "dude" a lot and tried to pretend they were not growing cannabis. She's not stupid, wasn't fooled, but also didn't care. What tier would she be in?

I hope a day comes soon when cannabis farmers can just open a bank account without hiring a lawyer, like any other farmer.

If the upcoming election results in President Trump or President Bloomberg, that day will be further in the future, which I guess would be good for your business but I think it's bad for the rest of us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

 

Some of her better customers were California cannabis growers who tended to call her "dude" a lot and tried to pretend they were not growing cannabis. She's not stupid, wasn't fooled, but also didn't care. What tier would she be in?

I hope a day comes soon when cannabis farmers can just open a bank account without hiring a lawyer, like any other farmer.

If the upcoming election results in President Trump or President Bloomberg, that day will be further in the future, which I guess would be good for your business but I think it's bad for the rest of us.

Tier III. Incidental MRB.

My business would be even better under complete legalization.  In a world with the Patriot Act and BSA, unless ALL drugs are legalized, commercial growers will always need a lawyer to deal with the anti-money laundering provisions of those laws and the'tough on crime' politicians that passed them. 

Come to think of it, every commercial business needs a business lawyer sooner or later.  I guess cannabis farming really is becoming legitimate business.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, MR.CLEAN said:

Tier III. Incidental MRB.

My business would be even better under complete legalization.  In a world with the Patriot Act and BSA, unless ALL drugs are legalized, commercial growers will always need a lawyer to deal with the anti-money laundering provisions of those laws and the'tough on crime' politicians that passed them. 

Come to think of it, every commercial business needs a business lawyer sooner or later.  I guess cannabis farming really is becoming legitimate business.

 

Hee hee. I haven't been in a while and might have to go to her orchid club meeting next week just to tell her about her "Tier III Incidental MRB."

Not sure what you mean there about ALL drugs being legalized. How would the legal status of heroin, for example, be relevant to a business that only deals in cannabis?

You're right that any business is going to need at least one lawyer sooner or later. I have two at the moment but have never needed one just to open a bank account.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/7/2019 at 7:57 PM, Plenipotentiary Tom said:

Speaking of outright stupidity

NYPD DOES SOMETHING Stupid
 

 

They only got 106 lbs of hemp.

Idaho cops grabbed almost 7,000 lbs.

https://reason.com/2020/02/20/hemp-is-legal-what-if-cops-dont-care/

 

Quote

 

The farm bill Congress passed in 2018 brought an end to the federal prohibition of hemp, a variety of cannabis that contains almost no tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the compound in marijuana that gets you high. At the time, many would-be hemp farmers anticipated a bright future of legally growing the plant for use in paper products, rope, construction materials, clothing, and nutritional supplements. Jason Amatucci, founder of the Virginia Industrial Hemp Coalition, predicted to Reason that the farm bill would "help to clarify any legal gray areas that federal and state agencies have towards hemp and their end consumer products."

A year later, the hemp industry is withering on the vine for want of clarity. After the farm bill was signed into law, Montana-based Big Sky Scientific LLC was transporting a 6,701-pound hemp shipment from Oregon to Colorado when the truck was stopped by Idaho State Police. The driver attempted to explain that he was not carrying marijuana, but Idaho state law classifies all parts of the cannabis plant as marijuana, making no distinction for hemp.

With the shipment confiscated and the driver charged with felony trafficking, Big Sky tried unsuccessfully to regain its product. Idaho argued that the shipment was not federally protected because Oregon had not received federal approval for its own rules.

 

I thought the federal hemp bill was official federal DISapproval of laws like Idaho's. I guess not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like Obama before him, Trump deserves and gets a hat tip from me for using his exec power to do a little piecemeal righting of drug war wrongs.

Blago made big news, but...
 

Quote

 

...

While much of the media coverage focused on Blagojevich and some of the other high-profile names on Trump's clemency list (more on that in a moment), there are others whose names you don't know but probably should.

People like Crystal Munoz, who spent the past 12 years in prison for a nonviolent drug offense. Munoz was convicted in 2007 of assisting a marijuana smuggling operation because she drew a map of a dirt road near Big Bend National Park in Texas. That map was used by drug smugglers, and the Drug Enforcement Administration eventually traced it back to Munoz, who got a 19-year prison sentence despite the fact that she never possessed or sold any of the drugs.

Nothing about Munoz's case suggests that the 40-year-old mother of two girls is a danger to society who needs to be kept in a cage—she's just another person in an endless line of drug war victims. Thankfully, Trump's clemency order will allow her to return to her family.

People like Munoz are "are the forgotten majority of the country's crisis in mass incarceration, a crisis that disproportionately impacts lower-income communities and communities of color, and they are every bit as deserving of a second chance," said Holly Harris, executive director of the Justice Action Network, a criminal justice reform nonprofit that advocated for Munoz's release. In a statement, Harris said she hopes Trump will "use this executive power to grant more commutations and clemencies in due course for any of the thousands of deserving individuals who are neither rich, nor famous, nor connected."

...

 

I join Harris in that hope but I hope even more that Trump and future Presidents don't have to do this because we stop trying to win the stupid drug war by incarcerating more and more people. It hasn't worked, isn't working, and is harmful, not to mention expensive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vaper Madness

https://reason.com/2020/02/20/thc-vaping-madness-reaches-reefer-proportions/

Quote

If you've seen the 1936 movie Reefer Madness, you know that this script isn't getting any fresher. And, as they did when that movie came out, prohibitionists now threaten to make things worse by keeping an industry in the shadows where the real dangers lie.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A good sign from Israel.

Israel's Prime Minister To Explore Marijuana Legalization
 

Quote

 

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu yesterday said his government is exploring the legalization of marijuana for recreational use, following a model similar to Canada's. Justice Minister Amir Ohana "has begun work on the issue, and he will head a committee including professionals and Oren Leibovich, chairman of the [pro-legalization] Green Leaf Party, that will investigate importing the Canadian model for regulation of a legal market in Israel," Netanyahu tweeted in Hebrew.

...

Still, it is notable that Netanyahu seems to think legalization would be a popular move, and his tweet also touted his plan to expunge "tens of thousands" of criminal records related to marijuana possession. He said prosecution of cannabis consumers "is a burden on the courts" and causes "unnecessary suffering to many."

In an interview with The Jerusalem Post, Leibovich, the Green Leaf Party leader, welcomed the prime minister's interest in legalization. "I believe that this week we made a significant step on the path to a legal cannabis market in Israel," he said. "I think this is something that should have been done a long time ago, and I appreciate the prime minister who paid attention, met with me, heard me, and made the right decision." Leibovich said he made overtures to every party, but Netanyahu was the only politician who showed any interest.

Medical marijuana has been legal in Israel since the early 1990s.

...

 

Related to that last, the other thing that has been legal there is medical research involving cannabis, which is why they've done a lot more of it than we have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DEA agent accused of conspiring with cartel

https://apnews.com/6c490312bef4c0600002c539d8c80cba

Quote

 

A once-standout U.S. federal narcotics agent known for spending lavishly on luxury cars and Tiffany jewelry has been arrested on charges of conspiring to launder money with the same Colombian drug cartel he was supposed to be fighting.

Jose Irizarry and his wife were arrested Friday at their home near San Juan, Puerto Rico, as part of a 19-count federal indictment that accused the 46-year-old Irizarry of “secretly using his position and his special access to information” to divert millions in drug proceeds from control of the Drug Enforcement Administration.

...

When The Associated Press revealed the scale of Irizarry’s alleged wrongdoing last year, it sent shockwaves through the DEA, where his ostentatious habits and tales of raucous yacht parties with bikini-clad prostitutes were legendary among agents

But prior to being exposed, Irizarry had been a model agent, winning awards and praise from his supervisors. After joining the DEA in Miami 2009, he was entrusted with an undercover money laundering operation using front companies, shell bank accounts and couriers. Irizarry resigned in January 2018 after being reassigned to Washington when his boss in Colombia became suspicious

...

The DEA has declined to comment on its employment of Irizarry and potential red flags that came up during his screening process. Irizarry was hired by the DEA despite indications he showed signs of deception in a polygraph exam, and had declared bankruptcy with debts of almost $500,000. Still, he was permitted to handle financial transactions after being hired by the DEA.

In total, Irizarry and informants under his direction handled at least $3.8 million that should’ve been carefully tracked by the DEA as part of undercover money laundering investigations.

Not all of that amount was pocketed by the co-conspirators, but the indictment details at least $900,000 that was paid out from a single criminal account opened by Irizarry and an informant using the name, passport and social security number of a third person who was unaware their identity was being stolen.

Proceeds from the alleged scheme funded a veritable spending spree. It included the purchase of a $30,000 Tiffany diamond ring, a BMW, three Land Rovers and a $767,000 home in Cartagena as well as homes in south Florida and Puerto Rico, where the couple has been living. To hide his tracks, Irizarry allegedly opened a bank account in someone else’s name and used the victim’s forged signature and Social Security number.

....

 

Legendary. So much winning. They hire the best people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now