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Terrorvision

Man Overboard - Oman Sail

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Front page mentions he wasn't wearing a PFD but not sure if that came from the audio- here is the official message from Oman Sail.

 

Man Overboard - Oman Sail:

 

Musandam-Oman Sail, MOD70, skipper Sidney Gavignet (FRA), reported a Man Overboard (MOB) at 05:05 Central European Time on Wednesday 7 October off the coast of Croatia (position: 44° 32' 98N - 014° 02' 50E). The Italian and Croatian coastguards are assisting with the search and rescue operation for missing crewmember Mohammed Al Alawi (26). Wind speed at the time of the MOB was 15-17 knots. Mohammed’s family has been notified and Oman Sail team members are with them and supporting them through this uncertain time. We will send an update on the situation when we have more information.

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Latest update:

 

Man overboard – Oman Sail – update:

Further to our report of a Man Overboard (MOB) on Wednesday 7 October at 05:05 Central European Time, we can confirm that Mohammed Al Alawi, 26, went missing just south of Pula in Croatia while our MOD70 trimaran, Musandam-Oman Sail, was en route from Lorient via Marseille in France to Trieste in Italy, to be present at the Barcolana yacht race, as part of our European season.

A combined operation between Oman Sail and the Italian and Croatian coastguards searched the area throughout the day on Wednesday but by nightfall they were unable to find Mohammed. The coastguards and Oman Sail resumed the search this morning and we will provide updates as soon as there is any news.

The absolute priority at this stage is to find Mohammed, and no effort will be spared in the pursuit of that objective. Oman Sail team members remain with Mohammed’s family to support them through this difficult time.

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I guess it is 'No news is Oman Sail PR incompetence' now. Can't see any good news coming at this late stage.

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it's not looking positive. maybe they are focussing more on his family and not the interwebs?

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October 10th, 2015

Mohammed Al Alawi, 26-year-old crewmember of MOD70 trimaran Musandam-Oman Sail remains missing this evening following a Man Overboard incident last Wednesday 7 October in the early hours of the morning, pre-dawn, just south of Pula in Croatia while the MOD70 was en route from France to Trieste in Italy for the Barcolana.

Sail Oman latest:

Day four and the extensive search for Mohammed continues and the search area has extended into Italian waters; the search team has been a mix of Oman Sail, private search and rescue companies and the Croatian coastguard, using helicopters, airplanes, and boats including Musandam-Oman Sail. Today’s inclement weather of strong easterly winds, limited visibility and rain was not conducive to a detailed search.

Ahmed Al Alawi, father of Mohammed, who is in Croatia with the team said “We [the family] extend our deep gratitude to all who are supporting this search, especially the Omani Government, the staff of Oman Sail, Her Excellency The Sultanate of Oman’s Honorary Consul of Croatia and the Croatian Coastguard who have been exemplary. We have been inundated with heart-felt messages of support which are much appreciated.”
The search continues.

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Tis too tragic just how many pro crew are REGULARLY going MOB....brings home the maxim if on watch alone donteventhinkaboutit without the PFDs....

 

According to the RNLI 1 in 8 of us will flip out of the boat so why not stack the odds more in your favour?

 

http://overboard.rnli.org/

 

I’ve also recently invested in one of these…

 

ACR-2881-ResQLink-Plus-C.jpg

 

The good news stories as to why are rather compelling…

 

https://www.acrartex.com/survivors/

 

 

(Condolences to the Al Alawi family)

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Unless they're searching the shoreline to see if he is trapped on a secluded beach or outcrop I don't see that the search is going to turn anything up 5 days after he was reported as going overboard.

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Five days into our search for Mohammed Al Alawi, our missing Musandam-Oman Sail crewmember, and the area of focus has extended into Italian waters. Croatian and Italian coastguards are in contact to coordinate the next phase. The Croatian coastguard who has worked tirelessly since Wednesday alongside the Oman Sail search team was on standby today to continue looking for Mohammed, but unfortunately, Saturday’s bad weather continued into today and the high winds, bad visibility and rough sea state grounded the search aircraft. Tomorrow conditions are expected to improve and we aim to continue the search from the air.

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The search for Mohammed Al Alawi, our missing sailor, continued for a sixth day today both on the water and in the air and with the combined efforts of the Croatian coastguard and the Oman Sail search teams.

The Oman sail boat and the Croatian coastguard searched the water, and the Oman Sail search team also flew a light aircraft along the Italian coast in the hope of finding Mohammed, sadly without results.

As day six comes to an end, the Croatian coastguard has informed Oman Sail that this will be their final day of searching and they have expressed their extreme regret not to have been able to find Mohammed. David Graham, Oman Sail CEO, said, “It is with immense sadness we heard the news that Croatian coastguards have concluded the search and Mohammed remains missing. That said, we completely understand why and respect their decision, The coastguard have worked tirelessly alongside our crews for everyday since Mohammed was lost at sea. The search has been thorough and extensive and Mohammed’s father, asked me to convey his deepest gratitude for their efforts, and all involved in the search which we, Oman Sail, echo”

The Italian coastguard has put all stations along the coast of the Adriatic on alert.

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It's all over. Sail away Mohammed- it was good sailing with you.

 

In an immensely sad decision, today, nine days after the man overboard incident, the search has stopped. Today we will accompany Mohammed’s father and uncle back to Muscat to be with their family at this tragic time. The Italian and Croatian coastguards remain on alert.

“We are completely devastated,” said David Graham, Oman Sail Chief Executive Officer “Mohammed [26] has been a sailor and sailing instructor with Oman Sail for many years, he was a cherished member of the team with a hugely positive approach and passion for the sport. He was a highly respected colleague and will be greatly missed. We are doing everything that we can to support his family at this difficult time.”

Mohammed Al Alawi was reported as the Man Overboard on Wednesday 7 October, pre-dawn, just south of Pula in Croatia. The MOD70 trimaran Musandam-Oman Sail was on a delivery from Lorient, France to Trieste in Italy for the Barcolana. A combined search effort between the Croatian coastguard and Oman Sail began immediately using all means available: aircraft, RIBs, the MOD70 and coastguard launches.

Time and tidal patterns prompted the search to shift to the Italian side of the Adriatic Sea between Ancona and Rimini yesterday. The search in this area continued today. Using a light aircraft, we searched the coast and coastal waters, sadly, once again, without results.

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I’ve also recently invested in one of these…

I've been carrying one of those for years...... in our cold waters we say it will be a great way to find the body. I also carry an AIS overboard device and that is instant and allows the boat to locate you immediately assuming your conscious, unlike the g-EPIRB.

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R.I.P. Mohammed Al Alawi ! - Another sailor - as many thousands over years, decades, centuries before - found his "wet grave" on high seas. Sadly to say. The seas and oceans are their homes... there they belong to with their ships, crew mates to sail away exploring themselfs behind the horizons. Sometimes they never come back.

 

My condolences go to the family, close friends and the whole Sailing Team of Oman Sail. The coast guards from Croatia and Itala did a great job keeping their eyes open so long during many days of search. We can be happy to have them doing their job 24hx7d.

 

I hope the team management has the courage to publish the fully accident report, so "we" all in the sailing community around the globe can learn to have a safely stay on (fast) boats, day and night.

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I’ve also recently invested in one of these…

I've been carrying one of those for years...... in our cold waters we say it will be a great way to find the body. I also carry an AIS overboard device and that is instant and allows the boat to locate you immediately assuming your conscious, unlike the g-EPIRB.

 

 

 

This should be communicated more in public ! - I suppose nowadays for a crew the AIS overboard device is the best to get for quick finding, beside the personal Epirb.

 

This AOD rescued the life of a sailor during the Clipper Round the World race in spring 2014 in the pacific ocean.

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+1 SkipJayR

 

The size and cost of these devices continues to drop so there is really no reason not to have one on your PFD (even us weekend warriors). I do however feel that a DSC MOB device is more practical than AIS as not all vessels have AIS but many now have DSC. In addition models like the V100 from Mobilarm also send a recorded voice distress signal over Ch16 so basically every VHF becomes a potential rescuer.

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+1 SkipJayR

 

The size and cost of these devices continues to drop so there is really no reason not to have one on your PFD (even us weekend warriors). I do however feel that a DSC MOB device is more practical than AIS as not all vessels have AIS but many now have DSC. In addition models like the V100 from Mobilarm also send a recorded voice distress signal over Ch16 so basically every VHF becomes a potential rescuer.

 

I think, it confuses the hobby sailor (maybe not the anarchist) to have so many options. Security and MOB should follow one standard on board (by law). - All boats sailing on coastal and offshore sea areas shall be equipped as defined by GMDSS... http://www.vhf-dsc.info/why.html

 

VHF DSC is linked with GMDSS... and latest since more than 8 years in US and other nations, DSC has been required on all new mounted radios for some time, so you probably used ones in the market (e.g. as sold on Ebay) have one... as we can read from an article in 2008... http://yachtpals.com/vhf-radio-dsc-4026

 

The Icom IC-M91D was one of the first handhelds which can send DSC with a GPS position by a "press one time the button"... actually there is a big prize range between 70 to 400 Euros for such devices.

 

The display of the Icom IC-M91D with navigation to the waypoint and MOB...

icom-ic-m91d-display_510.jpg

 

 

Boating made a test in winter 2013/2014 with different brands... http://www.boatingmag.com/gear/boatinglab-tests-handheld-vhf-radios

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Firstly I do hope that this slight topic drift doesn't in anyway diminish the condolences we all feel for those affected by this tragedy and that it rather puts more info out there so we can learn from such horrible events.

 

Skip JayR I actually just purchased a M92 and one of the things that has just occurred to me is that if you set acknowledge to auto one can do a DSC position request from the onboard base station so that it can be found even if the wearer is incapacitated. Units like the V100 from Mobilarm are water immersion activated (or by manual intervention) which can be an issue on wet fast boats.

 

Is it practical for every crew member to have a fully functional VHF? That's a question I can't answer, but it might be a great thing to toss in with the life ring if somebody goes MOB

 

The sad thing here in Oz is that lots of people don't bother to get their radio license (MROVCP at a minimum) and therefore cannot get a MMSI making all the bells and whistles of a DSC radio unavailable.

 

The Icom M92 retails for $450 here in Oz which is cheap for the amount of peace of mind it gives me.

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Try Flying Is it practical for every crew member to have a fully functional VHF? That's a question I can't answer, but it might be a great thing to toss in with the life ring if somebody goes MOB

 

 

 

 

In tendency I see more and more small crews on board... which has different reasons:

 

  1. Individualisation in our modern, Western societies preaches (as a kind of new religion) that "being an individualist" is the true form of being (Rec.: A real nonsense in my understanding about human's nature as humans are social beings).
  2. Smaller boats nowadays are very seaworthy, and one can get them at low price (as the boat market has collapsed since longer).... so more and more people think about "living on a boat" or start sailing adventures single handed.
  3. An increasing number of people are pulled to pick up single-handed or short-handed sailing as a kind of "self realization" (maybe better to define it as "self finding") as the over-organized life on land gives on the feeling not being alive, being bored and to miss liberty having the own life in own hands from A to Z (which is same an illusion on board of a boat as there many, many duties one has to follow to keep everything safely which is more a kind of burdon).
  4. More and more people become wealthy and can afford comfortable bigger boats which are designed by purpose and buuilt by boat warfts for short handed or single handed crew (e.g. 60 foot catamaran for an elder couple in the 50th)

 

So in tendency we see more and more smaller sailing crews on boats, so it looks for me.... which let increase the risks for every MOB as its always of benefit to have bigger crews, e.g. with 3-4 crew members during each watch.

 

This year we lost the well experienced female sailor Charly Hill which went over board while her partner slept. A real nightmare...

 

I'd wish that such MOB devices have a "stop button" for the autopilot via short range radio signal to turn the sailing boat into the wind and stop it. Does it exist ?

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NKE autopilot remotes

 

 

I'd wish that such MOB devices have a "stop button" for the autopilot via short range radio signal to turn the sailing boat into the wind and stop it. Does it exist ?

 

NKE autopilot remotes have this functionality as does the NKE crew 'fob'. MOB is detected when the transmitter goes out of range of the receiver. Depending on mode / boat set up it will, in single handed mode put the AP head to wind or to full rudder if no wind sensor, or in crew mode sound an alarm. There are also 2 relays triggered, one after 3 minutes and a second one after 10 minutes which can be set up to activate an audio alarm, activate a beacon, send a VHF DSC message, loud hail your last rites etc

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NKE autopilot remotes

 

NKE autopilot remotes have this functionality as does the NKE crew 'fob'. MOB is detected when the transmitter goes out of range of the receiver. Depending on mode / boat set up it will, in single handed mode put the AP head to wind or to full rudder if no wind sensor, or in crew mode sound an alarm. There are also 2 relays triggered, one after 3 minutes and a second one after 10 minutes which can be set up to activate an audio alarm, activate a beacon, send a VHF DSC message, loud hail your last rites etc

 

Tks... dont wonder that its NKE... most of the French racing Trimarans and professional solo sailors on their racing mashines have NKE. Interesting that it can be expanded to 8 crew members...

 

ce3c3086c2.jpg

9aaaee0364.jpg

 

http://www.nke-marine-electronics.com/nke-instruments/remote-control/gyropilot-remote-control-transmitter/

 

 

This remote control is light and user friendly. Designed for the GyropilotGraphic, it allows freedom to move around safely. Whether you stand near the helm, on deck, at the mast base or on the bow, you can alter the heading, tack, gybe, switch pilot mode, or just toggle the pages on the display, all by the press of a button. The receiver installed on your nke bus will forward the command to the Topline bus. In a Man Over Board situation, it triggers an audible alarm to warn the crew and display bearing and distance to the Man Over Board on all multifunction displays. If the pilot is engaged the following actions are automatic:

In Crew Mode

  • no action on the Gyropilot

In Solo Mode

  • boat turns into the wind if your instrument system includes a wind sensor
  • rudder turns to the end stop on the opposite side if your instrument system does not include a wind sensor

In addition to this transmitter/remote control, you can have up to 8 M.O.B. Rescue Aids allowing one for each member of your family / crew. They all trigger alarms in the same way.

The transmitters are continuously sending their ID code to the system. In case of radio signal break, you are immediately warned. No need to jump in the water to check if the system works!

Characteristics
  • Power supply: lithium battery 3.6V. Battery life time ranges from 1 to 3 years. (Return the unit to your dealer for battery replacement)
  • Waterproof protection: IP68 (to immersion).
  • Weight: 65grs.
  • Operating temperature: -10°C to +50°C
  • Storage temperature: -20°C to +60°C

Gyropilot remote control/transmitter pack (1 gyropilot remote control + 1 receiver) (# 90-60-257)

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Is there any system that someone who's fallen off a boat can use to trigger the releace of a minimal one-person liferaft which will float low in the water (with flashing light on top and siren) until he catches up with it to inflate it, the point being that it mustn't blow away faster than he can swim? Stopping the boat as soon as possible and getting the remaining crew to hunt for someone who might be unconscious is important, but you also want a system that covers cases where the weather's so bad that the boat can't even get back to someone who is in full sight. You have to get something to them that will keep them out of the water.

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Is there any system that someone who's fallen off a boat can use to trigger the releace of a minimal one-person liferaft which will float low in the water (with flashing light on top and siren) until he catches up with it to inflate it, the point being that it mustn't blow away faster than he can swim? Stopping the boat as soon as possible and getting the remaining crew to hunt for someone who might be unconscious is important, but you also want a system that covers cases where the weather's so bad that the boat can't even get back to someone who is in full sight. You have to get something to them that will keep them out of the water.

 

 

.....how about an inflatable lifejacket?? :mellow:

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Is there any system that someone who's fallen off a boat can use to trigger the releace of a minimal one-person liferaft which will float low in the water (with flashing light on top and siren) until he catches up with it to inflate it, the point being that it mustn't blow away faster than he can swim? Stopping the boat as soon as possible and getting the remaining crew to hunt for someone who might be unconscious is important, but you also want a system that covers cases where the weather's so bad that the boat can't even get back to someone who is in full sight. You have to get something to them that will keep them out of the water.

 

He wasn't even wearing a lifejacket or tethered so any talk of personal EPIRBS or sell-releasing life-rafts is purely redundant in this instance.

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Just to be clear my comment was a response to Skip JayR's question 'I'd wish that such MOB devices have a "stop button" for the autopilot via short range radio signal to turn the sailing boat into the wind and stop it. Does it exist ?'. I was not speaking to the Oman Air MOB / sad loss of life situation.

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He wasn't even wearing a lifejacket or tethered so any talk of personal EPIRBS or sell-releasing life-rafts is purely redundant in this instance.

 

 

Every little kid in a dinghy workshop of a sailing academy or sailing club learns to wear a life jacket. Generally is the rule defined for yachts: Wear one during night as soon you do a step on deck and before leaving the cockpit to do some decks work ! its a must, even when the water is flat and calm. There is no discussion about this for night watches.

 

The problem seems on such racing mashines on the psychological level: Professional sailors too quickly forget the basic rules... they sail thousands of miles within short time... and more miles they sail without any little accident, more careless they might become. You can watch many videos of solo racing skippers filmed from helicopter where they jump to the bow to check sails.... not picking the life belt in rough seas. A real stupidity... it might look cool for the TV footage, but its a real naivity to think, that a professional sailor cannot be knocked out by a wave and fall over board.

 

Watchi this video from 01:54 on and you understand what I want say... I dont like to name it courage, its stupidity what we see.

 

If it was as Terrorvision describes I'd see it as a clear mistake of the skipper on board of Oman Tri and the watch captain not to take care for and keep an eye on that every single crew member follows such simple principle every beginner in sailing learns very early. - Latest when changing the watch this control must be taken and all crew members on deck wear a life jacket with personal epirb. This control is done from watch to watch newly. It is called "good seamanship".

 

Sponsors like the Sultanate of Oman have enough money and big annually budgets to equip each crew member with the best existing devices inclusive dry suits.

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Is there any system that someone who's fallen off a boat can use to trigger the releace of a minimal one-person liferaft which will float low in the water (with flashing light on top and siren) until he catches up with it to inflate it, the point being that it mustn't blow away faster than he can swim? Stopping the boat as soon as possible and getting the remaining crew to hunt for someone who might be unconscious is important, but you also want a system that covers cases where the weather's so bad that the boat can't even get back to someone who is in full sight. You have to get something to them that will keep them out of the water.

 

 

.....how about an inflatable lifejacket?? :mellow:

 

I was looking at the bigger picture and not just this one specific case. What I'm trying to find out is whether the lessons of the past have been learned yet. Glyn Charles had all the right gear on and the crew could see him swimming towards them, but the boat was blown away from him faster than he could swim and the weather was too wild for them to get back to him. Something is needed to cover that kind of extreme case, and if it exists it should be possible to adapt it to cover almost every other case. Anything less than that is an incomplete solution and will lead to more unnecessary deaths.

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Some people seem to regard safety measures as an insult to their competency and an intrusion on their personal rights by the nanny state. What they fail to recognise is that changes to safety requirements are usually at the recommendation of a coronial enquiry and many lives have already been lost.

 

The question sailors have to ask themselves is what value do they put on their own life? The difference between the cost of an inshore and offshore pfd? The cost of a plb?

 

Let's say $1,000.

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I was looking at the bigger picture and not just this one specific case. What I'm trying to find out is whether the lessons of the past have been learned yet. Glyn Charles had all the right gear on and the crew could see him swimming towards them, but the boat was blown away from him faster than he could swim and the weather was too wild for them to get back to him. Something is needed to cover that kind of extreme case, and if it exists it should be possible to adapt it to cover almost every other case. Anything less than that is an incomplete solution and will lead to more unnecessary deaths.

 

David, the problem is not "lack of knowledge". Take into view the situation land based.... How can people get a driving licence without being educated fully in "first aid" ? It is just for quick business making that the "normal consumer" has the feeling to overjump low hurdles for getting such a licence, without the need to visit first aid training and invest many days time.

 

I had been involved in different accidents, e.g. car against car, car against truck, motorbike against car.... and wherever I came along, people didnt stop, inspite it is the duty by (German) law to deliver "first aid". People are scared, because they dont have the practically experiences, they are scared to make a mistake and the accident victim might die under their hands.... so they make themselfs blind, look away and drive on.

 

Politics know all this but do not change law to enforce the drivers visiting at least every 2 years a weekend seminar with an intensive training in first aid, reanimation etc. ... I do this on my own... and it helped me to get routines and not being scared. An intensive course in first aid is going over 4-6 weeks, every whole weekend. Who is willing to invest so much time ?

 

Similarly we have the situation in water sports, yachting and boating.... the hurdles are too low (by law), inspite the knowledge is available. So the mistakes are done again and again. One reason is the psychological component, it is called "self-abnegation" (see definition). If people as hobby sailors would see it realistically they cannot leave the harbour because of lacking knowledge about "on board medical treatments".

 

On my own I visited a specific seminare "Medicine on high seas". I had to learn how to set injections and use the scalpel for little surgeries as I wanted be qualified to a minimum as skipper (I did this job professionally). Most hobby sailors just like to ignore the huge risks on high seas, otherwise they'd be blocked to come into action because of big fears.

 

Talk with representatives of Coast guard, they all have this knowledge... and they publish it, too. E.g. US Coast guard is doing and offering as PDF Download: Hypothermia, Drowning and Cold-Water Survival. Who is reading this as hobby skipper ? 0.01% of all sailors ? Probably less.

 

I posted the MOB accident of OMAN trimaran in the Cruiser's Forum. Guess what reaction I got ??? "0" posts.... nothing. Nobody of >144,000 members interested in ?? - As said, "self denial" is a typical psychological mechanism in people's mind to avoid confrontation with own fears. Its a mechanism of self protection, going on high seas into the wrong direction.

 

So we have to learn and teach again and again the same alphabet A-Z of sea safetyness, from sailing generation to new and upcoming sailing generation... and sadly we have to accept, that the same mistakes are done again and again.

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Some people seem to regard safety measures as an insult to their competency and an intrusion on their personal rights by the nanny state. What they fail to recognise is that

 

Good point.... would be interesting to have some scientifically studies about this psychologically aspect.

 

Indeed I have heard people saying, related to accidents: for this we have doctors. So its a kind of delegation of responsability to others to feel not guilty.

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Just to be clear my comment was a response to Skip JayR's question 'I'd wish that such MOB devices have a "stop button" for the autopilot via short range radio signal to turn the sailing boat into the wind and stop it. Does it exist ?'. I was not speaking to the Oman Air MOB / sad loss of life situation.

 

http://www.nke-marine-electronics.com/nke-instruments/remote-control/gyropilot-remote-control-transmitter/

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