• Announcements

    • Zapata

      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
Sign in to follow this  
DFL1010

The boat for a Winter North Atlantic crossing?

Recommended Posts

'Interesting' story in the local news here:

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-35357137

 

 

Left Norway in July, and have made it to (North) Cornwall. En route, they've required rescue services from Norway, Denmark, Scotland, Ireland, and now Cornwall (twice in three days) - i.e. most every country they've been past.

 

There's no not much land left to the west of them, so I don't know if they're bound west (undoubtedly with a rendezvous with Scilly lifeboat), or heading south to Spain, which would 'only' require a Biscay crossing.

 

 

Fortunately their boat is, I'm sure, more than capable:

_87810305_87810302.jpg

 

 

 

The weather is, as you'd expect, not great, but a lot quieter than it has been recently.

http://metbrief.com/EGRR.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That'll buff out! If the front doesn't fall off first...

 

How many environments are there that they can get towed out of? Sounds like they are running out of countries to request assistance from.

 

At least it isn't a Rawson 30...

 

How is that for a string of SA cliches?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That'll buff out! If the front doesn't fall off first...

 

How many environments are there that they can get towed out of? Sounds like they are running out of countries to request assistance from.

 

At least it isn't a Rawson 30...

 

How is that for a string of SA cliches?

Does it have a reg army rutter?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Fishermen in St Ives have doubted their competence and experience but the two men say they have simply had bad luck.

 

the seventh time they have been towed to safety during their voyage.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That'll buff out! If the front doesn't fall off first...

 

How many environments are there that they can get towed out of? Sounds like they are running out of countries to request assistance from.

 

At least it isn't a Rawson 30...

 

How is that for a string of SA cliches?

What does it rate?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Appears to be a symbiotic combination of Reid Stowe workmanship and Rainmaker seamanship...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a lack of seamanship, just bad luck. :rolleyes:

 

I expect the rescue services will be hearing a lot more from them.

 

Then again, with a record like that, maybe not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a lack of seamanship, just bad luck. :rolleyes:

 

I expect the rescue services will be hearing a lot more from them.

 

Then again, with a record like that, maybe not.

 

Next time the rescue folk need to take them off the boat and scuttle it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If that sinks I know where they can get a San Juan 24 - cheap! - which is much better suited for north Atlantic travel at this time of year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they put it 6 feet up a beach in Iceland, then he has a screenplay to write !

 

It is a gaff rig Colin Archer ex Nor life boat he bought.

King Ineptune is only at 3 rescue [one started mid ocean with a stand down] and 2 tows.

 

His quote is worthy of mention.

"In journalism there is a format. Based on Civil War time conflicts between Army Generals and journalists dishing the news.
Get it all out before they cut the telegraph wires."

 

http://www.steve-shapiro.net/index.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

That'll buff out! If the front doesn't fall off first...

 

How many environments are there that they can get towed out of? Sounds like they are running out of countries to request assistance from.

 

At least it isn't a Rawson 30...

 

How is that for a string of SA cliches?

What does it rate?

 

 

I've been informed by reliable sources that its an IRC killer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hate to sound like a broken record, but they're back.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-35413080

 

I didn't hear about the eighth rescue, but they've managed to go the wrong way when in a drying harbour (whether they knew they were going to take the ground remains to be seen), causing a fire thanks to a candle.

 

 

They may be waiting a while for their Northerlies too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hate to sound like a broken record, but they're back.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-35413080

 

I didn't hear about the eighth rescue, but they've managed to go the wrong way when in a drying harbour (whether they knew they were going to take the ground remains to be seen), causing a fire thanks to a candle.

 

 

They may be waiting a while for their Northerlies too.

 

It wasn't a lack of seamanship, it was the oceans fault.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These are clearly a couple of bad-ass slobs and anarchists not to be shamed or lectured about seamanship. Their Y valve is kept on overboard even when dried out because, as Knox-Johnson forgets, we won the war.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i thought only the teenies and twenty something crowd had that feeling of entitlement. These guys really make US sailors look like f' in idiots. And then to insult Sir RKJ....that's comparable to shooting an albatross. This is very disturbing on so many levels. Clearly this Shapiro character has never heard of hiring a captain or mate or someone who has basic seamanship skills which are clearly needed here. Or just pony up the cash and ship it over to the states. I would be willing to place a bet there is no way in hell those two will make it on that boat in its current condition by themselves to Maine....alive.

 

These guys make the turn key power boaters look like rock stars...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Went for a wee drive this afternoon and found the boat. When I first got there, they were entertaining a camera crew, so I took a few pics and went to get a cuppa. They certainly weren't anti-press, so I don't know if they're trying to defend their position, or just lapping up their 15mins.

 

Came back and the journos had gone, and there was no sign of our intrepid duo so I had a better look at the boat. It's in overall good condition (except for the past few months' use), and must have been bloody lovely before departure (by their hand or the previous owners is up for debate). All the brightwork was in good nick, and the sails looked pretty new.

 

However, it was clear that the 'small' fire was anything but. There were a couple of bin bags on the quay full of charred gear (including a duvet), and by the mast was quite a bit of interior similarly fire-damaged. I suspect they were quite lucky not to lose the boat in that incident.

 

 

All in all, it's a bit of a shame really. It's a very nice boat (if you like that sort of thing), and it was obviously a very good one.

 

 

 

Pics are all over 1MB so I can't upload them - advice?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Upload the pix to a file sharing site and then post links by using the insert pic icon.

Thx for the eye level view of this baffling story. I liked the blown kiss from big one to little one.

Are they drinkers do you think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here she is:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

Clearly in need of a lick of paint, but the hull appears to be solid.

 

 

 

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

Behind me as I took this pic is the Harbour Master's office (delightfully he's called Captain Haddock), so obviously they want to keep an eye on them.

 

 

Here's the fire damage:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

 

Headsail (and main) appears to be be new (one 'careful' owner):

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

 

 

And the full boat:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

Note the varnish at the back of the cockpit on good order, with holes for the tiller pins.

 

 

 

Rest of the pics here:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love the boat. Poor boat. It looks like the heat of the fire melted some of the deck tar out. Mess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed. It doesn't really show in the pictures but it must have been stunning not so long ago. All the varnish was shiny (at least it would have been but for Cornish weather), the sails were new, the solar panels looked new, etc etc.

 

Not my cup of tea, but if one wanted one of these, it would have been the one to go for. Now, not so much. God knows what it's like inside, especially after their fire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They remind me of somebody...

 

Grumpy-Men-560.jpg

They were just cranky old farts.

 

These two remind me of these guys.

 

post-95343-0-57126700-1454022400_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here she is:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

Clearly in need of a lick of paint, but the hull appears to be solid.

 

 

 

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

Behind me as I took this pic is the Harbour Master's office (delightfully he's called Captain Haddock), so obviously they want to keep an eye on them.

 

 

Here's the fire damage:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

 

Headsail (and main) appears to be be new (one 'careful' owner):

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

 

 

And the full boat:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

Note the varnish at the back of the cockpit on good order, with holes for the tiller pins.

 

 

 

Rest of the pics here:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

Excellent sleuthing!

Maybe you can try and get invited onboard for a cuppa (or Coffee as they're American) and get the SA inside scoop? :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Somehow think Donald and Sarah might not have got that far, maybe its just me....

 

"I can see Russia from here! Go the other way!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Following the typical SA thread drift, the OP asked:

 

 

The boat for a Winter North Atlantic crossing?

 

The only rational vessel for a winter North Atlantic crossing flies at about 40,000 ft at about 550 mph.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here she is:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

Clearly in need of a lick of paint, but the hull appears to be solid.

 

 

 

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

Behind me as I took this pic is the Harbour Master's office (delightfully he's called Captain Haddock), so obviously they want to keep an eye on them.

 

 

Here's the fire damage:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

 

Headsail (and main) appears to be be new (one 'careful' owner):

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

 

 

And the full boat:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

Note the varnish at the back of the cockpit on good order, with holes for the tiller pins.

 

 

 

Rest of the pics here:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

That the Harbourmaster is called Captain Haddock has really made my day! Whereabouts are they tied up at the moment?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fascinating story - I wonder what's really going on with them. In the TV interview, there's a moment when the big bloke blows a kiss at the small bloke, which opens up one interpretation (though it seems unlikely, and of course would be no excuse for their shamelessness in re seamanship).

 

At that moment of the blown kiss the big one looks so much like Bill Murray that I wondered if it was a reality version of a Wes Anderson film - doing for RK-J what the Life Aquatic tried to do for Jacques Cousteau.

 

The boat is the only part of the project that is fit for purpose in any way. As I understand it, rather than rush out to save fishermen in trouble (for these boats don't really do rushing), the Norwegian sailing lifeboats used to go out with the fleet to Icelandic and other northern waters to act as a shepherd, and remained on station with them all the time. I've seen pictures of the framing on some of them, where the frames seem wider than the gaps between them. In other words, they're designed and built for the worst weather possible. It probably wasn't even bothered by dropping off the harbour wall like that.

 

There's a wonderful bit of boat porn on youtube - search for RS 14 Stavanger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a great story, soon to be a movie! Congrats to Hancock for pointing to the armchair sailors. Truly great adventures sometimes mean that you don't always subscribe to everyone's concept of safety and sometimes you don't come back. If we wind the clock back, some of the boats and some of the skippers shouldn't have started the Sunday Times race in 1968, but that didn't stop us celebrating the race.

 

Year by year we need more certificates, more licenses and we face more scrutiny and pressure to meet the norm. I really hope they make it and inspire more to follow in their footsteps.

 

"One day as tiger is better than a 1000 as a sheep".

 

Paraphrased from Alison Hargreaves who died on K2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just when we thought D Trump was making American's look arrogantly stupid,

these two marine comedians arrive.

 

As they say, being dead is no problem to you because you don't know you're dead - it's just hard on those around you.

Like being stupid.,,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a great story, soon to be a movie! Congrats to Hancock for pointing to the armchair sailors. Truly great adventures sometimes mean that you don't always subscribe to everyone's concept of safety and sometimes you don't come back. If we wind the clock back, some of the boats and some of the skippers shouldn't have started the Sunday Times race in 1968, but that didn't stop us celebrating the race.

 

Year by year we need more certificates, more licenses and we face more scrutiny and pressure to meet the norm. I really hope they make it and inspire more to follow in their footsteps.

 

"One day as tiger is better than a 1000 as a sheep".

 

Paraphrased from Alison Hargreaves who died on K2.

 

 

 

Couldn't disagree more - yotting is very self-policing and most people are very responsible about looking after themselves. Their sort of behaviour will contribute to a nanny state mentality, from which in Britain-land at least, we are admirably free. Any of us here would be mortified at having demonstrated our incompetence so plainly. There: I've come over all sanctimonious.

 

E

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bingo!

Sadly he's completely barking

Steve-Shapiro.net is his site

I'm on a train so can't wallow in it, but he is mad as a mullet, has never had a "proper job" and has tried to create a career as writer and photographer, with little success. Seems like he inherited a bit from his mum.

Which brings me back to the first point, about mental illness. And now I feel guilty teasing him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

What a great story, soon to be a movie! Congrats to Hancock for pointing to the armchair sailors. Truly great adventures sometimes mean that you don't always subscribe to everyone's concept of safety and sometimes you don't come back. If we wind the clock back, some of the boats and some of the skippers shouldn't have started the Sunday Times race in 1968, but that didn't stop us celebrating the race.

 

Year by year we need more certificates, more licenses and we face more scrutiny and pressure to meet the norm. I really hope they make it and inspire more to follow in their footsteps.

 

"One day as tiger is better than a 1000 as a sheep".

 

Paraphrased from Alison Hargreaves who died on K2.

 

 

 

Couldn't disagree more - yotting is very self-policing and most people are very responsible about looking after themselves. Their sort of behaviour will contribute to a nanny state mentality, from which in Britain-land at least, we are admirably free. Any of us here would be mortified at having demonstrated our incompetence so plainly. There: I've come over all sanctimonious.

 

E

 

 

Exactly. To have to call out the lifeboat once is misfortunate. To have to call it out twice looks like carelessness. More than twice....?

 

 

 

The two men miscalculated the huge tidal range in England
Aka a basic bit of seamanship. But it's not as though it's hard to find the tidal heights.

http://www.ukho.gov.uk/easytide/easytide/ShowPrediction.aspx?PortID=0547&PredictionLength=7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Ed's disagreement.

 

Someone here is also in the rock-climbing community (I forget who), and they stated that climbers and sailors face the same issue- If we make a mess and keep expecting law and rescue services to clean up after us, we're just inviting outside regulation. This is something we do *not* want. We should be self-policing and clean up our own messes to keep unnecessary legislative action out of our passion.

 

Sometimes that means naming and shaming and tough love.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

What a great story, soon to be a movie! Congrats to Hancock for pointing to the armchair sailors. Truly great adventures sometimes mean that you don't always subscribe to everyone's concept of safety and sometimes you don't come back. If we wind the clock back, some of the boats and some of the skippers shouldn't have started the Sunday Times race in 1968, but that didn't stop us celebrating the race.

 

Year by year we need more certificates, more licenses and we face more scrutiny and pressure to meet the norm. I really hope they make it and inspire more to follow in their footsteps.

 

"One day as tiger is better than a 1000 as a sheep".

 

Paraphrased from Alison Hargreaves who died on K2.

 

 

Couldn't disagree more - yotting is very self-policing and most people are very responsible about looking after themselves. Their sort of behaviour will contribute to a nanny state mentality, from which in Britain-land at least, we are admirably free. Any of us here would be mortified at having demonstrated our incompetence so plainly. There: I've come over all sanctimonious.

 

E

+1000. I could not agree with the Ed more. In US waters the coastles would have you contact Sea Tow...most of these mishaps seem non life threatening. Even the fire...are you telling me these guys don't' have a thing called a fire extinguisher? Or know how to use one? These guys do not seem to be in any kind of hurry so why are these rescue services responding and dispatching craft for these mishaps? If this guy knows how to sail a broken prop shaft should not really matter as long as the spars are intact...it's a sailboat, RIGHT????? On the plus side it looks like this Archer design was a wise purchase and may just give its life to spare the lives of these two incompetent men...they should not be referred to as sailors.

 

Sorry Mr. Hancock but I cannot see how you are able to put a positive spin on this misguided adventure. Your line of thinking would create a huge problem for these rescue agencies. What if there were 100's of idiotic people with entitled beliefs and limited boating experience who purchased boats and then took to the open seas? It could prevent a proper rescue of deserving Mariners who encounter a real emergency through no fault of their own....it's just wrong to take advantage of these services on such a frequent basis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Ed's disagreement.

 

Someone here is also in the rock-climbing community (I forget who), and they stated that climbers and sailors face the same issue- If we make a mess and keep expecting law and rescue services to clean up after us, we're just inviting outside regulation. This is something we do *not* want. We should be self-policing and clean up our own messes to keep unnecessary legislative action out of our passion.

 

Sometimes that means naming and shaming and tough love.

Plus one Ajax.

We have watched hapless individuals in Vancouver get rescued over the years in the media and it ends up like this-gated trails and no access for anyone and an endless circle of North Shore Rescue missions not just on this infamous trail..

grouse-grind.jpg

http://www.nsnews.com/news/grouse-grind-remains-closed-for-winter-1.897986

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian you are out of touch, perhaps armchairing it a bit too much yourself. If these two ass clowns want to risk their own lives so be it. First rescue warning should be 'clean up your act', second rescue warning should be 'go home (on a plane)', third rescue call, sorry we are not going to put our lives at risk to save your dumb asses AGAIN.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian you are out of touch, perhaps armchairing it a bit too much yourself. If these two ass clowns want to risk their own lives so be it. First rescue warning should be 'clean up your act', second rescue warning should be 'go home (on a plane)', third rescue call, sorry we are not going to put our lives at risk to save your dumb asses AGAIN.

 

I can't help seeing it as a mental health issue - I don't know what his diagnosis is, but he's not well.

 

If he tried to play on the railway lines the way he's playing around with boats he'd be looked after, one way or another.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A bit more background on the navigation side.

 

The boat is alongside the wall in Hayle, on the N Cornish coast.

 

 

post-55655-0-37531900-1454083800_thumb.png

(Navionics Webapp)

 

 

As you can see, this is entirely drying (drying heights of 2-3m, 6.5-9ft), so it's not entirely correct to say that it was a 'simple' miscalculation of the tide that set them aground.

TIdal range at St Ives Harbour is about 5m, 16.5ft, and would have been a bit more at the time of the fire, as it's just off springs.

 

In addition, I have it on good authority that they were told how to tie their boat up so as to avoid it falling away from the wall - advice they either ignored or fluffed. Of course, the tide returns, and they refloat, so nothing more than embarrassment and a bad night's sleep, candles not withstanding.

 

Also, I suggest that this was no 'mere' small fire. If you look at my pictures of the load of fire-damaged rubbish around the mast, as well as the bin bags of dead stuff (that I thought far too boring to photo), elevates it to a more serious incident.

 

 

Another thing that strikes me as odd, is that incident no.7 was the one that got them towed in to St Ives. Incident no.9 was the fire. Logically therefore no.8 occurred between St Ives and Hayle, a distance of a few miles, which would have had to have been motored:

 

post-55655-0-94854700-1454084279_thumb.png

(Navionics Webapp)

 

 

So, what could have happened in those intervening few miles? Breakdown is possible, as they had mechanical issues which necessitated rescue no.7.

 

The other possibility is that they went aground. As Navionics shows, the entrance is not without sand-traps.

 

img_7961_1copy.jpg

 

 

Here's a aerial view of Hayle. The area of abandoned ground by the railway viaduct is now an Asda supermarket, and they're just around the corner, by the bridge next to the church. Again, clearly visible are the sand-related difficulties of the channel into Hayle.

 

For reference, the peninsula at the top of the picture is St Ives (where they were towed after No.7).

 

 

As a reminder for non-UK chaps, the RNLI is manned (and womanned) by volunteers, so not only do you have to factor in the cost to the charity (for it is not tax-payer funded) but also that these aren't USCG personnel either training or waiting - they're people with jobs who drop everything when needed to go and rescue people, be they swimmers, sailors or ships in danger. If I were these two, I'd be considering a donation to the RNLI, who I suspect may see more of each other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nora is doing all she can to divest herself of the present crew, like a horse refusing to be ridden.

 

I read that he made a donation to the rescuers.

 

Nice pics DFL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A bit more background on the navigation side.

 

The boat is alongside the wall in Hayle, on the N Cornish coast.

 

 

attachicon.gifHayle Hbr.PNG

(Navionics Webapp)

 

 

As you can see, this is entirely drying (drying heights of 2-3m, 6.5-9ft), so it's not entirely correct to say that it was a 'simple' miscalculation of the tide that set them aground.

TIdal range at St Ives Harbour is about 5m, 16.5ft, and would have been a bit more at the time of the fire, as it's just off springs.

 

In addition, I have it on good authority that they were told how to tie their boat up so as to avoid it falling away from the wall - advice they either ignored or fluffed. Of course, the tide returns, and they refloat, so nothing more than embarrassment and a bad night's sleep, candles not withstanding.

 

Also, I suggest that this was no 'mere' small fire. If you look at my pictures of the load of fire-damaged rubbish around the mast, as well as the bin bags of dead stuff (that I thought far too boring to photo), elevates it to a more serious incident.

 

 

Another thing that strikes me as odd, is that incident no.7 was the one that got them towed in to St Ives. Incident no.9 was the fire. Logically therefore no.8 occurred between St Ives and Hayle, a distance of a few miles, which would have had to have been motored:

 

attachicon.gifSt Ives Hayle.PNG

(Navionics Webapp)

 

 

So, what could have happened in those intervening few miles? Breakdown is possible, as they had mechanical issues which necessitated rescue no.7.

 

The other possibility is that they went aground. As Navionics shows, the entrance is not without sand-traps.

 

img_7961_1copy.jpg

 

 

Here's a aerial view of Hayle. The area of abandoned ground by the railway viaduct is now an Asda supermarket, and they're just around the corner, by the bridge next to the church. Again, clearly visible are the sand-related difficulties of the channel into Hayle.

 

For reference, the peninsula at the top of the picture is St Ives (where they were towed after No.7).

 

 

As a reminder for non-UK chaps, the RNLI is manned (and womanned) by volunteers, so not only do you have to factor in the cost to the charity (for it is not tax-payer funded) but also that these aren't USCG personnel either training or waiting - they're people with jobs who drop everything when needed to go and rescue people, be they swimmers, sailors or ships in danger. If I were these two, I'd be considering a donation to the RNLI, who I suspect may see more of each other.

 

Incident no.8 was them getting caught out in their tender I think, either in St Ives or Hayle, can't remember which.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always think of the lifeboat man or woman about to consummate an evening of romantic music - oysters followed by fillet steak, fine Belgian chocolate (a glass of French champagne for the other half but not you because you're on call), and you're just about to increase the heat yet further by getting the Barry White 8-track on when your bleeper goes.

 

Selflessly, because it's in your nature, you try to come up with a formula to keep the other party content and increase the odds of him or her still being there when you come back, and you rush down to the lifeboat station amidst visions of tragedy and heroism - a fisherman having lost his arm in an awful accident with a pot hauler, a heart attack for an elderly yachtsman leaving a panicking near widow to raise the alarm, a fire in the engine room of a passing cargo vessel, something like that.

 

You'd been working toward this evening for months, and looking forward to it for days, but its apparent sabotage by the call to action barely provokes a rolling of the eye, for you make sacrifices because you believe in the solidarity of the sea and the obligation to serve, to help.

 

And then you get there and it's someone who can't tie up a boat.

 

I think it's a miracle how nice they are to some of their customers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here she is:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

Clearly in need of a lick of paint, but the hull appears to be solid.

 

 

 

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

Behind me as I took this pic is the Harbour Master's office (delightfully he's called Captain Haddock), so obviously they want to keep an eye on them.

 

 

Here's the fire damage:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

 

Headsail (and main) appears to be be new (one 'careful' owner):

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

 

 

And the full boat:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

 

Note the varnish at the back of the cockpit on good order, with holes for the tiller pins.

 

 

 

Rest of the pics here:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-OwuWHHBtkEcWRvTXpGTndlUlk

So it seams by the wear patterns that they do not know how to pull up the fenders.... Is it possible that they went the whole trip with the damn tire bonking against the hull??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always think of the lifeboat man or woman about to consummate an evening of romantic music - oysters followed by fillet steak, fine Belgian chocolate (a glass of French champagne for the other half but not you because you're on call), and you're just about to increase the heat yet further by getting the Barry White 8-track on when your bleeper goes.

Selflessly, because it's in your nature, you try to come up with a formula to keep the other party content and increase the odds of him or her still being there when you come back, and you rush down to the lifeboat station amidst visions of tragedy and heroism - a fisherman having lost his arm in an awful accident with a pot hauler, a heart attack for an elderly yachtsman leaving a panicking near widow to raise the alarm, a fire in the engine room of a passing cargo vessel, something like that.

You'd been working toward this evening for months, and looking forward to it for days, but its apparent sabotage by the call to action barely provokes a rolling of the eye, for you make sacrifices because you believe in the solidarity of the sea and the obligation to serve, to help.

And then you get there and it's someone who can't tie up a boat.

I think it's a miracle how nice they are to some of their customers.

OTOH....

 

They do get to play with a lifeboat.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm afraid there will be a 10th rescue... and I'm sure all lifeguards in all the North Sea are praying that these guys leave their waters soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kent Island Sailor's linky from the other CA thread. http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/jan/28/us-yachtsmen-rescued-nine-times-since-july-say-they-are-totally-capable-guys

 

"Shapiro said he has become a donor to the lifeboat charity the RNLI. He said: “They are a great service and Britain is very lucky to have them. I have just made another donation.” "

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shame to think she's probably on her last voyage unless somebody involuntarily commits those two.

 

Those tire covers are totally in a class by themselves - I need to learn that skill. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I always think of the lifeboat man or woman about to consummate an evening of romantic music - oysters followed by fillet steak, fine Belgian chocolate (a glass of French champagne for the other half but not you because you're on call), and you're just about to increase the heat yet further by getting the Barry White 8-track on when your bleeper goes.

Selflessly, because it's in your nature, you try to come up with a formula to keep the other party content and increase the odds of him or her still being there when you come back, and you rush down to the lifeboat station amidst visions of tragedy and heroism - a fisherman having lost his arm in an awful accident with a pot hauler, a heart attack for an elderly yachtsman leaving a panicking near widow to raise the alarm, a fire in the engine room of a passing cargo vessel, something like that.

You'd been working toward this evening for months, and looking forward to it for days, but its apparent sabotage by the call to action barely provokes a rolling of the eye, for you make sacrifices because you believe in the solidarity of the sea and the obligation to serve, to help.

And then you get there and it's someone who can't tie up a boat.

I think it's a miracle how nice they are to some of their customers.

OTOH....

 

They do get to play with a lifeboat.

 

 

 

Yes, there is that ...

 

I was talking to our local lifeboat today, and they told a story of a captain calamity in a little power boat trying to do a long coastal passage. The three RNLI stations that had serially gone out to help him ended up clubbing together to stand him evening classes in navigation and boat stuff.

 

Brilliant!

 

However, I'm afraid these guys probably wouldn't listen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The description in the sale details of the huge Sabb engine and the variable pitch propellor may explain one of their salvage issues (the odd propeller failure), for it has a variable pitch propeller, which I'm sure requires a certain skill level to use.

 

Oh, it is lovely analyzing other people's problems from a distance, with all the insights of ignorance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I always think of the lifeboat man or woman about to consummate an evening of romantic music - oysters followed by fillet steak, fine Belgian chocolate (a glass of French champagne for the other half but not you because you're on call), and you're just about to increase the heat yet further by getting the Barry White 8-track on when your bleeper goes.

Selflessly, because it's in your nature, you try to come up with a formula to keep the other party content and increase the odds of him or her still being there when you come back, and you rush down to the lifeboat station amidst visions of tragedy and heroism - a fisherman having lost his arm in an awful accident with a pot hauler, a heart attack for an elderly yachtsman leaving a panicking near widow to raise the alarm, a fire in the engine room of a passing cargo vessel, something like that.

You'd been working toward this evening for months, and looking forward to it for days, but its apparent sabotage by the call to action barely provokes a rolling of the eye, for you make sacrifices because you believe in the solidarity of the sea and the obligation to serve, to help.

And then you get there and it's someone who can't tie up a boat.

I think it's a miracle how nice they are to some of their customers.

OTOH....

 

They do get to play with a lifeboat.

 

 

 

Yes, there is that ...

 

I was talking to our local lifeboat today, and they told a story of a captain calamity in a little power boat trying to do a long coastal passage. The three RNLI stations that had serially gone out to help him ended up clubbing together to stand him evening classes in navigation and boat stuff.

 

Brilliant!

 

However, I'm afraid these guys probably wouldn't listen.

 

 

Why should they? None of it has been a lack of seamanship on their part, only a series of bad luck - they said so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, it is lovely analyzing other people's ignorance from a distance, with all the insights of years of having corrected ones own problems.

 

Fixed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites