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Qingdaosog

J70 after three years.. it has been very successful Why is that and w

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I am not much of a sailor, but I love my J70. It goes well enough, It quickly tells you when you make a mistake, but it doesnt try to kill you. No other J70's around me so we just bumble around learning as we go, and drinking the odd beer. With a smile on our faces.

Its seems to be a great success. For you expert sailors, why do you like it when it can be so friendly to an amateur like me, and what tip can you pass to me to make mine go faster. (keeping it upright upwind is my biggest challenge).

And is this class going to continue to grow?

Any comments to enliven a lonely old J70 fan long winter appreciated! Its cold out there!

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Tow your boat down to Austin and play all "winter."

The fleet has beginners and guys who are competitive at the worlds.

Leave the boat and book a few cheap flights before towing it home in May

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Yup, we are all experts here.... :rolleyes: Keep on keepin on.....

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A ringing endorsement of the Texas educational system !

 

Perhaps a few more maps and a bit less evolution might be handy, no ?

 

To the Original Poster - you REALLY shipped a J/70 to China ? Wow. Good for you.

 

Must say I'm a bit surprised there isn't someone making a knock-off yet though.

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A ringing endorsement of the Texas educational system !

 

Perhaps a few more maps and a bit less evolution might be handy, no ?

 

To the Original Poster - you REALLY shipped a J/70 to China ? Wow. Good for you.

 

Must say I'm a bit surprised there isn't someone making a knock-off yet though.

J70 IS a knock off...

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A ringing endorsement of the Texas educational system !

 

Perhaps a few more maps and a bit less evolution might be handy, no ?

 

To the Original Poster - you REALLY shipped a J/70 to China ? Wow. Good for you.

 

Must say I'm a bit surprised there isn't someone making a knock-off yet though.

China can't be far away. I just ate lunch today at a Chinese restaurant and all the tools at the local Home Depot are made in China.

Actually I think China is in Arkansas as everything the Waltons sell is from China.

 

.Hope ! That's a Chinese name fir a city.

Bill Clinton was born in China!!!

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I had been interested in j boats after sailing on J80s and flying tigers here. Waited for J70 as suited my purposes better. Mine is first one built in China for Jboats. US rigging not European

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Well I certainly didn't expect my enquiry to lead to Monica Lewinski...

Was hoping for some insights on sailing J70's. Long way from support here.

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Well I certainly didn't expect my enquiry to lead to Monica Lewinski...

Was hoping for some insights on sailing J70's. Long way from support here.

 

We have had 2 seasons with the boat, and we love it! Congrats on choosing a 70$

 

In 2015 we had a brief but good 3 boat coaching session with our sailmaker (cat3) and his main lesson was: we will be moving our weight a lot. He said "Do it well and you will gain speed especially in light air." Another lesson was lots of twist in the sails and how to properly in-haul the jib in different wind strengths.

 

It made a substantial difference for us.

 

Cheers,

Go4

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Well I certainly didn't expect my enquiry to lead to Monica Lewinski...

Was hoping for some insights on sailing J70's. Long way from support here.

 

I'd like to see any J boat do what she could do with a cigar.

 

patience, I'm sure some folks will come in here and actually talk about the boat.

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Sure we will, after he gets things done first things first

 

Well I certainly didn't expect my enquiry to lead to Monica Lewinski...

Was hoping for some insights on sailing J70's. Long way from support here.

Fuck Off...

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Why is it so successful? Three words.

Cost

Crew numbers

+1

 

Ease of transport to regattas for your boat

 

And/or

 

Numerous OD events and opportunities to charter a hull on another continent

 

Does anyone know if hull numbers have cracked the 1000 mark worldwide?

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The J/70 is successful because it is not a sportsboat.

 

No, seriously! Over here, it attracts sailors who come from dragons, solings, stars, trias', and h-boats. The overall package fits. The fact that is sometimes planes a little is just a nice add-on.

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By the way: are the Euro rigs (ours is Seldén) in any way different compared to the American ones?

Yes they are different. NA (my) rig is made by Southern Spars. Check out the newest North Tuning Guide... There are notes and tables for both the Selen and the SS mast. I was told one is built as a one piece tube, the other is in two pieces.

 

You can gather from reading some of the info that one is a littler stiffer out of the box than the other.

 

Go4

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Why is it so successful? Three words.

Cost

Crew numbers

¿Cost?

 

I find it horribly expensive for a big dinghy... I think it's around 44.000€ here in Spain, For that kind of money you can get a used 40.7...

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The guy asked for some advice...SA is really good at not giving any of that!

 

1. Check your tuning guide that corresponds with the sails and get back to me after those are set.

2. Backstay has to be adjusted prior to heading out so you can fine tune it from the cockpit,...heavy breeze...wank it down.

3. Jibs are a funny bunch. We sail with North Inventory and they continually recut them for speed and shape. Ease, hike, trim on the main in breeze and make sure that Jib is all the way in...hitting the doghouse. If it is eased a slight bit, overpowering the rig becomes an issue. JIB halyard is adjusted often by our crew while we race upwind. It needs to be firm in the breeze but we all know that. If the rig is not tuned for heavy breeze then a trimmed jib is going to backwind the main since it's not flat enough and there is where the boat is not efficient and sluggish.

4. HEEL ANGLE UPWIND HAS TO BE MAINTAINED AT ALL TIMES. 12 - 15 DEGREES BUT CONSISTENCY IS THE KEY.

 

 

 

proOC

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Thanks for these insights. No worries in yanking the backstay on as hard as physically can? I think this is one area we cam improve here. And maybe harder on the jib. Jib carriage usually 4-5 holes from back,(Doyle sails) but recently saw a picture of jib carriage near front. That surprised me. Maybe I need to rethink basic settings

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Thanks for these insights. No worries in yanking the backstay on as hard as physically can? I think this is one area we cam improve here. And maybe harder on the jib. Jib carriage usually 4-5 holes from back,(Doyle sails) but recently saw a picture of jib carriage near front. That surprised me. Maybe I need to rethink basic settings

Quingdaosog,

Have you used this-

Doyle's M2 Tuning Guide - www.doylesails.com/onedesign/j70/tuning.html

 

They have details on the car position there as well as full set-up guidelines.

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If your main is fluttering and you are still overpowered you do not have the rig adjusted along with the backstay. It's a funny boat, we were sailing in 20+ knots a year ago, couldn't understand why were so overpowered. We didn't have our rig adjusted quite enough especially on the outers and the backstay would max out which told us that we did not general tune the backstay enought prior to heading out. We thought it was maxed but no it wasn't.

 

ProOC

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If your main is fluttering and you are still overpowered you do not have the rig adjusted along with the backstay. It's a funny boat, we were sailing in 20+ knots a year ago, couldn't understand why were so overpowered. We didn't have our rig adjusted quite enough especially on the outers and the backstay would max out which told us that we did not general tune the backstay enought prior to heading out. We thought it was maxed but no it wasn't.

 

ProOC

ProOC,

Have you ever found yourself in a spot with no time to adjust before the sequence and have the choice of one adjustment?

 

We had a race this year where a velocity change came in from the same direction with like 1 minute to make our adjustment, we thought it would pass but it didn't.

 

What is your favorite without blowing it in the setting if the pressure drops.

1) a couple of fast turns on the inner stays?

2) a big change on the gross tune of the Backstay legs?

3) others

 

We left it as it was and the boat was a mess upwind. Couldn't press the job at all. Hands down the worst miss we ever had in rig set-up.

 

Cheers,

Go4

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I first found it a bit confusing that the mast (Seldén) is so stiff. If I pull on the backstay, the mast doesn't seem to bend at all (so he main doesn't seem to change its shape at all). All I get is forestay tension. Which is ok. But if you come from bendy 7/8 aluminium rigs it takes a litte getting used to...

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I first found it a bit confusing that the mast (Seldén) is so stiff. If I pull on the backstay, the mast doesn't seem to bend at all (so he main doesn't seem to change its shape at all). All I get is forestay tension. Which is ok. But if you come from bendy 7/8 aluminium rigs it takes a litte getting used to...

10th,

I forget exactly who it was... But I think it was a North American team (may have been Helly Hansen) who attended the worlds in La Rochelle that wrote a post-event piece about the differences they found between the SS rig and the Selden rig. It was quite well written and it detailed the changes they made to maximize their performance given their old settings were not getting them what they wanted with the Selden rig. There may be some stuff in there that can help you out.

 

After getting the boat I found the sailmakers tuning guides a great place to start. We use Quantum and Scott Nixons old guide has been very helpful. Scott even helped us out at a regatta with some extra tips to tell if we were set-up correctly with the rig.

 

Cheers,

Go4

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All good,stuff that confirms I am subterranean on the mountain climb to get the best out of mine. Thanks for the time and trouble. It does bring me to another point that has been confusing me. The J70 has a backstay tensioner that should bend the mast... But also an adjustable forestay tensioner, which will presumably fight the flex. So should,one let off the forestay tensioner when yanking on the backstay?

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Gov, in a pressure drop situation the outers/uppers go off 1 turn to 1.5.

 

We immediately get to the backstay because like someone wrote above I can see where there is difficulty getting the mains' on these boats to look...full let's say.

 

The top aspect of the main is roached which would make you think that the upper leach could really help in a pointing situation or just getting some power up there but it seems everytime I look up the rig at it,...it's cut too damn flat. Maybe with the various spars they may see something different but not sure...get back to me..

 

ProOC

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It is not a forestay tensioner but more like a jib cunningham... Makes the camber a bit flatter and moves it forward. ...I think.

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My bad choice of words. Tensioner not directly tensioning the forestay but still effectively adding counter pressure to the mast than the backstay via the jib.. Maybe I am just not pulling on the backstay hard enough.

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The idiocy of the "J70 mindset" is personified perfectly in the quote below. Yes, other sportboats "try to kill you!" Please name 5 similar sportboats that "try and kill us," please...

 

1. ???

2. ???

3. ???

4. ???

5. ???

 

Why should children ever move beyond the majestic sailing wooden bathtub, the optimist? Those damn full battens will shoot your eye out kid. "That's just too damn fast!" "Get out of that crazy thing!"

 

This is why sailing bores me. The J70 has exposed the problem with US sailing. Boring, uninspired boats are "all the rage." Modern boats are feared. Other ancient, uninspired ODs are kept alive well past any normal lifespan thru draconian, un-natural efforts. It's become pathetic.

 

We have huge J70 fleets of people who think about modern sailboats like nitwit below. But we don't have any multihull fleets and modern high performance boats make most American sailors wet their pants, shaking in fear.

 

Thankfully there are plenty of other sports the explore in this life!

 

Very few aspects of sailing remain interesting.

 

I love my J70. It goes well enough, It quickly tells you when you make a mistake, but it doesnt try to kill you.

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The idiocy of the "J70 mindset" is personified perfectly in the quote below. Yes, other sportboats "try to kill you!" Please name 5 similar sportboats that "try and kill us," please...

 

1. ???

2. ???

3. ???

4. ???

5. ???

 

Why should children ever move beyond the majestic sailing wooden bathtub, the optimist? Those damn full battens will shoot your eye out kid. "That's just too damn fast!" "Get out of that crazy thing!"

 

This is why sailing bores me. The J70 has exposed the problem with US sailing. Boring, uninspired boats are "all the rage." Modern boats are feared. Other ancient, uninspired ODs are kept alive well past any normal lifespan thru draconian, un-natural efforts. It's become pathetic.

 

We have huge J70 fleets of people who think about modern sailboats like nitwit below. But we don't have any multihull fleets and modern high performance boats make most American sailors wet their pants, shaking in fear.

 

Thankfully there are plenty of other sports the explore in this life!

 

Very few aspects of sailing remain interesting.

 

 

I love my J70. It goes well enough, It quickly tells you when you make a mistake, but it doesnt try to kill you.

LS,

I am with Qing on this one. Now mind you "kill" is a strong term... However, it is hard to argue with the other 900ish owners around the world who have chosen the boat over the last three years. Not everyone will have a Porsche parked in the driveway, not everyone wants (needs) one. Buy what you want and need given the purpose it is intended.

 

I'm an amateur, who wants to sail with family (wife, my 5 and 7 year old), friends, newbies, OD, 4 crew, shorthanded, alone, etc. I want to be able to sail (and have) when others in fear will not leave the dock. I searched for years for a good all around compromise and for all these things and the J70 became the answer. To date it has never failed me.

 

Now don't get me wrong, the emerging tech of foiling is awesome! From cats to Moths, all very cool. With the proliferation of GoPro and Drones it makes one almost feel like being there. Thanks for being a proponent on the front trying to push high performance forward! Eventually the advances make it back to the slow moving crowd.

 

Perhaps there is more under the surface of your note, are you upset your chosen fleet/design is not growing? One sailor and one boat can make a difference. Take somebody out on your adrenaline machine and show them how easy, fun and SAFE it is. They may just be the next owner in your fleet!

 

Cheers,

Go4

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Nice effort to spin. I'm momentarily amused.

 

Spin vs "reality."

 

Reality - The J70 personifies the sailing ability and "comfort level" of most US sailors. That ability is very low, and they are unwilling or afraid to learn. Physically they are not in shape and are afraid of competing physically. Deep down, they have always been afraid of true sportboats. Afraid of the high performance potential, physical requirements (might have to hit the gym a bit) or the occasional wipeout. To compesate for their insecurities, they need a far heavier boat that is still, laughably, refered to as a sport boat. It makes them feel safe...secure...all warm inside.

 

This discussion reminds me of one of my favorite movie lines...

 

"Heavy is good. Heavy is a sign of reliability. If it does not work you can always hit him with it..." - Boris the Blade

 

 

I appreciate your honesty. I really do. But I just don't buy your spin. Your slant on the J70 is bias. I have no dog in the fight.

 

The J70 is a commercial success for J boats because it goes the average US sailor what he needs, somethings in his comfort zone. But I insist that it is an utter disaster for the sport of sailing in the long run. The J70 is the equivalent of an optimist dinghy for adults with an Asail (launched out of the cockpit hatch of course) for psuedo "sportiness." Everyone knows the J70 is so heavy with its 4 crew that it would be far faster with a symetrical spinnaker. It's a J22 with a new pair of 8 inch platform heels. Zero functional value.

 

Sure, it's made some decent cash for Jboats. The groupies are easily convinced to buy their bridges. Good for J boats. A great example of Capitalism at its finest. Taking advantage of market trends and providing a solution. You know, like junk food. Spineless, but very profitable and effective. We just have a nation of fat asses. Yeah!

 

Now back to something more interesting, like a book.

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Nice effort to spin. I'm momentarily amused.

 

Spin vs "reality."

 

Reality - The J70 personifies the sailing ability and "comfort level" of most US sailors. That ability is very low, and they are unwilling or afraid to learn. Physically they are not in shape and are afraid of competing physically. Deep down, they have always been afraid of true sportboats. Afraid of the high performance potential, physical requirements (might have to hit the gym a bit) or the occasional wipeout. To compesate for their insecurities, they need a far heavier boat that is still, laughably, refered to as a sport boat. It makes them feel safe...secure...all warm inside.

 

This discussion reminds me of one of my favorite movie lines...

 

"Heavy is good. Heavy is a sign of reliability. If it does not work you can always hit him with it..." - Boris the Blade

 

 

I appreciate your honesty. I really do. But I just don't buy your spin. Your slant on the J70 is bias. I have no dog in the fight.

 

The J70 is a commercial success for J boats because it goes the average US sailor what he needs, somethings in his comfort zone. But I insist that it is an utter disaster for the sport of sailing in the long run. The J70 is the equivalent of an optimist dinghy for adults with an Asail (launched out of the cockpit hatch of course) for psuedo "sportiness." Everyone knows the J70 is so heavy with its 4 crew that it would be far faster with a symetrical spinnaker. It's a J22 with a new pair of 8 inch platform heels. Zero functional value.

 

Sure, it's made some decent cash for Jboats. The groupies are easily convinced to buy their bridges. Good for J boats. A great example of Capitalism at its finest. Taking advantage of market trends and providing a solution. You know, like junk food. Spineless, but very profitable and effective. We just have a nation of fat asses. Yeah!

 

Now back to something more interesting, like a book.

LS,

Jesus that is some deep seeded resentment! Yes, I was sharing reality. Mine and I can only surmise some other owners too.

 

Please tell me this doesn't come from you buying an emerging OD fleet boat and it subsequently getting run outa your club by the J70...

 

If you don't have a dog in the fight, go somewhere you do and do something there to move the needle. Or go to the "J70 Impressions" board, there are many like minded folks to you there... It hasnt been very active since May 2015, but I'm sure your comments and opinions could change that.

 

The commercial success overall and of this JBoat is now global. So your points about the US (fat sailor) market are weak, and getting weaker. JBoats success is making what the market wants and the market either determining success or failure - they've had hulls on each side of that ledger. So far the J70 is successful, and JBoats because of it. You are out of business otherwise.

 

Regardless, enjoy your book, I hope your armchair (or Adirondack) is comfortable.

 

Go4

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The idiocy of the "J70 mindset" is personified perfectly in the quote below. Yes, other sportboats "try to kill you!" Please name 5 similar sportboats that "try and kill us," please...

 

1. ???

2. ???

3. ???

4. ???

5. ???

 

Why should children ever move beyond the majestic sailing wooden bathtub, the optimist? Those damn full battens will shoot your eye out kid. "That's just too damn fast!" "Get out of that crazy thing!"

 

This is why sailing bores me. The J70 has exposed the problem with US sailing. Boring, uninspired boats are "all the rage." Modern boats are feared. Other ancient, uninspired ODs are kept alive well past any normal lifespan thru draconian, un-natural efforts. It's become pathetic.

 

We have huge J70 fleets of people who think about modern sailboats like nitwit below. But we don't have any multihull fleets and modern high performance boats make most American sailors wet their pants, shaking in fear.

 

Thankfully there are plenty of other sports the explore in this life!

 

Very few aspects of sailing remain interesting.

 

 

I love my J70. It goes well enough, It quickly tells you when you make a mistake, but it doesnt try to kill you.

LS,

Maybe you could help out Qing with the other part of his question you neglected to quote - "what tip can you pass to me to make mine go faster."

 

With your expertise in obviously much faster & better boats you gotta have something to add, and not just a "sell that POS and buy a ___________."

 

Shit man help us all learn!

 

Go4

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The idiocy of the "J70 mindset" is personified perfectly in the quote below. Yes, other sportboats "try to kill you!" Please name 5 similar sportboats that "try and kill us," please...

 

1. ???

2. ???

3. ???

4. ???

5. ???

 

Why should children ever move beyond the majestic sailing wooden bathtub, the optimist? Those damn full battens will shoot your eye out kid. "That's just too damn fast!" "Get out of that crazy thing!"

 

This is why sailing bores me. The J70 has exposed the problem with US sailing. Boring, uninspired boats are "all the rage." Modern boats are feared. Other ancient, uninspired ODs are kept alive well past any normal lifespan thru draconian, un-natural efforts. It's become pathetic.

 

We have huge J70 fleets of people who think about modern sailboats like nitwit below. But we don't have any multihull fleets and modern high performance boats make most American sailors wet their pants, shaking in fear.

 

Thankfully there are plenty of other sports the explore in this life!

 

Very few aspects of sailing remain interesting.

 

I love my J70. It goes well enough, It quickly tells you when you make a mistake, but it doesnt try to kill you.

 

We had two years of owner meetings to decide which boat would replace the Platu fleet, Owners voted the J70.

We brought some modern and faster alternative for the optimist to our club. All the kids voted to keep the optis.

 

 

Maybe you are not as smart as you think, LS.

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If you want sport, sail a skiff!

If you want a modern keelboat, sail a J/70!

If you want sportsboats, you know where to find them! (Just be prepared to be laughed at by 60-year-old FD and Star sailors...) :P

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Yeah LS is probably reading a tuning guide on J70's....oops forget that he knows everything that makes a boat fast because he read it....on the internet

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I'm guessing the J/70 will begin dying out in a couple of years. Out of the 54 boats registered for KWRW, 45 racing, 11 corinthian, 34 pro boats. 9 out of the 11 amateur boats are currently 30th or lower. I think the amateur owners are gonna start getting pissed off at losing to a bunch of pros and will either join the dark side and hire some of their own, or get out of the class.

 

I was too young to be around the heyday of the Melges 24 fleet, but I think the J/70 is headed the same way, with regattas being dominated by pros and amateurs not able to keep up.

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Skosh, some of us like sailing against and beating those "pros".

 

A little practice CAN get you up to speed,...and a little hard work.

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I'm guessing the J/70 will begin dying out in a couple of years. Out of the 54 boats registered for KWRW, 45 racing, 11 corinthian, 34 pro boats. 9 out of the 11 amateur boats are currently 30th or lower. I think the amateur owners are gonna start getting pissed off at losing to a bunch of pros and will either join the dark side and hire some of their own, or get out of the class.

 

I was too young to be around the heyday of the Melges 24 fleet, but I think the J/70 is headed the same way, with regattas being dominated by pros and amateurs not able to keep up.

I agree with you, here in Vigo there are 10 boats only (one of them is the top corinthian there at KWRW, "Marnatura"). Most of them are national or even world champions in different classes (Laser, vaurien, Snipe,VOR sailors, TP52, former AC sailors...) If I wanted to race OD with a chance of being top of the list I'd have to race J80s instead, now the pros are selling them at half the price of a J70 and regular club sailors like me are buying them....

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Yeah LS is probably reading a tuning guide on J70's....oops forget that he knows everything that makes a boat fast because he read it....on the internet

ProOC,

The asshat LS is long gone. His M/o is to stir shit and take off. Poor fella got his feelings hurt when his "chosen" sport boat got run outa dodge by a less than "able" boat in his esteemed opinion.

 

It took me about 5 seconds in his profile and the power of Google to get an idea of who he is. He's a troll in other sports too.

 

Sent him an olive branch on Sunday in a PM. No response. Surprise surprise he likes to have his tantrums in public.

 

Poor thing... I am surprised he wasn't addressing himself in third person being important and entitled.

 

Go4

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I'm guessing the J/70 will begin dying out in a couple of years. Out of the 54 boats registered for KWRW, 45 racing, 11 corinthian, 34 pro boats. 9 out of the 11 amateur boats are currently 30th or lower. I think the amateur owners are gonna start getting pissed off at losing to a bunch of pros and will either join the dark side and hire some of their own, or get out of the class.

 

I was too young to be around the heyday of the Melges 24 fleet, but I think the J/70 is headed the same way, with regattas being dominated by pros and amateurs not able to keep up.

I agree with you, here in Vigo there are 10 boats only (one of them is the top corinthian there at KWRW, "Marnatura"). Most of them are national or even world champions in different classes (Laser, vaurien, Snipe,VOR sailors, TP52, former AC sailors...) If I wanted to race OD with a chance of being top of the list I'd have to race J80s instead, now the pros are selling them at half the price of a J70 and regular club sailors like me are buying them....

Chuso,

That's a cool opportunity. The J80 never took off here, but it was the boat we were going to buy before the J70 opportunity came along. Pissed to loose at big events? Where I live we have a small Corinthian fleet of J70s. Buying the J70 was the price of admission we paid to sail against some of the best out there - Roble, Hutchinson, Smith, Healy, etc. - folks I have only read about in magazines for years. For the most part you can't have that in other sports.

 

Where am l going with this? Well the PROs beat us easily. But and this is key, they also provide an amazing amount of help when you get to shore, did you do this, that, etc. Even their shore guys were give tips in throw fleet. After attending a regatta with a big fleet of PROs, we easily came back 10% better. So it was worth it to get schooled. It didn't piss me off, I saw it as the best damn sailing education going. Plus we improved each day and had a couple results where statistically in the fleet we were beating PRO boats. It was an amazing experience. IMHO this is what can, and will attract more amateurs to the class. There are only so many PROs showing up to each regatta. Aside: As a PRO I can only assume it is not great for business showing up for an owner to finish 35th, or worse cause everyone can't finish first...

 

I believe the fleet will balance out as the years go by. Sure, the pros will win national and named championships, but there will still be opportunity for the 80%+ of the boats not attending to sail at smaller OD events or handicap where the PROs are not so prevalent.

 

My bet is 3000 hulls in 5 years time.

 

Cheers,

Go4

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You're right Go4asail, I have crewed for some of this pros, and it's great to sail with and against them, but the fact is that out of 10 boats, scoring better than maybe 8th place for a regular club sailor would be almost unthinkable. Actually there is an eleventh boat from out of town and the poor guy just gets last places in every race... (He wins races in his hometown with his other ORC boat)

 

If we had a larger fleet then it would really work (we used to have 23 Platus with the same guys and there was a silver fleet that was pretty cool), but my guess is that unsponsored boats and groups of friends that share a boat for some exciting OD racing will keep choosing the J80

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You're right Go4asail, I have crewed for some of this pros, and it's great to sail with and against them, but the fact is that out of 10 boats, scoring better than maybe 8th place for a regular club sailor would be almost unthinkable. Actually there is an eleventh boat from out of town and the poor guy just gets last places in every race... (He wins races in his hometown with his other ORC boat)

 

If we had a larger fleet then it would really work (we used to have 23 Platus with the same guys and there was a silver fleet that was pretty cool), but my guess is that unsponsored boats and groups of friends that share a boat for some exciting OD racing will keep choosing the J80

Chuso,

^+1

As long as you are sailing... It don't matter what it is as long as It makes you happy!

 

Someday that 11th place finisher you noted above will finish 6th and he'll be over the moon!

 

Go4

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If the object of your sailing/racing is to "win" or crawl up that ladder of success then you have to race against those that have winning ways and low and behold some of them are pros.

 

My viewpoint is to not look at them that way, and most don't want extra attention because they sail for a living. Ego's have to be put aside and this comes from both ends. All the great sailors and pro's that I try to surround myself with are cool and like to help out those that continually finish last. I see the biggest problem over the years are boat owners and crews that need the help, but don't ask and then talk shit about the other crowd. And here in lies a problem to why fleets die. Egos are not checked on the boat, they lose a bunch and get frustrated and quite the fleet and boat all together.

 

Everyone can rise to the top 1/3rd or better if they surround themselves with positive and energetic crew,...that also hike hard!

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Yes I miss YouTube in China....

Does anyone know how we could get Tim Healey and Vince Brun's North Sails videos from YouTube over the "wall" to Qing in China via email or internet means?

 

If there is no easy way, you might contact Tim Healey/North Sails directly and ask to send you the 4 videos.

 

Cheers,

G

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Used J/70 prices are high. I've heard a story, if you sold your 3 year old boat and bought a new one (with a little bargaining), you would have "lost" the equivalent of a new set of sails.

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