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psychosailing

Ever heard about Coppercoat? Is it effective?

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I bumped into this http://www.coppercoatusa.com/The_Product.htmland I've never heard of it before.

 

They claim it is a 10 year lasting solution for your bottom which I doubt (knowing sea creatures). But I may be wrong. They also claim it is a barrier coat for osmosis. In fact it looks just like a barrier coat epoxy paint to which you add copper powder.

 

According to their online calculator I would need a total of 6kits of 1.5liters for the bottom of my boat (29ft modified full keel) bringing the total cost to 780$ .I already have a barrier coat on my hull so I am more interested in the antifouling properties than anything.

 

Now if their 10yrs protection claim is correct the saving can be considerable. With a regular antifouling paint application every two year the math can go up to 400+ per coat considering haul out and yard time for a boat like mine. If it only Coppercoat would last 6 years with no need for recoats and drydock maintenanca the saving can be great.

 

But I am skeptical. Don't know why but it look too easy.

 

Anybody tried it or have first hand experience, observation on Coppercoat?

 

Being about to leave for a long term cruising I would be very happy to have a long lasting bottom paint with no need to haul out or invent creative drydock solution every 2 years.

 

 

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There was a long thread on this somewhere in the archives. I think the overwhelming opinion was that it was snake oil.

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If it kinda works 50%, isn't that still okay?

A few more scrubbing sessions, but save the big bills from complete repaints. Maybe not so easy if your boat isn't the sort that can dry out (whether freestanding like a bilge-keeler or alongside like an old long-keeler), but that's just a reason to buy a snorkel

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I saw this a few years ago and looked into it then. If I misremember correctly, the powdered copper goes into an epoxy 'paint' which then goes onto your hull. there are a couple of issues -

 

First is that if you don't prep well - hey, it's a hard epoxy and it'll peel right off. Given that it's really expensive, that doesn't sound terribly interesting.

 

Second, assuming that you did get that really good bond - the copper will eventually leech out (doing what it is supposed to do), and you are left with - you guessed it - a hard epoxy sponge, with lots and lots of teeny tiny holes where the copper used to be. Getting that epoxy off is a copper plated beyotch; and painting over a porous epoxy surface isn't something I'd want to do to my boat.

 

I'm sure that you'll find people who swear that it's the best stuff since Astro-glide and you'll find others who rank it right up there with used kitty litter.

 

Best of luck either way you choose.

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I used an Australian product from ATL Composites - they stopped making it because the EPA licences were too expensive. My boat was the "test platform" for tropical waters. My thoughts were that if it didn't work well, I'd antifoul over the top of it and when the antifoul wore through, I'd still have *some* protection. I never did antifoul over the top. Once or twice a year I'd rub with a stiff scourer or even wet and dry to burnish the surface and refresh the copper surface.

 

After ATL stopped making it, I wanted some more to freshen up (this was probably 5 years after applying it). ATL gave me the grade of powder and the contact details of a mill in Tasmania. I ordered the copper and mixed it with standard West System resin, using a super slow tropical hardener that ATL had developed for me (now 209 in the West System range). It wasn't a big success because I didn't add enough thixotropic mixer, but that just meant I had to sand off some runs to get a decent racing finish.

 

That boat was kept in the water all year round and never had any osmosis, so I was happy with the barrier effect as well. ATL told me that there was a synergistic effect from the copper that made the copper/epoxy almost totally impermeable, much more so than plain epoxy, and exceeded only (in their testing) by adding powdered aluminium to the resin.

 

My next boat had an inboard motor. With ss shaft, bronze propellor, copper HF groundplate and bronze hull fittings, I was too scared to add a copper coating to the mix and create some sort of monster battery, so I used Micron CSC on that boat. However, I'm now building a glass over ply cat and intend applying the copper/epoxy coating on that as there will be no other metals immersed full time.

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I've heard and read mixed reports so I wonder if it has to do with mixing, prep, or application. But I also think this is true of any bottom paint, that success is a product of your local yard as much as the product itself.

 

I think Harbor 20s came out of the mold with Copperpoxy, basically the same thing. I know a lot of H20 folks, but never asked how their original bottoms held up.

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Lots of threads over on the YBW forums. General consensus is that it works, possibly not quite as well as A/F paint, but does need to be applied exactly as specified. No shortcuts allowed.

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My friends father developed a system way back in the 80's called CopperLock-

 

Basically they applied a coat of epoxy resin then they blew micro balloons on to the surface to create a semi porous surface then they sprayed a molten copper/nickel alloy over the resin-

 

It was freakin cool, it used these guns that fed wire into the back and sprayed molten metal out the front like paint... You could spray copper, copper nickel, stainless, aluminum, etc.

 

Not sure what ever became of it... My buddy has a guns and sprays all sorts of stuff from garden statues to ceramics. Their biggest contracts were with oil rigs offshore-

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We have a small swing keeler which sits on the trailer with the keel up, and as a result is a PITA to antifoul.

 

I re-did the bottom and chose Coppercoat because:

 

I wanted to do the bottom once. The boat is hard to paint and I don't want to be under there every season. Coppercoat is tough as hell and lasts at least 10 years.

 

We scrub every 4 weeks so the actual antifouling properties aren't that important. It works okay but not amazingly. People report different results depending on their area. We're in a high fouling area and nothing works that well. Coppercoat works just as well as the International Hard Racing I used before.

 

So I would say it depends what you want. If you scrub regularly it's good. If you're in an area where people have had good results with it, happy days. Also as others have said, bottom prep is key. It stuck to our hull like glue.

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I'm sure that you'll find people who swear that it's the best stuff since Astro-glide and you'll find others who rank it right up there with used kitty litter.

 

 

If those are your only options, you're really doing it wrong.

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Where do your boats live, jhiller?

The Contessa in the UK and Michigan and the Tartan in Biscayne Bay and the Great Lakes.

The secret of getting really good antifouling properties with Coppercoat is in the preparation and the application.I have been very happy with it and an added bonus is that it increases the resistance to water penetration of the hull. I’m rather surprised more people don’t use it

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Have you tried wet scrubbing, hard, with scotchbrite pads, to expose the new copper, before launching? Think you have to expose some new copper, every so often.

 

Don't think anyone has said it's a no maintenance product, just no annual top ups, and better at barnacles than hard antifouling. You let the slime build up on any underwater surface...

 

Jhiller, have you any idea how much weight it adds?

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My wife applied Coppercoat to our J/120 in April 2012. We've cleaned the bottom a maximum of 4 times in a year, since. In fact, we didn't clean the bottom at all for the first 9 months (seriously) and then we cleaned it ourselves with snorkels and brushes. There was just a light dusting of growth. This past April, 3 years after applying CC we finished 3rd overall in a two-day double-handed race out of 110 boats, so it is clear the bottom was not slowing us down.

 

We've found that algae type growth does grow somewhat faster than something like Trinidad SR, but simply going for a sail gets rid of most of it and a light wipe gets rid of the rest. Stuff doesn't seem to stick well to it. Never had any hard growth and we've had the boat in Annapolis, Portugal, Gibraltar, Galveston Bay, SF Bay, Hawaii, and the Salish Sea. Perhaps we are just keeping the bottom creatures confused???

 

This summer we hauled out for other reasons, had it pressure washed and then I sanded everything quickly with 300 grit and an orbital sander to reactivate the copper. Pretty darn smooth for an amateur roll-on job. Seems to be working. I'm pleased.

 

It does seem to work best in colder waters, but I suppose all bottom paints do. Salish Sea has been great, Portugal was great, Galveston Bay was not as good, and SF Bay was the least good. We had the boat in the water in SF Bay for only 2 months and the diver mentioned there was more growth than he expected for that amount of time, but then it comes off really easy.

 

So 3.5 years and a bit over 10k miles sailed. Will other bottom paints last that long? I have no idea.

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Jhiller, have you any idea how much weight it adds?

Weight? No more than traditional copper based paint. It is just epoxy and copper. 20 or 30 pounds for a 40' hull?

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So it's 1.32 pounds of copper power per liter in thin epoxy at 80 % by volume.

 

Some reference to a law if 80 percent copper....probably a myth.

How does COPPERCOAT work?

COPPERCOAT is the combination of a specially developed two-part epoxy resin and 99% pure copper. Each 1½ liter kit of COPPERCOAT contains 4.4 lbs of ultra fine copper powder, the maximum allowed by law. On immersion, seawater attacks the exposed pure copper powder, causing the formation of cuprous oxide. This highly effective anti-......

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So it's 1.32 pounds of copper power per liter in thin epoxy at 80 % by volume.

 

Some reference to a law if 80 percent copper....probably a myth.

How does COPPERCOAT work?

COPPERCOAT is the combination of a specially developed two-part epoxy resin and 99% pure copper. Each 1½ liter kit of COPPERCOAT contains 4.4 lbs of ultra fine copper powder, the maximum allowed by law. On immersion, seawater attacks the exposed pure copper powder, causing the formation of cuprous oxide. This highly effective anti-......

 

I love mixing measurement systems. 2 kg per 1.5 liter kit = 11.35 lbs per US gallon or thereabouts.

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geez, is that ablative copper?

 

do you sand between coats?

 

what would happen in case of lightning strike?

 

Is the scrap value of the bottom higher than the value of the boat?

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geez, is that ablative copper?

 

do you sand between coats?

 

what would happen in case of lightning strike?

 

Is the scrap value of the bottom higher than the value of the boat?

 

 

it looks like old hot water tanks to me

 

and I assume that all those nails driven into a wooden hull are not the best things in the world

 

good to see though I reckon

 

blast from the past and it was allowed the britsih navy to kick the asses of the french on a consistent basis

 

it meant that we could outrun them when we could outgun them and runaway when they outgunned us

 

much the same way the Orcadians controlled the whole of the North parts of the North sea

 

speed is everything

 

D

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Big advantage of copper sheathing to wooden boats is that it removes the problem of teredo worms. Correct way of doing it is tarred felt between the planking and the copper, and use copper nails to hold it in place, so minimizing any problem of electrolysis. I would bet that Kentra (for the big boat is she) will be doing the Caribbean/Med thing, so keeping out Mr Teredo sounds like a good plan.

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So, 3.5 years after applying CC and 7 months after a sanding to "reactivate" the copper we had the bottom cleaned for the first time. Diver said the bottom looked "good". 7 months. Boat had only left the dock once since August. We raced this past weekend and saw quite good speeds motoring and under sail upwind.

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In keeping with the general vibe about whinging over kids on YouTube that have a boat but haven't sailed anywhere because the coffers aren't topped up yet...

 

These two architect grads are refurbing an old Pearson (that I would have sent to the landfill), and they went "DIY CopperCoat" on the cheap.

 

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...they went "DIY CopperCoat" on the cheap.

"We expect the copper to give us many years of a barnacle-free bottom."

 

What these two don't realize is that the ONLY reason Coppercoat provides any anti fouling performance at all is that it uses a water-based epoxy. Using a resin-based epoxy will encapsulate the copper particles, keeping them forever isolated from the water-hull boundary layer and the fouling growth that attaches there.

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...they went "DIY CopperCoat" on the cheap.

 

"We expect the copper to give us many years of a barnacle-free bottom."

 

What these two don't realize is that the ONLY reason Coppercoat provides any anti fouling performance at all is that it uses a water-based epoxy. Using a resin-based epoxy will encapsulate the copper particles, keeping them forever isolated from the water-hull boundary layer and the fouling growth that attaches there.

Fast: do you clean any vessels using Coppercoat? If so what do you think of it? Kim

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...they went "DIY CopperCoat" on the cheap.

 

"We expect the copper to give us many years of a barnacle-free bottom."

What these two don't realize is that the ONLY reason Coppercoat provides any anti fouling performance at all is that it uses a water-based epoxy. Using a resin-based epoxy will encapsulate the copper particles, keeping them forever isolated from the water-hull boundary layer and the fouling growth that attaches there.

Fast: do you clean any vessels using Coppercoat? If so what do you think of it? Kim

 

 

Yes I do and I am not a fan of the product.

 

coppercoatbottom.jpg

 

That said, I recently received two Coppercoated panels from the distributor and will be conducting a side-by-side comparison test against Pettit Trinidad, here in the Oakland Estuary. In a separate thread, I will be posting results and pix as the test progresses.

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...they went "DIY CopperCoat" on the cheap.

"We expect the copper to give us many years of a barnacle-free bottom."

What these two don't realize is that the ONLY reason Coppercoat provides any anti fouling performance at all is that it uses a water-based epoxy. Using a resin-based epoxy will encapsulate the copper particles, keeping them forever isolated from the water-hull boundary layer and the fouling growth that attaches there.

Assuming the stuff works at all, is it a negative that they use a water-based epoxy? If a resin-based epoxy would prevent the product from working it seems that they made the right formulation choice.

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...they went "DIY CopperCoat" on the cheap.

"We expect the copper to give us many years of a barnacle-free bottom."

What these two don't realize is that the ONLY reason Coppercoat provides any anti fouling performance at all is that it uses a water-based epoxy. Using a resin-based epoxy will encapsulate the copper particles, keeping them forever isolated from the water-hull boundary layer and the fouling growth that attaches there.

Assuming the stuff works at all, is it a negative that they use a water-based epoxy? If a resin-based epoxy would prevent the product from working it seems that they made the right formulation choice.

 

 

No, it is not a negative. That's the point- the two kids making up their own kitchen sink version presumably used a resin-based epoxy, which will not work. While I believe that water-based epoxy Coppercoat does not provide much anti fouling performance, it obviously works well enough for some, based on the many positive anecdotes about it.

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Ah, didn't catch that. I guess I should've watched the video above but after watching the video Dylan posted about in the other thread, I didn't have it in me.

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...they went "DIY CopperCoat" on the cheap.

"We expect the copper to give us many years of a barnacle-free bottom."

 

What these two don't realize is that the ONLY reason Coppercoat provides any anti fouling performance at all is that it uses a water-based epoxy. Using a resin-based epoxy will encapsulate the copper particles, keeping them forever isolated from the water-hull boundary layer and the fouling growth that attaches there.

 

Fast: do you clean any vessels using Coppercoat? If so what do you think of it? Kim

Yes I do and I am not a fan of the product.

 

coppercoatbottom.jpg

 

That said, I recently received two Coppercoated panels from the distributor and will be conducting a side-by-side comparison test against Pettit Trinidad, here in the Oakland Estuary. In a separate thread, I will be posting results and pix as the test progresses.

Well that will be very helpful to me as I currently have Trinidad on my boat.

I understand that Coppercoat is easy to clean in the water, but I only got that from reading about it. I have never used it.

Any reports you can make about it would be appreciated Fast. Thanks.

Kim

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...they went "DIY CopperCoat" on the cheap.

"We expect the copper to give us many years of a barnacle-free bottom."

What these two don't realize is that the ONLY reason Coppercoat provides any anti fouling performance at all is that it uses a water-based epoxy. Using a resin-based epoxy will encapsulate the copper particles, keeping them forever isolated from the water-hull boundary layer and the fouling growth that attaches there.

 

Fast: do you clean any vessels using Coppercoat? If so what do you think of it? Kim

Yes I do and I am not a fan of the product.

 

coppercoatbottom.jpg

 

That said, I recently received two Coppercoated panels from the distributor and will be conducting a side-by-side comparison test against Pettit Trinidad, here in the Oakland Estuary. In a separate thread, I will be posting results and pix as the test progresses.

 

I understand that Coppercoat is easy to clean in the water, but I only got that from reading about it. I have never used it.

 

 

You can be assured that the above-pictured Coppercoat bottom was not easy to clean in the water.

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For those that have it and like it, could you comment on your application?

 

From what I have gathered, the varying results might be chalked up to issues in the application. It looks like an interesting product, but if it needs hyper perfect application conditions and techniques that is a big negative.

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FB-

 

I'm glad that the company sent you the test panels. That should definitely answer the question as to whether the product is junk or that people are not properly applying it.

I look forward to hearing about the results.

 

Roleur is a smart and honest fellow. I doubt he's embellishing his experience with the product, but I'd still prefer a more scientific test sample.

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...they went "DIY CopperCoat" on the cheap.

"We expect the copper to give us many years of a barnacle-free bottom."

What these two don't realize is that the ONLY reason Coppercoat provides any anti fouling performance at all is that it uses a water-based epoxy. Using a resin-based epoxy will encapsulate the copper particles, keeping them forever isolated from the water-hull boundary layer and the fouling growth that attaches there.

The kids did mention they coarse sanded the hull to " activate " the copper. Will be interesting to see how it works out.

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...they went "DIY CopperCoat" on the cheap.

"We expect the copper to give us many years of a barnacle-free bottom."

What these two don't realize is that the ONLY reason Coppercoat provides any anti fouling performance at all is that it uses a water-based epoxy. Using a resin-based epoxy will encapsulate the copper particles, keeping them forever isolated from the water-hull boundary layer and the fouling growth that attaches there.

The kids did mention they coarse sanded the hull to " activate " the copper. Will be interesting to see how it works out.

 

This. FB is completely wrong, with respect. It doesn't matter what type of epoxy is used - a water based system is not water soluble once it has cured. Sanding once cured is what exposes the copper granules for the antifouling effect to be "activated". Burnishing from time to time refreshes the surface, but also thins the layer of product over time.

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About copper plating a wooden boat: check this YouTube from minute 12: a newly build Collin archer being plated in a beautiful job:

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[OT aside] Like this one about getting his mainmast sawn at a windmill powered sawmill. Very cool. And amusing that he uses a powered plane. There are limits to authenticity.

 

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FB is completely wrong, with respect. It doesn't matter what type of epoxy is used - a water based system is not water soluble once it has cured. Sanding once cured is what exposes the copper granules for the antifouling effect to be "activated". Burnishing from time to time refreshes the surface, but also thins the layer of product over time.

Sanding the surface may expose some copper limited amount of copper, but for anything approaching acceptable anti fouling performance, you need fresh copper biocide to be continuously available to the surface of the hull. Which is exactly why ablative paints ablate, why hard paints leach and why Coppercoat uses a water-based epoxy. Or maybe sanding your boat's bottom four times a year sounds reasonable to you. rolleyes.gif

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I had a buddy that painted his Tayana 42 with it in Galveston Bay. I cleaned the boat bottom one time and it didn't really seem to work that much better than any other top quality anti-fouling paint. It was rough finish, like 100 grit sandpaper but was pretty easy to clean. The rough finish was probably due to how they applied it and that fact that it wasn't burnished. The bottom did last quite a while though.

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FB is completely wrong, with respect. It doesn't matter what type of epoxy is used - a water based system is not water soluble once it has cured. Sanding once cured is what exposes the copper granules for the antifouling effect to be "activated". Burnishing from time to time refreshes the surface, but also thins the layer of product over time.

Sanding the surface may expose some copper limited amount of copper, but for anything approaching acceptable anti fouling performance, you need fresh copper biocide to be continuously available to the surface of the hull. Which is exactly why ablative paints ablate, why hard paints leach and why Coppercoat uses a water-based epoxy. Or maybe sanding your boat's bottom four times a year sounds reasonable to you. rolleyes.gif

 

FB, I'm not picking a fight with you - you know your business, and I know my experience with resin based copper antifoul. I don't know if Coppercoat uses a water based epoxy, but what difference would that make? Are you suggesting that the epoxy dissolves, thus releasing new copper? Wouldn't that have the effect of the copper granules accumulating on the harbour bottom beneath the boat?

 

As I mentioned, my boat (this was 20+ years ago) was a test unit for the manufacturer. Accordingly, I was given a lot of technical info about the product. When applied and cured, virtually no copper is exposed to the water (as you said, it is sealed by the resin - whether a water base resin or not). Sanding removes the resin sealing the surface and ATL advised that over 70% of the exposed surface would be copper. After a few months, the exposed copper would oxidise and the surface would be noticeably darker. Burnishing the surface with a scouring pad was sufficient to "refresh". If that didn't "brighten" the surface, I'd give a quick rub with 220 grit wet and dry. I would sand with an orbital using 120 grit at least once a year. This was only a 25' boat and I was only 40 then, so it wasn't a big deal at all.

 

Perhaps the system I was using was different to the system you are describing - there seems little common ground between our experiences.

 

Edit: I should mention also that the boat would be grounded a couple of times a year on a sandbar (keel up) for our son to play. The swirling water/sand mix probably helped refresh the surface also - but you would think twice before doing that with an ablative paint!

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I am working on refurbishing a small boat that had been Coppercoated more than 10 years back. Getting it off of the bottom has been a harder job than any antifouling removal project I have done in the past. The copper in the paint combined with the epoxy dulls sandpaper very quickly. The chemical peelers I have had success with on other boats removed the overcoated antifouling, but didn't make much of a dent in the coppercoat. Scrapers don't cut through.

 

Biggest issue is that the applicator didn't mix as well as might have been desired, resulting in what behave like blisters where a pocket of copper had been, and when exposed leached out, leaving an unsmooth surface and a hole right down to the original bottom surface.

 

Cannot comment on how it performed, but getting it off has proven to be a bitch.

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Biggest issue is that the applicator didn't mix as well as might have been desired, resulting in what behave like blisters where a pocket of copper had been, and when exposed leached out, leaving an unsmooth surface and a hole right down to the original bottom surface.

 

From the U.S. distributor-

 

If you have just applied a new solvent based epoxy barrier/primer coat, wait 2 days before applying Coppercoat. If there is less than 60% solids additional cure time may be required. If not, the solvents in the barrier coat will “gas out” and cause small blisters under the Coppercoat. This is different from most anti-fouling; you cannot “hot coat” Coppercoat over a solvent based epoxy.

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On 12/7/2015 at 4:44 PM, Roleur said:

My wife applied Coppercoat to our J/120 in April 2012. We've cleaned the bottom a maximum of 4 times in a year, since. In fact, we didn't clean the bottom at all for the first 9 months (seriously) and then we cleaned it ourselves with snorkels and brushes. There was just a light dusting of growth. This past April, 3 years after applying CC we finished 3rd overall in a two-day double-handed race out of 110 boats, so it is clear the bottom was not slowing us down.

 

We've found that algae type growth does grow somewhat faster than something like Trinidad SR, but simply going for a sail gets rid of most of it and a light wipe gets rid of the rest. Stuff doesn't seem to stick well to it. Never had any hard growth and we've had the boat in Annapolis, Portugal, Gibraltar, Galveston Bay, SF Bay, Hawaii, and the Salish Sea. Perhaps we are just keeping the bottom creatures confused???

 

This summer we hauled out for other reasons, had it pressure washed and then I sanded everything quickly with 300 grit and an orbital sander to reactivate the copper. Pretty darn smooth for an amateur roll-on job. Seems to be working. I'm pleased.

 

It does seem to work best in colder waters, but I suppose all bottom paints do. Salish Sea has been great, Portugal was great, Galveston Bay was not as good, and SF Bay was the least good. We had the boat in the water in SF Bay for only 2 months and the diver mentioned there was more growth than he expected for that amount of time, but then it comes off really easy.

 

So 3.5 years and a bit over 10k miles sailed. Will other bottom paints last that long? I have no idea.

Two years on and another update.  Up in the PNW.  We've cleaned the bottom twice in the last year.  Previous cleaning was in early June.  Sadly we only sailed the boat 5 times or so since then.  Only about 10 hours.  Hauled out today to pressure wash and replace the zincs.  Both the yard owner and the new hire were impressed.  The yard owner, who cleaned the bottom back in June couldn't believe how little growth there was given the time and lack of use.  The new hire couldn't believe how easy what was on there came off.  This is 5.5 YEARS and 10,000 NM after application.  Nevermind that it is race bottom smooth.    As an additional indicator the prop and shaft had a lot of barnacles this time, but zero hard growth on the hull.  Personally, we couldn't be happier.

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Coppercoat works...a local  bareboat charter fleet has coppercoat bottoms.  Each year they come out clean of barnicles, only the normal slime and require only small chafe touchups.

i dont know if  coppercoat erodes anodes faster or causes any other problems with underwater metals.  Outdrives, shafts,  aluminium rudder stocks, thru hulls.........

 

you might  ask around 

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I wish someone would do some testing in Boot Key Harbor, Marathon, FL. Absolutely the worst fouling I’ve seen, and more so than the rest of the Keys. Hard growth (small barnies) in <2 weeks. I know this bc I clean every other week. Local divers stay busy, so fortune passes everywhere I guess...

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Just read this old thread, wondering what would happen if I just used copper in non ablative paint, rather than epoxy.

it would need to be burnished regularly, but gets around the problems of preparation and removal...

or am I just reinventing non ablative antifouling paint?

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I seem to recall copper fell foul of EPA legislation ?

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3 hours ago, olaf hart said:

Just read this old thread, wondering what would happen if I just used copper in non ablative paint, rather than epoxy.

it would need to be burnished regularly, but gets around the problems of preparation and removal...

or am I just reinventing non ablative antifouling paint?

Yes, you are:

 

http://www.pettitpaint.com/media/3575/1088-pettit-trinidad-pro-black-1108800-sds-1.pdf

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or even:  https://www.westmarine.com/buy/west-marine--cpp-ablative-antifouling-paint-with-cct-gallon--P004_121_001_514

I was very skeptical of an inexpensive WM paint but I'm on my 3rd season and I still have zero hard growth. The Chesapeake is a high fouling area. I just use a soft brush on a long handle or get in the water and wipe it down.

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10 hours ago, Ajax said:

or even:  https://www.westmarine.com/buy/west-marine--cpp-ablative-antifouling-paint-with-cct-gallon--P004_121_001_514

I was very skeptical of an inexpensive WM paint but I'm on my 3rd season and I still have zero hard growth. The Chesapeake is a high fouling area. I just use a soft brush on a long handle or get in the water and wipe it down.

This is going off a possibly incorrect memory from years ago, but when they brought the wm paints around to try and get shops to switch to it, they mentioned that it was just a repackaged product and told us what it actually was(can't remember any more, I think it was petit).  It was significantly cheaper so many shops did switch.   I think the msds sheets even included the original naming as well.  Worked well, was cheaper than the branded cans but still had a bigger margin.  Some greedy shops kept old cans with the original labeling and continued to charge list price for the other branding. 

 

 

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Back to Coppercoat-

There seem to be two main arguments.  It either works or it doesn't work. The rebuttal to it not working, is that the user applied it incorrectly.  The young couple in the Sailing Kittiwake blog have applied Coppercoat and they are sailing in the Med.  I'm definitely curious to see how it works out for them.

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Few people claim it is value for money. ESPECIALLY those who had it peel off.

Remember it needs a monthly scrub. OK if like me you can do it yourself.  If you are paying someone else do the math.

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My RM 880 has coppercoat still going from 2007. Needs a clean and gentle sanding pre-season to get best results. Will be going to regular antifouling next year though.

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Somewhere I have a coppercoat kit. No idea if it's still good, but if someone wants to try it and report back here I can see if I can dig it out of the attic, probably about 8 years old.  Bought it for a customer who wanted it then changed to CSC instead.  Just pay the shipping cost if I find it. 

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On 5/16/2018 at 9:16 AM, TQA said:

Few people claim it is value for money. ESPECIALLY those who had it peel off.

Remember it needs a monthly scrub. OK if like me you can do it yourself.  If you are paying someone else do the math.

'Why would you ever peel it off?  At worst it is just an epoxy bottom.  You can put any paint over it. 

Monthly scrub?  Not everywhere.  We are averaging twice annually after 6 years. 

FWIW we’ve had a fantastic spring racing with our 6 year old CC bottom.

Southern Straits - 6th overall, 2nd boat across the line, doublehanded against fully crewed boats

Patos Island - 2nd overall

Race to the Straits - 3rd overall out of 125

Swiftsure - 3rd overall out of 62

Money well spent?  The data speaks for itself.

 

 

 

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I don't think He meant they chose to peel it off, I do know of a boat where with poor application(probably) of Coppercoat or similar, it came off the hull in sheets..

 

As is always said, Preparation is everything.

I'm going to be doing a DIY copper coating on my hull but it's only 16ft long and in a fairly low weed area. So it will be easy to lift out and give it a clean..

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I’d like to remind everyone that not all bottom paints work the same in all areas and I’d be very surprised to hear that CC is any different. 

I’ll offer my own experience: I have Trinidad Pro on. In Mississippi waters, it was great. Moved to the Keys and especially in Marathon, I thought the paint had outright failed. Moved on to the Bahamas, that same bottom absolutely went back to the same low fouling rates as in Mississippi. Back in the Floriduh again, and back to frequent wiping.

This is not just seasonal; I’ve spent the better part of a year in each area.

Ask what works where you are, or are going. Don’t count on paint or coatings to behave alike everywhere. 

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