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Bob Perry

My friend Jeff is doing a solo, non stop circumnavigation -Day 51

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Around Alone Days-190-191-192..

Day-190.
24hr.Run=66nm. Pos. Lat.20*54'S. Long.90*29'W. Weather=Bar=1010mb. Wind=NNW 4-10kts. Seas=4-6ft.W. Cabin Temp=72*-80*.

Day-191.
24hr.Run=104nm. Pos. Lat.19*31'S. Long.89*30'W. Weather Bar=1010mb. Wind=NNW4-12kts. Seas =SW 6-8ft. Cabin Temp=75*-79*.

Day-192.
24hr.Run=131nm. Pos. Lat.17*43' S. Long.88*23'W. Weather=Bar=1010mb. Wind NW 8-12ktsSeas=W. 4-6ft. Cabin Temp=75*-78*.

Total Miles sailed so far=23,801nm.

Miles sailed the last 3-days=301nm.

Distance left to go to finish=1124nm.

Top speed so far = 14.1kts.

The Rest of the Story:

Day-190.
Wind is up a little today, yet still very light.The good thing is I can almost steer the desired course, a big improvement.
I have received many great ideas from many of you out there, on how to help elevate my water shortage problem. I will name a few just for every body's benefit.
1-A quick and easy one is a 4-quart sauce pan on your stove with a cup secured in the middle of it and salt water poured in around the cup[not over the cup], then place the pot lid upside down on the pan and boil salt water, and then the steam condensing on the lid will run down to the knob and drip into the cup.
2-Another great idea is take your pressure cooker and either by removing a pop up or drilling a hole in the top attach a copper tube and coil it as a condenser so that steam is cooled and converted to fresh water that runs out the end of the tube .Plastic tube could be substituted for copper as long as it didn't taint the taste of the water.
3-A solar still comprised of a pop or beer can with top cut off filled with sea water than take a 2-liter platic popbottle with top on cut hole in bottom for can and roll bottom of pop bottle up inside creating trough around the inside of the bottle and set in the sun, its suppose to work.
4-Use hand operated water-maker to pump salty tainted water in tank through water maker to yield more fresh water quicker and save discharge water for other cleaning uses on boat.
Of course the first two ideas require that you have enough propane to boil the water, I'm not sure I do, but as a last resort I will give it a go.
The water maker one is a good idea but my water-maker refuses to produce any product water from any source at this time.
John from the yacht Nakia reminded me that the hot water tank has a back flow preventer on the bottom of it, and the only real way to get the water out of the tank is to remove that back flow device at the bottom of the tank. So I logged that good info.
I'm going to make it in ok and I checked the specifications on my life raft and there is 3-liters of 17-year old water inside of it that could be used if need be.

Day-191.
Today winds are up just a little and sailing on course.
I decided to build a 6-volt battery for my water salinity tester, as the factory battery had died and I didn't have a replacement. I taped 4-AA-batteries into a bundle, placing every other one + end up. On the bottom of the battery pack I soldered two separate parallel bare copper wires connecting the negative ends of two batteries to the positive ends of the other two batteries creating two 3-volt batteries. On top of the battery bundle I connected the negative of one three volt battery to the positive of the other one, and that gave me 6-volts at the two remaining terminals where I soldered Two wires and connected them in the meter where the normal 6-volt battery would hook up, and of course the meter turned on.
This enabled me to fill a cup with the salty water from my tank and read the salinity. According to my "Pur" water-maker manual any product water over 1500 parts per million should be discarded. My meter read 1480 parts per million making the water just barely yet still drinkable. So for now I'm still drinking coffee with extra sugar as long as water lasts in tank???? I feel much relieved to have this additional water, and we will see how long it lasts.

Day-192.
Sailing along nicely picking up favorable current, and it is most likely the outer edge of the Humboldt Current.
I can see the trade-winds getting closer and should start to get into them within 24hrs. Once I pass through the transitional area where I will be slowed for at least 12-hrs. I can get moving again.
Debbie is reporting in from Bahis Caraqez, Ecuador where she is sleeping out in the yard of our friend's house in a 3-man tent. She says there are people sleeping in tents on the streets of Bahia. She also mentioned that they tried opening the Tia store in the down town section and the people all went in and looted it. So now it is closed until security is beefed up enough to reopen. Debbie says there are lots of soldiers on the streets making things pretty safe and a few stores are open with lots of security.
There were deaths in Bahia when some large buildings collapsed.
Tripp has sold the marina and it is open under new owner and management with most of all the old employees still there. The Porto Amistad restaurant should be open by the time I get there.
This is a pretty good example of what I eluded to several months before the earth quake ever happened, how hunger is our strongest driving force and very few people are provisioned to last more than a few days before they become desperate and will take what they need at what ever risk
We should all learn from this example as this was an unpredictable natural disaster, and they do happen in most places. I know its hard when you know there is a store two blocks away stuffed full of what ever you might want on a normal day, it's those other days when that store becomes an " illusion", I'm talking about.
I had provisioned Sailors Run for approximately 7-months, and when all those lockers were jammed to the tops with goods it seemed almost ridicules that I should take so much stuff, but now I'm down to just about the same place in provisions as many people in Ecuador and from this perspective it causes you to think "sobering thoughts".
Fortunate for me I can see a light at the end of the tunnel.
Watching the light grow larger and brighter as the Jefe' gets "saltier" day by day.

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Between the wind and the current, hope he knocks out some 150-175 mile days without blowing up patches.

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This thread, or Bobs build threads.....it makes wadding through all the other stuff worth while......

( Bob - don't let the buggers get you down in the "New Project " thread.....haters will hate, and that's there ball and chain to lug - not yours)

 

Cheers

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There is now a serious tone to Jeff's entries.

Bob,

 

I think both serious and now starting to get reflective. The end is peering up over the horizon. Another 8-10 days and he'll be back into civilization, his friends and family and the outcome of a natural disaster will fill him with a rush of emotions. He's a different man than when he left and he's returning to a changed place.

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Sounds like re-supplying to go where-ever next is going to be a bit of a biatch. (andI don't think I would want to leave the boat there)

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Sounds like re-supplying to go where-ever next is going to be a bit of a biatch. (andI don't think I would want to leave the boat there)

 

I would even leave the boat unattended right now.

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GoDaddy is showing the domain registration for Sailorsrun.com has expired as of the 7th. With Debbie in Ecuador and Jeff obviously at sea, anyone know how to handle the reregistration/renewal? I took a look and you have to know the owners account info to try to renew the registration. Would hate to see his blog lost while he is preoccupied. I'd front up to keep it alive if I knew how. All I'd want is a signed first edition of his book and a chuck of Patches.

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Say it ain't so!

 

I doubt you can renew without knowing how to log in to the domain's admin panel. You may be able to call someone, but I suspect that they need the owner's permission.

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I get Jeff's logs via email. I will post everyone I get if no one else is posting them first. One way or another we will keep this thread going till the end.

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I get Jeff's logs via email. I will post everyone I get if no one else is posting them first. One way or another we will keep this thread going till the end.

Thank you Bob.

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Here is your latest Jeff fix:

 

Around Alone Days-193-194-195.

 

Day-193.

24hr.Run=58nm. Pos. Lat.16*56'. Long.87*58'W. Weather=Bar=1010mb. Wind= W 4-8kts. Seas=W. 4-8ft. Cabin Temp=75*-80*.

 

Day-194.

24hr.Run=63nm. Pos. Lat.16*08'S. Long.88*09' W. Weather=Bar=1010mb. Wind=NE-SE. 0-12kts. Seas= S. 4-6ft. Cabin Temp=75*-81*.

 

Day-195.

24hr.Run=79nm.Pos. Lat.15*00'S. Long.88*18'W. Weather=Bar=1010mb.NE-SE. 4-12kts. Seas=4-6ft. S. Cabin Temp=75*-80*.

 

Total Miles sailed so far=24,069nm.

 

Miles sailed last three days=200nm.

 

Distance left to go to finish off Bahia=975nm.

 

Top Speed so far= 14.1kts.

 

The rest of the Story.

 

Day-193.

Sailing once again is slow as we try to get clear of the center of the high.

We had a close encounter with a 120-ft. Ecuadorian fishing vessel "Bandana" that set off the A.I.S.-Alarm. I tried contacting the vessel on VHF-radio, as it appeared the 120ft. fishing vessel was bearing down on me. After several attempts the skipper came back to me in Broken English, assuring me that there was no problem and he was altering course. I used my best broken Spanish to let him know all was "muy bueno" with that , he chuckled into the microphone and pased ½ mile off my stern. What seemed pretty funny is that as he passed behind me there was a large school of tuna jumping out of the water off my port bow happily frolicking about, swimming clear of both vessels.

 

Day-194.

In the early morning hours the winds remained light as I slowly moved forward hoping to find the SE-Trades.

Today was the day I had hopped to avoid, as both water tanks were exhausted of all water and only a fine "fog" ushered forth from the spigot in the galley sink.

My next attempt at water recovery was to retrieve the water from the hot water tank. I pulled the high pressure blow off valve off of an upper portion of the tank, and water began to bubble forth. I was using a funnel and a two litter bottle to collect the water, and after a while I had used many old two liter pop bottles from my recycled plastic waste department.

Once the water was below the level of the whole created by removing the blow off valve I resorted to using the 06-Pur water-maker as a pump to get at the remaining water down in the tank. Towards the bottom the water appeared rusty and I left that in the tank.

The 6-gallon water tank gave me 5-gallons of salt tainted water with readings of 1480ppm to 1800ppm. readings on the salinity tester.

It was pointed out by friends of mine in the medical field that the law in the US requires drinking water to be less than 500ppm., and in Mexico it is required to be less than 750ppm, possibly because of all the Tequila they drink there kidneys can handle more salt. They also "recommended" that I drink my "urine" rather than the salty water, as it would be safer. I just have to say if I was worried about safety I would "never" circumnavigate via the "5-great capes". So after not to much deliberating about this I have come to the conclusion that since I have drunk no "rum" for over two months my kidneys need a little adventure and I hope for a week or so they will see me through "urine free".

As dinner time rolled around I figured I would combine one of the water recovery ideas with cooking. When I steamed the whole grained brown rice I had a cup placed in the center of the 4-quart pan and the lid turned upside down on the top so the steam would be diverted into the cup off the knob on the pot lid. After 40-minutes of steaming the 1-cup of rice in 2.5 cups of water my yield in the cup was 1.5 ounces of salt free water. That was not much but I dumped it into the coffee pot to reduce the salinity on my next batch of coffee.

 

Day-195.

Still no trades even though for about 4-hrs the winds were up a little and we were moving pretty well.

Last night some showers came our way and I set about trapping water on deck, but by the time I was set up the rains stopped. At least now I have clan decks and sails for the next shower if it comes.

The past two mornings I have found flying fish on deck, usually a good sign for improved fishing. I have had little luck fishing I believe mainly because the boat is seldom moving fast enough to cause the lures to be effective.

I seen another Cargo Ship on the A.I.S. last evening but it never came any closer than 25-miles and appeared to be headed in the direction of Callow, Peru the largest port on the west side of South America.

This evening I watched as the sun dipped below the horizon, and was treated to the most magnificent "green flash" I have yet to see. I believe because I stepped up on to the coming around the cockpit just as it started to happen and then the boat rose up on a wave that caused the green flash to last for a full 3-seconds and it was a real "ooh-ahhh-ooh" event, followed by a beautiful sunset.

I guess there are still more wonderful things for me to experience on this voyage and possibly "King Neptune" and the Mayan wind God "Quaxicatle" [most likely miss spelled] have teemed up to keep Sailors Run and crew out here just a little longer.

Still "ghosting along" in the Pacific the Jefe'.

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Come on Neptune, let's give the Jefe a nice patches-friendly breeze and enough rain to collect a few gallons!

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Man he has been nearly stalled for how long now? I'd have to look back, but Jefe' has had what, about one 100 nm day in the last two weeks or so? He needed to pour the last of that rum out for Neptune, that bugger just isn't giving him any breaks.

 

Here is to a good breeze and a rainy day.

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Jeff continues to do it with the Baba 40 ketch.

 

Around Alone Days-196-197-198.

 

Day-196.

24hr.Run=103nm. Pos. Lat.13*28'S. Long.87*44'W. Weather=Bar=1010mb. Wind =ENE-ESE 10-6-12kts. Seas=SW 4-6ft. Cabin Temp=76*-80*.

 

Day-197.

24hr.Run=148nm. Pos. Lat.11*21'S. Long.86*34'W. Weather=Bar=1008mb. Wind=E-SE12-18kts. Seas=SE-6-8ft. Cabin Temp=78*-80*.

 

Day-198.

24hr.Run=161nm. Pos.08*59'S. Long.85*26'W. Weather=Bar=1007mb.Wind=E SE 15-20kts. Seas=ESE 6-10ft. Cabin Temp=78*-80*.

 

Total Miles sailed so far=24,499nm.

 

Mileds sailed last 3-Days=412nm.

 

Miles left to go to finish off Bahia=581nm.

 

The Rest of the Story.

 

Day-196.

The SE- trade winds have begun to fill in at last. Now I must pray "Patches" will hold together for this final dash to the finish, in the building trade -winds.

Last evening I was once again treated to an amazing "green flash", and if it is possible to record one in a video, I surely have it!

It was during one of my late night watch inspection, while panning the horizon that I spotted a huge bright glow coming from over the NW horizon. This glow was surely coming from a large fishing vessel that was all lit up harvesting the sea. We are now just 600nm off the South American coast and converging with it. As always when a vessel nears land the hazards increase, and vigilance must also increase to stay clear of "harms way".

The large fishing vessel over the horizon did not appear on my A.I.S. a bit concerning and I can only hope he has an A.I.S. receiver on board, receiving my signal as the receiver is much cheaper to purchase than the transmitter.

 

Day-197.

Sailors Run is now "hauling ass" in the SE Trades! Yahoo!!

Debbie is waiting for me in Bahia and has fresh salt free water that she will bring out to me once across the finish line should I need it. It is possible when I arrive that I might miss the high tide to get across the bar and might have to anchor in the "open roadstead" anchorage off shore over night.

I would like to share with you one of the hardest things about a voyage solo around the world unassisted south of the 5-great capes.

In my mind it has to be remaining "confident" of your abilities to pull it "all off". I must admit that this is very difficult when you and your small vessel are thousands of miles from the nearest help in perilous seas and winds caused by numerous gales and storms over a duration of 4.5 months. This scenario is a huge grinder chafing away at your "personal metal"; something far greater than one can even imagine.

The "confidence" that is required comes from your knowledge and experience that you bring along about sailing in heavy weather conditions on a well designed boat. That confidence is shored up and supported by the beliefs of friends and family, that you can do it .Let me give you a couple of examples. Debbie is my greatest supporter and continually tells me and others I'm the best sailor she knows and I can do this voyage.

Another example is like when I was completing my first rounding of "Cape Horn" back in 2009 and was sailing up the Rio De Plata river a shallow 200-nm body of water approaching Buenos Aires Argentina. I was exhausted and wanted to make the marina at Yacht Club Argentino before dark. I started up my Perkins diesel and motor sailed a knot faster than I could go with out the motor. It was after only two minutes the engine sized and was a total loss. I hadn't checked the oil as I knew it was full, but because of a knock down in a storm and a broken dip stick tube all the oil was out side the engine in the drip pan.

I'm not a wealthy person by any stretch of the imagination, and this engine scenario was going to cost me 13,000 dollars and Debbie was all excited to celebrate with me in Buenos Aires the successful Cape Horn Trip. Now all of these events had shattered my confidence and I was seriously thinking about running the boat up on the beach and walking away. I ended up pulling my emails and there was this one brief email from my friend "Willy" and he seemed to know right where I was at in my mind and he wrote this" Jeff you have successfully rounded the greatest cape of all, Cape Horn and you are nearly there, now just "kick its Fnn ass and sail that boat right into Yacht Club Argentino and grab onto something". You can not imagine how that shored up my confidence and suddenly everything became perfectly clear, and simple what I had to do.

So I just want to say thanks to all of you out there that have encouraged me and shored up my confidence helping to make this voyage a success. I do believe we all get by with a little help from our friends.

 

Day-198.

Trade winds continue to build and we find ourselves close reaching on course with good speed.

Today I became alarmed when suddenly 22 targets appeared on the A.I.S. Once I started pulling the target list up I seen that they were all over 600 miles away. It seems that there was some sort of atmospheric conduit that had opened up the propagation for me to be able to receive these signals, and after about 15 minutes they disappeared off the A.I.S.

Still no rain and I'm still making coffee with the much too salty water, just trying to weather through this drought for a few more days.

I have not yet resorted to drinking my "urine" My daughter "Ginger" thoughtful like she is, suggested that I serve it up in a nice tea cup and add some "herbs" and sip it like an exotic tea. Now I'm sure most "exotic teas" have a name and possibly this one should be called "Me-Tea"; what do think "mates".

Slipping along thinking about "sipping it up" the Jefe'.

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gripping

and what a pleasure to read, to think he´s writing all the while he deals with very real survival issues

this is so refreshing to read after checking the Rimas thread... it´s like inverse universes

Go the jefe!

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Go The Patches! An object lesson in hard work, patience, and perseverance paying off. I would have probably dumped that sail overboard in a fit of temper at some point, but now it is the thing that may give him that last little bit of juice to make land before he is totally out of water.

 

Can't wait to read the book.

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Plane:

I posted a couple of Jeff's logs on the Rimas thread on SA and I was told to bugger off. I thought , as you said, Jeff's adventure made a stark contrast to the Rimas BS. But it appears that those on SA would prefer to go on endlessly about Rimas than to follow El Jefe. Not sure what to make of that.

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Good grief, that's strange. Well, CA is the "walled garden" of SA.

Yeah, I can hardly imagine how he feels at this point, with the finish line in view. He's literally going to ghost over the line out of potable water.

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Ajax:

In fairness to SA there are 271 views of the thread and a handful of responses. I guess, compared to Rimas, the reality of Jeff's adventure speaks for itself.

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Haters gonna hate, Bob, and trolls gonna troll. In fairness, El Jefe's story also gets more interesting the longer you've followed it. For people not up to speed on the drama of the weather, the busted watermaker, Patches' inability to keep it together, the food running low, the last couple days of the trip are probably not that compelling. Kind of like if you watched the Sopranos last episode but not the first hundred some odd. The front page has also touted a bunch of other much more highly publicized solo circumnavigations (and attempts) that were frankly a lot more disappointing.

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This guy Jefe is some kind of bad ass super stud sailor.

 

I will look forward to shaking his hand when he returns to SeattlE.

 

And he is not on the Front Page?

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He's not on the front page because he's not in a boat that will plane or foil. Outside of CA that's all anyone on this site seems to be interested in, well that and tits, (and I get that part) Turns out I'm pretty disinterested in any of those things, and this being the internet I can find all the tits I want, so I almost never open anything other than CA here unless it is a really slow day.

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I think you are all right. It's going to be a cold day in hell before a Baba 40 makes the front page. That's ok.

 

What if we told Clean it was a foiling Baba?

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rats, foiled again! I for one would love to see this on the FP. I certainly enjoy the latest/greatest whatevers but doing what Jeff has (almost) done is epic. There is a lot to be said for a boat that is tough enough to do it and durable enough to last for decades.

 

As for the Baba 40, I don't know that I have ever seen one in person but still remember the first time I saw the Valiant 40, we were racing her and I thought "wow, now that is a salty boat".

 

I still feel that way.

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It'd be awesome if he makes land hauling like a boss with Patches flying into pieces of torn rags on his approach.

"Oh, just went for a little sail."

 

Go the Patches!

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Here is a Baba 40. Jeff's is one of the few ketch rigged Baba 40's out there. The hull has a midsection very similar to a Valiant 40 with slightly less deadrise. The bow shape is very different from the V-40. The keel is "full" but I cut away as much of the leading edge as I could. It's a great sailing boat. AIRLOOM the turbo Seattle Baba 40 has done very well racing in the PNW.

Baba%2040%20another%20reach%20pic_zpsciq

Baba%2040%20sail%20plan_zpsxnzl7y4j.jpg

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Bob, should have said "in person" and thanks for posting the picture/drawings. I knew about the boat from reading your blog. Having worked in and owned a variety of businesses I find the behind the scenes details most informative, seems much like walking a tightrope to satisfy the client and the builder. I knew it was similar to the Valiant but didn't know the differences (besides the keel) until you pointed it out. I have raced and sailed on several of your designs and have always been impressed by how they handled in a variety of conditions. Many years ago a friend decided to semi retire and bought a Freeport Islander 36, went out with he and his wife for a weekend to the coast and back. I didn't know it was one of yours and the wind piped up, the wife went down and my friend was enjoying it so we didn't shorten sail and just pushed it. I was surprised by how well behaved it was until I asked him who did it. Was a fun trip, we pretty much rearranged everything below and the wife wasn't nearly as happy as we were. He went on to do some LD solo stuff including Bermuda 1/2. (different boat) although he still has the 36.

 

Good times, and I highly recommend anyone who hasn't to start reading the blog, lots of great history and design information there.

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Yep, very well behaved. So telling that story reminded the next trip was from Clear Lake to Freeport (a long day sail) and back. Just my friend as the wife decided we were too adventuresome. My friend had never done the Houston ship channel at night, was in the afternoon had been in the channel maybe an hour motor sailing as wind was on the nose. We lost propulsion (later found out the prop had wrapped a huge piece of plastic), debated turning around and to the north was like a black curtain. Later found out this was the big Allison flood (2001?) so I said with no engine let's keep going so his first at night trip was tacking the ship channel at night. He got into sailing after major heart surgery a couple years prior so I trimmed and coached him on crossing traffic (really can't get out of the channel safely on either side). Wind kept building (thankfully) and by the time we reached the yacht basin in Galveston was probably in the low 20's. Did a perfect landing. His wife became convinced i was some sort of voodoo/adventure magnet.

 

I really enjoyed sailing that boat. He belonged to a cruising club and a lot of the members were surprised that it was faster than their bigger boats. When I first got on the boat I convinced him to put add a vang and cunningham and he was so impressed he added adjustable cars. Good times. Did the same drill on a Tatoosh 42 and the owner brought him silverware on quite a few occasions. Did I mention I am laid back and very competitive? I love taking something from the cheap seats to the podium.

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As one who follows both el Jefe and duh Rimas, I look at it like this: el Jefe's exploits make me feel like I'm 1/10 the sailor he is and even less of a person because I neither could nor would attempt what he is doing. Rimas makes me feel like I'm 100X the sailor he is, so I feel more confident I could sail to Hawaii successfully. So maybe Rimas has more readers because we'd rather feel superior than inferior.

 

Or to put it another way, el Jefe's saga is high drama, especially now that he's running short of water, so I'm legitimately worried about him, while Rimas is more like a cartoon character who keeps going no matter how many times he's flattened, so who really cares? And my guess is most people prefer a comedy to a drama anyway.

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Ecuador was again hit by two earthquakes today, both >6.7 in magnitude, apparently. Fortunately, there seem to be no reports of casualties, let's hope and/or pray it stays this way.

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Patches laughs at earthquakes. Jeff's wife Debbie - hope she's managing OK.

The resourcefulness of those two...They should be fine. Jeff would probably beach Sailors Run and dig a harbor.

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Anxiously awaiting the next update. He should be close now. When I've been offshore the last thing I'm interested in doing is sitting down and writing, and I was with 2 or 3 other crew, pretty much everything on the boat working and plenty of food and water. Jeff reminds me of some of the sailors I grew up reading about, who press on regardless.

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Around Alone Days-199-200-201.

 

Day-199.

24hr.Run=137nm. Pos. Lat.07*00'S. Long.82*09' W. Weather=Bar=1006mb. Wind=SE 12-15kts. Seas= SE 6-8ft. Cabin Temp=78*-83*.

 

Day-200.

24hr.Run=144nm. Pos. Lat.04*58'S. Long.83*27'W. Weather =Bar=1004mb. Wind=SE 10-15kts. Seas=SE 6-8ft. Cabin Temp=76*-83*.

 

Day-201.

24hr.Run=141nm. Pos. Lat.03*16'S. Long.82*09"W. Weather=Bar=1004mb. Wind=SE 10-15kts. Seas=4-6ft. SE. Cabin Temp.72*78*.

 

Total Miles sailed so far=24,921nm.

 

Miles sailed last three days =422nm.

 

Distance left to go to finish line off Bahia Caraquez,Ecuador=187nm.

 

Top Speed so far =!4.1kts.

 

The Rest of the Story.

 

Day-199.

Today we find our selves sailing along in slightly lighter winds, that are forecasted to drop even a little more in two days.

At last today I caught a small 24-inch Dorado weighing approximately 4lbs and cooked it up. It will be enough for two dinners. Yea fresh food from the sea!!

It was later in the afternoon, as the winds were moderating, that I went forward to slide the block aft on "Patches" so I could let her all the way out to gain speed. I grabbed hold of my forward lower shroud on the lee-side of the mizzen mast as a hand hold and felt it start popping strands as it became very loose.

I scrambled back to the cockpit dropping the mizzen sail to unload the mast and took the halyard forward to the hawser hole amidships on the leeward side where I attached it and tensioned it up to help stabilize the mast.

It was then that the I thought about had the forward lower shroud on the windward side had let go, that it would have popped right off and most likely the deck mounted mizzen mast would have toppled into the sea.

I made up a monkeys fist of sorts and tossed a string over both spreaders on the mizzen mast, so I could pull in a line up over them and around the mast and tie a long bowlen knot into it enabling the mast to be supported enabling me to retrieve my one and only halyard on that mast. Now I could pull my set of blocks aloft for hoisting me up the mast to replace the unraveling shroud with a piece of 5/16' line. This project would have to wait until day light as now it was already getting dark.

I saw a small fishing boat pass within 1-2nm. of us during the night, on one of my looks up top side.

 

Day-200.

I began my day at 5am anxious to make the Mizzen operational once again. The breeze was up and we were close reaching at 7kts in 6-8ft seas.

I hoisted the blocks aloft on the halyard and attached the boson's chair to the end of them. As I was climbing into that chair many things were running through my mind, like we are going pretty fast already, maybe this could wait, and if one of those shrouds that are only 5-years old failed what about the other five that now my life is going to have to depend on. I wondered what it might be like to ride the mizzen mast into the sea, and I was unable to visualize a good way to do it. Oh well at least I had my inflatable life jacket on as a safety harness.

I began pulling myself aloft with my go-pro camera strapped on my head to record the event .It was fortunate I didn't have to go up over 25ft but even at that, there were a couple of times that I came loose from the mast flying out and slamming into the shrouds that were trying to "slice and dice" me and then back into the mast where I hit the camera into the mast and the camera in turn took a bite out of my skin at the bridge of my nose.

Once I was at the spreaders I could see that only three of the 19-strands were still holding the shroud aloft. I quickly inspected the other three terminations at the spreaders and they seemed to be "golden" and I hope they will stay that way for the remainder of this voyage.

It was easy to pop off those final 3-strands and I tossed the shroud clear of the boat and into the sea where it streamed along side the boat as it was still attached to the chain plate below. Now I pushed the "stem-ball" fitting up out of the spreader position and replaced it with the 7/16" line that I tied a figure eight "jam-knot" into and sucked it down onto the cup of the hole it passed through.

Once on deck I rigged up a small set of blocks and tensioned up the line so that I could remove the long bowlen- knot and clear the sail track for the mizzen sail. Soon the sail was up and we were all powered up once again.

I believe the rigging on the mizzen is a substandard wire at least not 316 stainless as it shows signs of some rusting and I will replace all the shrouds on this mast before putting to sea again.

 

Day-201.

Still sailing along nicely and just received an email from a friend that Ecuador just had another 6.8 earth quake in the early morning hours. I was anxious to hear if Debbie was all right and I got an email from her letting me know she was.

The earth quake occurred as she was sleeping in her tent under the eves of the house and she awoke to the screams of a neighbor as the quake began. Debbie bolted from her tent getting clear of the house and ran down into the garden area where our friends were getting out of their tent. Debbie said that nothing too much really happened right there around them as the earthquake was deep in the ground and no tsunami warning was issued, also the military started immediate patrols of the area to check things out and keep the peace.

It was later in the day when Debbie was at Puerto Amistad and the marina office that another tremor was felt and they all rushed out of there to the middle of the street and she said the girls from Amistad were all frightened and crying as they hugged each other. Pillar the office head received a phone call that her father had fallen and hit his head and wasn't breathing, so Debbie and Pillar went with the new owner of Puerto Amistad whom is also a doctor and raced out about 30-minutes to where her father lived. When they arrived other family members were there but Pillars father lay dead upon his bead. Our thoughts and prayers go out to Pillar and her family. Sometimes we fail to remember just how fragile life is.

I'm hopping to arrive at the finish line on Friday and must get there by 2:30pm to be taken in across the bar, and its going to be very close as to whether I make it in time or not.

I received more information on salty water yesterday from a friend and sailor a former California water district employee, and he said that one of their wells was putting out water at 1100 parts per-million salt and they considered that potable although their customers complained about the salty taste and he says that they believe that you can drink water up to 2000 parts per million without harming your body, of course it would taste salty.

My current water supply is down to three quarts and I'm good through Sunday and I better "damn" well be there by then; the "Lord" willing.

Last night I seen eight-ships pass during the night, the closes one came was within 3-miles.

On "watch" preparing for "shoring-up" the J

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Admire his accomplishments. But am

Wondering how much "garbage" has gone over the side . Think he wrote of dumping "patches" at on time.

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Ed:

I think the plan is to cut it, patches, into little pieces and give them away with his book. Initially anyway.

I will definitely be in for one of those.

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Bob thank you so much for posting Jeff’s adventure here, it has been spellbinding and inspirational, there is no denying this guy is a total stud. Thanks also to Jeff for taking time to provide us with the details of his efforts, that could not be an easy thing to do. It feels like he invited us to join him on him travel odyssey and I am grateful for that.

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Admire his accomplishments. But am

Wondering how much "garbage" has gone over the side . Think he wrote of dumping "patches" at on time.

If you are referring to the shroud he said it was attached to the chainplate and dragging not discarded.

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Admire his accomplishments. But am

Wondering how much "garbage" has gone over the side . Think he wrote of dumping "patches" at on time.

Probably no more or less than from any other boat crossing oceans.

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X:

I know Jeff. He's about 5'9" and very normal. Except,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

 

It has been my pleasure to help share his adventure.

 

d'ranger:

Good on ya. I was at the boat yard today so I could not check my emails.

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So what happens if he does not get across the bar? Does he anchor and wait for a tide change?

I think he (or someone else maybe?) mentioned an anchorage in one of his recent posts when he first commented that that you have to time it to get across the bar to get into the harbor.

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High tide is at 1520 Equador TZ.

 

www.tidetablechart.com/tides/hightide_lowtide/41137/Rio%20Chone

 

 

Looks like no AIS reporting stations nearby and his self reporting SPOT has not functioned since April 24.

 

Don't the "rules" allow the iron jenny this close??

 

Thanks again, Bob for staying up beyond your bedtime to post the latest.

 

He doesn't appear on AIS. What time is high tide there?

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