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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
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DryArmour

Miami to Havana Race Wx

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of course he did. sidmon watches EVERYTHING. He sits outside my house in an 85 monte carlo watching me change clothes and jerking off into a burlap sack. it's nasty. but like Bowie used to say, haters have much more value than sycophants.

 

Always gotta make it about you (and real soon now your li'l buddies) instead of the story...

 

 

So Frank Kern is a 'li'l buddy' and not a winning skipper? How about Mike Hennessey? Also a 'li'l buddy'? How have you done in the Class 40 fleet?

 

You denigrate the winners of this great race because they are my friends. That's pretty fucking bizarre, and shows your colors to all.

 

 

Who gives a shit about -you- Fascist Fuck

 

Great story. Just a shame you have some narcissistic need to believe you are part of it.

 

What a tiresome, narcissistic, ass carrot you are. Go back to playing with your bag of dicks would ya. Clean is about as much a fascist as he is an anarchist.

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of course he did. sidmon watches EVERYTHING. He sits outside my house in an 85 monte carlo watching me change clothes and jerking off into a burlap sack. it's nasty. but like Bowie used to say, haters have much more value than sycophants.

 

Always gotta make it about you (and real soon now your li'l buddies) instead of the story...

 

 

So Frank Kern is a 'li'l buddy' and not a winning skipper? How about Mike Hennessey? Also a 'li'l buddy'? How have you done in the Class 40 fleet?

 

You denigrate the winners of this great race because they are my friends. That's pretty fucking bizarre, and shows your colors to all.

 

 

Who gives a shit about -you- Fascist Fuck

 

Great story. Just a shame you have some narcissistic need to believe you are part of it.

 

What a tiresome, narcissistic, ass carrot you are. Go back to playing with your bag of dicks would ya. Clean is about as much a fascist as he is an anarchist.

 

 

Even less of any semblance of a "journalist".

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.

 

 

 

...okay sidmon,,we get it. :mellow:

 

 

 

 

.......you've got a hard-on for Clean :wacko:

I might get flicked for outing him but Sidmon is Santa. (You know which Santa I am talking about. What you don't see in that infamous photo is the Clean blow up doll.)

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The foxxe saye....where the foxxe that? What the hell is this all about? Clean is a sycophant of the successful because he is unsuccessful but that's ok.....we need the unsuccessful to create a test for the successful. Clean is harmless and irrelevant. Sidmon should mellow out and just enjoy the circle jerk.

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.

 

 

 

...okay sidmon,,we get it. :mellow:

 

 

 

 

.......you've got a hard-on for Clean :wacko:

 

Just engaging in a little nouveau anarchy couch.

 

Wish we could get some -real- reporting about this race.

 

Still doubt Fascist Fuck will surprise us with any solid story telling.

 

Again, congrats to all the participants.

 

Peace Out

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What happened to Longbow?

Besides heading the wrong way as clean pointed out, they also shredded their A-2 and A-4. Slowed them down quite a bit.

 

Sweet jesus.. imagine if Wespy had beaten them!

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Sweet jesus.. imagine if Wespy had beaten them!

 

I guess I don't have to. I lent those guys a life raft, Dan said they almost needed it. Fortunately they didn't or Wes might have had a long swim, and can you imagine getting Wes to pay for the re-pack.

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Sweet jesus.. imagine if Wespy had beaten them!

 

I guess I don't have to. I lent those guys a life raft, Dan said they almost needed it. Fortunately they didn't or Wes might have had a long swim, and can you imagine getting Wes to pay for the re-pack.

 

did he puke on it??

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How goes a professional student pay for anything?

I'm sorry LH. You really are cursed. Not one of your boats has ever finished an ocean race. You're like that officer in master and commander everyone wanted dead. He had the good sense to drown himself. Then the southerly filled

 

Head over to Woodys on Islamorada and you can catch Big Dick and the Extenders tonight.

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Can we move this conversation from all things clean (and his numerous shortcomings) to whether or not you would choose to set sail on a Friday, load the ship's stores with bananas, head off into a cat 3 hurricane, hire Gilligan as your trusted first mate, or invite Left Hook to sail on your boat in an offshore event?

Salle on Friday - no

ship o bannasas - no

heade oof cat3 strome- no

hire Gigillian fist mate - no (hese dts)

offshore with wespey - surre

 

:)

 

Well Saggnie that would have you batting zero if you actually wanted to get to your destination.

 

I think Clean should use a satphone anyhow....... or maybe a ham radio......

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Sweet jesus.. imagine if Wespy had beaten them!

 

I guess I don't have to. I lent those guys a life raft, Dan said they almost needed it. Fortunately they didn't or Wes might have had a long swim, and can you imagine getting Wes to pay for the re-pack.

 

did he puke on it??

 

I forgot about that. Did you Wes?

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interesting factoids:

 

Average salary for low-level cuban government jobs; 20$/month.

 

Average doctor salary: $33

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Thank you for the news item. I just bathed in 40% DEET after sleeping all night in a boat full of skeeters. I'll let you know if I get Dengue.

 

 

Will you guys STFU
Can we please get a Dengue update ???

Fuckin Facist Fucktard !!!

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What happened to Longbow?

Besides heading the wrong way as clean pointed out, they also shredded their A-2 and A-4. Slowed them down quite a bit.

 

Decision also shredded a kite on the peel, with the flapping bits of the A2 triggering the tack of the A3 and skying it. Probably lost 10-20 minutes in the clusterfuck. Also took 7 minutes for a full back down.

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The winning H33 talked to me for a while about Wes and the boys running them down like rabbits and passing them. Really good stuff from the kids, bummer they couldn't keep it together!

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We had a pretty shocking downwind mode with the 15 year old Melges 24 A2 and 6 year old etchells jib. Some fun video from the late afternoon is forthcoming. Viva had great speed when it turned into a reach and we couldn't match them in a breeze forward mode after dark. Steve and his boys did a great job of making it a fun battle there and they showed great overall!!

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Congrats to Mr Woolsey for the hard-work put in to pull this off (the race, not 'stupid'). Thanks for the updates - Mr Clean.

 

Back into hiding...

 

Peace & cupcakes,

 

~Skirts.

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WINNING is Not EVERYTHING

 

Like let's say a Pissing Contest

 

monkey-drinks-own-pee-o.gif"V" vjbgSnq.gif

 

 

 

Funny how you can tell who is Stuck in the FROST and who's Kickin it in the Warmth of the Sun :)

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interesting factoids:

 

Average salary for low-level cuban government jobs; 20$/month.

 

Average doctor salary: $33

Will be the same here under President Sanders. At least college will be free.

 

Have you seen the Pope yet ? Don't let him touch your balls!

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Apologies for slow results. A function of little to no internet most of the day yesterday, and not getting times from half the fleet until late yesterday or this morning.

 

Some interesting logistical challenges which should, like other challenges, become easier to handle in the future.

 

All boats accounted for as of this morning. Rest of the results to post shortly.

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Did anyone run into The Pope?

I dowte it, hese prittey hevilley garded

I thought this pope was a pope of the people though. I could see him pulling up to the regatta party in his Fiat, or since its Cuba, some classic Russian sedan.

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Did anyone run into The Pope?

I dowte it, hese prittey hevilley garded

I thought this pope was a pope of the people though. I could see him pulling up to the regatta party in his Fiat, or since its Cuba, some classic Russian sedan.

 

Mabey you rite. :)

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Thank you for the news item. I just bathed in 40% DEET after sleeping all night in a boat full of skeeters. I'll let you know if I get Dengue.

 

 

Will you guys STFU

Can we please get a Dengue update ???

 

Fuckin Facist Fucktard !!!

 

well, judging by the size of your melon, you don;t have Zeka :o

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Thank you for the news item. I just bathed in 40% DEET after sleeping all night in a boat full of skeeters. I'll let you know if I get Dengue.

 

 

Will you guys STFU

Can we please get a Dengue update ???

 

Fuckin Facist Fucktard !!!

 

well, judging by the size of your melon, you don;t have Zeka :o

 

 

 

Fascist Fuck is congenitally deprived, regardless of the contagion dujour.

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Thank you for the news item. I just bathed in 40% DEET after sleeping all night in a boat full of skeeters. I'll let you know if I get Dengue.

 

 

 

Will you guys STFU

Can we please get a Dengue update ???

 

Fuckin Facist Fucktard !!!

well, judging by the size of your melon, you don;t have Zeka :o

 

Fascist Fuck is congenitally deprived, regardless of the contagion dujour.

Have another rum and find another outlet. Other than beating your wife.

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Thank you for the news item. I just bathed in 40% DEET after sleeping all night in a boat full of skeeters. I'll let you know if I get Dengue.

 

 

Will you guys STFU

Can we please get a Dengue update ???

 

Fuckin Facist Fucktard !!!

well, judging by the size of your melon, you don;t have Zeka :o

 

Fascist Fuck is congenitally deprived, regardless of the contagion dujour.

Have another rum and find another outlet. Other than beating your wife.

 

Diddente sombodey saye he hase blowuppe dolle of Cleane?

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Apologies for slow results. A function of little to no internet most of the day yesterday, and not getting times from half the fleet until late yesterday or this morning.

 

Some interesting logistical challenges which should, like other challenges, become easier to handle in the future.

 

All boats accounted for as of this morning. Rest of the results to post shortly.

How about a write up when the dust clears?. There have to be some great stories.

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Thank you for the news item. I just bathed in 40% DEET after sleeping all night in a boat full of skeeters. I'll let you know if I get Dengue.

 

Will you guys STFU

Can we please get a Dengue update ???

 

Fuckin Facist Fucktard !!!

well, judging by the size of your melon, you don;t have Zeka :o

 

Fascist Fuck is congenitally deprived, regardless of the contagion dujour.

Have another rum and find another outlet. Other than beating your wife.

Diddente sombodey saye he hase blowuppe dolle of Cleane?

 

Maybe this is the issue??

 

Maybe a new addition to the anarchy swag bag is needed?

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Thank you for the news item. I just bathed in 40% DEET after sleeping all night in a boat full of skeeters. I'll let you know if I get Dengue.

 

Will you guys STFU

Can we please get a Dengue update ???

 

Fuckin Facist Fucktard !!!

well, judging by the size of your melon, you don;t have Zeka :o

 

Fascist Fuck is congenitally deprived, regardless of the contagion dujour.

Have another rum and find another outlet. Other than beating your wife.

Diddente sombodey saye he hase blowuppe dolle of Cleane?

 

Maybe this is the issue??

 

A new addition to the anarchy swag bag is needed?

Didn't you get the memo? Sidmon wrote a check and Clean inflatables will be in every bag from now on. Sid said he wanted to share the joy! Batteries and carrots are not included.

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^^^^^^^^^^ That was NOT about the Topic

 

I would Love to hear about this even when possible :)

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There will be a full race recap going up on the 13fifty blog later, but i just wanted to give a few shoutouts here. First, thanks to Sol and co for putting the race together and giving tons of help and advice generally through the chair emails and to our team personally to make sure that we were doing all of the paperwork right. Huge amount of work and i hope for his sake its a little easier next year!

 

I also, but not secondly, want to thank the crew of Hot Stuff. Yes, this even includes Left Hook. We all give him a lot of shit, and i will continue to, but he was a huge help in making sure we were setup and legal to do this race. In addition, two crew members spent a significant amount of time and effort finishing the race prep for the boat, and with the help of a the third member and a delivery crew, made a very windy delivery to the other side of florida. I dont envy them, and a trailer is in the works to not have deal with that bullshit again.

 

When the shit hit the fan in the race, i really could not have asked for a better group of sailors to be with. At night, kite up, surfing down waves, and steerage is lost. No one freaked out, and the boat was brought back under control with no more fanfare than a regular douse (i didnt even get roused from my bunk until after the douse...). I've been on boats where people who had a lot more "experience" lost their shit for a lot less. Even in the ensuing attempt to get back on our way to Cuba, and then just trying to get home, no one ever bitched and spirits were high. I've never had this much fun after dropping out of a race. We put our best efforts in - and for getting everyone and the boat back safely - i could not be happier. That and not having to repack Matt B's liferaft...

 

One last thanks to the Holy Toledo team for letting us use their trailer!

 

Watch out Cuba, we're coming for you next year.

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There will be a full race recap going up on the 13fifty blog later, but i just wanted to give a few shoutouts here. First, thanks to Sol and co for putting the race together and giving tons of help and advice generally through the chair emails and to our team personally to make sure that we were doing all of the paperwork right. Huge amount of work and i hope for his sake its a little easier next year!

 

I also, but not secondly, want to thank the crew of Hot Stuff. Yes, this even includes Left Hook. We all give him a lot of shit, and i will continue to, but he was a huge help in making sure we were setup and legal to do this race. In addition, two crew members spent a significant amount of time and effort finishing the race prep for the boat, and with the help of a the third member and a delivery crew, made a very windy delivery to the other side of florida. I dont envy them, and a trailer is in the works to not have deal with that bullshit again.

 

When the shit hit the fan in the race, i really could not have asked for a better group of sailors to be with. At night, kite up, surfing down waves, and steerage is lost. No one freaked out, and the boat was brought back under control with no more fanfare than a regular douse (i didnt even get roused from my bunk until after the douse...). I've been on boats where people who had a lot more "experience" lost their shit for a lot less. Even in the ensuing attempt to get back on our way to Cuba, and then just trying to get home, no one ever bitched and spirits were high. I've never had this much fun after dropping out of a race. We put our best efforts in - and for getting everyone and the boat back safely - i could not be happier. That and not having to repack Matt B's liferaft...

 

One last thanks to the Holy Toledo team for letting us use their trailer!

 

Watch out Cuba, we're coming for you next year.

 

Nice bit of a recap

 

Reporting w PIX should be Live before the first boat finishes [/as a follower]

 

Living an Event does Not afford the time for Proper Reporting Till the Event is out behind you

 

Thanks in advance to Any & All who chose to Share their Adventures with the rest of us

 

Clean I hope you got sum Vid's in the Donkey Show

 

And helped a Cigar-Bar set up a Store Front on Amazon-Prime :)

 

Oh and What about Hookers & Rum :huh:

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We had a pretty shocking downwind mode with the 15 year old Melges 24 A2 and 6 year old etchells jib. Some fun video from the late afternoon is forthcoming. Viva had great speed when it turned into a reach and we couldn't match them in a breeze forward mode after dark. Steve and his boys did a great job of making it a fun battle there and they showed great overall!!

That M24/etchells setup was wicked fast! Wish you guys could have made it all the way, would have been a great battle to the end.....and you missed some great post race parties!

 

Sidmon, did you enjoy watching the race your moms basement?

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Apologies for slow results. A function of little to no internet most of the day yesterday, and not getting times from half the fleet until late yesterday or this morning.

 

Some interesting logistical challenges which should, like other challenges, become easier to handle in the future.

 

All boats accounted for as of this morning. Rest of the results to post shortly.

How about a write up when the dust clears?. There have to be some great stories.
Back in the states and driving for another four hours to get home. As close to a religious experience as I get these days. Truly amazing. A bit overwhelming. Write up to follow.

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Dragon Tales - Havana Dispatches

 

Apologies for the late update. The complete lack of internet or phone service in Cuba got my head into a space where I was not really paying attention to modern conveniences, and the attitude persisted once back in the States.

 

First and foremost, kudos to Chris Woolsey and the gang at SORC. It is difficult to put together a first class event with participants from around the United States in the best of circumstances, and doing it in this situation had its own unique set of challenges. But from start to finish, this was a really great event. It helped that the destination promoted itself, but that and SORC's reputation only meant there were entrants. Everything else came from the effort and commitment of Chris and his team.

 

I had prepped the boat in Charleston in late February, and then my all-star crew of Merf Owen and Ashley Perrin did the delivery to Miami on February 4. They took advantage of the comfortable and romantic amenities aboard to get engaged on the trip, another first for the mighty Dragon. Then Kyle Hubley and I joined up with the boat down in Miami.

 

The party and Skipper's meeting at Coral Reef Yacht Club was a great time, with a slick and fast check in followed by what seemed like a never ending open bar pouring Cuba Libre's and all the rum you could drink. A great band, and a skipper's meeting that was notable for its limited time spent on bureaucracy and the rousing speech given by Commodore Jose Miguel Diaz Escrich who clearly has picked up some rhetorical technique from Fidel. The rest of the event was a great chance to catch up with various folks from all over the place who had come in for this race.

 

Race day saw us headed out early for a start that needed to be out to the south of the channel to take into account the draft of some of the boats. Dawn had brought something that looked like 10 knot south westerlies, but that pretty quickly evolved into 5 knot north westerlies. We went off the line under kite, VMG running. Most of the leader pack through a quick gybe in to get off shore, where we chose to take it as far as we could to the west and benefited as the boats struggled a bit in what seemed like more current further out. When they came back in, we had some gains on our Class 40 competitors but were struggling to shake the Santa Cruz 52 and the J111 and J120s that were in our division. That cat and mouse game continued all the way down to the upper end of Islamorada as the wind gradually picked up into the teens and settled in for a near reach under Code 5 in westerlies. Those conditions allowed us to pull away from the non Class 40s, but also allowed Amhas and Long Bow to pull forward for what was evolving into a drag race between us. Long Bow turns out (no surprise) to be really fast in those conditions.

 

Routing from the Wednesday morning files suggested a near rhumb line race, with a departure from the reef somewhere between Islamorada and just below Key Largo. Virtually all of the fleet seemed to follow that course, with the distinction of Decision to committed to the most easterly course. Meanwhile, we pulled the 1800 hour files down and re-ran the routing. The westerlies we were experiencing were forecast to back, making the rhumb line route much less attractive. It looked like it was going to play out well for Decision who could use it to get east in a hurry and then Gybe on the lift for a straight shot at Havana, but the rest of the fleet was going to be spending a lot of time gybing to the rum and all of it in the Stream with its adverse current. We chose instead to use the lift to continue the follow the reef line us it curved to the southwest, maintaining maximum reaching speed and minimizing current.

 

That plan took us to well to the south of Key West, where Ashley called the layline from 57 miles out. Even a mile less and we would have been gybing, and a mile more would have been wasted. That last leg was a fantastic run under the A2 at 145 to 150 TWA in 12 to 17 knots. We had some set to the east from the Gulf Stream as well as much as 2 knots of adverse, and the conditions of wind against tide did not help with the wave state that much. But even with that, we did get enough wind driven wave action that we could get some lazy surfing during the run and kept up our average speeds.

 

We had not checked the tracker during this race, and as we came up on the coast we were worried about the lack of any other sails on the horizon. It was pretty clear that we were either going to be animals or assholes given the complete lack of any other boats. The finish was a straight forward thing complicated only by a hostile lee shore that was just below the government mark where we took our own finish time. Once we got things stowed it was a well marked channel through the reef, with both day and night markers to line up on. That took us into the man made lagoon that is Marina Hemingway. The combination of Customs, Immigration, Health, Vet and god knows what else were very easy to get through other than a lot of signatures. They were polite and efficient, and the only thing they did that was unusual was to seal our sat comms with tape to prevent us from using them while on island. Then to the dock, an interview with Clean and tidy up. The hardest part was getting a taxi from the local hotel to a neighborhood closer to Havana where we had a Casa lined up through Air BnB.

 

Cuba is a time machine. The cars are a good metaphor for the island, a rolling museum that is kept going through necessity, ingenuity, and a great deal of pride. The buildings are a mix of worn but proud colonial architecture along side the American influenced Art Deco work of the early 20th century and some surprisingly well done modernist design of the 1950s. There are more recent buildings from the time of Soviet patronage which are pretty much what you would expect, low quality and poor design. In many respects the pre-revolutionary building are in better physical shape than anything that came after. But the combination of cars and buildings create a mood that is unique, one where you don't have to stretch very hard at all to imagine yourself back 60 years. The topper is a complete lack of advertising. Not a single poster, billboard, commercial, or other form of media pushing you to buy or consume anything. Coming from a world where we are encouraged to consume by messages on every available surface, this was perhaps the most subtle but also the most pervasive difference. It makes all sorts of sense when you think about it in the context of a communist society with limited resources, but it was very unexpected.

 

All of the people we met are happy, positive and looking forward to the changes that are in motion. The Caribbean Communism created by Castro is still evident everywhere. The vast majority of people still have jobs provided by the State, where the government official makes the same money as the driver that they are provided. They still use ration cards, where each person is able to go to their local bodega (and only their local bodega) to buy food and clothing. Anything else has to be purchased using the CUC currency meant for foreigners. They don't have much, but they have enough. And it is notable that we did not see a single homeless person, a single beggar or other person that did not look like they were at least cared for in some way.

 

In some respects, its interesting to compare Cuba and Puerto Rico when trying to judge the impact of the Revolution. Two island states, with economies that struggle with similarly limited resources and options. One has worked under the umbrella of the USA and unfettered capitalism for the past 60 years, and the other has been led by Castro with initially Soviet patronage and then some help from Venezuela in the past couple of decades. Is Cuba really any worse off than Puerto Rico? In many respects, they are better off. Less abject poverty, far less debt and a far less precarious future.

 

The job system, and lack of ownership has created a culture that lacks ambition, but the desire for more had lead to a robust black market economy that has now been given legitimacy by Raul Castro. Only in the past two years have they been able to own their own homes, and to start businesses. Those that forego a state job to run a Casa, or the private restaurants known as Paladars or their own taxi service end up paying taxes to the State, somewhere in the range of 50%. Which, when I think about it is about the same amount I pay in Federal, State and Local taxes. Those allowances are driving a strong current of change. There are signs all over Havana of grass roots efforts to renovate homes and buildings, along side what are clearly state sponsored efforts on bigger hotel projects.

 

It will be interesting to how Cuba navigates this evolution from Communism to a hybrid economy, and how thawing relationships with the USA impacts them. One thing is for sure... there will be change and as a result some of the things that make it unique will vanish. You should get there soon.

 

An epic awards party and pig roast on Sunday night ensured that we headed back on Monday with sore heads and bad stomachs, enjoying a 35 knot bash uphill to Fort Lauderdale. Wind against Stream made it wet and uncomfortable, but quick and we pulled into the Cut just after dawn only to be hit by a ferocious front that saw sustained winds in the 50's and rain so hard that we could not see more than 50 feet. Which is probably a good thing since apparently a tornado touched down just to the north of us, and then another one to the south of us. We saw Ashley and Merf off, got the boat cleaned up, fixed our fuel system and oil sender, and caught up on sleep. We shortly shove off for what will hopefully be a 35 hour trip up to Charleston, and then back to the real world.

 

Viva Cuba!

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Nice report Rail

 

Can't wait till sum Pix start to come in

 

And Cleans video, I want to see TNZ up on foils :-)

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Dragon Tales - Havana Dispatches

 

Apologies for the late update. The complete lack of internet or phone service in Cuba got my head into a space where I was not really paying attention to modern conveniences, and the attitude persisted once back in the States.

 

First and foremost, kudos to Chris Woolsey and the gang at SORC. It is difficult to put together a first class event with participants from around the United States in the best of circumstances, and doing it in this situation had its own unique set of challenges. But from start to finish, this was a really great event. It helped that the destination promoted itself, but that and SORC's reputation only meant there were entrants. Everything else came from the effort and commitment of Chris and his team.

 

I had prepped the boat in Charleston in late February, and then my all-star crew of Merf Owen and Ashley Perrin did the delivery to Miami on February 4. They took advantage of the comfortable and romantic amenities aboard to get engaged on the trip, another first for the mighty Dragon. Then Kyle Hubley and I joined up with the boat down in Miami.

 

The party and Skipper's meeting at Coral Reef Yacht Club was a great time, with a slick and fast check in followed by what seemed like a never ending open bar pouring Cuba Libre's and all the rum you could drink. A great band, and a skipper's meeting that was notable for its limited time spent on bureaucracy and the rousing speech given by Commodore Jose Miguel Diaz Escrich who clearly has picked up some rhetorical technique from Fidel. The rest of the event was a great chance to catch up with various folks from all over the place who had come in for this race.

 

Race day saw us headed out early for a start that needed to be out to the south of the channel to take into account the draft of some of the boats. Dawn had brought something that looked like 10 knot south westerlies, but that pretty quickly evolved into 5 knot north westerlies. We went off the line under kite, VMG running. Most of the leader pack through a quick gybe in to get off shore, where we chose to take it as far as we could to the west and benefited as the boats struggled a bit in what seemed like more current further out. When they came back in, we had some gains on our Class 40 competitors but were struggling to shake the Santa Cruz 52 and the J111 and J120s that were in our division. That cat and mouse game continued all the way down to the upper end of Islamorada as the wind gradually picked up into the teens and settled in for a near reach under Code 5 in westerlies. Those conditions allowed us to pull away from the non Class 40s, but also allowed Amhas and Long Bow to pull forward for what was evolving into a drag race between us. Long Bow turns out (no surprise) to be really fast in those conditions.

 

Routing from the Wednesday morning files suggested a near rhumb line race, with a departure from the reef somewhere between Islamorada and just below Key Largo. Virtually all of the fleet seemed to follow that course, with the distinction of Decision to committed to the most easterly course. Meanwhile, we pulled the 1800 hour files down and re-ran the routing. The westerlies we were experiencing were forecast to back, making the rhumb line route much less attractive. It looked like it was going to play out well for Decision who could use it to get east in a hurry and then Gybe on the lift for a straight shot at Havana, but the rest of the fleet was going to be spending a lot of time gybing to the rum and all of it in the Stream with its adverse current. We chose instead to use the lift to continue the follow the reef line us it curved to the southwest, maintaining maximum reaching speed and minimizing current.

 

That plan took us to well to the south of Key West, where Ashley called the layline from 57 miles out. Even a mile less and we would have been gybing, and a mile more would have been wasted. That last leg was a fantastic run under the A2 at 145 to 150 TWA in 12 to 17 knots. We had some set to the east from the Gulf Stream as well as much as 2 knots of adverse, and the conditions of wind against tide did not help with the wave state that much. But even with that, we did get enough wind driven wave action that we could get some lazy surfing during the run and kept up our average speeds.

 

We had not checked the tracker during this race, and as we came up on the coast we were worried about the lack of any other sails on the horizon. It was pretty clear that we were either going to be animals or assholes given the complete lack of any other boats. The finish was a straight forward thing complicated only by a hostile lee shore that was just below the government mark where we took our own finish time. Once we got things stowed it was a well marked channel through the reef, with both day and night markers to line up on. That took us into the man made lagoon that is Marina Hemingway. The combination of Customs, Immigration, Health, Vet and god knows what else were very easy to get through other than a lot of signatures. They were polite and efficient, and the only thing they did that was unusual was to seal our sat comms with tape to prevent us from using them while on island. Then to the dock, an interview with Clean and tidy up. The hardest part was getting a taxi from the local hotel to a neighborhood closer to Havana where we had a Casa lined up through Air BnB.

 

Cuba is a time machine. The cars are a good metaphor for the island, a rolling museum that is kept going through necessity, ingenuity, and a great deal of pride. The buildings are a mix of worn but proud colonial architecture along side the American influenced Art Deco work of the early 20th century and some surprisingly well done modernist design of the 1950s. There are more recent buildings from the time of Soviet patronage which are pretty much what you would expect, low quality and poor design. In many respects the pre-revolutionary building are in better physical shape than anything that came after. But the combination of cars and buildings create a mood that is unique, one where you don't have to stretch very hard at all to imagine yourself back 60 years. The topper is a complete lack of advertising. Not a single poster, billboard, commercial, or other form of media pushing you to buy or consume anything. Coming from a world where we are encouraged to consume by messages on every available surface, this was perhaps the most subtle but also the most pervasive difference. It makes all sorts of sense when you think about it in the context of a communist society with limited resources, but it was very unexpected.

 

All of the people we met are happy, positive and looking forward to the changes that are in motion. The Caribbean Communism created by Castro is still evident everywhere. The vast majority of people still have jobs provided by the State, where the government official makes the same money as the driver that they are provided. They still use ration cards, where each person is able to go to their local bodega (and only their local bodega) to buy food and clothing. Anything else has to be purchased using the CUC currency meant for foreigners. They don't have much, but they have enough. And it is notable that we did not see a single homeless person, a single beggar or other person that did not look like they were at least cared for in some way.

 

In some respects, its interesting to compare Cuba and Puerto Rico when trying to judge the impact of the Revolution. Two island states, with economies that struggle with similarly limited resources and options. One has worked under the umbrella of the USA and unfettered capitalism for the past 60 years, and the other has been led by Castro with initially Soviet patronage and then some help from Venezuela in the past couple of decades. Is Cuba really any worse off than Puerto Rico? In many respects, they are better off. Less abject poverty, far less debt and a far less precarious future.

 

The job system, and lack of ownership has created a culture that lacks ambition, but the desire for more had lead to a robust black market economy that has now been given legitimacy by Raul Castro. Only in the past two years have they been able to own their own homes, and to start businesses. Those that forego a state job to run a Casa, or the private restaurants known as Paladars or their own taxi service end up paying taxes to the State, somewhere in the range of 50%. Which, when I think about it is about the same amount I pay in Federal, State and Local taxes. Those allowances are driving a strong current of change. There are signs all over Havana of grass roots efforts to renovate homes and buildings, along side what are clearly state sponsored efforts on bigger hotel projects.

 

It will be interesting to how Cuba navigates this evolution from Communism to a hybrid economy, and how thawing relationships with the USA impacts them. One thing is for sure... there will be change and as a result some of the things that make it unique will vanish. You should get there soon.

 

An epic awards party and pig roast on Sunday night ensured that we headed back on Monday with sore heads and bad stomachs, enjoying a 35 knot bash uphill to Fort Lauderdale. Wind against Stream made it wet and uncomfortable, but quick and we pulled into the Cut just after dawn only to be hit by a ferocious front that saw sustained winds in the 50's and rain so hard that we could not see more than 50 feet. Which is probably a good thing since apparently a tornado touched down just to the north of us, and then another one to the south of us. We saw Ashley and Merf off, got the boat cleaned up, fixed our fuel system and oil sender, and caught up on sleep. We shortly shove off for what will hopefully be a 35 hour trip up to Charleston, and then back to the real world.

 

Viva Cuba!

 

 

Nice report Railmeat, Cuba has just gone on my list to visit.

 

 

 

...yah,,,same here....often fantasize a long kayak trip in those parts.

 

 

....are tourists still coraled to specific areas only,,or is roaming the counrtyside allright?

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No corralling, and as far as I could tell no tailing by secret police or any such agents.

 

Customs and immigration very smooth both ways in Cuba, and surprisingly easy on return to USA.

 

Some locals a bit pushy for "tips" and "donations" and "gifts" but i've encountered worse. Overall people very friendly and glad to see Americans visiting and spending money. Overall atmosphere is extremely welcoming and laid back. I have received much less cordial greetings at many marinas stateside.

 

Although changing money near the marina was a bit of a hassle but plenty of merchants willing to take crisp american bills for payment and give change in local currency. I'll know to plan ahead a little better next time and hopefully the credit card infrastructure will continue to improve.

 

As to the race itself, it was my first time crossing the stream and i did it on a Hobie33, a bit gnarly at times due to the sea state but overall a great ride down and I look forward to doing it again.

 

Major thanks to Marina Hemingway and to SORC in general and to Chris in particular for overcoming the logistical hassles and putting on a truly fantastic event. I am really glad I was part of the inaugural race and could see myself doing it many times again.

 

If this isn't on your list of ocean races to do either as an owner or crew put it on there now.

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Sorry this took a while. Lots to do when getting back to the real world. This took a while, but there was a lot of ground to cover.

 

Tiempo de la Isla
Before I dig into this, if you are looking for the story of the racing or of experiences outside of Marina Hemingway, I suggest reading Rail Meat’s excellent story on the Miami to Havana Race. My experience was a blur of race management stuff done within the sheltered confines of Marina Hemingway, so my insight into Havana and the Cuban people is severely constrained. I worked pretty much from the moment I arrived until five days later when I left, with one afternoon atop Morro Castle (which turned into a race video event) and an evening in Habana Vieja. I look forward to expanding that experience in the near future.
Background
Long before December 17, 2014, when President Obama announced a thaw in relations between the U.S. and Cuba, many of us in the sailing community, particularly in South Florida, had pondered the day when we would once again be allowed to visit out island neighbors to the south. Even within the SORC committee, it had been a topic of conversation for several years, usually emphasizing the need to move quickly to make sure that the race was done the SORC way (well) and before the flood of cash from the NE U.S. turned the place into Generic Resort #25.2. Once Coral Reef Yacht Club expressed an interest in hosting such a historic race, the ball was rolling at a swift pace, with a natural spot for the start of the race locked-in: Miami to Havana. That guaranteed us a phenomenal ocean race course using the northern boundary of the Florida Keys, and the natural challenge of the Gulf Stream to wrack navigators minds about the right time to cross over to Cuba.
The last six months really seems like a continuous stream of phone calls and emails. I wrote somewhere else that I have not been told “no” as often as I have in the last few months since I quit frequenting singles bars. I cannot count how many times I explained the revised Cuba travel regulations to otherwise very bright people who insisted on quoting the old regs to support their assertion that we were doing something wrong. I literally had to apply for a specific license from OFAC which I knew we did not need, to get a denial letter saying that they do not grant licenses for travel they have already authorized.
The first race is always going to be the hardest, and this one ended up being the embodiment of the Teddy Roosevelt quote, “believe you can and you are half way there.” Thanks to a courageous group of competitors who bought-in and went all-in on being part of the first race between the sister-cities, not to mention the tireless efforts of a dedicated group of Coral Reef Yacht Club members, 46 boats made it to the starting line the day after an amazing party at Coral Reef, complete with a free Mt. Gay Rum pour, which like the free food, ended long before I got free to enjoy any of it. A four-piece band straight from Calle Ocho in Little Havana kept things moving before and after the Skippers’ Meeting.
It’s On
The race started on Wednesday the 10th, just southeast of Government Cut, Miami, with light northerlies getting the fleet across the line and spread across the horizon to the south in relatively short order. A pretty diverse fleet guaranteed that there would be a wide range of finish times, and approaches to the challenge presented by the course. The next morning, the tracker showed the fleet spread almost evenly on either side of the rhumb line, and with the extremes being far far apart. With the racing in good shape, we headed to MIA to catch a Havana Air flight (on the newly reborn Eastern Airlines) to Jose Marti Int’l Airport, to get on station at Marina Hemingway for the fun.
Arriving at Jose Marti is like going through a time warp, something you notice the moment you step walk down the steps from the 737 to the tarmac. After a series of different check in points, the three of us (me, Clean, and photographer/all around good dude Marco Oquendo) made our way through the throngs to find a cab. Everyone has seen pictures of the 1950s cars in Cuba, and the cab fleet has its share, along with plenty of newer Hyundais and Ladas. We were not more than five minutes out of the airport before I was already planning a trip back without so much of my schedule devoted to work. Make no mistake about it, putting on a new event in any new venue is work, but in Cuba, it comes with all kinds of challenges, all of which eat up any planned free time.
SORC headquarters for the week was a 1939 76' Trumpy at Marina Hemingway. Other than being on an unfortunate row of the marina, which meant an extra four or five miles of walking per day, given the various trips back and forth, it was the perfect spot for us. Like Cuba itself, the boat was a trip back to a very different time. The owner was an interesting guy from Russia, who clearly has the whole life-thing figured out. He splits time between his wife at home, and his boat at Marina Hemingway. Like so many other people at Marina Hemingway, one got the sense that there was more to the story, about which we neither knew nor cared. He greeted us with beer, the key ingredient to any first chapter. The ensuing chapters wrote themselves So Fast that it would make your head spin.
Most of the fleet arrived on Thursday night/Friday morning. Conditions prevented a finish boat from remaining on station, meaning that we had to get finish times from every boat in the fleet. That, along with my posted hours of being on station on the back deck of the Club Nautico most of the day on Friday, and the local issue of the Internet being down all day on Friday, meant that results were slow to post. Some of the comments about that are just plain good comedy. If you want to find out how to handle something in Cuba, there’s nothing like getting advice from someone in NY who has never been there, to save the day. The satphone idea was my favorite. I encourage anyone who thought that was a good idea to do the race next time and wander around Marina Hemingway using their satphone. Please let me know when you plan to do so, so that I can prepare the video. Friday was largely a blur of chasing down finish times and people with European cell phones, on which to call them to someone in Miami for posting. The first of several pigs to be roasted hit the spit on Friday afternoon, and the Friday night roast was a thing of beauty. For an unscheduled event, that was quite a party. It became readily apparent that the folks at CNIH know how to show folks a good time.
Saturday was a similar thrash; up at the butt-crack of dawn to chase down all of the remaining finish times the hard way, beating the pavement all the way up and down each row of the marina until I had all of the times, to have all but one boat’s finish time by the time I had to go on station at the yacht club for the day. (My the time I made it home, I had logged over 50 miles of walking in four days.) The news that the Internet was back up and running set off a mad scramble to get online and get things posted. The rest of the day was a blur of logistics for that evening’s Welcome Cocktail Party and Sunday’s Morro Castle Race. Did I mention that CNIH knows how to throw a party? A pretty simple skippers meeting and welcoming comments turned into a flood of signatures and written messages on collectors item charts of the race course for the next day’s race. My hand is still tired from holding the pen.... There is a pretty good little nightclub around the corner from the yacht club, which was packed, due to the influx of people for both our race and the Havana Triathlon. The place was rumored to be a prolific pickup spot, but I can neither confirm nor deny.
Sunday morning brought a moment of chill, as I had time to visit the little café by the yacht club for some breakfast, before heading to the Farr 395 Senara for the coastal race to Morro Castle. This resulted in what I liked to call the “pressed ham” sandwich, which dominated the diet in the Marina Hemingway area. I use the term “pressed ham” on purpose, and if you do not understand the reference, try Urban Dictionary. You don’t see a lot of fat bastards running around Cuba...with good reason, but the beer was alright and some of the rum was phenomenal. Our race day came to an early end with a tear in the main by a batten pocket, and the daily breeze filling in at 25+. That gave me a bit of chill time for the day, before heading to Club Nautico to help set up shop for the awards presentation and final party. The presentation and party went zooming by. Thanks to the benevolence of some folks in line, I was able to sneak a bit of the second of two pigs which were roasted for the affair (with a worker turning the spit for seven hours to get it done). Another night in the nightclub followed, also zooming by in a heartbeat.
The results. Trebuchet First to Finish, First Monohull, First Race Record Holder, First in IRC. Dragon first in PHRF A, First in PHRF Fleet, winner- Best Overall Performance. Carinthia first in PHRF B, Viva Las Vegas first in PHRF C, Grand Cru first in PHRF D, and The Beat, first in Multihull, first Multihull to finish. Decision wins the Inaugural SORC Islands in the Stream Series, with a first in the Nassau Race, Palm Beach Race, and second in the Havana Race (IRC).
We finally got to head out for some tourist stuff on Monday afternoon, after seeing most of the fleet off from Marina Hemingway. Being atop Morro castle when the FtF and race record holder Trebuchet headed out of Havana Harbor for the delivery home provided a nice exclamation point to the event, and a fitting end, in that the one day off became yet another work day. We capped this workday with a visit to Hemingway’s “La Bodeguita del Medio,” birthplace of the Mojito, where they still make a damn good one, and cook pork, rice, beans and plantains that are substantially better than merely edible, a nice change of pace.
I cannot speak for Clean or Marco, but the experience did not really hit home for me until last Tuesday morning, sitting in a little café in Jose Marti Airport, guzzling some of the best coffee I’ve ever had. When the guy behind the counter found out that we were from La Regatta, his disposition gave away how much the event meant to him and others. That, along with gratitude from any number of competitors, made all of the pre-race organizing angst more than worthwhile. I am still digesting the whole thing, a week later, and am not quite back up to speed in the real world yet.
The folks who did the racing are far better sources for opinions about it than I am. I had an absolute blast from start to finish, but I am more than a bit biased. I know for sure that there were a ton of people on the fence about whether or not to do the race and deal with the hassles of the “first time”. The hassles seem insignificant in comparison to the power of the experience, for me at least, and I’m fairly certain that I dealt with more hassles than anyone. The next one will be even better.
Watch for an announcement about the next one, and don’t miss it.

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I want to follow up with the comments made by Sol. Chris Woosley did a herculean effort to keep this race on track. Since it was never done before there were a lot of things that had to be invented. For instance a special Coast Guard permit was needed to enter Cuban waters as there is still officially an embargo. He got together with the right people to help the owners get that squared away. Communication with the outside world was really difficult as the internet connections were hard to get and unreliable. When we landed the Cuban officials took my satellite phone and sealed it, saying phoning from Cuban was strictly forbidden. The following day I did phone home in secret to wish my daughter a happy birthday and to assure the outside world we were all fine.

Carinthia's strategy for the race was to get as close as possible to the Florida Keys to stay out of the current. At Elbow #6 the rhumb line peels off to Havana and we stayed more north of it but started going more southwest. We jibed south when we got in the teeth of the a 3 knot gulf current and jibed back about 2 miles off of Cuba. To our pleasant surprise we got about a 1 knot push which helped us with the competition. From what I saw on the tracking Dragon stayed north until Key West and then jibed south directly to Havana. In the end they beat us by 18 minutes corrected time, which is pretty close considering how long the race was. Was this ideal conditions for a Class 40 vs. a J120? Was it courses for horses? Who knows as they did sail a nearly perfect race and after all they did take home the gold. My congrats to these guys for doing what was needed to win.

Marina Hemingway was a very nice harbor and I found the people here very accepting of Americans. We were glad we stayed to see a little of Havana. The Cubans are very poor but there are cracks showing it may improve. A lot has been said about the old cars and most are privately owned. It makes a great way for the locals to make some cash. Hotel space here was very difficult to get some competitors were able to find space with airbnb. I also heard many bathrooms did not have toilet seats, probably a symptom of communism. I know some boats dropped out of sailing here because of all the red tape BS but it was worth it. Certainly this was a bucket list race. When this thing comes up next I highly recommend doing it.

 

Here is a link to the band at the Club Náutico Internacional Hemingway de Cuba: https://goo.gl/photos/bSPn9UMuGsfUdvqeA

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I want to follow up with the comments made by Sol. Chris Woosley did a herculean effort to keep this race on track. Since it was never done before there were a lot of things that had to be invented. For instance a special Coast Guard permit was needed to enter Cuban waters as there is still officially an embargo. He got together with the right people to help the owners get that squared away. Communication with the outside world was really difficult as the internet connections were hard to get and unreliable. When we landed the Cuban officials took my satellite phone and sealed it, saying phoning from Cuban was strictly forbidden. The following day I did phone home in secret to wish my daughter a happy birthday and to assure the outside world we were all fine.

Carinthia's strategy for the race was to get as close as possible to the Florida Keys to stay out of the current. At Elbow #6 the rhumb line peels off to Havana and we stayed more north of it but started going more southwest. We jibed south when we got in the teeth of the a 3 knot gulf current and jibed back about 2 miles off of Cuba. To our pleasant surprise we got about a 1 knot push which helped us with the competition. From what I saw on the tracking Dragon stayed north until Key West and then jibed south directly to Havana. In the end they beat us by 18 minutes corrected time, which is pretty close considering how long the race was. Was this ideal conditions for a Class 40 vs. a J120? Was it courses for horses? Who knows as they did sail a nearly perfect race and after all they did take home the gold. My congrats to these guys for doing what was needed to win.

 

Marina Hemingway was a very nice harbor and I found the people here very accepting of Americans. We were glad we stayed to see a little of Havana. The Cubans are very poor but there are cracks showing it may improve. A lot has been said about the old cars and most are privately owned. It makes a great way for the locals to make some cash. Hotel space here was very difficult to get some competitors were able to find space with airbnb. I also heard many bathrooms did not have toilet seats, probably a symptom of communism. I know some boats dropped out of sailing here because of all the red tape BS but it was worth it. Certainly this was a bucket list race. When this thing comes up next I highly recommend doing it.

 

Here is a link to the band at the Club Náutico Internacional Hemingway de Cuba: https://goo.gl/photos/bSPn9UMuGsfUdvqeA

Interesting about the north shore of Cuba. I'd heard rumors of a GS countercurrent there but it seemed like a lot to gamble on, plus low confidence in the charts for the area being correct. How far inshore did you need to be to get it? How Far East did you find it?

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I want to follow up with the comments made by Sol. Chris Woosley did a herculean effort to keep this race on track. Since it was never done before there were a lot of things that had to be invented. For instance a special Coast Guard permit was needed to enter Cuban waters as there is still officially an embargo. He got together with the right people to help the owners get that squared away. Communication with the outside world was really difficult as the internet connections were hard to get and unreliable. When we landed the Cuban officials took my satellite phone and sealed it, saying phoning from Cuban was strictly forbidden. The following day I did phone home in secret to wish my daughter a happy birthday and to assure the outside world we were all fine.

Carinthia's strategy for the race was to get as close as possible to the Florida Keys to stay out of the current. At Elbow #6 the rhumb line peels off to Havana and we stayed more north of it but started going more southwest. We jibed south when we got in the teeth of the a 3 knot gulf current and jibed back about 2 miles off of Cuba. To our pleasant surprise we got about a 1 knot push which helped us with the competition. From what I saw on the tracking Dragon stayed north until Key West and then jibed south directly to Havana. In the end they beat us by 18 minutes corrected time, which is pretty close considering how long the race was. Was this ideal conditions for a Class 40 vs. a J120? Was it courses for horses? Who knows as they did sail a nearly perfect race and after all they did take home the gold. My congrats to these guys for doing what was needed to win.

 

Marina Hemingway was a very nice harbor and I found the people here very accepting of Americans. We were glad we stayed to see a little of Havana. The Cubans are very poor but there are cracks showing it may improve. A lot has been said about the old cars and most are privately owned. It makes a great way for the locals to make some cash. Hotel space here was very difficult to get some competitors were able to find space with airbnb. I also heard many bathrooms did not have toilet seats, probably a symptom of communism. I know some boats dropped out of sailing here because of all the red tape BS but it was worth it. Certainly this was a bucket list race. When this thing comes up next I highly recommend doing it.

 

Here is a link to the band at the Club Náutico Internacional Hemingway de Cuba: https://goo.gl/photos/bSPn9UMuGsfUdvqeA

Interesting about the north shore of Cuba. I'd heard rumors of a GS countercurrent there but it seemed like a lot to gamble on, plus low confidence in the charts for the area being correct. How far inshore did you need to be to get it? How Far East did you find it?

 

Porto Seboruco, about 45 miles west of Havana Harbor about 7 miles north of the shoreline. The gulf current was much farther north than what the grib files showed. Once in a while you have to stick your head outside the nav station to see what is going on.

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I want to follow up with the comments made by Sol. Chris Woosley did a herculean effort to keep this race on track. Since it was never done before there were a lot of things that had to be invented. For instance a special Coast Guard permit was needed to enter Cuban waters as there is still officially an embargo. He got together with the right people to help the owners get that squared away. Communication with the outside world was really difficult as the internet connections were hard to get and unreliable. When we landed the Cuban officials took my satellite phone and sealed it, saying phoning from Cuban was strictly forbidden. The following day I did phone home in secret to wish my daughter a happy birthday and to assure the outside world we were all fine.

Carinthia's strategy for the race was to get as close as possible to the Florida Keys to stay out of the current. At Elbow #6 the rhumb line peels off to Havana and we stayed more north of it but started going more southwest. We jibed south when we got in the teeth of the a 3 knot gulf current and jibed back about 2 miles off of Cuba. To our pleasant surprise we got about a 1 knot push which helped us with the competition. From what I saw on the tracking Dragon stayed north until Key West and then jibed south directly to Havana. In the end they beat us by 18 minutes corrected time, which is pretty close considering how long the race was. Was this ideal conditions for a Class 40 vs. a J120? Was it courses for horses? Who knows as they did sail a nearly perfect race and after all they did take home the gold. My congrats to these guys for doing what was needed to win.

 

Marina Hemingway was a very nice harbor and I found the people here very accepting of Americans. We were glad we stayed to see a little of Havana. The Cubans are very poor but there are cracks showing it may improve. A lot has been said about the old cars and most are privately owned. It makes a great way for the locals to make some cash. Hotel space here was very difficult to get some competitors were able to find space with airbnb. I also heard many bathrooms did not have toilet seats, probably a symptom of communism. I know some boats dropped out of sailing here because of all the red tape BS but it was worth it. Certainly this was a bucket list race. When this thing comes up next I highly recommend doing it.

 

Here is a link to the band at the Club Náutico Internacional Hemingway de Cuba: https://goo.gl/photos/bSPn9UMuGsfUdvqeA

Interesting about the north shore of Cuba. I'd heard rumors of a GS countercurrent there but it seemed like a lot to gamble on, plus low confidence in the charts for the area being correct. How far inshore did you need to be to get it? How Far East did you find it?

Porto Seboruco, about 45 miles west of Havana Harbor about 7 miles north of the shoreline. The gulf current was much farther north than what the grib files showed. Once in a while you have to stick your head outside the nav station to see what is going on.

Considering my head sticks out of the companionway hatch sitting upright in the Nav station that's not much of an issue ;)

 

It was the first edition. There were genuine concerns onboard about running the north shore of Cuba. There were worries that the topography of the island would rob the wind. That the countercurrent wouldn't be there. The fact that it was possible the charts could be leaving out key features. Some places said you need to be closely in contact with the Cuban Coast Guard once you crossed a certain limit.

 

It's a strategy for future years, for sure. In the event of a western focused gulf stream or a downwind race from the east or even a drifter.

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Why don't you first find a boat you can finish a race on before worrying about some fuckin half ass counter current mystery? What are you? Oh for 4?

It could be the curse of Left Hook. Maybe you should put a cannon ball in your pants and jump overboard!

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A $60,000/year New England liberal arts undergraduate school who's favorite guest speaker was Maya Angelou. Who would have guessed?! They probably have a sattelite campus in Havana

Can't they a find a daddy with a nicer boat?!

 

If you google notable alimni the first person to come up is the son of WWE founder Vince McMahon. He might have a boat.

 

 

I just said he was unlucky. He was probably the best sailor on at least one of those boats. He's already over qualified to be President of the YRALIS

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he'll be back next year, and the boat will have a one piece shaft and a bit more prep time.

Will you ever learn????

"bit more prep time"....

One would hope ~stang. No dickin' around. Go over the boat and make a very detailed punch list, prioritize it, then work your way through it all. Don't cut corners. Get yourself to a place where your mindset isn't "help is a right turn(or left turn) away".

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he'll be back next year, and the boat will have a one piece shaft and a bit more prep time.

Will you ever learn????

"bit more prep time"....

One would hope ~stang. No dickin' around. Go over the boat and make a very detailed punch list, prioritize it, then work your way through it all. Don't cut corners. Get yourself to a place where your mindset isn't "help is a right turn(or left turn) away".

 

 

There was a very specific punch list that was made and it was followed. It included having the rudder serviced at a reputable yard. Unfortunately, sometimes you don't get what you pay for.. I'm alluding to the long hours prior to the race, not how the boat performed on the race.

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Not on a high horse kid. Just some friendly advice from an old shipmate.

 

 

BTW, the "Will you ever learn?" wasn't about your program..... it was about the program killer.

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sorry misread your angle. i made some edits. It sucks when you try and do everything right, including going to the "good guys" and you get kicked in the balls anyway.

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sorry misread your angle. i made some edits. It sucks when you try and do everything right, including going to the "good guys" and you get kicked in the balls anyway.

I know about getting kicked in the balls. Just gotta stand back up and try it again.

 

Sorry to have not met you at the skippers meeting and party.

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sorry misread your angle. i made some edits. It sucks when you try and do everything right, including going to the "good guys" and you get kicked in the balls anyway.

Ya know nothin' is ever perfect. When I did the RTW gig, boat was real nice to begin with but we took her apart and spent a huge amount of time on every moving part. Took a while with a 55' boat, better part of a month on he hard at Pilots Point. The 367 to BDA, she wasn't what you would call tired but very stock, which wouldn't cut it. Had some challenges to get her to incline correctly, that aside we spent the better part of a span of 60+ days taking her apart, upgrading, servicing.

Offshore sailing is so much different. Have to be able to really rely on your gear for the long haul. No hoping it gets you by.

 

Sorry to hear about the rudder. First thought was it wasn't something you knew about. I understand your frustrations if you trusted someone to make it right and they fell short of goal. One thing I learned at a young age was to hone and trust my own judgement on such things rather than rely on others. Doesn't mean you have the full scope of skills (although the more the merrier), just that you fully grasp how to correctly evaluate and come up with a good plan of action.

 

Boats that sail offshore require a huge amount of intimacy.

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