timmytwinstay

"Dis is Sayula"

Recommended Posts

America Jane III. The best all around boat at the 1976 One Ton Worlds. A young Gary Weisman helped make it go. Lost to Resolute Salmon in the last race, in a light air downwind gibing dual at the finish after 300 miles of just about every condition. No one was sure who won at the finish (one of the marks, 100 miles offshore was rounded in the fog) until French Navy radar plots (interesting that they stationed a destroyer in the area) could confirm that all 50 boats rounded the big mark. Two boats were shown to make a beeline straight for the mark from 100 miles out when every other boat milled about looking for it. Come to find out that the mark had people stationed on it who radioed the mainland on a regular schedule. The two boats that made a beeline for it were French and had RDF. French manned the mark. French finished that race 1,2, their best series finish by allot. Local knowledge can be helpful.

 

The boat was owned for many years by one of my friends in the Houston area. I did several Harvest Moon Regatta on it.

I was told that the name was the nickname of one of the ancestors of the original owner: America Jane was a whore in San Francisco during the gold rush era. My friend got the mast painted red...

It might be urban legend, but I like it.

 

I believe the boat was sold to someone who intended to "sail south", never had the finances to maintain the boat and ended up somewhere in Cuba. The boat was apparently damaged during a hurricane season and is now abandoned/sunk somewhere in Cuba... Sad story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have my own Sayula II story.

I used to live in Mazatlan Mexico and had a IOR C&C38 named "Galapagos" that I used to club race. One day as I was solo sailing and leaving the marina's treacherous entrance channel, Sayula II was trying unsuccessfully to get a response from the Harbor Master at the marina. I responded, telling him that I had just left the marina and the office was closed, but if I could help in any way. He asked for water depth at the entrance channel for which I responded its depth. After a great day sailing, I was surprised to see Sayula II tied in the berth next to mine. A gentleman onboard recognized the name of my boat and thanked me for my assistance earlier that day; he invited me aboard for a rum. I accepted and that's where and how I met Ramon and was given a tour of Sayula II with a rum in hand.

I had no idea of her pedigree but was totally enthralled with the story; how he had bought her, how he put his crew together, the knockdown in the Southern Ocean and how after Swan refurbished her for free once he sailed her back to their shipyard, how he wanted the ceiling liner in the master stateroom to remain as-was to remind him of that knockdown. The liner was full of small holes made as the tool box opened and all the tools ended up on the ceiling. He also mentioned that the helm was bent by the body of the helmsman and was still hanging, as a "trophy" at the Swan headquarters.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

coming east?

Apparently it's going to the Newport RI festival I'm supposed to go in support, as well as in Seattle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saw the movie last Friday evening in Newport Beach. Very well done. I really liked how the story was presented by each crew member. A real inside and personal look into the incredible adventure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

coming east?

Apparently it's going to the Newport RI festival I'm supposed to go in support, as well as in Seattle.

 

when?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You would have to go to the site and find out. I don't remember exactly what Bernardo said. If you all like and will follow, I will contact the producers and try to get a proposed schedule. I know its playing in Europe quite a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking of Sails by Watts, here is a set of 1976 sails that came out of the bag for the first time last September. Sail bag was still tied shut.

 

 

20150926_190656361_iOS_zpsp6hr8nvu.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Future dates for the movie!! Here ya go.

 

30 april Newport RI
23 and 25 may..seattle

there will be more in the future and even more in 2017

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

If I had to choose between Sayula and a VOR boat to sail around the world it would be Sayula, no contest.

 

The VOR boats seem to have trouble keeping their rigs standing and their keels attached just sailing while Sayula got rolled 360 (twice IIRC), came up intact and raced on to the win. Obviously she would be last by a matter of weeks, if not months now but I'll bet the crew would be a whole lot happier, rested, comfortable and well fed. :D

She would have kicked Vestas Wind's ass......

 

Well anything that made it around the marble would............................

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Future dates for the movie!! Here ya go.

 

30 april Newport RI
23 and 25 may..seattle

there will be more in the future and even more in 2017

When's it coming to Britain-land?

 

Or some sort of digital release? I want to see it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did they do a port call in Brisbane on that one? I have a memory from my childhood of a sailor from a big round the world race visiting with us briefly then finding out later that he was lost at sea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did they do a port call in Brisbane on that one? I have a memory from my childhood of a sailor from a big round the world race visiting with us briefly then finding out later that he was lost at sea.

Leg Start Finish Leg winner Skipper 1 Portsmouth, England Cape Town, South Africa Sayula II Ramón Carlin 2 Cape Town, South Africa Sydney, Australia Pen Duick VI Éric Tabarly 3 Sydney, Australia Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Great Britain II Chay Blyth 4 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Portsmouth, England Sayula II Ramón Carlin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Future dates for the movie!! Here ya go.

 

30 april Newport RI
23 and 25 may..seattle

there will be more in the future and even more in 2017

When's it coming to Britain-land?

 

Or some sort of digital release? I want to see it!

 

I know it's playing in Europe, Norway for sure and other. Best to contact Bernardo via the website/facebook.for more. They're not flying me to Europe much as I would love.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And you do want to see it ! promise..Where are you in the UK? I lived in Lymington, and have spent a bunch of time at the Wolfson unit in Southampton.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know it's playing in Europe, Norway for sure and other. Best to contact Bernardo via the website/facebook.for more. They're not flying me to Europe much as I would love.

 

 

 

It looks like it was played once in a festival, in a really remote place - even for Norway. I hope they will let people watch it online, I'm sure there are hundreds and thousands of sailors who'd pay to watch it. I would.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And you do want to see it ! promise..Where are you in the UK? I lived in Lymington, and have spent a bunch of time at the Wolfson unit in Southampton.

 

Essex and London - could easily organise yott club showings - could borrow a cinema come to that. Will look at arsebook and so on for ?Bernardo?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Future dates for the movie!! Here ya go.

 

30 april Newport RI
23 and 25 may..seattle

there will be more in the future and even more in 2017

No Vancouver/Victoria venue Keith? Could put it together one of the clubs. If it was West Van the Victoria/Sidney guys could drive up to Nannymo and grab the ferry as walk-on's. Just a thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am heartbroken. he was 92 and lived a full life, touched many people. At our reunion in mex city, there was a party/fiesta at his house with 80 people. All 12 of the crew and the rest his family. I loved him and will dearly miss him as will the Carlin family

Keith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Didn't know the man but a lot of respect I see. Obviously had a full and rich life.

 

Sail on Ramon!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wonderful family. Many friends and acquaintances. A life well lived.

 

Save me a spot Ramon. I look forward to standing a watch together and getting to know you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I run my own campaigns, 3 transpacs so far, Mexican as Ramon, but none with the same success as his single most aggressive entry on this race. Great respect for this achievement. Descanza en paz.Ramon.

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok, figured out how to load a pic :-)

 

Dis is Sayula, in beautiful Scarlino

post-131-0-59526300-1492532995_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I know it's playing in Europe, Norway for sure and other. Best to contact Bernardo via the website/facebook.for more. They're not flying me to Europe much as I would love.

 

 

 

It looks like it was played once in a festival, in a really remote place - even for Norway. I hope they will let people watch it online, I'm sure there are hundreds and thousands of sailors who'd pay to watch it. I would.

 

the film is available on iTunes for $10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Found it on Amazon for rent for $4. That was a truly awesome movie. Should be required for any sailor.

 

I do have one question, and I don't mean to be an ass. Was there any grumbling about Sayula's rating?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Found it on Amazon for rent for $4. That was a truly awesome movie. Should be required for any sailor.

 

I do have one question, and I don't mean to be an ass. Was there any grumbling about Sayula's rating?

 

Tabarly was against the concept of handicap racing, so probably yes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Found it on Amazon for rent for $4. That was a truly awesome movie. Should be required for any sailor.

 

I do have one question, and I don't mean to be an ass. Was there any grumbling about Sayula's rating?

 

Tabarly was against the concept of handicap racing, so probably yes!

 

 

!!! As he was one of the best RORC (pic 1) and CCA (can't find pic of shortened + bowsprit P-D II) rule tweakers, I somehow doubt this, but .... what do I know

post-6361-0-51933700-1492939570_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Found it on Amazon for rent for $4. That was a truly awesome movie. Should be required for any sailor.

 

I do have one question, and I don't mean to be an ass. Was there any grumbling about Sayula's rating?

Olin Stephens was only doing doing what he did best back then designing to various offshore rating configurations as they evolved...everyone copied it and then some like Farr and Frer's started to fine tune it...And very successfully.

 

Tabarley was treated as a Frog moaner and groaner by the Brit based world back then and arguably he was justified by his complaint.. but he probably didn't appreciate at the time he was well and truly while a tweaker as Moody points out was before his time for promoting fast boats and fuck the rule shit....

 

...wind the clock forward ..hey presto the VG and the IMOCA class.

 

You just need to be patient in this business. My score to date is France 1 Brits 0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Found it on Amazon for rent for $4. That was a truly awesome movie. Should be required for any sailor.

 

I do have one question, and I don't mean to be an ass. Was there any grumbling about Sayula's rating?

Olin Stephens was only doing doing what he did best back then designing to various offshore rating configurations as they evolved...everyone copied it and then some like Farr and Frer's started to fine tune it...And very successfully.

 

Tabarley was treated as a Frog moaner and groaner by the Brit based world back then and arguably he was justified by his complaint.. but he probably didn't appreciate at the time he was well and truly while a tweaker as Moody points out was before his time for promoting fast boats and fuck the rule shit....

 

...wind the clock forward ..hey presto the VG and the IMOCA class.

 

You just need to be patient in this business. My score to date is France 1 Brits 0

 

As it should be!! Frogs are the kings of the oceans, and have been for some time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Billy ..maybe Kings on land too if you forget about their white flag factories...it just gets better. Then again I just love the French.

 

France may go to bed on 7th May with this very young guy as their President ...unremarkable one would think except for his 63yo hot for her age wife....who also used to be his teacher. They are a fuckin weird mob.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take it to the "Hot for Teacher" thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amazon Prime is showing it for free.  I'm way late to this party, but what an incredible story!  I'm turning all my sailing friends on to it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Grinder said:

Amazon Prime is showing it for free.  I'm way late to this party, but what an incredible story!  I'm turning all my sailing friends on to it.

 

 

Thanks Grinder, must check that out!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Watched it and it's the best  offshore sailing movie I've ever seen.  Astounding given the  primitive  film  cameras,  no communications 'cept shortwave, celestial for navigation.  The modern interviews of the crew added a special twist to what  ocean crossing racing has become.

Best of all is my boat was built in 1973 too so because I maintain my gear in the as built state and saw lots of setups  I still use on my boat.  Of course I use modern synthetic sails & cordage now, but not ridiculously strong & light carbon fiber hull ULDB scantlings,  shrinking, deeper and swinging appendages, planing hulls  & 24hr online website availability.

Somehow, it reaffirmed by belief that my boat is more seaworthy than the offshore monstrosities presently on the 'Round the World"  circuit.  I'm slow, but it's unlikely something will break.  Loved Poncho's point that the shortest route is not necessarily the fastest.  That's how they won back then,  what were flyers then is now carefully analysed.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. How surprised am I to find "dis is sayula" is still up and seen.

I am still in contact with the crew, which is nice. Amazon prime has the movie. Now off to make a sail and sail our Hobie. It's a nice day here in Coronado. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was trying to get it on Amazon through my Comcast, but didn't work.  I guess I will remember how to work the Firestick that I never use.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

I was trying to get it on Amazon through my Comcast, but didn't work.  I guess I will remember how to work the Firestick that I never use.....

Amazon Prime doesn't support streaming to the Chromecast due to proprietary Big Tech Company pissing wars.  I believe same with AppleTV.  Firestick will definitely work since it's Amazon, any game console will have an Amazon Prime app, as well as a lot of newer smartTVs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, some dude said:

also $4 on Google Play.  just watched it on a tablet. very very cool movie and great story

watching on prime now , so far so good ! say you in the intro poncho , but they called you pancho !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Viewed it with the wife tonight on Stars Encore via Comcast for free.

Great story!  And the vintage FWG - not at all like the color-coordinated, team kit of today.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just watched - really fun presentation of a fantastic and moving story. Viva Mexico!  (Married to a Tapatia)

I think sailing and certainly racing might have been more fun back then.  I certainly remember thinking that when reading Moitessier's book and then Pete Goss’ - the boats are getting faster and more miserable.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Morgan Crewed said:

Viewed it with the wife tonight on Stars Encore via Comcast for free.

Great story!  And the vintage FWG - not at all like the color-coordinated, team kit of today.   

 

I found it on Comcast Stars Encore, but I can only watch the Spanish language version, the English version, I cannot "watch", but only add to favorites?

Never mind, the Spanish version has English subtitles, so watching it now!!  And Spanish subtitles for the English speakers.  Amazing all these young men to signed up for this not knowing a single other person on the boat!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rainy day here so I watched it as well. Enjoyed the experience. Would like to spend time with some of the crew and learn more about how they strategized and made their choices of how to sail around the world. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, socalrider said:

Just watched - really fun presentation of a fantastic and moving story. Viva Mexico!  (Married to a Tapatia)

I think sailing and certainly racing might have been more fun back then.  I certainly remember thinking that when reading Moitessier's book and then Pete Goss’ - the boats are getting faster and more miserable.

 

 

I would much prefer to go around the world on that Swan 65, than a Volvo boat!!!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

I would much prefer to go around the world on that Swan 65, than a Volvo boat!!!

not really a question tis it , far too much discomfort for the chance of a 24hr sleigh ride ......................................

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the Amazon tip. Watched it last night. Great story. Much more of an adventure back then. Loved that Ramon's wife signed up, left after the first leg, and convinced Ramon not to give up after the second leg.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Powerful and wonderful story!  Can't to watch again at home on large flat screen, instead of Dell Desktop monitor!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

I found it on Comcast Stars Encore, but I can only watch the Spanish language version, the English version, I cannot "watch", but only add to favorites?

Never mind, the Spanish version has English subtitles, so watching it now!!  And Spanish subtitles for the English speakers.  Amazing all these young men to signed up for this not knowing a single other person on the boat!

 

Yeah, in my area Comcast offered it in two versions - the English was free and the Spanish version was with a subscription.  I went for the free, English version.

YMMV.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, socalrider said:

Just watched - really fun presentation of a fantastic and moving story. Viva Mexico!  (Married to a Tapatia)

I think sailing and certainly racing might have been more fun back then.  I certainly remember thinking that when reading Moitessier's book and then Pete Goss’ - the boats are getting faster and more miserable.

 

I am not sure that a 360 rollover is really fun! Modern boats might break masts but they don't seem to seem to capsize easily.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So glad I brought this thread back!  I love the story and am getting my sailing friends to watch it, too.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Panoramix said:

I am not sure that a 360 rollover is really fun! Modern boats might break masts but they don't seem to seem to capsize easily.

It wasn't a 360, just 170! Still enough to scare the bejeesus out of us. We ran on adrenaline till we decided we weren't sinking. You can find it on srarz. If ya'all want more fun stories, contact me, I'm happy to share stories. 

In the movie, I'm the long hair at the beginning, I set up the stews in Rio, am shown holding the trophy at the end. It was a great race!  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, and you can get my book "back when sailing was fun" on Amazon!!

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, poncho said:

It wasn't a 360, just 170! Still enough to scare the bejeesus out of us. We ran on adrenaline till we decided we weren't sinking. You can find it on srarz. If ya'all want more fun stories, contact me, I'm happy to share stories. 

In the movie, I'm the long hair at the beginning, I set up the stews in Rio, am shown holding the trophy at the end. It was a great race!  

 

Well done, Sir!!  The Consumate Wingman Extraoedinaire!!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got a chance to watch this on Amazon today. Fantastic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am so glad you all like it!!

I filled the second half for the BBC and itv. Most all the stills are mine as well.   Enjoy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched it the other day and think it's absolutely fantastic.  Will be sharing it with anyone/everyone I can.  Amazing.  Thank you!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally watched it and, wow, glad I did! What an amazing story and great footage! Yes, they were not as experienced as other teams, but it shows how enthusiasm, a willingness to listen and learn, and most of all good leadership that make all of that happen are not to be underestimated. 

Poncho, many thanks for sharing your stories and memories. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, AnotherSailor said:

Finally watched it and, wow, glad I did! What an amazing story and great footage! Yes, they were not as experienced as other teams, but it shows how enthusiasm, a willingness to listen and learn, and most of all good leadership that make all of that happen are not to be underestimated. 

Poncho, many thanks for sharing your stories and memories. 

Watched for the 60th ? Time yesterday.every time i do I catch more hidden stuff. Most obvious one I point out at showings is the still shot facing aft surfing down a 20 foot wave with another 20 foot wall backing it up. Happens about 5 min after the knockdown piece. Another small thing is the foot of the Genoa being tied up to lower snap so I didn't have to continually patch pulpit wear. We did a fair bit of wing and wing in 40 k and over. (we saw 80 k twice). I have taken to pausing in showings to let pieces sink in. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, poncho said:

Watched for the 60th ? Time yesterday.every time i do I catch more hidden stuff. Most obvious one I point out at showings is the still shot facing aft surfing down a 20 foot wave with another 20 foot wall backing it up. Happens about 5 min after the knockdown piece. Another small thing is the foot of the Genoa being tied up to lower snap so I didn't have to continually patch pulpit wear. We did a fair bit of wing and wing in 40 k and over. (we saw 80 k twice). I have taken to pausing in showings to let pieces sink in. 

No shit! 80 knots! I would not want to encounter that ever, let alone on a sailboat in one of the most remote places on the planet. 

I did actually replay a few scenes. Yes, I am sure there are a ton of hidden gems, many of which only you are another crew member might be able to see. 

Regarding some of the discussions about sailing around the world in a Volvo 65 vs (let's say) a Swan 65, I assume any boat can be knocked down. A faster boat spends less time on the course, experiences a lower apparent wind, and a planing boat might be able to escape a monster wave. Nevertheless,  a few have experienced knockdowns (although not 170degree ones, I think) and a Volvo 65 is also extremely exhausting and very uncomfortable in pretty much any condition. For me (this entirely hypothetical question) would be a lot about the crew and the skipper. In the current edition I would prefer to sail with let's say Brunel as opposed to Dongfeng. I could not deal with the high levels of stress that I see on Dongfeng. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We yeah, the faster u go, the fewer chances of this happening. The Volvo boats usually go faster than a Pacific swell (20 or so), but down there the swells are faster, however the new boats seem to be up to it. 

We measured 80 k by the B&G pegged at 20 k BS and wind speed pegged at 60 k ws. Try 20 k on an S&S IOR gravedigger!  So we really don't know how far over 80 it was. I will just say it was fuckin windy 

The 69 fastnet was child's play even 5 years removed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So

12 hours ago, poncho said:

We yeah, the faster u go, the fewer chances of this happening. The Volvo boats usually go faster than a Pacific swell (20 or so), but down there the swells are faster, however the new boats seem to be up to it. 

We measured 80 k by the B&G pegged at 20 k BS and wind speed pegged at 60 k ws. Try 20 k on an S&S IOR gravedigger!  So we really don't know how far over 80 it was. I will just say it was fuckin windy 

The 69 fastnet was child's play even 5 years removed.

12 hours ago, poncho said:

We yeah, the faster u go, the fewer chances of this happening. The Volvo boats usually go faster than a Pacific swell (20 or so), but down there the swells are faster, however the new boats seem to be up to it. 

We measured 80 k by the B&G pegged at 20 k BS and wind speed pegged at 60 k ws. Try 20 k on an S&S IOR gravedigger!  So we really don't know how far over 80 it was. I will just say it was fuckin windy 

The 69 fastnet was child's play even 5 years removed. 

Sorry. 79 fastnet. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/22/2016 at 5:16 AM, Laser1 said:

"Dis is Charisma" - Swan Europeans Cowes 1983 - I believe one of the last brand new ketch 65's before the 651 kicked in and my very first paid job on a boat - Won prix d'elegance (not much else I believe) with a bunch of Ozzie crew - German owned. Complete lost track of her but then this was 33 years ago

 

Charisma%203_zpschbqoioj.jpg

 

Charisma%201_zpsgmw9wuvg.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oh Jesus.....  I can't believe I missed this thread.  I loved Swan 65s, did a couple of Atlantics on them in the 70s.

Ramon was a wonderful gent, and well deserved the win.

Re Charisma, yes it was Cowes 1983, and there's yours truly in beard and shades standing under the mizzen boom.  I was brought on as local knowledge.  Great crew.

Thanks for the pix, mate.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Presuming Ed said:

1983. When men were men and shorts were short.

The racer-chasers loved that look. They could get a full preview before buying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Borax Johnson said:

Going to PV in a few days. I am told that Sayula is on the same dock as my boat. I also have been told that she is in very good shape. Film at 11?

It should be back by then. While it was here, it got an electric rf, windlass, sails, and engine and generator rebuild. I sailed on it back to PV, and stayed on it for a week last year. It's in excellent shape.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/6/2018 at 8:47 PM, poncho said:

We yeah, the faster u go, the fewer chances of this happening. The Volvo boats usually go faster than a Pacific swell (20 or so), but down there the swells are faster, however the new boats seem to be up to it. 

We measured 80 k by the B&G pegged at 20 k BS and wind speed pegged at 60 k ws. Try 20 k on an S&S IOR gravedigger!  So we really don't know how far over 80 it was. I will just say it was fuckin windy 

The 69 fastnet was child's play even 5 years removed. 

 

I was on a Gulfstar 50 that was knocked down like that in December '89.  The cups blew off the anemometer at 80 kts.  We were bare poles, trying to take the waves on the stern, but the windage on the bare mizzen mast turned us sideways to the waves at times.  We had all kinds of line and things trailing off the stern, trying to work like a drogue sea anchor, to keep perpendicular to the waves.  The waves were about 40 feet with 10 feet of breaking water atop many.  After we realized that we couldn't steer, we took the raft below, and let it ride out.  I was in a Main Salon bunk in the first knock down, and we were so far over that jars of jam and relish and stuff from Galley cupboards crashed onto the overhead, and the broken bits fell down onto my sleeping bag when we righted.  One of the guys was still on deck when that happened, and he said the spreaders never hit the water, because we were atop such a big wave, when we went over.  The next breaking wave flattened the SS Stern pulpit down to the deck on the port rear quarter from the water pressure against the horseshoe buoy there.  Water also smashed out the Aft Cabin portlights, and continued on to splinter two teak cabin and head doors.  We limped to the Azores and left "Now or Never" there, with a bent rudder, cracked hull to bulkhead joints, among others...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/26/2018 at 9:54 AM, billy backstay said:

 

I was on a Gulfstar 50 that was knocked down like that in December '89.  The cups blew off the anemometer at 80 kts.  We were bare poles, trying to take the waves on the stern, but the windage on the bare mizzen mast turned us sideways to the waves at times.  We had all kinds of line and things trailing off the stern, trying to work like a drogue sea anchor, to keep perpendicular to the waves.  The waves were about 40 feet with 10 feet of breaking water atop many.  After we realized that we couldn't steer, we took the raft below, and let it ride out.  I was in a Main Salon bunk in the first knock down, and we were so far over that jars of jam and relish and stuff from Galley cupboards crashed onto the overhead, and the broken bits fell down onto my sleeping bag when we righted.  One of the guys was still on deck when that happened, and he said the spreaders never hit the water, because we were atop such a big wave, when we went over.  The next breaking wave flattened the SS Stern pulpit down to the deck on the port rear quarter from the water pressure against the horseshoe buoy there.  Water also smashed out the Aft Cabin portlights, and continued on to splinter two teak cabin and head doors.  We limped to the Azores and left "Now or Never" there, with a bent rudder, cracked hull to bulkhead joints, among others...

In our adventure, we had been in 65k and more for 3 days. We kept the storm jib and staysail up to help keep the bow down. Main secure on boom. Two crew on Deck with the other on watch crew below. Why have them on Deck to take more punishment than necessary?

Now, a swan 65 isn't the great sled, and the fast Indian ocean waves pounded us pretty hard. (I've heard reviews from subsequent races putting the 73 race as one of the toughest). The inevitable wave that got us was quite large. The driver had only a split second to see it as it rolled us over. He suggested it was near the top spreader before it all went dark. We we're hit with the breaking 40 whitecap and rolled nearly upside down, judging by the knife stuck in the ceiling. The mast hit the water hard, bending the almost masthead steaming lights and breaking the leeward, lower, mizzen shroud. When the boat became vertical again, we looked around in awe. No one more so than the driver. He was still near the wheel. But his harness went around the backstay! He had been off the boat. He was naturally shaken, so we sent him below to come to grips with this. We lived obviously, but with the swan 65 1/3 full of water, the radios we're toast, and we're reported lost in the news. When we arrived unannounced in Sydney, battered and bruised as sleddog describes, our families breathed a big sigh. First of two times I was reported lost at sea in West coast news. My mother asked me to stop!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Somebody Else said:

Just watched the movie for the first time. Fantastic!

 

Pretty cool isn't it. Bernardo captured the human side beautifully. 

One thing I haven't mentioned is that when you go upside down, anything on Deck goes Newton and then Neptune. Winch handles fall out of pockets. Sails fall off as well as spare sheets. We bought a bunch of handles, a new Spinnaker, and a few sheets. It was expensive monitally on top of emotionally. 

You're NW, I was too for 23 years. I owned a sail loft in Seattle. Might we know each other?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was in the arina in Puerto Vallarta where she is moored. In face about 3 slips away. I was pretty excited to get some pics and post them here, but she was in the yard for a pretty big refit. One of the guys working on the boat I was on was going to paint her hull and topsides about the time we were leaving. From what he told me, the family keeps her in immaculate condition and this was a 6+ weeks trip to the salon with all of the systems receiving attention.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just got to watch for the first time on Am Prime. What a great story!!!!! Loved some of the quotes too: "Always eat well, always drink well, a good wine." An amazing effort by that crew.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Missed this thread first and second time around.  Thanks for reviving it and clueing me in.  Watched it tonight on Amazon Prime.  Very inspirational.  Ramon must have been a joy to be around and quite a mentor I'm sure.  His wife seems pretty solid too.  I hope the crew know how well received this movie has been.  My wife said she'd watch it again so its that good.  Sent email to son and his Brazilian wife to watch it just now.  It would be fun to see it with Poncho pausing and adding his commentary.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I missed it as well but glad I could finally watch it. I loved when he wanted to quit (make up a some business excuse or something) and his wife said if you do I will divorce you....that is solid.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, I'm surprised this is still going!  I've been showing to friends lately

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Poncho, Its a cool tale about the unknown guys prevailing.  Timeless theme.  The story is worth remembering for what was/is possible.  If you show it up in Seattle let us know.  Your name is familiar.  I was once on the far periphery of the CYC dingy scene.  You wouldn't know me but we probably have mutual acquaintances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I did spend some time at CYC. Was married there! Lived on my houseboat on Fairview for 20 years. Loved it in Seattle.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Small world.  Lived at 2731 Fairview, 1972-81. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We lived at 2019-B from 77 to 95. My sail loft was in Mariners sq, a short summer Laser sail to work. On the rare 90 degree days, we hung a sign on the door saying "gone swimming" over the lunch time. Customers knew this and never came around on hot hot days.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Know it well, nice commute & neighborhood, but getting yuppified or is it millenialized.   Plenty of warm days where you are now for a swim.  Nuff of this small talk no one wants to hear.   But if you do show that flick up here sometime give us anarchists a shout.   Fair winds.  Over and out. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great story... fun to watch the old school tech. No carbon, no high modulus lines, no goretex gear... just a bunch of guys willing to pull together for a skipper who wanted to win more for his country than himself.

Nice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now