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theotherjon

Need info on 16ft Australian Corsair

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I have searched all over and have had a hell of a time finding any info on these boats. I recently bought this dinghy on craigslist for next to nothing and from my best guess it's a 1967 Corsair, 16ft centerboard dinghy. It's an Australian boat designed by Alan Payne, and I have no idea how it found it's way down to Gulf Shores Alabama, but I rescued it from some butchers who cut a hole in the top of the stern for an outboard. It has managed to lose all it's orginal rigging and has, what looks to be, a sunfish lateen rig on it now. It pushes it around ok but I want these baby to fly. Looks like it's supposed to be a fractional sloop.

 

Any info on the boat or where I could start my search to find a mast and rigging for it would be greatly appreciated!

 

I'll have to take some pictures tomorrow when the sun comes back out.

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The original masts are no long in production, but gold spar had an approximate replacement section. Send them and email, they should be able to give you some basics.

Mast stepled on the centrecase, with deck partners. Fractional sloop, with a kite, a bit slower than an i420, somewhere around laser radial in speed. They were raced one design surprisingly competitively for a long while, but also got sold to training schools with smaller rigs.

Heavy little fuckers, plate alloy centreboard, and a bit of a shit rudder. I would consider making a new rudder box and blade if you are planning on sailing in some breeze regularly.

The kite pole ring on the mast is quite high as standard, making it a prick to launch the pole if you are on the shorter side.

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They were also the Australian naval cadet dinghy for many years, maybe one came back on the deck of a USA warship?

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What's left of the Australian association, now seems to reside on Yahoo groups and Facebook. https://au.groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/CorsairAustralia/conversations/messages

 

Haven't been any new boats built for a while now, so any parts you would be able to find are likely to be second hand or stored in a shed in Australia - not likely to be many in Texas that's for sure!

 

They are still actively sailed by Aust Navy sailing schools around the place, and these boats are generally well maintained. The fittings, etc are pretty generic, so you should be able to adapt across a rig from a similar sized boat pretty easily. Maybe a 470 rig is a good donor that you could source easily in your area?

 

Don't expect your baby to fly - they are a heavy displacement almost I ndestructible truck, and the best sailing you get from them is tactical, not performance based.

 

Lots of people around here learnt to sail with 5 or 6 on board at time and have fond memories of them... (Not me!)

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So solid even Cyclone Tracy didn't hurt it. So heavy even 200 + knot winds didn't shift it! I dug it out of a bloke's backyard, removed a bagful of hardened cement from the cockpit, used string to attach some blocks and sailed it on Opening Day of 1975 - one of very few boats on the water that day. The De Haviland Corsair!

 

Yes, yours would undoubtedly have been a navy training vessel that was left behind somehow.

 

Maybe 10 years ago we were at Lake Cootharaba in Queensland for a national champs, and the Corsairs had their nationals there at the same time. About 25 boats, all with brand new sails!

 

Try a 505 rig or I14 if you can find one.

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Nice! Thanks everyone. I don't have a lot of dinghy experience, learned on a keel boat, so this has been great. My first boat was a Cal 2-27, another stout heavy boat, so I like the stability aspect.

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The plate centreboard is not ballasted, they are still capsizable. Make sure you have a decent sized bailing bucket tied in, as they come up half full of water. Closing in the front section under the foredeck helps a lot with that

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corsair464.jpg$_75.JPG

 

In Aus their yardstick (handicap) is 119.5, which is based on kite and 3 crew, for comparison a Laser full rig is 113, 4.7 rig is 122. Still see a few Corsairs getting around.

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I think they still build them for the RAN cadets, but last I checked was 10years ago so perhaps not.

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I think they still build them for the RAN cadets, but last I checked was 10years ago so perhaps not.

Scanas, no the Navy cadets now use a similarly sized Joe Adams design called the Envy (a play, I think, on NV for Navy Vessel).

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R, the 4.3m NV was a creation of Mark Phillips at Dinghy Sports based on a disused 470 hull mold. Not sure Joe Adams was involed. Mark designed the deck mold based on the Corsair to allow as many kids as possible to fit in with a senior instructor. He saw a market for this type after the Corsairs were well out of production and boats were getting very tired. He sold quite a few around Sydney. Still see a few NVs but no Corsairs for maybe 10 years.

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Hmmm, not sure where I got the Joe Adams connection from, but I swear the NV has his 8 degree deadrise signature transom! I thought the "sit-in" cockpit seemed based on the Corsair - figures.

 

Cheers

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They moved to Facebook and have a pretty good list of files.

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/246345349242/

 

A number of Scout groups have Corsairs still because you can put a skipper and 4 small kids on there as a bus or an instructor and 3 larger kids. We have 5 including 3 from the original build run, The only ones that tend to sale around Cocoktoo Island still. I think NSW Navy cadets have gone the Envy route but I heard that some of the Victorian have gone the 16ft Topper Omega.

 

The Envy isn't a bad boat but I find we can't get as many kids on it for bus duties; it wallows bit under load. Its great for when they can sail themselves. One of the Canberra Scout groups has 6 I believe.

 

Jon check the files on the facebook site it should have the manual but the standing rig is simple shrouds with a single spreader setup , fore stay and jib stay. I should have the files somewhere if they aren't there. In particular look for the centreboard and centreboard S clip diagrams to get it to pivot correctly. Some of the other fittings aren't made anymore (goddamn Riley goosenecks) so closest fit.

 

We found closing in the front section caused the bow to lift higher when they capsized resulting in turtle. So we took off the bulkheads we added. Of course you could hold a dinner party under a turtled Corsair there is so much air and space.

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Hi, sorry I don't have any pictures, but just wanted to say I worked for Miller & Whitworth back in 1966, when they opened a store in Rockdale. N.S.W. as a chandlery and sales for the three De Havilland fibreglass boats designed by Alan Payne : The 10 ft Gypsy, single sail; 12ft Vagabond - main and jib; and the Corsair, which seems to have been the only one to take off.

We used to put an ad in the local paper offering rides at the weekend down on Botany Bay, show up with the boats, take folks out for rides, and then try to sell them...Ha, ha....not easy. But I left after a few months, sadly, as it was my 'dream' job, having been sailing dinghies since the early 50's. Still at it, out here in Puget Sound, in dinghies, why would you sail anything else!

 

Mike

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