• Announcements

    • Zapata

      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
Sign in to follow this  
Auld Mug

AC quiz....

Recommended Posts

Q; who has sailed or been involved in the most AC's without success?...

 

A clue... its 10 attempts, as helmsmen, crew, coach,tactical advisor. And its not Chris Dickson.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think anybody has helmed all 3. John Kostecki comes closest having got a silver in the olymics, won the VOR and he has been on the winning crew for the AC, but not as helm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Morning guys how are you today:

Quiz..

Which of the following is not an Olympic Class Anymore:

 

1 Star class

2 Laser

3 Finn

4 Elliot

 

Take your pick.

The right answer is?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think anybody has helmed all 3. John Kostecki comes closest having got a silver in the olymics, won the VOR and he has been on the winning crew for the AC, but not as helm.

Dennis Conner comes closest with olympic gold, AC wins, and a good Whitbread attempt albeit with a spilt helm position on Winston.

 

If coutts or ainslie won a VOR then they would be the men!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I don't think anybody has helmed all 3. John Kostecki comes closest having got a silver in the olymics, won the VOR and he has been on the winning crew for the AC, but not as helm.

Dennis Conner comes closest with olympic gold, AC wins, and a good Whitbread attempt albeit with a spilt helm position on Winston.

 

DC only won "bronze" at the Olympics and Winston came 6th. I think that means that Kostecki is closest, although it depends on how you view his role in AC33 when he was the tactician. Does full time tactician on a winner trump part time helm in 6th place?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I don't think anybody has helmed all 3. John Kostecki comes closest having got a silver in the olymics, won the VOR and he has been on the winning crew for the AC, but not as helm.

 

Dennis Conner comes closest with olympic gold, AC wins, and a good Whitbread attempt albeit with a spilt helm position on Winston.

DC only won "bronze" at the Olympics and Winston came 6th. I think that means that Kostecki is closest, although it depends on how you view his role in AC33 when he was the tactician. Does full time tactician on a winner trump part time helm in 6th place?

Yeah thats right he won two world champs in the star And a bronze in olympics.

 

 

Good point...maybe?

 

There are guys who have won all three as crew.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DC won bronze in the Tempest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Morning guys how are you today:

Quiz..

Which of the following is not an Olympic Class Anymore:

 

1 Star class

2 Laser

3 Finn

4 Elliot

 

Take your pick.

The right answer is?

Has the Elliot not been ditched too?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Morning guys how are you today:

Quiz..

Which of the following is not an Olympic Class Anymore:

 

1 Star class

2 Laser

3 Finn

4 Elliot

 

Take your pick.

The right answer is?

Has the Elliot not been ditched too?

 

Elliot 6m was a one Olympic wonder, 2012 Women's Match Racing, which is no more along with keelboats in the Olympics today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Morning guys how are you today:

Quiz..

Which of the following is not an Olympic Class Anymore:

 

1 Star class

2 Laser

3 Finn

4 Elliot

 

Take your pick.

The right answer is?

Has the Elliot not been ditched too?

You are right. One month ago it wasn't

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sailing_at_the_2016_Summer_Olympics

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

Morning guys how are you today:

Quiz..

Which of the following is not an Olympic Class Anymore:

 

1 Star class

2 Laser

3 Finn

4 Elliot

 

Take your pick.

The right answer is?

Has the Elliot not been ditched too?
You are right. One month ago it wasn't

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sailing_at_the_2016_Summer_Olympics

I thought the Star and Elliot (women's match racing)" was voted out a while ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

Morning guys how are you today:

Quiz..

Which of the following is not an Olympic Class Anymore:

 

1 Star class

2 Laser

3 Finn

4 Elliot

 

Take your pick.

The right answer is?

Has the Elliot not been ditched too?
You are right. One month ago it wasn't

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sailing_at_the_2016_Summer_Olympics

I thought the Star and Elliot (women's match racing)" was voted out a while ago.

 

What was the reason they ditched women's match racing. Too expensive?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^ Probably had something to do with which boatbuilders came up with the best kick-back package.

And the highest bidders for the 2016 Olympic Sailing Classes are...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the people very much involved in that decision is well known to me and has given back more to the sport than I suspect you ever have. Thanks for the random smear, tosser.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^ Probably had something to do with which boatbuilders came up with the best kick-back package.

And the highest bidders for the 2016 Olympic Sailing Classes are...

RS:X

Laser Radial

Laser

Finn

470

49erFX

49er

Nacra 17

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cammas never won Olympic, or even come close to America's Cup. Ainslie never competed in VOR. Outridge never won AC or VOR, so you will have to try a lot harder to come up with anyone.

Kostecki is certainly one of the closest, with VOR win (Illbruck), Cup win in the dodgy DOG match and involved in most of the 2013 San Fran win and a silver in the games.

Conner isn't really close, with no Olympic gold, and his VOR/Whitbread participation was mostly as a Syndicate leader who raised funds, did a couple of legs, never came on deck and didn't do very well.

 

Few interesting ones like Calafat (470, Alinghi but any VOR?), don't think Schumann ever did VOR, maybe some Kiwis?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cammas never won Olympic, or even come close to America's Cup. Ainslie never competed in VOR. Outridge never won AC or VOR, so you will have to try a lot harder to come up with anyone.

Kostecki is certainly one of the closest, with VOR win (Illbruck), Cup win in the dodgy DOG match and involved in most of the 2013 San Fran win and a silver in the games.

Conner isn't really close, with no Olympic gold, and his VOR/Whitbread participation was mostly as a Syndicate leader who raised funds, did a couple of legs, never came on deck and didn't do very well.

 

Few interesting ones like Calafat (470, Alinghi but any VOR?), don't think Schumann ever did VOR, maybe some Kiwis?

Fellow yachtclub member Dirk de Ridder.

  • 1998 - Whitbread Round the World Race, 2e
  • 1999 - Tour de France à la Voile, Mumm 36, 16px-Gouden_medaille.svg.png
  • 1999 - WK, Soling, 16px-Bronzen_medaille.svg.png
  • 1999 - EK, Soling, 16px-Gouden_medaille.svg.png
  • 2000 - Kieler Zeilweek, Soling 16px-Gouden_medaille.svg.png
  • 2000 - OS, Soling, 4e
  • 2002 - Volvo Ocean Race, winnaar
  • 2006 - Volvo Ocean Race, 2e
  • 2006 - MedCup, TP52, winnaar
  • 2007 - Hublot Palmavela Trophy, TP52, winnaar
  • 2010 - America's Cup, winnaar

 

Source: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dirk_de_Ridder

 

I met him 2 days ago again and we had a big laugh about his ban..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Q2 - Name the sailor/s that have helmed a boat to olympic gold, a AC win, and a around the world/VOR race win.

 

...

 

torben grael has plenty of olympic medals (gold, silver and bronze), won the vor and was tactician aboard luna rossa. that's the closest i can find.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That third trophy is for cheats and amateur actors (specialising in lingering death scenes). The ball is also round, i.e. the wrong shape!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New Zealand owned world cup rugby three times and America's cup twice.

Australia owned world cup rugby twice and America's cup once.

The United Kingdom won fifa worldcup once and world rugby once.

 

France, in the near future, will have owned;

and the FIFA world cup

and the America's Cup.

 

Source:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/America%27s_Cup

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FIFA_World_Cup

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rugby_World_Cup

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ he's good - (only the U.K. does not compete in the Football or Rugby World Cups).

 

How many succesful defences of their 'Cups' - by NZ, Oz or England

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ he's good - (only the U.K. does not compete in the Football or Rugby World Cups).

 

How many succesful defences of their 'Cups' - by NZ, Oz or England

England is part of the United Kingdom.

Team Bar has the Union Jack as a flag and the UK as their nationality.

 

England won the fifa cup in 1966

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1966_FIFA_World_Cup

In 2003 england won the world rugby cup.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2003_Rugby_World_Cup

 

Those are the facts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ In sport as in many other things the U.K. (and sometimes Ireland) has some anachronistic features.

 

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is recognised as a single Nation in most International forums, the citizens all have the same U.K. (EU member nation) passport for example.

But U.K. the nation is represented in Rugby for example by three teams, England, Scotland and Wales.

And then again it competes in the Olympics as 'Great Britain'.

 

In some sports Ireland and Northern Ireland compete in a combined team, but otherwise those in the north might seem to be missing out?!

 

(Consequently this will lead to the bizarre situation where in the Rio Olympics 2016 the 'nation' Great Britain will be represented by only players eligible for the 'nation' England - so mostly Fijians and Samoans ;), in the Rugby Sevens)

 

 

So parts of the UK often compete against other parts of the UK in sport and it was 'England' - on it's own, that won the Football and Rugby World Cups.

 

The United Kingdom won fifa worldcup once and world rugby once.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the grand palais somewhere in Paris they showed the three cups together:

m1227_crop169014_1024x576_proportional_1

Jimmy Spithill was also present together with two another very famous sportmen that I have never heard of.

m1228_crop169014_1024x576_proportional_1

 

The other two cups are made of gold or goldplated but there are two things that the america's cup absolutely has the record for.

Name the two facts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's pretty old (oldest international sporting trophy).

It's the only cup to have had a sledgehammer installed in it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's pretty old (oldest international sporting trophy).

It's the only cup to have had a sledgehammer installed in it?

Haha that's funny. You refer to the aboriginal accident where the cup was smashed.

It's the tallest of the three cups shown!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1997 was a good year for trophy repairers...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very important question: (Otherwise you won't understand the design contest in the ac 35.)

Will the Turbo (T version) Sport (S version) race?
Answer provided by Jack Griffin:

jack-griffin-100x118.jpg

Ted: Will the "Turbo" and "Sport" boats race?
Jack: Short answer: No. Longer answer: Those boats are for testing design ideas and developing crew work but the only racing they will do is informal racing during training. In 2015 and 2016 the teams race one design AC45F catamarans with battery powered daggerboard rake controls. In 2017 the teams will race their own design "America's Cup Class" catamarans which may only use power manually generated by the crew to move the daggerboards, to change the rudder rake and to trim the wing and the jib. Since the control systems for the AC Class boats are such an important part of the design, the Turbo and Sport boats are being used to test those systems and to decide how to manage the limited power available from four grinders. Those control systems will be top secret and inside the hulls, so we won't get to see them. But winning the America's Cup in 2017 will depend on those systems and how well the crews learn to use them.

Source: http://us5.campaign-archive1.com/?u=5b22acb550cbb7053ea617522&id=c1a1ba439d&e=75ea6378bf

 

You can mail Jack Griffin directly on this subject.

http://www.cupexperience.com/ask-jack-2/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^

 

LARBAR has quite a bit exposed outside the hulls of their T boats at times.

 

Battery power on an AC45 for foil rake, is that how it's done?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^

 

LARBAR has quite a bit exposed outside the hulls of their T boats at times.

 

Battery power on an AC45 for foil rake, is that how it's done?

 

"... quite a bit exposed outside the hulls..." Think about it. Why would they do that?

 

"Battery power on an AC45 for foil rake..." How did you think they were doing it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe it is only the board control rams that are exposed on LRBAR which would lead me to believe that they are building the test systems to full size AC50 spec, and that they would be covered in the final AC50 class hulls and aero package.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

^

 

LARBAR has quite a bit exposed outside the hulls of their T boats at times.

 

Battery power on an AC45 for foil rake, is that how it's done?

 

"... quite a bit exposed outside the hulls..." Think about it. Why would they do that?

 

"Battery power on an AC45 for foil rake..." How did you think they were doing it?

 

The way I see it, is replacement of hydraulics to "fly by wire systems."

Electromotors driven by batteries. Easier to maintain, more reliable, more vunerable to water. (electrocircuits will have to be waterproof for obvious reasons) Under the rules as stated above the cup is more and more moving towards a push button boat ,where the electricity is being delivered by the grinders. No more peak loads, but steady uploading of batteries and far more power by the electromotor when you need it. (An electromotor instantly deliveres torque)

colorTS1.jpg

For this charactaristics the brushed DC is suitable for adjustment of foil angle. (High loads)

More background on the various types and characteristics of direct current motors here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brushe..._of_a_DC_motor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ Are you speaking about the set up on the ACWS boats mentioned above, or suggesting that electric motors can replace hydraulics under the ACC rule - or experimentally on the T/S boats???

 

It's one thing to find a potential improvement, but quite another to get it past the 'mother-knows-best', 1D, AC rule makers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ Are you speaking about the set up on the ACWS boats mentioned above, or suggesting that electric motors can replace hydraulics under the ACC rule - or experimentally on the T/S boats???

 

It's one thing to find a potential improvement, but quite another to get it past the 'mother-knows-best', 1D, AC rule makers

Why not use electronic controll in foilers and wings? Hydraulics is expensive, not easy to maintain,

energy ineffecient and heavy. And less reliable then fly by wire. (Unless shunted by waterleaks)

It has to be proven one can make the electronic systems waterproof.

Under the almost water jet conditions of the AC45's, that will not be easy.

 

So first experimental on the S and T types, later on the final ac's for 35th cup.

I had the impression these rules let any improvement on measuring regulating systems free to the teams.

I'll ask Jack Griffin what his opinion is about this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ Or read the rules..

 

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/ILsDddo2xuPlx47DHh2qyEpRz5WA9yn6U1PCEpTTvsvbQkJqfnSspJd-1y43dx0L7rzb9w=s190

 

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/DcbsKCZ9gzreJM40gckxxONQ20q7-kaSQ2pCrCvPTH3C_7AjXMMWWF9q3-trY2xgg1bRaA=s190

 

 

They are experimenting on the test boats, they are (or were) also using power packs, but only to drive the hydraulics to save crew for other activities during the testing phase.

Do you think they'd be going to all that trouble and partnering with Parker Hannifin, the auto and aircraft industries to gain hydraulic expertise and parts - if they intended to toss the whole lot for manually driven generators, battery banks and electric motors - and all before the designs are finalised (next week ;) )?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ACEA and the teams have gone to great lengths to keep batteries, stored power and electric motors out of the operation of the actual AC competition boats. The batteries in the AC45 one designs is a neccesary evil to control the foil rake as adding a grinder and the needed hydrolics to power the foils would have been not only expensive but would have required a massive modification of the non foiling cat.

Electrical power for the AC50 will not happen, not only because of the rules, but because of the stigma of using electric motors to run the boats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ Or read the rules..

 

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/ILsDddo2xuPlx47DHh2qyEpRz5WA9yn6U1PCEpTTvsvbQkJqfnSspJd-1y43dx0L7rzb9w=s190

 

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/DcbsKCZ9gzreJM40gckxxONQ20q7-kaSQ2pCrCvPTH3C_7AjXMMWWF9q3-trY2xgg1bRaA=s190

 

 

They are experimenting on the test boats, they are (or were) also using power packs, but only to drive the hydraulics to save crew for other activities during the testing phase.

Do you think they'd be going to all that trouble and partnering with Parker Hannifin, the auto and aircraft industries to gain hydraulic expertise and parts - if they intended to toss the whole lot for manually driven generators, battery banks and electric motors - and all before the designs are finalised (next week ;) )?

Rules can be changed and the links you provided gives forbidden as 403 warning.

The combination of hydraulics and electro is where the strength is.

So you pump oil with an electromoter driven hydraulics pump.

Prestored power from the grinders in accu's when you need it.

 

Electronic rollers on L foilers so you can rise and lower them very quickly with power much greater then muscle power.

 

Can also been done for adjusting the wing to the opposite position during tacking.

Fast and reliable when properly tested.

Proven in superyacht industry and on the 90 x 90 Alinghi and Oracle DOG multi's in AC 33.

 

It will feel and look like a computer regulated push button boat.

What is so bad about that? Oracle also owns java.

Java is the regulating system in the dedicated circuits of your car, refrigarator, washing machines, mobile phone, game toy, computer and even airplanes.

 

List of even more java applications:

http://www.geom.uiuc.edu/~slevy/si/u_pkg_java102/docs/javaone/strat/JavApps.pdf

Why not regulate a foiler catamaran with this world wide spread technology?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The idea of hydraulic pumps is confirmed by Jack Griffin in a personal mail I recieved via Cup experience.

Copied with permission from Jack: (Jack's comment in red)

The question Nav asked in the AC quiz thread is a complicated one.
I quote:

"LARBAR has quite a bit exposed outside the hulls of their T boats at times.
The hydraulic ram outside the hull was not there when the boat launched. In their “Fighter Jet” video you never see more than about 2 seconds of foiling at a time. They did major work on the boat after the first day that they sailed it. When it relaunched, the ram was outside the hull. Maybe they underestimated the friction in the daggerboard cage bearing and needed more leverage by moving the ram?

Battery power on an AC45 for foil rake, is that how it's done?"
This question is about the AC45F one design. Yes of course that’s how the daggerboards are raked. Battery powered hydraulic pump in the hull.

 

Here is the "Fighter Jet on Water" clip he means.
http://land-rover-bar.americascup.com/en/news/199_A-Fighter-Jet-on-Water.html

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is pretty much common knowledge on this thread and AC Forum that the test boats (Sport and Turbo) use hydrolic pumps to operate the foils, and as the boats evolve; wings. The pressure is generated by the grinders. The first test boats had one grinding station, so with limited ability to create pressure, some battery power was needed to power these controls.

The new test boats (like OR Sport III) have increased grinding stations and are now relying on human powered hydrolic pumps with minimal batteries.

The AC45s have basic wings that are manually operated. Because there are no grinding stations (only winches) the foils require electrically actuated hydraulics.

When the AC50's are launched the only batteries will be for radio, lights and instrumentation. All boat controls will be human powered hydraulics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ACEA and the teams have gone to great lengths to keep batteries, stored power and electric motors out of the operation of the actual AC competition boats. The batteries in the AC45 one designs is a neccesary evil to control the foil rake as adding a grinder and the needed hydrolics to power the foils would have been not only expensive but would have required a massive modification of the non foiling cat.

Electrical power for the AC50 will not happen, not only because of the rules, but because of the stigma of using electric motors to run the boats.

 

If the power is manually generated - why is their any stigma as to how it's stored and dispersed?

 

It is pretty much common knowledge on this thread and AC Forum that the test boats (Sport and Turbo) use hydrolic pumps to operate the foils, and as the boats evolve; wings. The pressure is generated by the grinders. The first test boats had one grinding station, so with limited ability to create pressure, some battery power was needed to power these controls.

The new test boats (like OR Sport III) have increased grinding stations and are now relying on human powered hydrolic pumps with minimal batteries.

The AC45s have basic wings that are manually operated. Because there are no grinding stations (only winches) the foils require electrically actuated hydraulics.

When the AC50's are launched the only batteries will be for radio, lights and instrumentation. All boat controls will be human powered hydraulics.

 

According to Oracle's recent PR and some earlier from LARBAR, the power on the S/T boats is produced by 'powerpacks' during certain test phases. Oracle announced they were 'switching to manual' (OTUSA thread) now that major testing was completed by removing the powerpacks to get closer to 'normal' ACC/AC15/AC50 conditions for ongoing crew training.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nav, there is nothing different from what I wrote or what you added. As far as stigma, could you imagine the comments if the AC50's were totally push button with electric motors running the show? It takes a lot more "hump" to grind out the hydraulic pressure they need to run the controls than turning a generator to charge a battery.

As the teams get closer to designing their final control systems, the more they will operate the Sport/Turbos like the AC50 with manually generated hydraulic pressure for all systems so the "hampsters" can get used to race conditions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ One difference ^ is the reasons behind the initial use of - and eventual elimination of, electric power aboard...

 

But leaving that aside, if it's 'easier' (as you state) to produce and utilise kW via a generator/battery/electric motor than it is via a hydraulic system, why would you automatically be against that innovation.

 

Not relevent for AC35 but maybe 36 - if they can get away from such a prescriptive rule that is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the philosophy behind the boats being manually powered for several reasons, some being simply aesthetic. But one of the more technical reasons is that it may, due to the power constraints, lead to the design of more efficient control systems; ones that would have a better trickle-down effect to other platforms - even if those other platforms did include some kind of (hopefully more minimal this way) stored power.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the philosophy behind the boats being manually powered for several reasons, some being simply aesthetic. But one of the more technical reasons is that it may, due to the power constraints, lead to the design of more efficient control systems; ones that would have a better trickle-down effect to other platforms - even if those other platforms did include some kind of (hopefully more minimal this way) stored power.

 

The present rules allow for stored power.

 

And no one here has suggested any non-manual power system. The question is whether there is value in considering anything other than hydraulics (next time)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I like the philosophy behind the boats being manually powered for several reasons, some being simply aesthetic. But one of the more technical reasons is that it may, due to the power constraints, lead to the design of more efficient control systems; ones that would have a better trickle-down effect to other platforms - even if those other platforms did include some kind of (hopefully more minimal this way) stored power.

The present rules allow for stored power.

 

And no one here has suggested any non-manual power system. The question is whether there is value in considering anything other than hydraulics (next time)

oops, should have written "even if those other platforms did include some kind of (hopefully more minimal this way) non-manually-generated power"

 

Yes, there clearly are alternatives to hydraulics that may work well in future designs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When generating electricity with a simple generator, resistance on the armature never changes. You pass the magnets past the coils faster for more generation of power, slower for less.

As pressure builds in the hydraulic system, resistance increases.

This makes the production of pressure to the hydraulic systems more of an athletic feat than the generation of electrical energy.

At least the thought of manually "pumping hydraulics" sounds a bit more athletic than "charging batteries".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As you will - but that's a pretty weak argument IMO. Wouldn't it be amusing if a more efficient system was built - but some teams wouldn't change because it was not 'manly' enough.

 

a kW is always a kW and...

 

electro hamster = hydro hamster!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mr. Fusion off the stern. Powered by garbage collected from the shoreline at the regatta to reset the green agenda. Dr. Emmitt Brown, where are you?

1.21 gigowatts at the touch of a finger!

That's an outstanding goal for AC36.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you'll find that it was offered (in perpetuity) to the winner of a one off race around the Isle of Wight - until it had been raced for and won, it was 'held' by no one, after the race it was owned - by the owners of 'America'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this