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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
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Production MORC boats

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I enjoy learning about boat designs and am always looking to what the next boat might be, and I've found that there are many ways that my personal tastes are similar to my understanding of the kind of boats produced to the MORC rule (compact boats w/ relatively long waterlines, comfortable but simple interiors, etc.). Since I wasn't yet alive during the heyday of the rule, I don't really know what boats were being built to compete in it. Custom designs and one-offs can be fascinating, but I'm primarily interested in boats that were production built, but influenced by the rule.

 

Thanks!

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G&S 27 was a particularly good one. S2 7.9, Rodgers 26, Schock 30/30, Soveral 26 and 30, Lindenburg 26, Merit 25 and 28, Kelly 24. Production boats designed to the earlier version of the MORC rule: Ranger 26, Morgan 24 and 27, Gulfstream 25 (which became the Annapolis 26 with a different cabin), Chris-Craft 26, all the smaller Cal boats.

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MORC never made inroads here which I thought was too bad - they seemed much better boats than the small IOR boats that abounded here.

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G&S 27 was a particularly good one. S2 7.9, Rodgers 26, Schock 30/30, Soveral 26 and 30, Lindenburg 26, Merit 25 and 28, Kelly 24. Production boats designed to the earlier version of the MORC rule: Ranger 26, Morgan 24 and 27, Gulfstream 25 (which became the Annapolis 26 with a different cabin), Chris-Craft 26, all the smaller Cal boats.

good rundown, I rode on 6 of those.

N/M, Capo and Andrews to add in there too

go the Harv

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Several Alan Andrews designs: Andrew 26 & 30, being the most common. Star 30, Mariah 30.

Bruce Kirby: North Castle 30 and I suppose you could add Kirby 30 and Mirage 30SX.

Doug Peterson: Pinnacle 29 and Adhara 30

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MORC never made inroads here which I thought was too bad - they seemed much better boats than the small IOR boats that abounded here.

 

RVic had a brief experimentation with MORC in the mid 80's or so. Spearheaded I think by the guys behind X-S (HF30) and Horizon (HF27) who both attended the West Coast MORC Championship.

 

Agree the MORC boats were way better than IOR, but it's a pretty small pond around here and there probably wasn't simultaneous room for IOR, PHRF, and MORC.

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Thanks guys, that's a lot of good information to keep me busy for a while

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C&C 29 mk 2 design influenced by MORC rule.

 

Pearson Flyer and J-30 while not designed specifically to the rule, rated ok under it as well...

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Santana 23-D

 

http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=456

 

Unbelievable light air weapon, the only thing we couldn't leave in the dust is a Soverel 33. Downwind with a long straightaway, a San Juan 30 can hang in there but as soon as any maneuvering is done, they are much heavier and cannot accelerate again.

 

Unfortunately, these photos don't seem to cross over into SA but here is my flickr album. In it you will see us rolling a J92 and rounding a leeward mark way ahead of a Bene36.7

https://www.flickr.com/photos/43110001@N08/albums/72157643036677233

 

That was a really fun boat but unfortunately WD Schock construction practices make them time bombs. If you want a promising retro-cool weekender/PHRF warrior that can be trailered relatively easily, very difficult IMHO to do better. The hull shape is classic MORC, rounded sections for low wetted surface, somewhat like an IOR boat without the bumps. At the time I was lusting after a Quarter Tonner and this boat satisfied quite nicely

:D

 

FB- Doug

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Al of the above plus Ranger 23, 26 and 29. Cal 27 and 29. San Juan 24. Irwin Competition 30, Pearson 28. My personal favorite was the Morgan 27.

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Al of the above plus Ranger 23, 26 and 29. Cal 27 and 29. San Juan 24. Irwin Competition 30, Pearson 28. My personal favorite was the Morgan 27.

SJ 24 was an IOR 1/4-tonner. The quarter and half tons did do ok in MORC, but they really weren't MORC designs.

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MORC penalized light displacement fairly severely and as a result, most of the designs didn't surf readily.

 

Santana 30/30 is a fine light-air boat but becomes sort of a pig above 14 knots TWS.

I like the Capo 30/Olson 911S a lot. Nice sailing boats and fine little pocket cruisers.

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Can someone explain MORC and.other measurement rules for those of us who have only races PHRF?

 

I thought MORC was a short lived system but it seems like it lasted a long time. What was good and bad about it?

 

I assume the MORC Pearson 28 was the 70s model, not the 80s flavor?

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Thanks. That gives a lot on the history, I guess I was looking for the math behind it. Or even what does a MORC rating certificate look like and how could I find common handicaps for various designs?

 

I just like learning about this stuff, it isn't important.

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Thanks. That gives a lot on the history, I guess I was looking for the math behind it. Or even what does a MORC rating certificate look like and how could I find common handicaps for various designs?

 

I just like learning about this stuff, it isn't important.

 

This may help with the math part...

 

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?app=core&module=attach&section=attach&attach_id=153745

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Can someone explain MORC and.other measurement rules for those of us who have only races PHRF?

 

I thought MORC was a short lived system but it seems like it lasted a long time. What was good and bad about it?

 

I assume the MORC Pearson 28 was the 70s model, not the 80s flavor?

It was originally formed in the 50s, the measurement formula virtually identical to the CCA rule, with a different multiplier in front. In the mid 70s, the measurement formula was changed to be based on a 'length' that was measured 4% of the waterline length above the waterline.

In general, MORC boats were pretty wholesome. Good stability, good speed for their size, decent volume for accomodations, and very suitable for production building and inexpensive for home or custom building.

I was a MORC measurer for a time in the later 80s and had a copy of the national data base for every single boat measured for MORC. At the end of the data base was the average dimensions....they were virtually identical to those of a Ranger 26.

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The Capo 26 and 30 were great boats

MHOB J29 was a very good MORC boat too

Did time on all of them

 

Did a MORC intergalactics on a masthead J24 one time. The distance race was painful. Does that count?

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Originally the 'OR' in MORC actually meant ocean racing. The first International Regatta was held in Miami, and the long distance race was a W-L across the Gulfstream to the Bahamas and back...25-30 knots...120 miles or so. Yes, crews even did it on 20 & 22 footers.

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Santana 23-D

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/43110001@N08/albums/72157643036677233

 

That looks like an early one! Was the daggerboard centered in the deck recess or in the revised (aft) location?

 

 

 

 

It was supposed to be a 1981 number #140 and the DB trunk was centered in the keel recess just aft of the mast step bump.

 

 

 

Can someone explain MORC and.other measurement rules for those of us who have only races PHRF?

 

I thought MORC was a short lived system but it seems like it lasted a long time. What was good and bad about it?

 

I assume the MORC Pearson 28 was the 70s model, not the 80s flavor?

It was originally formed in the 50s, the measurement formula virtually identical to the CCA rule, with a different multiplier in front. In the mid 70s, the measurement formula was changed to be based on a 'length' that was measured 4% of the waterline length above the waterline.

In general, MORC boats were pretty wholesome. Good stability, good speed for their size, decent volume for accomodations, and very suitable for production building and inexpensive for home or custom building.

I was a MORC measurer for a time in the later 80s and had a copy of the national data base for every single boat measured for MORC. At the end of the data base was the average dimensions....they were virtually identical to those of a Ranger 26.

 

 

Ah so, that bit about the 4% explains why MORC boats started trending toward plumb ends so much sooner than other design types did. Still, they were generally wholesome boats (the boat-next-door?) and it's a shame racing died out.

 

FB- Doug

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Don't forget the S2 9.1 and the venerable Pearson 30. 9.1s were brilliant as MORC Boats. The real problems with MORC started in the early to mid 80s when one off custom boats started coming on the scene. The ensuing arms race killed the class by mid to late 90s. A lot MORC designs live on today because they were decent sailing boats with livable interiors.

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Don't forget the S2 9.1 and the venerable Pearson 30. 9.1s were brilliant as MORC Boats. The real problems with MORC started in the early to mid 80s when one off custom boats started coming on the scene. The ensuing arms race killed the class by mid to late 90s. A lot MORC designs live on today because they were decent sailing boats with livable interiors.

They are good sailing boats. I miss that racing.

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Weren't they designed to race in a "Midget Ocean" ?

Funny story on that. Tampa Bay used to have a PHRF Championship similar to a mini Admirals Cup. Each YC sent a team of 3 spinnaker class and 3 non-spinnaker class boats to compete. Several of us who weren't selected for our YCs due to typical YC politics decided to enter a rogue team under the MORC Station 10 banner. It was a light air series, and our team was all light air speedsters. Our team mostly made the time limits, and the other teams mostly didn't. It was an absolute epic slaughter...we won by over 100 points. Young gal covering the event for the local newspaper asked us what MORC stood for...we told her the Midget Ocean Racing Club was for sailors under 5'6"". Monday's headlines: "Midget Sailors Win PHRF Championship". That was 27 years ago...I think the blue blazer crowd is still butt hurt...

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MORC penalized light displacement fairly severely and as a result, most of the designs didn't surf readily.

 

Santana 30/30 is a fine light-air boat but becomes sort of a pig above 14 knots TWS.

I like the Capo 30/Olson 911S a lot. Nice sailing boats and fine little pocket cruisers.

 

Ya gotta believe... :)

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MORC penalized light displacement fairly severely and as a result, most of the designs didn't surf readily.

 

Santana 30/30 is a fine light-air boat but becomes sort of a pig above 14 knots TWS.

I like the Capo 30/Olson 911S a lot. Nice sailing boats and fine little pocket cruisers.

Ya gotta believe... :)

Not sure where Somebody Else gets that idea. J-24, J-27, and Wavelength 24 all good MORC boats that not only surf, but plane. There are others too.

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Some MORC designs surfed OK.

 

The Santana 30/30 and Capo 30, not so much.

At least not while I was on them.

The last MORC boat I sailed on was a custom 27, designed in '70, and home-built over an 18 year period. I did a good deal of the building around 77, and then did some rebuilding and refitting in '96. It would clock an average 10+ downwind in a breeze. 22' waterline, 5000lbs, 7.25' beam. Went upwind like a rocket too. Just a bit sticky in light air, but one of the sweetest sailing boats I ever sailed. It would probably kick ass over in England under IRC. Boat went up to NJ in the late 90s and disappeared.

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Love, love, love my Lindenberg 26. I don't bother with local club racing anymore, mostly due to bullshit club politics and involvement with my kids extracurricular activities, but we race the shit out of it in several overnight distance races each year. I still need to tick off the O in MORC one of these days. I'm told my boat once won the DelMarVa race, but haven't been able to find evidence to prove it. I'd have no issues taking that 37 year old boat out in the ocean.

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MORC penalized light displacement fairly severely and as a result, most of the designs didn't surf readily.

 

Santana 30/30 is a fine light-air boat but becomes sort of a pig above 14 knots TWS.

I like the Capo 30/Olson 911S a lot. Nice sailing boats and fine little pocket cruisers.

Ya gotta believe... :)

Not sure where Somebody Else gets that idea. J-24, J-27, and Wavelength 24 all good MORC boats that not only surf, but plane. There are others too.

 

I think the thought is the more purpose built & rule optimized boats didn't surf. For sure the 7-8Klb 30 footers didn't, in the small range boats like the (very heavily optimized for the time) Evelyn 25.5 did not.

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MORC penalized light displacement fairly severely and as a result, most of the designs didn't surf readily.

 

Santana 30/30 is a fine light-air boat but becomes sort of a pig above 14 knots TWS.

I like the Capo 30/Olson 911S a lot. Nice sailing boats and fine little pocket cruisers.

Ya gotta believe... :)

Not sure where Somebody Else gets that idea. J-24, J-27, and Wavelength 24 all good MORC boats that not only surf, but plane. There are others too.

I think the thought is the more purpose built & rule optimized boats didn't surf. For sure the 7-8Klb 30 footers didn't, in the small range boats like the (very heavily optimized for the time) Evelyn 25.5 did not.

You guys gotta better define surf for me. Almost any boat, given enough wind and sea can surf. But I call surfing accelerating down a wave front in excess of hull speed...so doing 10 or 11 kts down a wave front in 20 kts of breeze is something I've done in both my Santana 30/30 and S2 9.1. Back when I owned them. But maybe we are talking different surfing....

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Donovan 30. 3300 pounds. 20 knots and 240 miles/day. Built in the 80's. Pretty amazing.

 

31655191079386543819.jpg

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Donovan 30. 3300 pounds. 20 knots and 240 miles/day. Built in the 80's. Pretty amazing.

 

31655191079386543819.jpg

 

There were many "rules be damned, I'll be 1st to finish" designs that were 29.99 feet long and claim to be designed to the MORC rule, but in fact paid no attention to it. This is an example of one of those. I would say this is not a MORC typeform.

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Can someone explain MORC and.other measurement rules for those of us who have only races PHRF?

 

I thought MORC was a short lived system but it seems like it lasted a long time. What was good and bad about it?

 

I assume the MORC Pearson 28 was the 70s model, not the 80s flavor?

It was originally formed in the 50s, the measurement formula virtually identical to the CCA rule, with a different multiplier in front. In the mid 70s, the measurement formula was changed to be based on a 'length' that was measured 4% of the waterline length above the waterline.

In general, MORC boats were pretty wholesome. Good stability, good speed for their size, decent volume for accomodations, and very suitable for production building and inexpensive for home or custom building.

I was a MORC measurer for a time in the later 80s and had a copy of the national data base for every single boat measured for MORC. At the end of the data base was the average dimensions....they were virtually identical to those of a Ranger 26.

 

Ah so, that bit about the 4% explains why MORC boats started trending toward plumb ends so much sooner than other design types did. Still, they were generally wholesome boats (the boat-next-door?) and it's a shame racing died out.

 

FB- Doug

 

 

Yes, that nails it.

 

Love, love, love my Lindenberg 26. I don't bother with local club racing anymore, mostly due to bullshit club politics and involvement with my kids extracurricular activities, but we race the shit out of it in several overnight distance races each year. I still need to tick off the O in MORC one of these days. I'm told my boat once won the DelMarVa race, but haven't been able to find evidence to prove it. I'd have no issues taking that 37 year old boat out in the ocean.

 

My favorite!!

 

Originally the 'OR' in MORC actually meant ocean racing. The first International Regatta was held in Miami, and the long distance race was a W-L across the Gulfstream to the Bahamas and back...25-30 knots...120 miles or so. Yes, crews even did it on 20 & 22 footers.

 

The National regatta always required a distance race to meet the offshore intent of the 'O' in MORC. We sailed a 60+ mile course in Lake St. Clair. It had to have 5 legs.

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Don't forget the S2 9.1 and the venerable Pearson 30. 9.1s were brilliant as MORC Boats. The real problems with MORC started in the early to mid 80s when one off custom boats started coming on the scene. The ensuing arms race killed the class by mid to late 90s. A lot MORC designs live on today because they were decent sailing boats with livable interiors.

They are good sailing boats. I miss that racing.

 

i love my 9.1 wish there was still MORC racing

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Can someone explain MORC and.other measurement rules for those of us who have only races PHRF?

 

I thought MORC was a short lived system but it seems like it lasted a long time. What was good and bad about it?

 

I assume the MORC Pearson 28 was the 70s model, not the 80s flavor?

It was originally formed in the 50s, the measurement formula virtually identical to the CCA rule, with a different multiplier in front. In the mid 70s, the measurement formula was changed to be based on a 'length' that was measured 4% of the waterline length above the waterline.

In general, MORC boats were pretty wholesome. Good stability, good speed for their size, decent volume for accomodations, and very suitable for production building and inexpensive for home or custom building.

I was a MORC measurer for a time in the later 80s and had a copy of the national data base for every single boat measured for MORC. At the end of the data base was the average dimensions....they were virtually identical to those of a Ranger 26.

 

Ah so, that bit about the 4% explains why MORC boats started trending toward plumb ends so much sooner than other design types did. Still, they were generally wholesome boats (the boat-next-door?) and it's a shame racing died out.

 

FB- Doug

 

Yes, that nails it.

 

 

Love, love, love my Lindenberg 26. I don't bother with local club racing anymore, mostly due to bullshit club politics and involvement with my kids extracurricular activities, but we race the shit out of it in several overnight distance races each year. I still need to tick off the O in MORC one of these days. I'm told my boat once won the DelMarVa race, but haven't been able to find evidence to prove it. I'd have no issues taking that 37 year old boat out in the ocean.

 

My favorite!!

 

 

Originally the 'OR' in MORC actually meant ocean racing. The first International Regatta was held in Miami, and the long distance race was a W-L across the Gulfstream to the Bahamas and back...25-30 knots...120 miles or so. Yes, crews even did it on 20 & 22 footers.

 

The National regatta always required a distance race to meet the offshore intent of the 'O' in MORC. We sailed a 60+ mile course in Lake St. Clair. It had to have 5 legs.

they later left it to the descretion of the host club. In 1996 in Tampa there was no med or long distance races, just paper clips.

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I was alway liked the Wavelength 24. Not so production, the Capo 26. Oh and then the Capo 30 is pure brilliance.

Love that boat in the Olson 911s version. All though the best two MORC boats I ever sailed were the N/M 26 "Easy Go" and the N/M 30 "Invincible". However the Andrews 26 may have been the best light air boat ever.

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I was alway liked the Wavelength 24. Not so production, the Capo 26. Oh and then the Capo 30 is pure brilliance.

Love that boat in the Olson 911s version. All though the best two MORC boats I ever sailed were the N/M 26 "Easy Go" and the N/M 30 "Invincible". However the Andrews 26 may have been the best light air boat ever.

Both great boats and I've always thought an old MORC maxi makes the best So Cal PHRF boat, but of course a production boat will have a less changeable rating

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I was alway liked the Wavelength 24. Not so production, the Capo 26. Oh and then the Capo 30 is pure brilliance.

Love that boat in the Olson 911s version. All though the best two MORC boats I ever sailed were the N/M 26 "Easy Go" and the N/M 30 "Invincible". However the Andrews 26 may have been the best light air boat ever.

 

 

Perfect Timing, Andrews 26 (#1, i believe) ir sitting at Santa Monica Windjammers Yacht Club in MDR. Needs s bit of work!

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Are we counting 1/4 Tonners later slightly changed to be MORC cruiser/racers?

The Northstar 500 that later morphed into the Northstar/Hughes 26 was pretty fair sailing MORC boat.

 

As fugly as a pregnant beluga, but it could score pretty decent.

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Are we counting 1/4 Tonners later slightly changed to be MORC cruiser/racers?

The Northstar 500 that later morphed into the Northstar/Hughes 26 was pretty fair sailing MORC boat.

 

As fugly as a pregnant beluga, but it could score pretty decent.

sailBlueH2O here on SA built himself a daggerboard Kiwi 1/4 ton that he did very well in MORC with. There was also a custom Craig Walters 1/4 ton that did well in the Tampa Bay MORC fleet, and an OH Rodgers daggerboard miniton that raced MORC very successfully for years. The MORC rule worked pretty well handicapping boats.

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Axolotl,

So what's the difference then between surfing and planning? I have always heard what you call surging as surfing...dating back to the late 70s/early 80s...and I would call what you calling surfing, planning...

 

That "surfing" on a boat, is like surfing on a surfboard. You accelerate down the wavefront, exceed hull speed of a relatively short period of time (10s of seconds vice minutes). Then catch the next wave and do it again. On older CCA like designs, you typically could only surf every other wave...

Crash

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Some MORC designs surfed OK.

 

The Santana 30/30 and Capo 30, not so much.

At least not while I was on them.

The last MORC boat I sailed on was a custom 27, designed in '70, and home-built over an 18 year period. I did a good deal of the building around 77, and then did some rebuilding and refitting in '96. It would clock an average 10+ downwind in a breeze. 22' waterline, 5000lbs, 7.25' beam. Went upwind like a rocket too. Just a bit sticky in light air, but one of the sweetest sailing boats I ever sailed. It would probably kick ass over in England under IRC. Boat went up to NJ in the late 90s and disappeared.

 

 

Ah, the old yellow boat...

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Axolotl,

So what's the difference then between surfing and planning? I have always heard what you call surging as surfing...dating back to the late 70s/early 80s...and I would call what you calling surfing, planning...

 

That "surfing" on a boat, is like surfing on a surfboard. You accelerate down the wavefront, exceed hull speed of a relatively short period of time (10s of seconds vice minutes). Then catch the next wave and do it again. On older CCA like designs, you typically could only surf every other wave...

Crash

You are correct. I actually woke up in the middle of last night and realized I got it wrong. I deleted my post.

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With the exception of custom boats, I think the list of production boats that did well

under MORC is pretty well covered here. There was a controversy at one of

the championships when a J-22 showed up with an "antennae" type mast, and

was rated in the custom division while an Abbott (can't remember the length)

was given production status although only 2 had been built. A boat not

mentioned was the Rogers 26. There was a production run of them. One

(I think Cookie Monster - may have had another name) one the Internationals

one year I think in Cleveland. It had a "bolt on" transom option that would

extend the boat to 30 or 32 feet for "offshore" racing.

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With the exception of custom boats, I think the list of production boats that did well

under MORC is pretty well covered here. There was a controversy at one of

the championships when a J-22 showed up with an "antennae" type mast, and

was rated in the custom division while an Abbott (can't remember the length)

was given production status although only 2 had been built. A boat not

mentioned was the Rogers 26. There was a production run of them. One

(I think Cookie Monster - may have had another name) one the Internationals

one year I think in Cleveland. It had a "bolt on" transom option that would

extend the boat to 30 or 32 feet for "offshore" racing.

Actually the Abbott 27 that won overall as the Production was Hull #7 so your math is a bit off there. I can't remember how many they actually built but certainly more 2.

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The problem with the Rule designed boats (MORA/MORC) is when a good one comes out and dominates the Designers change the rule to kill it.

Bruce King hit the nail on the head with the Zap 26 and they killed the boat from a real production run.

Probably one of the best small boats I have sailed. It could use a bit more sail area but it is easily handled by almost any level of sailor.

 

Low wetted surface, easily driven and a keel that keeps the boat pointing high.

 

Zap26_103013.jpg

 

Nice wide decks and a big cockpit. (old photo)

 

deck.jpg

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Very cool old boat! It would be interesting to know how the draft of the Zap 26 was handled by MORC when it was new.

Draft was a pretty heavily penalized item as far as I remember. Looks like it has PLENTY! :)

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The problem with the Rule designed boats (MORA/MORC) is when a good one comes out and dominates the Designers change the rule to kill it.

Bruce King hit the nail on the head with the Zap 26 and they killed the boat from a real production run.

Probably one of the best small boats I have sailed. It could use a bit more sail area but it is easily handled by almost any level of sailor.

 

Low wetted surface, easily driven and a keel that keeps the boat pointing high.

 

Zap26_103013.jpg

 

Nice wide decks and a big cockpit. (old photo)

 

deck.jpg

The designers could not change anything regarding the MORC rule. Any rule measurement changes had to be proposed to the BOG and presented to the membership for a vote usually after much discussion.A few of the craftier designers got very good at manipulating the rule as all good designers do in a measurement based handicap system...

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I was alway liked the Wavelength 24. Not so production, the Capo 26. Oh and then the Capo 30 is pure brilliance.

Love that boat in the Olson 911s version. All though the best two MORC boats I ever sailed were the N/M 26 "Easy Go" and the N/M 30 "Invincible". However the Andrews 26 may have been the best light air boat ever.

 

I ran into Easy Go two years ago in Cheboygan MI. Looks like the keel has been changed??

post-161-0-00060100-1459208406_thumb.jpg

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I was alway liked the Wavelength 24. Not so production, the Capo 26. Oh and then the Capo 30 is pure brilliance.

Love that boat in the Olson 911s version. All though the best two MORC boats I ever sailed were the N/M 26 "Easy Go" and the N/M 30 "Invincible". However the Andrews 26 may have been the best light air boat ever.

 

I ran into Easy Go two years ago in Cheboygan MI. Looks like the keel has been changed??

attachicon.gifEasy Go.jpg

 

 

I think it had an elliptical keel on it if I am remembering correctly.

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I was alway liked the Wavelength 24. Not so production, the Capo 26. Oh and then the Capo 30 is pure brilliance.

Love that boat in the Olson 911s version. All though the best two MORC boats I ever sailed were the N/M 26 "Easy Go" and the N/M 30 "Invincible". However the Andrews 26 may have been the best light air boat ever.

 

Our club used to have a Olson 911S, Olson 911SE and a Capo 30 racing against each other. Below is a pic of Olson 911. In the foreground is another good MORC boat, a Mariah 27

post-161-0-18488000-1459209219_thumb.jpg

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I was alway liked the Wavelength 24. Not so production, the Capo 26. Oh and then the Capo 30 is pure brilliance.

Love that boat in the Olson 911s version. All though the best two MORC boats I ever sailed were the N/M 26 "Easy Go" and the N/M 30 "Invincible". However the Andrews 26 may have been the best light air boat ever.

 

I ran into Easy Go two years ago in Cheboygan MI. Looks like the keel has been changed??

attachicon.gifEasy Go.jpg

 

I think it had an elliptical keel on it if I am remembering correctly.

 

That's what I was remembering also.

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Yes, Easy Go used to have an elliptical keel. I got to sail on the boat with Harry one Midwinters...sweet boat!

Mariah 27 also known as G&S 27, another great sailing MORC boat.

In general... MORC rule favored moderate displacement and modest sail area. Pretty big penalties for light displacement/big rigs. So the boats typically weren't planing boats, but were easily driven hulls with reasonable rigs. This made them pretty adaptable to production racer/cruiser builders.

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The problem with the Rule designed boats (MORA/MORC) is when a good one comes out and dominates the Designers change the rule to kill it.

Bruce King hit the nail on the head with the Zap 26 and they killed the boat from a real production run.

Probably one of the best small boats I have sailed. It could use a bit more sail area but it is easily handled by almost any level of sailor.

 

Low wetted surface, easily driven and a keel that keeps the boat pointing high.

 

Zap26_103013.jpg

 

Nice wide decks and a big cockpit. (old photo)

 

deck.jpg

The designers could not change anything regarding the MORC rule. Any rule measurement changes had to be proposed to the BOG and presented to the membership for a vote usually after much discussion.A few of the craftier designers got very good at manipulating the rule as all good designers do in a measurement based handicap system...

 

 

 

As I understand the history. After about 20 (Zap 26) were built, but production stopped because of a rule change killed the excitement. PHRF was for Cat 27 and 30's at the time.

My guess would be that someone (Bruce King) figured out how to design lighter boats to the rule. I wish Bruce was in better health and could talk about it. I think he still lives but is not well.

 

Rating Rules = A-holes who want dominance and a name.

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The problem with the Rule designed boats (MORA/MORC) is when a good one comes out and dominates the Designers change the rule to kill it.

Bruce King hit the nail on the head with the Zap 26 and they killed the boat from a real production run.

Probably one of the best small boats I have sailed. It could use a bit more sail area but it is easily handled by almost any level of sailor.

 

Low wetted surface, easily driven and a keel that keeps the boat pointing high.

 

Zap26_103013.jpg

 

Nice wide decks and a big cockpit. (old photo)

 

deck.jpg

The designers could not change anything regarding the MORC rule. Any rule measurement changes had to be proposed to the BOG and presented to the membership for a vote usually after much discussion.A few of the craftier designers got very good at manipulating the rule as all good designers do in a measurement based handicap system...

 

 

 

As I understand the history. After about 20 (Zap 26) were built, but production stopped because of a rule change killed the excitement. PHRF was for Cat 27 and 30's at the time.

My guess would be that someone (Bruce King) figured out how to design lighter boats to the rule. I wish Bruce was in better health and could talk about it. I think he still lives but is not well.

 

Rating Rules = Wealthy A-holes who want dominance and a name.

 

Fixed it for ya

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The problem with the Rule designed boats (MORA/MORC) is when a good one comes out and dominates the Designers change the rule to kill it.

Bruce King hit the nail on the head with the Zap 26 and they killed the boat from a real production run.

Probably one of the best small boats I have sailed. It could use a bit more sail area but it is easily handled by almost any level of sailor.

 

Low wetted surface, easily driven and a keel that keeps the boat pointing high.

 

 

 

Nice wide decks and a big cockpit. (old photo)

 

 

The designers could not change anything regarding the MORC rule. Any rule measurement changes had to be proposed to the BOG and presented to the membership for a vote usually after much discussion.A few of the craftier designers got very good at manipulating the rule as all good designers do in a measurement based handicap system...

 

 

 

As I understand the history. After about 20 (Zap 26) were built, but production stopped because of a rule change killed the excitement. PHRF was for Cat 27 and 30's at the time.

My guess would be that someone (Bruce King) figured out how to design lighter boats to the rule. I wish Bruce was in better health and could talk about it. I think he still lives but is not well.

 

Rating Rules = Wealthy A-holes who want dominance and a name.

 

Fixed it for ya

 

 

.MORA and MORC was not about the wealthy.

IOR was about designers and of course some wealthy aholes But the IOR designers were A holes too for not calling foul on the rating rule that built boats that were crap. Yes, IOR sucked

 

Box Rules rule.

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Where is SKIDOO ,she was always a favourite MORC design designed by Chuck Burns

 

 

BURNS 30

Burns 30 drawing on sailboatdata.com

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Thanks For That Chuck still has his site showing her and the article in wooden Boat Magazine #51 Inspired Design

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This one just missed the production mark by Islander not going through with the project, "Details" the Andrews 30.

We're in the process of a full restoration at the moment.

Should be a great family cruiser racer, we'll see. :)

 

Details%20reduced_zpsohbgy7ca.jpg

Details%20at%20MORC%20Internationals%201

Details%20at%20CalYC%20dock%20with%20Ear

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Where is SKIDOO ,she was always a favourite MORC design designed by Chuck Burns

 

 

BURNS 30

Burns 30 drawing on sailboatdata.com

Chuck Burns, Naval Arsonist?

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Is this where we are headed? Over ballasted IOR and MORC/MORA boats.

 

What ever happened to the ULDB Craze that melded into the rating rule boats and created better boats that were more fun to sail?

Has the economy become so anemic that we have to dig up the bones of the past to create a future?

 

I fear that what was old is new again and we will all fall prey to more marketing BS.

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This one just missed the production mark by Islander not going through with the project, "Details" the Andrews 30.

We're in the process of a full restoration at the moment.

Should be a great family cruiser racer, we'll see. :)

 

Details%20reduced_zpsohbgy7ca.jpg

Details%20at%20MORC%20Internationals%201

Details%20at%20CalYC%20dock%20with%20Ear

Excellent news. Great boat. Please be a good caretaker. Where will the boat live?

Where is SKIDOO ,she was always a favourite MORC design designed by Chuck Burns

 

 

BURNS 30

Burns 30 drawing on sailboatdata.com

Great boat. Not a MORC boat. More in the Santa Cruz mold. England.

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This one just missed the production mark by Islander not going through with the project, "Details" the Andrews 30.

We're in the process of a full restoration at the moment.

Should be a great family cruiser racer, we'll see. :)

 

So you were the one who bought Details. I was trying to convince a local sailor to buy her. I'm sure she needs work, but seemed like a steal at the asking price of $6500. Plus it's kind of cool to own a legend - maybe not quite a Ganbare or Waverider - but certainly one of the most recognized names in MORC.

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Many of the boats in this thread seem to be designed for IOR, but did OK in MORC as well.

 

What boats were just designed for MORC?

 

I am thinking of boats like the Tartan 30 here, with a broader stern, shortish overhangs, and bigger main.

 

They rated as 3/4 tonners on IOR, different to the Yankee 30 which rated as a 1/2 tonner, so seem to have been designed for MORC and IOR be damned.

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Many of the boats in this thread seem to be designed for IOR, but did OK in MORC as well.

 

What boats were just designed for MORC?

 

I am thinking of boats like the Tartan 30 here, with a broader stern, shortish overhangs, and bigger main.

 

They rated as 3/4 tonners on IOR, different to the Yankee 30 which rated as a 1/2 tonner, so seem to have been designed for MORC and IOR be damned.

 

I would say the vast majority of boats listed above were either designed specifically for MORC or with MORC in mind.

 

There wasn't really a lot of IOR racing in North America for boats 30 ft and under.

 

Any of the above with the names Andrews, N/M, G&S, or Peterson attached to it would likely be designed specifically for MORC. I'm sure there are others, but that is a short and simple list.

 

One of my favourite MORC boats is the Davidson 30. Very much on the light side for a MORC-Maxi at around 4500 lb but had less SA than others. I believe it rated 74 under SoCal PHRF and is now somewhere in the 80-90 range in PNW.

post-12572-0-39482800-1459326117_thumb.jpg

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Thanks for the comments on "Details"guys, we're very excited about the boat!

Totally agree with the owning a piece of history comment, we will be excellent caretakers.

After a careful evaluation we decided to do a full restoration based on how good the condition is.

Core testing & metering revealed only a few areas in the deck to repair but none in the hull, so actually in great shape for a 34 year old boat.

I'll post pics of the progress, plan is to launch in late June.

"Details" now lives in CT.

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