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Fastnet 2015

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A week to go until the start of this classic race. 355 enteries, with Comanche and Spindrift 2 both going, so potentially a new record in both the mono and multihull classes.

To early for a forecast in this fickle part of the world, but should be great sight of them all going down the Solent and through Husrt, where I shall be. The days of ocean racing have sadly passed me by!

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I had to pull out after work cancelled my leave, absolutely gutted.

 

I notice that RORC have made the Fastnet TSS a mark of the course (to port) should avoid the situation we had last time of boats going head to head with 30knt closing speeds in fog with <100ft vis as people skirted round the left side of it on the way to the rock.

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Has Rambler 88 been fitted with her DSS foils yet? Apparently this was always the plan so will be interested to see if she is competing with these enhancements and what difference they might make to her speed against Comanche given the conditions are suited. Certainly the Fastnet is Comanche's kind of race is the breeze is blowing she could shatter the record?

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Spanish Translation, Apparently yes is the answer to my own question.


Being the first is all that matters it is well known the phrase.. "! ... Majesty, there is no second" And that aspiring two large sailing super-maxi such as "Comanche" 100 feet in length and the "Rambler 88" to 88 feet long.


That small difference of only 12 feet long (3.68 meters) is enough for the team "Rambler 88", skippered by Brad Butterworth put an to find the best solution to slow the pace of "Comanche".


Both sailmakers use canting keel, lateral drifts and ballast tanks; Butterworth commitment but a technical solution already proven in the "Wild Oats" in the latest edition of the Sydney - Hobart, the DSS (Dynamic Stability Systems). It is basically a sheet of foil so transversely installed in the vessel and can move from side to side to counter the heel of the sailboat. Butterworth will be vital to above 14 knots.



On paper "Comanche" has everything in its favor to win the Fastnet in 2015, more length, more sail area, but "Rambler 88" expected to catch up with the DSS. The DSS aims to realize the effect produced by the change of the crew to windward or leeward depending on the wind strength, the only difference is that you just have to move this foil downwind sailing ship based on the heel counter to pretend.


During the 90th anniversary of the Fastnet, one of the tall ships that will be in the fight will be "Leopard", a 100-foot cruise - regatta, which aims to take third place in real time.


For now the glory of the Fastnet in monoscasco lies with the VO 70 "Abu Dhabi" Ian Wlaker pattern, which in 2011 set a record of 1 days, 18 hours and 39 minutes on the 603 miles of travel.


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Long range models from Predict wind. Think I will order the one on the right. :wacko:

 

post-10233-0-99124300-1439204361_thumb.png

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I'm flying over to race round the rock-

First one- don't know what to expect other than to be wet and cold-

 

See ya in Plymouth-

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Spanish Translation, Apparently yes is the answer to my own question.

Being the first is all that matters it is well known the phrase.. "! ... Majesty, there is no second" And that aspiring two large sailing super-maxi such as "Comanche" 100 feet in length and the "Rambler 88" to 88 feet long.

That small difference of only 12 feet long (3.68 meters) is enough for the team "Rambler 88", skippered by Brad Butterworth put an to find the best solution to slow the pace of "Comanche".

Both sailmakers use canting keel, lateral drifts and ballast tanks; Butterworth commitment but a technical solution already proven in the "Wild Oats" in the latest edition of the Sydney - Hobart, the DSS (Dynamic Stability Systems). It is basically a sheet of foil so transversely installed in the vessel and can move from side to side to counter the heel of the sailboat. Butterworth will be vital to above 14 knots.

On paper "Comanche" has everything in its favor to win the Fastnet in 2015, more length, more sail area, but "Rambler 88" expected to catch up with the DSS. The DSS aims to realize the effect produced by the change of the crew to windward or leeward depending on the wind strength, the only difference is that you just have to move this foil downwind sailing ship based on the heel counter to pretend.

During the 90th anniversary of the Fastnet, one of the tall ships that will be in the fight will be "Leopard", a 100-foot cruise - regatta, which aims to take third place in real time.

For now the glory of the Fastnet in monoscasco lies with the VO 70 "Abu Dhabi" Ian Wlaker pattern, which in 2011 set a record of 1 days, 18 hours and 39 minutes on the 603 miles of travel.

 

 

 

Rambler had the DSS boards in and used them during Transatlantic. Comanche still a knot and a half faster reaching when looking at the tracker and Comanche did their 618 mile 24 hour run to Ramblers 580 something run certainly in DSS conditions. George David commented that Rambler flies much more bow out when the boards are used but Comanche simply has pace.

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Spanish Translation, Apparently yes is the answer to my own question.

Being the first is all that matters it is well known the phrase.. "! ... Majesty, there is no second" And that aspiring two large sailing super-maxi such as "Comanche" 100 feet in length and the "Rambler 88" to 88 feet long.

That small difference of only 12 feet long (3.68 meters) is enough for the team "Rambler 88", skippered by Brad Butterworth put an to find the best solution to slow the pace of "Comanche".

Both sailmakers use canting keel, lateral drifts and ballast tanks; Butterworth commitment but a technical solution already proven in the "Wild Oats" in the latest edition of the Sydney - Hobart, the DSS (Dynamic Stability Systems). It is basically a sheet of foil so transversely installed in the vessel and can move from side to side to counter the heel of the sailboat. Butterworth will be vital to above 14 knots.

On paper "Comanche" has everything in its favor to win the Fastnet in 2015, more length, more sail area, but "Rambler 88" expected to catch up with the DSS. The DSS aims to realize the effect produced by the change of the crew to windward or leeward depending on the wind strength, the only difference is that you just have to move this foil downwind sailing ship based on the heel counter to pretend.

During the 90th anniversary of the Fastnet, one of the tall ships that will be in the fight will be "Leopard", a 100-foot cruise - regatta, which aims to take third place in real time.

For now the glory of the Fastnet in monoscasco lies with the VO 70 "Abu Dhabi" Ian Wlaker pattern, which in 2011 set a record of 1 days, 18 hours and 39 minutes on the 603 miles of travel.

 

 

 

Rambler had the DSS boards in and used them during Transatlantic. Comanche still a knot and a half faster reaching when looking at the tracker and Comanche did their 618 mile 24 hour run to Ramblers 580 something run certainly in DSS conditions. George David commented that Rambler flies much more bow out when the boards are used but Comanche simply has pace.

 

Cheers, That answers the question. 30 Miles faster approx over a 24 hour run whilst using DSS means Comanche has the legs and the feet, 12 extra of them.!

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I'm flying over to race round the rock-

First one- don't know what to expect other than to be wet and cold-

See ya in Plymouth-

More of the same and tidal gates.

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2011 was fun. upwind to the rock on a swan42. 2,5hrs gennaker run, upwind to plymouth. cold and miserable. Luckily we were early in plymouth before the big fleet came in, so the toilets and showers were still clean.

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First one- don't know what to expect other than to be wet and cold-

 

 

Expect dolphins.

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Did the race in 2008, light downwind start, breeze on 12hrs later, upwind to the Rock, foggy when we got there, didn't see it, A3 reach away from the offset mark, peel to the A2, light through the Scilly's, and a bit of breeze to finish...in the dark. Tie the boat up, commence drinking at 2300 or thereabouts, watch the sun come up, shitfaced, still in the same 3 day old gear and boots, in the same chair! Good times with a great bunch, shame I didn't get to see the Rock though. Cold and wet, gotta love Pom Rock in August!

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Pretty much sums up my two Fastnet experiences. First time ever got probably the best rock rounding you could imagine if you did the race for 100 years, second time I got the more typical night time, rain and fog so thick you could barely see the masthead.

 

post-14825-0-15512700-1439315883_thumb.jpg

 

Still a few boats looking for crew last I heard, J/133 and a Mat 12 who were on the waiting list and got last min entries.

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First fastnet.

 

Hoping for a smooth ride... I'll settle for not too wet and cold though :P

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checking this one off the bucket list this year.

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Did the race in 2008, ... Cold and wet, gotta love Pom Rock in August!

 

2008? Nuff said.

Its not a pommie rock.

It belongs to the Irish Republic. We just kinda borrow it once ever 2 years.

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Did the race in 2008, ... Cold and wet, gotta love Pom Rock in August!

 

2008? Nuff said.

Its not a pommie rock.

It belongs to the Irish Republic. We just kinda borrow it once ever 2 years.

 

Pom Rock = British Isles

The Rock = Fastnet Rock

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Did the race in 2008, ... Cold and wet, gotta love Pom Rock in August!

 

2008? Nuff said.

Its not a pommie rock.

It belongs to the Irish Republic. We just kinda borrow it once ever 2 years.

 

Pom Rock = British Isles

The Rock = Fastnet Rock

 

Ha yeah. Granted. But still 2008 must have been a lonly year?

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Good luck to all you guys doing the race this year. Have a great time and stay safe..!

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Just been looking at the list of entrants and no Ran the RP72. anyone know what she is up to?

https://secure.rorc.org/app/index.php?action=entryList&iRaceId=114&sHash=c23dadf9b73b0fbc8c99619ea732a5ebbfccec4b

The owner was running short of cash. Down to his last couple of bilion by all accounts so he is concentrating on his new business for a bit.

 

Momo is a sister ship to Ran

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Just been looking at the list of entrants and no Ran the RP72. anyone know what she is up to?

https://secure.rorc.org/app/index.php?action=entryList&iRaceId=114&sHash=c23dadf9b73b0fbc8c99619ea732a5ebbfccec4b

 

Ran must be celebrating her Class zero win in the Copa del Rey Palma, last week, under new ownership or charter.

 

http://www.regatacopadelrey.com/resultados2015/resultados2015.php?ln=sp&ms=50&claseinput=01

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Just been looking at the list of entrants and no Ran the RP72. anyone know what she is up to?

https://secure.rorc.org/app/index.php?action=entryList&iRaceId=114&sHash=c23dadf9b73b0fbc8c99619ea732a5ebbfccec4b

 

Ran must be celebrating her Class zero win in the Copa del Rey Palma, last week, under new ownership or charter.

 

http://www.regatacopadelrey.com/resultados2015/resultados2015.php?ln=sp&ms=50&claseinput=01

 

Ran was sold to the owner of shockwave

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Looks like a very frustrating/tactical race, doubt we well see any race records, I would guess the winner will come from IRC 2 or 3.

 

Start

post-14825-0-67964700-1439657136_thumb.jpg

 

Sun night

post-14825-0-04598900-1439657136_thumb.jpg

 

Mon noon

post-14825-0-44859800-1439657123_thumb.jpg

 

Mon night

post-14825-0-45188700-1439657122_thumb.jpg

 

Tues noon

post-14825-0-63805600-1439657139_thumb.jpg

 

Tues night

post-14825-0-83270400-1439657137_thumb.jpg

 

Wed noon

post-14825-0-66018300-1439657212_thumb.jpg

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competitive anchoring....

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Slownet

 

Dragon is prepped and ready to go, excess weight off loaded, GRIBs refreshed, provisioned and some extra water laid on to account for what will likely be a slow race. We have been in Hamble since last Sunday, making it a pretty leisurely time for getting things sorted. This is in no small part to the help I have received from Phillipa Hutton Squire and Paul Peggs. Both local to Hamble and both plugged into the Class 40, they have been a huge help with logistics.

 

Dragon's crew for the race is rock-star awesome. Simon Day and Richard Feeny have come over from the States for the race. Simon's day job is as an engineer at NEB, but he has also owned and campaigned a Mini, and clocked some time on Toothface I and II.Richard might be lacking in Class 40 experience, but he comes to the table with a vast set of experience in racing including racing, development and coaching in the multi-hull classes including a stint racing in the Extreme series. Our fourth brings to the table the local knowledge. Two time Olympian and pro driver / tactician Andy Beadsworth lives on the Solent and is filling in a huge hole that cost me several places in the 2011 edition. We have also had a great assist from ian Moore who shared some nav and meteo thoughts with us today.

 

The weather window is looking challenging. The Azores high has been split into two and located pretty far west and south, but is organizing itself and moving north and east. Combined with a high that is sitting on the Channel and then a loosely organized low that will be moving towards Greenland in the next couple of days we have a lot of different inputs into the picture. We are expecting a light north westerly gradient on Sunday for the start, with the fleet sailing into a ridge of high pressure and light air on Monday that will persist into Tuesday. By Tuesday, the southeast boundary between the low pressure system and the Azors high should produce some reasonably strong southwesterly flow with winds in the low teens for Wednesday into Thursday.

 

We start mid day on Sunday, on an outbound tide that should see most of the boats able to make the Needles at the western end of the Solent so long as we get any type of breeze at all. But after that, it is anybodies' guess. The next gate is Portland Bill, 30 miles or so to the west and the tide turns there at 6:30, producing vicious currents. Some of the fastest boats are going to struggle to make it there in the predicted conditions, and there could be a lot of kedging come nightfall on Sunday. If any boats do make it there by the tide turn, they could stand to make huge gains on the fleet over night into Monday.

 

The predicted conditions across the course should result should be a race that favors smaller boats who will be able to ride the south westerlies into the back of the faster fleet as they come down from the Rock. Faster boats that will have struggled to finish by Wednesday evening are going to be sitting in Plymouth watching the slower portion of the fleet romp down the rhumb line all day on Thursday and end up correcting out in front of them.

 

If I was racing in IRC, I might care about all of that, but the reality is that we have 23 Class 40's registered and that is the only fleet that I am going to focus on. Of those 23, there are probably ten or so boats that have a shot at getting a podium spot, and I expect it will be a close thing the entire way. Looking at the scratch sheet, the handicap looks something like:

  • Tales II - This Botin designed weapon is very probably the fastest boat in the Class 40 fleet. Plus, she has a crew that is top notch. She has won all of the relatively short list of races that she has been in since being launched in 2014, but it is a very impressive list of races.
  • Concise 8 - Helmed by Jack Trigger since Ned Collier Wakefield graduated to the Mod 70 that is now Concise 10, this Ker designed had lots of teething pains with its rudders for its first year or so of existence. They seem to have fixed those issues, and the boat has shown some very good speed in the races it has competed in this year.
  • Stella Nova - Fresh off a dominating performance in the Transat, Burkhardt has an incredibly impressive crew on this Mach 40 design that has really strong reaching abilities, particularly in heavier air..
  • Visit Brussels - Roaring 40 - Michele Kleinjans has as many miles under his keel as anyone in the Class 40 fleet, and has beat Dragon in both of our match ups this year. The Farr design is a good all-around boat, and Michele knows how to sail it.
  • Nivea - This Pogo S3 is new to her owner, but he has got a great crew around him. Ana Maria Renken is joined by Miranda Merron and legendary French offshore coach Tanguy Leglatin. On talent alone, this boat is one to keep an eye on.
  • Concise 2 - Another boat in Tony Lawson's stable of sailing hardware, this Akilaria is being helmed by Phillipa Hutton Squire. Her all female crew is all UK based and bring local knowledge to the event. A third place in the Round the Island race make them a contender for the podium here.
  • Moonpalace - This is a Dutch entry, another Pogo S3 and skippered by Adrian van Oord. The boat is very well prepared, and it will be interesting to see what Adrian can do with a boat that is new to him this year.
  • Silvi Belle 2 - This boat is third generation Akilaria and helmed by Mike Gascoyne. previously raced as Cat Phone, she had an unfortunate dismasting in last years RdR but he has a crack crew and a decent shot of making it to the podium
  • L'Express Conquerants and Red round out what I view as the top ten. Both have not seen much racing this year but the skippers are talented and the designs are fast.

 

Its difficult to assess where Dragon might show amongst this group. We have a top notch crew, and the boat is prepped as well as she has ever been. Most of all, these conditions are indisputably in our sweet spot. I feel as if we have as good a shot as any boat in the Class 40 fleet, and we are going to be gunning for it. The race will be won by whom ever can best navigate the predicted light air, and make the fewest mistakes.

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Good luck Mike, I'll be keeping an eye out for you from the beach at Hurst. Look forward to reading your reports as the race progresses, if you can find the time that is!

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Good luck to everyone doing the Fastnet this year, we had to turn down a place due to a lack of crew. :( Maybe next time! Will be out watching though and will try and get some photos and videos.

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Such a shame the wind didn't play ball, a Fastnet start is normally a spectacular thing but this is pretty painful.

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Well,you can see a flying dragon. Come spit some fire :ph34r:

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This is such a cool fucking race. Won the start at the Cowes end of the line. Stayed ahead of the Class 40 fleet and with the IMOCA 60 fleet all the way down the Solent in a beat with mostly sub 5 knots of wind. Wind picked up to 10 knots at Hurst, down shifted to jib. Left Needles behind still in front, and with the back half of the 60s pulling away.

 

Tacking down to St. Albans and trying to maintain our lead. There is a lot of racing to go.

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Go Dragon! Watching on the tracker.

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This is such a cool fucking race. Won the start at the Cowes end of the line. Stayed ahead of the Class 40 fleet and with the IMOCA 60 fleet all the way down the Solent in a beat with mostly sub 5 knots of wind. Wind picked up to 10 knots at Hurst, down shifted to jib. Left Needles behind still in front, and with the back half of the 60s pulling away.

 

Tacking down to St. Albans and trying to maintain our lead. There is a lot of racing to go.

 

Andy B knows his Solent.

 

Have a good race.

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Poor old Lucky hit the Shingles... Looks like it could be there a while.

On the way back into the Solent by the looks of the tracker.

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Massive left to right set there. Get a bit too far north when it's light & shite, & you're in the doo-doo.

Always stayed clear of that one, saying that, found the bottom whilst tide dodging more than once.

 

North, South and that bit by Ryde sands.

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Looks like everyones parked, majority of the fleet pointing due south on the tracker which means that at the moment they're just managing to stem the tide.

 

One solitary boat tried inshore at Portland and doesn't look to be going anywhere fast and 4 appear to be stuck off Swanage.

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Tracker looks schooling fish at present. Pray for some decent breeze soon.

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That was a tough dinner period. We got caned off of St. Albans and let a good portion of the fleet past us. Moving well now, but we have ground to make up. We all are about to run into a high pressure ridge in the next few hours which will likely result in fleet compression and then a day of light air sailing.

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^^

 

I am guessing the red zones are restricted areas. If you look at the track of the Class 40s they all tacked as close to the red zone as they dared.

 

The zones near Land's End and the Scilly Ilies will make life interesting for the navigators.

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That's right - they are Traffic Separation Schemes and been set as excluded areas for this race

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Spindrift looks to be lining up for south of the Lands End zone, and the other multis north unless they gybe soon

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Whow,

 

J-V 72 "Momo" only 7 miles behind MOD 70 "Concise" (which started 1h40mn earlier) between Lands End and the Scillies after 1/3 of the course.

And no more than 16 miles on first MOD 70

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Interesting move by R88 to go south of Isles of Scilly and split from the big C and Momo

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Well, looking at the Dragon someone must have not only cut the the wings off but also extinguished the fire. 1.6 knots looks like no wind and current from the wrong side. South looks much brighter.

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uh yup. Last night was OK following my last post. Winds were decent at 9 knots or so and we stayed in touch with most of the Class 40 fleet, picking up a modest amount of ground. Then we sailed into the expected high pressure ridge, and wind dialed back to sub 5 knots around 8 AM. Long stretches at sub 2 knots. Lucky for us, the tide was giving us something otherwise we would have been stopped.

 

We picked up a North westerly around 1 PM local, at about 4 knots. A critical 4 knots, just enough to get the boat moving. Code 0 up, and at least rolling. There are nice cumulous clouds on shore indicating some sea breeze, but with 10 miles to get there it just ain't gonna happen until we get closer to the Lizard at which point we will be praying for it since the tide will be turning.

 

Looking at AIS, boats to the south saw more pressure though out this period.

 

GRIBs are calling for another shift in about an hour and half. Time for a kip.

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Curious how hte battle between Imoca and the VOR boats will evolve after the lands end TSS, and Tonnere with 85 your old Piet Vroon onboard for his 25th Fastnet.

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looking at Passage Weather they should start rowing at least til tuesday night :angry:

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Comanche and R88 have gotten away and having a good armwrestle. The former having better approach to the Fastnet TSS.. the latter going quicker. Big parkup in the cheaper seats....the IMOCA's all on top of each other.

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Class 40 Parking Lot

 

We are a small handful of miles east of the Scilly's, trying to aim at the south west corner of the TSS and squeezing every millimeter of distance out of 2..8 knots of north westerly breeze. We have managed through good luck and a little bit of skill to close 13 miles on Class 40 leader Concise 8, and the front half of this fleet lies in a ten mile stretch around this upper part of the Scilly's.

 

After a great start and trip down the Solent, we screwed up a bit on Sunday night. We made a decision to take a hitch to the north towards St. Albans, contrary to the fleet, and ended up seeing the southern boats get more air in a light night. Even worse, the furthest west got a lift and were able to clear mid-Channel TSS without having to sacrifice miles to a tack which led to Concise 8 jumping to a huge lead.

Today was better for us, with our speed and relative position stabilized this morning and then a well timed tack towards the Lizard this afternoon putting us in some favorable air for the late afternoon.

 

The next stage is all about gentle finesse. with an 18 hour light air exercise of the Fastnet Drift before we get the south westerly flow established.

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Stop fucking posting and go sail.

You really are just a cunt.

 

 

Mike; Everyone else loves your posts. Keep 'em coming!

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First rule of drift racing - the first boat that gets to the new wind wins. Currently Dragon is heading North East.

New wind is forecast to fill in from the west.

 

Wouldn't the better tactics for all the boats shagging around at the Scillies to be to get as far west as possible before trying to track north?

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Comanche followed by R88 around the rock and drifting home. This one looks like the race to miss so you could honour that promise to take the family to Wally World.

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Really appreciate the updates from Rail Meat - keep them coming

 

Having drifted in 2 fastnets, I have a lot of sympathy for the guys and girls out there - at least with the promise of wind tomorrow, they have something to look forward to!

 

Apart from the 1st four, the big boats must be in a world of pain - the IMOCAs etc have hardly moved in 24 hours!

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First rule of drift racing - the first boat that gets to the new wind wins. Currently Dragon is heading North East.

New wind is forecast to fill in from the west.

 

Wouldn't the better tactics for all the boats shagging around at the Scillies to be to get as far west as possible before trying to track north?

I would want to be on the west side of the fleet. By going through the Scillies the boats are taking a westerly course. The traffic separation scheme prevents getting too far west. Looks like tokoloshe has tacked once round the tss to get West. Is red going for the gap between the 2 tss?

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Nice to see Dragon back at my morning glance of the tracker.

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Anyone have a link for the crewlists for Rambler and Comanche, or any of the other big boats ?

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There are some horrific tacking angles going on.

 

It must be rather distressing for Nivea who is doing 5kts at 90° to the rhumb line if they see Sprindrift 2 crossing their bow at 13kts, about 300Nm further down the course.

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No bigboat crew list at hand...but if someone has banged your wife you can narrow it down to a bowman.

or an australian tennis player...

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Dragon Tales - The Interim Comeback Edition

 

A little over 300 miles of sailing left, but we managed to work this back into a bit of a restart for us. Concise 8 is still out there, maybe 8 miles to the lead but that is sure as shit better than the 28 she had at one point. Other wise, the lead pack of Class 40s are all within sight of one another.

 

Coming out of last night's post, we saw 6 to 7 knot tight reaching conditions up to the eastern TSS last night, then fading to just 4 knots of wind and headed. We managed to get to the north side of the track and used the inside lane to pass Red, Concise 2, Stella Nova and Nivea. Go team.

 

Then it was a mixed bag of shit from there to all the way around the top of the Scilly's At one point, we were two boat lengths away from Concise 2, close enough to give them a clap when they successfully had someone up the rig to kick their battens through. After crossing them one more time with a half boat length, it seems we have shaken them for the time being.

 

Wind has build to 5 whole knots and started its clock and is at WSW. We are favoring the left side of the course, and sailing towards a gradual build and left shift. Routing puts us at the Rock a little after mid-night tonight, BST. If you care to believe the GRIBs and polars.

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