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2 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

That is definitely a t-fitting. 

You may need new backing plates that fit that T fitting, who knows the old t-fitting measurements....

 

So...there are backing plates inside the mast, inside the slot?  How will I get into the mast to replace them if I need to?

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39 minutes ago, Ajax said:

So...there are backing plates inside the mast, inside the slot?  How will I get into the mast to replace them if I need to?

Should be riveted to the mast wall above and below the hole.  See the backing plate pic on the link. Works like a nut plate.  You feed a piece of small stuff through the holes in the mast and plate, slip the plate through the hole and then use a "Hanson clamp" or partially set the first rivet to hold the plate until you align all of the holes.  The rivets don't carry any rig loads.  They just position the backing plate.  

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30 minutes ago, Innocent Bystander said:

Should be riveted to the mast wall above and below the hole.  See the backing plate pic on the link. Works like a nut plate.  You feed a piece of small stuff through the holes in the mast and plate, slip the plate through the hole and then use a "Hanson clamp" or partially set the first rivet to hold the plate until you align all of the holes.  The rivets don't carry any rig loads.  They just position the backing plate.  

Ah,  super helpful.  Thanks. 

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7 hours ago, Ajax said:

I'm putting together the list of parts and materials for a total re-rigging.

I've never seen or used stem balls or t-fittings before.  I know my wire size but how to I know what kind of t-fittings are used on my mast? I see a slot and some kind of rubber plug. I think these are pretty old...

Is it this?  https://www.velasailingsupply.com/navtec-swage-t-for-7mm-9-32-wire/

@Snore Do you have any data on this?

No help amigo.

 

But following closely.  But following this closely.   I may have the stick pulled, redo standing rigging and add wind inst next year.  

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Yesterday, I installed a CO detector in the head, which is the threshold between 2 berthing spaces to provide the best coverage.

Since you're supposed to replace them every 60 months and the form factor continually changes with each new release, I refused to ruin the bulkhead with screw holes. I used VHB 15lb. exterior mounting tape. In the future, I can scrape the old tape off the bulkhead.

It's mostly out of sight and it will tap into the hidden wiring for cabin lights in the hang-up locker directly beneath, for 12v power. I decided that tapping the boat's electrical system was better than trying to stock AA or 9v batteries on the boat.  I'll be less skittish about running my heater now.

This weekend, I hope to complete the installation of my additional 50 watt solar panel. Since the location is somewhat experimental,  I again, do not want to puncture the fiberglass with screws. For this I bought 30lb. VHB exterior mounting tape.  We'll see if I can get the surface clean enough to allow the tape to get a good bond.  I have a hard spot with installing solar panels on the dodger because then it becomes difficult to take the dodger down in a hurry to save it from bad weather.  I actually raise and lower my dodger a lot more than most people. I hate flying the spinnaker while it's raised.

I've observed that the pilot bunk becomes a "junk pan" for electronic devices on charge, hats, reading material and other gear adrift. I hate this. The only 12v adapter is mounted in the pilot bunk headboard. This weekend I'll install a multi-port USB charger in my gadget locker at the nav desk. We can tuck our phones and tablets in with the VHF while they charge. This will get the iJunk and their spaghetti out of the pilot bunk and also stop collisions when someone is digging in the icebox and the other person wants their phone.

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

Yesterday, I installed a CO detector in the head, which is the threshold between 2 berthing spaces to provide the best coverage.

Since you're supposed to replace them every 60 months and the form factor continually changes with each new release, I refused to ruin the bulkhead with screw holes. I used VHB 15lb. exterior mounting tape. In the future, I can scrape the old tape off the bulkhead.

It's mostly out of sight and it will tap into the hidden wiring for cabin lights in the hang-up locker directly beneath, for 12v power. I decided that tapping the boat's electrical system was better than trying to stock AA or 9v batteries on the boat.  I'll be less skittish about running my heater now.

This weekend, I hope to complete the installation of my additional 50 watt solar panel. Since the location is somewhat experimental,  I again, do not want to puncture the fiberglass with screws. For this I bought 30lb. VHB exterior mounting tape.  We'll see if I can get the surface clean enough to allow the tape to get a good bond.  I have a hard spot with installing solar panels on the dodger because then it becomes difficult to take the dodger down in a hurry to save it from bad weather.  I actually raise and lower my dodger a lot more than most people. I hate flying the spinnaker while it's raised.

I've observed that the pilot bunk becomes a "junk pan" for electronic devices on charge, hats, reading material and other gear adrift. I hate this. The only 12v adapter is mounted in the pilot bunk headboard. This weekend I'll install a multi-port USB charger in my gadget locker at the nav desk. We can tuck our phones and tablets in with the VHF while they charge. This will get the iJunk and their spaghetti out of the pilot bunk and also stop collisions when someone is digging in the icebox and the other person wants their phone.

Just make sure you keep that head door open or your best of both worlds compromise could become the worst.

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I have been contemplating panels on the V40 soft dodger, it has two tilting 100 watt panels on the side rails which handle maintenance needs, the extra dodger panels are for cruising demand.

My plan is to use flexible panels, and make them removable. Each has its own controller, as it is likely one or the other will be shaded. Storing them below when not needed should improve their lifespan, as there will be little UV damage.

Anyway, that is the plan.

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@Ajax when I purchased her, my boat came with no engine deadening. I am finally tired of listening to my 5424!  
 

How thick is your sound deadening?  Going to buy sound down, but want to get correct thickness

 

thanks

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1 hour ago, Snore said:

@Ajax when I purchased her, my boat came with no engine deadening. I am finally tired of listening to my 5424!  
 

How thick is your sound deadening?  Going to buy sound down, but want to get correct thickness

 

thanks

I just have the factory stuff.  It's a black,  furry stuff covered by a tough mesh. 

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3 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I just have the factory stuff.  It's a black,  furry stuff covered by a tough mesh. 

When you can, could you measure the final thickness?  Want to get the thickest available that is not thicker than the original.

 

thanks

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Just now, Snore said:

When you can, could you measure the final thickness?  Want to get the thickest available that is not thicker than the original.

 

thanks

It's negligible. I'd be surprised if it were 1/4" thick. 

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On 10/23/2020 at 4:08 PM, olaf hart said:

I have been contemplating panels on the V40 soft dodger, it has two tilting 100 watt panels on the side rails which handle maintenance needs, the extra dodger panels are for cruising demand.

My plan is to use flexible panels, and make them removable. Each has its own controller, as it is likely one or the other will be shaded. Storing them below when not needed should improve their lifespan, as there will be little UV damage.

Anyway, that is the plan.

I like your plan, Olaf.

@IStream  Yes, the head door will always be open especially if a heat source is running.  I'm attending my annual "man cruise" this weekend and the forecast is wet, cold and absolute shit. I thought I was going overboard with the CO detector but I fully expect to run my heater for prolonged periods so now I'm glad I installed it.

My 50 watt solar panel installation went very well. I used a Scanstrut DS-Multi deck seal. It allows multiple cables and has a heavy duty aluminum body.  I found a way to pass the solar panel cables through the cowl vent box on deck, then into the cabin in a way that preserved the water tight integrity of the vent box so that water won't eventually leak into the overhead. 

From there, I took advantage of the voids in the overhead panels and the small bit of fiberglass cabin liner near the nav desk/breaker panel and routed the panel cables through these areas to the new solar panel controller. By a miracle, the cables were exactly the right length. There's only about 9 total inches of cable visible on deck and then it's all completely hidden. The MC connectors are part of that 9 inches so I can easily remove/replace the panel if I need to.

It looks great but it took an entire day and a lot of grunting and wrestling. I really hope I don't need to add the additional 100 watts I've allotted for as a "just in case."

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For what it's worth..I have my controllers port/starboard, each big enough to control all the panels should something happen to one. I would lose efficiency, but retain most of my capacity. I'll have 100W on the dodger in two 50W flexible panels, one rigid 100W on the arch and two flexible of 100W each on the bimini. 

 

 

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52 minutes ago, Elegua said:

For what it's worth..I have my controllers port/starboard, each big enough to control all the panels should something happen to one. I would lose efficiency, but retain most of my capacity. I'll have 100W on the dodger in two 50W flexible panels, one rigid 100W on the arch and two flexible of 100W each on the bimini. 

 

 

I can't do that.  My controllers require multiple panels connected to the same controller to be identical.  I can't lump dissimilar panels onto an MPPT controller. You could do this to a PWM controller.

Wow, you're going to have 500 watts of capacity. That's mega. Do you/will you have a desalinator onboard?

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I've got 870W and, as I've said before, would take more if I could fit it without heroics. More output gives you more shading tolerance, lets you charge through cloudy days, and extends the season despite the shorter days. 

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1 minute ago, IStream said:

I've got 870W and, as I've said before, would take more if I could fit it without heroics. More output gives you more shading tolerance, lets you charge through cloudy days, and extends the season despite the shorter days. 

Having more capacity for cloudy days is a biggie for sure.

I think my boat is very wee compared to you and @Elegua.  I don't know that I could ever approach 870w. 

I could fit a pair of narrow 50w panels on my cabin top on either side but I think the better plan is to build a bimini frame that can accommodate my current 160 watt panel and add another one. I'd skip canvas altogether and simply use the panels for shade. I've seen it done. That would take me from 210 to 370w.

The trade off is that wiring up a bimini frame for a pair of 160w panels would be easy. It would have a clearer sky view than panels on deck.  The bimini would be up full time and fairly permanent, which I do not like.  Panels mounted on deck are fairly safe no matter the weather and they don't ruin the visual lines of the boat but they are frequently shaded and routing the wiring in a tidy way requires major deconstruction of the cabin and is a pain in the ass.

It's a conundrum.

Aside from the 'fridge, the next hungry item I would ever have onboard is a B&G radar. Fortunately that is an intermittent load and new radars use a fraction of the power that the old ones did.  That's a future problem that can wait.

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Yup, everyone's got their own set of compromises. My hard dodger simplified my decision process significantly because it's a permanent feature of the boat. Might as well use every square foot of it for power gen. 

However, my other favorite saying besides "you can't have too much solar" is "a watt conserved is worth two in the bank". Anything you can do to reduce consumption is gonna help you under any circumstance, in any weather, and will save you the round trip inefficiencies of a discharge/charge process, assuming you have sun at all. The biggest hog is invariably refrigeration but don't forget those 24/7 loads. Every 24/7 parasitic amp consumes 24Ah of battery capacity per day. 

Even little things like charging your phones and devices via a 12V adapter instead of an AC power brick, turning off your inverter if you don't need it, killing the boat's wifi if you're not using it, etc. can make a big difference.

 

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

I can't do that.  My controllers require multiple panels connected to the same controller to be identical.  I can't lump dissimilar panels onto an MPPT controller. You could do this to a PWM controller.

Wow, you're going to have 500 watts of capacity. That's mega. Do you/will you have a desalinator onboard?

I'm not that much bigger.  400W  - I can only get 100W on my dodger, 200 on the bimini and 100 on the roll-bar without waaaayy too much crap.  Maybe I could stick some on the bottom of my dinghy when stowed on deck. 

Ok, I'm pretty ignorant - but I thought you could place same voltage, different amps, in parallel on the same MPPT controller? Isn't it like permanent shading? Otherwise I'd need 3 controllers. 

When it comes time to push-off/FO-for-real, I'll have a desalinator.

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1 hour ago, Elegua said:

I'm not that much bigger.  400W  - I can only get 100W on my dodger, 200 on the bimini and 100 on the roll-bar without waaaayy too much crap.  Maybe I could stick some on the bottom of my dinghy when stowed on deck. 

Ok, I'm pretty ignorant - but I thought you could place same voltage, different amps, in parallel on the same MPPT controller? Isn't it like permanent shading? Otherwise I'd need 3 controllers. 

When it comes time to push-off/FO-for-real, I'll have a desalinator.

All I know is,  Victron says don't do it. 

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9 minutes ago, Ajax said:

All I know is,  Victron says don't do it. 

They give mixed messages. They say "no" and then go ahead and explain how to do it in the Q&A.  So I guess that means you can do it, but not under warranty. Which is "No". 

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The new 50w panel is working out nicely.

I sailed in some absolute shit weather a couple weeks ago and the cable penetrations proved their watertight integrity. The aluminum body Scanstrut DS-Multi deck seal is a good piece of kit. The guts is just a block of quality rubber that you drill through. The aluminum body will last a lifetime. Follow the instructions precisely, to drill the proper size hole for the cable you're passing through, and also that you put enough space between holes so that the walls are thick enough. If you do this, the rubber creates a very tight seal around the cable.  I used a drill press for max accuracy.

My boat when in its slip is oriented in such a way that the 160w panel gets very little winter sun but the 50w panel gets a good blast from mid morning until mid afternoon, which allows it to top up the batteries to the "float" point each day.

The boat was mostly unmolested by its several previous owners but I did find an unpleasant defect last week-  Someone bolted a large eye or strap to the cabin top and mast base for the vang and cunningham (definitely not Tartan).  They used a piece of scrap teak as a bed/standoff. The installer missed with the drill and drilled TWO holes and shoddily filled the unused hole with a shot of 3M white goop. The wood disintegrated and the little turd of white sealant popped out. Now I have a nice stain on my cabin bulkhead.

I made a new standoff out of Starboard, filled the "miss" hole with Six-10, and bedded the working hole with butyl tape and put it all back together.

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

The new 50w panel is working out nicely.

I sailed in some absolute shit weather a couple weeks ago and the cable penetrations proved their watertight integrity. The aluminum body Scanstrut DS-Multi deck seal is a good piece of kit. The guts is just a block of quality rubber that you drill through. The aluminum body will last a lifetime. Follow the instructions precisely, to drill the proper size hole for the cable you're passing through, and also that you put enough space between holes so that the walls are thick enough. If you do this, the rubber creates a very tight seal around the cable.  I used a drill press for max accuracy.

My boat when in its slip is oriented in such a way that the 160w panel gets very little winter sun but the 50w panel gets a good blast from mid morning until mid afternoon, which allows it to top up the batteries to the "float" point each day.

The boat was mostly unmolested by its several previous owners but I did find an unpleasant defect last week-  Someone bolted a large eye or strap to the cabin top and mast base for the vang and cunningham (definitely not Tartan).  They used a piece of scrap teak as a bed/standoff. The installer missed with the drill and drilled TWO holes and shoddily filled the unused hole with a shot of 3M white goop. The wood disintegrated and the little turd of white sealant popped out. Now I have a nice stain on my cabin bulkhead.

I made a new standoff out of Starboard, filled the "miss" hole with Six-10, and bedded the working hole with butyl tape and put it all back together.

Glad the solar is working out. Those Scanstrut deck seals are nice.

The "PO drilled multiple holes wrong, filled them with sealant, then hid them under something" phenomenon is the single most common source of leaks I've run into for three boats running. On my West Wight Potter, even the factory did it.

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On 10/26/2020 at 10:24 AM, Ajax said:

I can't do that.  My controllers require multiple panels connected to the same controller to be identical.  I can't lump dissimilar panels onto an MPPT controller.

Which is a bit odd, since it is fairly normal for even identical panels to output differing volts and amps, due to orientation, shading, fade, etc. If the array is paralleled before hooking into the controller, I'm not sure exactly how the MPPT *knows* you are using mixed panels. Array voltage and amperage work out their issues at the common bus; the result of that negotiation gets fed to the charge controller as a single DC input.  As a rule, MPPT is highly flexible about input voltages and takes amps as it finds them. 

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I think the issue is that if you parallel panels to the MPPT controller, it can't find an operating point that's optimum for every individual panel in the group for exactly the reason Diarmuid mentioned. If each panel has its own MPPT function, you can theoretically get better overall output because the system can use a different MPPT operating point for each panel but unless the panels are very dissimilar from each other I think the gains would be marginal. I wouldn't hesitate to parallel two or more panels of the same size, make, and model into a single MPPT controller and that's in fact what I've done with my two 435's.

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18 minutes ago, IStream said:

I think the issue is that if you parallel panels to the MPPT controller, it can't find an operating point that's optimum for every individual panel in the group for exactly the reason Diarmuid mentioned. If each panel has its own MPPT function, you can theoretically get better overall output because the system can use a different MPPT operating point for each panel but unless the panels are very dissimilar from each other I think the gains would be marginal. I wouldn't hesitate to parallel two or more panels of the same size, make, and model into a single MPPT controller and that's in fact what I've done with my two 435's.

Did you parallel them before attaching them to the controller or did you feed all the wires into the controller?

Hey, you once sent me a photo or a link of some cool terminators to put on the panel wires. Can you send me that info again?

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5 hours ago, Ajax said:

I sailed in some absolute shit weather a couple weeks ago and the cable penetrations proved their watertight integrity. The aluminum body Scanstrut DS-Multi deck seal is a good piece of kit. The guts is just a block of quality rubber that you drill through. The aluminum body will last a lifetime. 

I’ve never heard of that Scanstrut deck seal - only the Blue Sea one.  Had a look online - looks nice b/c they’re made to route several cables through, whereas (as far as I know) Blue Sea only makes the round ones, for a single cable to pass through - the Scanstrut one looks like a great solution for routing multiple solar panel wires belowdecks in a single location- something which I’ve been wondering about on my own boat, as I plan solar...didn’t want to Jane several of those single-cable Blue Sea deck glands here and there.

One thing I do like about the Blue Sea deck glands, however, is the stainless steel cover on one model - it looks “smart” and definitely protects the plastic underneath from UV.

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3 hours ago, Ajax said:

Did you parallel them before attaching them to the controller or did you feed all the wires into the controller?

Hey, you once sent me a photo or a link of some cool terminators to put on the panel wires. Can you send me that info again?

Before. My controller has screw-down terminals meant for bare wire or wire terminated in a sleeve, so it's not good practice to try to get multiple wires in there. 

Were you referring to these Y connectors?

https://www.fisheriessupply.com/victron-energy-mc4-y-solar-splitter-connector-1x-m-2f-1xf-2m-sca520500000

 

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3 hours ago, IStream said:

Before. My controller has screw-down terminals meant for bare wire or wire terminated in a sleeve, so it's not good practice to try to get multiple wires in there. 

Were you referring to these Y connectors?

https://www.fisheriessupply.com/victron-energy-mc4-y-solar-splitter-connector-1x-m-2f-1xf-2m-sca520500000

 

No,  they were metal tips meant for screw down terminals. 

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Ah, this is the cheapo Amazon set I have:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B073TZ5BBG/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It's important that the ferrules are tin plated copper, not brass or aluminum. Also, most of these kits cheap out on the large end. Make sure the biggest ferrules in the kit are big enough for your needs.

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They're also handy for making new shoelaces out of paracord stock.  Just peel off the plastic bit.

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12 hours ago, IStream said:

Ah, this is the cheapo Amazon set I have:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B073TZ5BBG/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It's important that the ferrules are tin plated copper, not brass or aluminum. Also, most of these kits cheap out on the large end. Make sure the biggest ferrules in the kit are big enough for your needs.

That's the one, thanks.

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One little winter project I need to take on, is adding a 3rd leg to my lazy jacks.

With two legs, the primary/upper leg is drawn too far aft. A few times, the lazy jack has become wrapped around the front side of the spreader and given me quite the heart attack during a gybe.  If I add a "middle" leg, the upper leg will lay closer to the mast and stop flipping around the spreader.  ...not to mention, 3 legs will gather the sail more effectively when it comes down.

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3 legs makes perfect sense for that size boom.  

 

My ego has long caused me to avoid jacks for the manly art of going forward to flake the sail while using my foot to control the halyard.  BUT as I near 66, it may be time.  Photos of how yours is rigged and mounting locations would be appreciated.

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Have a different project for you during your hibernation-- recover the cushions!   

 

With COVID, my deliveries are down so I took up sewing.  Total budget was about $600 with new foam for port side seats and backs, PVC backboard for lower seats, used the backerboard material to install doors on the port side lockers behind the seats, recovered helm seat and starboard settee.

Will finish the rest when I get back from upcoming delivery.

 

 

IMG_2726_(1).jpeg

IMG_2725 (1).jpeg

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@Snore  Ooooh, you have A/C. Fancy!

I *hate* my upholstery. It's perfectly functional but it is a drab, gray color probably selected for its durability and not aesthetic appeal. It doesn't match the feng shui of the boat.  I like your upholstery and would consider a similar pattern where green is the dominant color but I have one question-  Do you find the stripes on the upholstery and the teak and holly stripes on the sole make the cabin seem very "busy?"

I'll try to get some photos of my lazy jacks today.  All this stuff was installed by PO's, none of the layout is mine.  There actually is a point on the boom for the intermediate leg, I just never rigged it up. I also think the intermediate point needs to move closer to the gooseneck.

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@Ajax yes love the AC, in FLA you really need it.  Makes working on the boat much more comfortable.  Also makes it the ultimate man cave.   "Yes dear, you are right darling.  Oh, did I mention that I have to go down to the boat to change the nav light fluid."

 

The stripe thing cuts two ways. First, it brightens the cabin and adds color.  The second is that it can be seen as too busy and not calming for those prone to seasickness.   I will likely make the vet berth cushions solid for that reason.  Now that I understand how to do it, I can change it for a $2-300, if I so desire.

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If you like stripes but worry they might feel overpowering, maybe look into stripes that either 'pixilate' or offer multiple shades of the same color value, semi-randomly assorted:

Sunbrella Upholstery - Intent Moss - 16003-0001

 

Sunbrella Fusion Upholstery - Ascend Spa - 145410-0009

If you break the color transition into multiple, smaller steps, or if you blend the transition edge, it's easier on the eye. We chose two fairly bold colors for our upholstery (cinnamon and lime), but the cinnamon stripe is much blurred out and the lime has kind of a tweedy brown toning it down.

tmp_1LWQNH.jpg

tmp_6aeufI.jpg

Both are busy, but busy in different ways.

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I like the bottom one best, but in a darker green.

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9 hours ago, Ajax said:

One little winter project I need to take on, is adding a 3rd leg to my lazy jacks.

With two legs, the primary/upper leg is drawn too far aft. A few times, the lazy jack has become wrapped around the front side of the spreader and given me quite the heart attack during a gybe.  If I add a "middle" leg, the upper leg will lay closer to the mast and stop flipping around the spreader.  ...not to mention, 3 legs will gather the sail more effectively when it comes down.

I much prefer to have the Lazy Jacks set up so they can be taken forward and clipped to the mast when the main is set.

Then I deploy them before dropping the sail.

Keeps them out of the way, no chafe on the sail, no problems like you describe, no extra windage or lines flopping around when sailing - better in every way.

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Hm. I think I could do that.  I need to find something on the mast to secure them to. 

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44 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Hm. I think I could do that.  I need to find something on the mast to secure them to. 

Why not the reefing hooks at the gooseneck?

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5 hours ago, Ajax said:

Hm. I think I could do that.  I need to find something on the mast to secure them to. 

I had small hooks riveted to the mast.

Slacken the Jacks and take the main leg forward, hook it under the hook and then tension the Jacks - they sit as an "L" down the mast and along the boom.

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@SloopJonB  The aft leg of the lazy jacks passes through a small eye riveted to the underside of the boom. I can't get the line out of it to bring it to the mast. What kind of hardware do you have on your boom to keep the lazy jacks at their proper place?

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The "drop lines" or vertical legs of the system went to pad eyes on the boom and the main line went from the back of the boom up to blocks up the mast then back down to small cleats on the mast.

By easing the line up the mast, the jacks could be gathered forward and led under the clips I mentioned previously - then simply tightened and cleated.

That way they lie in a tensioned "L" along the boom and up the mast.

This has another benefit - after flaking the main and tying it off with sail ties you can "furl" the Jacks and use a conventional sail cover.

The Jacks are only wanted when dropping the main so this keeps them out of the way the rest of the time.

This image shows the concept.

image.png.9449552b972e7135bcdb0dcc583f330e.png

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Ok, so you aren't disconnecting them from the boom. They are slacked and make the "L".

I'll look at my setup and see how I can adopt this method.

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'Zacktly

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@SloopJonB

Seeking a KISS operating solution— If the black/dark blue line had 5-6’ of shock cord between the block and the cleat, could you leave the Lin cleated and simply pull it down and snap it back when needed?  

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45 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Ok, so you aren't disconnecting them from the boom. They are slacked and make the "L".

I'll look at my setup and see how I can adopt this method.

This is what I do with mine. My lazy jacks are textile with no metal parts or blocks. Now that I removed the bullhorns/reef hooks at the gooseneck, I clip them into the tylaskas. 

As for cushions - seafoam green is the color, man. Hides the stains even if it makes your boat look like the inside of an APC. 

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54 minutes ago, Snore said:

 

@SloopJonB

Seeking a KISS operating solution— If the black/dark blue line had 5-6’ of shock cord between the block and the cleat, could you leave the Lin cleated and simply pull it down and snap it back when needed?  

I doubt it would provide enough tension when the Jacks are deployed - I liked to have mine pretty tight when they were deployed because I found if they were not the battens would be more likely to foul.

Also, shock cord suffers from UV much worse the polyester line.

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On 10/8/2020 at 3:40 AM, Alaris said:

I can assure you we thoroughly researched options and are no strangers to machine shops. Replacing the whole unit was the decision made. Perhaps some money could have been saved but then you’ve got a new gearbox that won’t bolt up to anything else if the 40 year old engine packs it in.

Bullshit. Sorry, but it is.

You have a standard mass manufacture engine.

You have a standard mass manufacture gearbox.

In the middle you have an adaptor housing.

Generally you can buy the housing you want to mate the engine to the gearbox. In special cases you have to make one. Making one in no way removes the possibility of buying a different one to fit the g/box to a different engine in the future.

I'm not second-guessing any decision made on cost/benefit or pure desire for new stuff but please don't tell me that you can't swap out the engine in the future for a new one and also have to swap the g/box. That *might* be true in some niche use-case in the universe, but it's not the norm.

FKT

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14 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Bullshit. Sorry, but it is.

You have a standard mass manufacture engine.

You have a standard mass manufacture gearbox.

In the middle you have an adaptor housing.

Generally you can buy the housing you want to mate the engine to the gearbox. In special cases you have to make one. Making one in no way removes the possibility of buying a different one to fit the g/box to a different engine in the future.

I'm not second-guessing any decision made on cost/benefit or pure desire for new stuff but please don't tell me that you can't swap out the engine in the future for a new one and also have to swap the g/box. That *might* be true in some niche use-case in the universe, but it's not the norm.

FKT

I simplified the issue. Sure it was possible. It made more sense to replace the entire setup. 

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On 10/26/2020 at 11:42 AM, IStream said:

The biggest hog is invariably refrigeration but don't forget those 24/7 loads. Every 24/7 parasitic amp consumes 24Ah of battery capacity per day. 

Now that my boat’s at the dock for the winter, after the annual six months on a mooring with somewhat intermittent use (but a full month away in August), no solar and only occasional wind to spin the wind gen, I can maybe address this (parasitic amps).

Every time I row out to the boat I see the backlit screen of the propane detector/monitor, and of course the LCD display.  And the LCD display of the Xantrex battery monitor.  And hope I didn’t forget to turn off the circuit I labeled “12v”, which is the cigarette-lighter style 12b sockets for phone chargers - one of which has an LED on it when it’s plugged in and the circuit is energized (not just when it’s charging).  And, finally, the LEDs on the Xantrex battery combiner unit (Xantrex Echo Charge) - unseen, as it’s in the battery compartment, but there’s always a light on.  Milliamps, or perhaps tenths of amps in total —which don’t keep me awake at night— but there always there, draining the battery...reminding me to install a solar panel!! :-).  Hopefully this winter/spring.

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7 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Now that my boat’s at the dock for the winter, after the annual six months on a mooring with somewhat intermittent use (but a full month away in August), no solar and only occasional wind to spin the wind gen, I can maybe address this (parasitic amps).

Every time I row out to the boat I see the backlit screen of the propane detector/monitor, and of course the LCD display.  And the LCD display of the Xantrex battery monitor.  And hope I didn’t forget to turn off the circuit I labeled “12v”, which is the cigarette-lighter style 12b sockets for phone chargers - one of which has an LED on it when it’s plugged in and the circuit is energized (not just when it’s charging).  And, finally, the LEDs on the Xantrex battery combiner unit (Xantrex Echo Charge) - unseen, as it’s in the battery compartment, but there’s always a light on.  Milliamps, or perhaps tenths of amps in total —which don’t keep me awake at night— but there always there, draining the battery...reminding me to install a solar panel!! :-).  Hopefully this winter/spring.

My propane sniffer burns .3 amps. My new CO sniffer burns 60 milliamps.  I still haven't put an LED into my anchor light so that's an ugly 1.5 amps, I think.

I can turn off the propane sniffer if I get off my ass and shut the tank valve in the cockpit. The CO sniffer is wired to the "cabin light" circuit so the only way to shut it off, is to turn off that breaker. It is normally on while I'm aboard.  I could shut the cabin light breaker off at night, when I'm not using heat if I really wanted to hoard amps but at 60 milliamps it hardly seems worth it.

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5 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Now that my boat’s at the dock for the winter, after the annual six months on a mooring with somewhat intermittent use (but a full month away in August), no solar and only occasional wind to spin the wind gen, I can maybe address this (parasitic amps).

Every time I row out to the boat I see the backlit screen of the propane detector/monitor, and of course the LCD display.  And the LCD display of the Xantrex battery monitor.  And hope I didn’t forget to turn off the circuit I labeled “12v”, which is the cigarette-lighter style 12b sockets for phone chargers - one of which has an LED on it when it’s plugged in and the circuit is energized (not just when it’s charging).  And, finally, the LEDs on the Xantrex battery combiner unit (Xantrex Echo Charge) - unseen, as it’s in the battery compartment, but there’s always a light on.  Milliamps, or perhaps tenths of amps in total —which don’t keep me awake at night— but there always there, draining the battery...reminding me to install a solar panel!! :-).  Hopefully this winter/spring.

Perko Battery Selector Switch?  :P

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5 minutes ago, chester said:

Perko Battery Selector Switch?  :P

Propane sniffer wires directly to batts - should’ve turned tank off and then turned sniffer off.

As for the other LEDs, they’re just always on!  Just need a solar panel...

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See, once you start adding parasitic loads like this, a quality battery monitor is really a blessing.

I really thought I should buy a Victron to keep things homogeneous with my solar controllers but the new Balmar SG-200 is mo' better.

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@Jud - s/v Sputnik Over here, Jud.  Yeah, I know that guy.

First of all, I don't want to wait for this guy to fit me into his schedule. Second, I don't want to pay him to rebuild an obsolete transmission with a mediocre reputation for reliability to begin with.

A rebuild kit is $450 for the Hurth 50/100.  He'll charge me $500-$1k to rebuild it.

For $1200, I can buy this and bolt it right in: http://www.soundmarinediesel.com/transmissions.shtml

It uses a cone clutch which is mo' bettah than disc packs.  I've heard of Sound Marine before. Anyone have any dealings with them? Trustworthy? No?

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12 minutes ago, Ajax said:

@Jud - s/v Sputnik Over here, Jud.  Yeah, I know that guy.

First of all, I don't want to wait for this guy to fit me into his schedule. Second, I don't want to pay him to rebuild an obsolete transmission with a mediocre reputation for reliability to begin with.

A rebuild kit is $450 for the Hurth 50/100.  He'll charge me $500-$1k to rebuild it.

For $1200, I can buy this and bolt it right in: http://www.soundmarinediesel.com/transmissions.shtml

It uses a cone clutch which is mo' bettah than disc packs.  I've heard of Sound Marine before. Anyone have any dealings with them? Trustworthy? No?

@Ajax

Yeah, figured you’d heard of him.  And figured it was an “easy” decision - I.e., doing the math/cost comparison! :-). But just thought I’d chuck that out there, in case.

Sorry, don’t know Sound Marine. 

(I’m fairly terrified my Volvo MS2B transmission will fail at some point...entirely rebuilt engine...but the transmission, not so much...and probably limited options if it fails...best not to worry right now... :-) )

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Here are the dimensional specs of the Techno drive:

https://www.twindisc.it/technodrive/italy/invertitore-marino/pdf/TMC_40P.pdf

What I need to determine, is if the height/angle of the output flange is close to the old HBW-5. My Sigma Drive coupling can accommodate 3 degrees of angle to compensate.

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5 hours ago, Ajax said:

@Jud - s/v Sputnik Over here, Jud.  Yeah, I know that guy.

First of all, I don't want to wait for this guy to fit me into his schedule. Second, I don't want to pay him to rebuild an obsolete transmission with a mediocre reputation for reliability to begin with.

A rebuild kit is $450 for the Hurth 50/100.  He'll charge me $500-$1k to rebuild it.

For $1200, I can buy this and bolt it right in: http://www.soundmarinediesel.com/transmissions.shtml

It uses a cone clutch which is mo' bettah than disc packs.  I've heard of Sound Marine before. Anyone have any dealings with them? Trustworthy? No?

Seems like a good call to me. Replace and upgrade. Give you some peace of mind for your planned travels farther afield.

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5 hours ago, Ajax said:

@Jud - s/v Sputnik Over here, Jud.  Yeah, I know that guy.

First of all, I don't want to wait for this guy to fit me into his schedule. Second, I don't want to pay him to rebuild an obsolete transmission with a mediocre reputation for reliability to begin with.

A rebuild kit is $450 for the Hurth 50/100.  He'll charge me $500-$1k to rebuild it.

For $1200, I can buy this and bolt it right in: http://www.soundmarinediesel.com/transmissions.shtml

It uses a cone clutch which is mo' bettah than disc packs.  I've heard of Sound Marine before. Anyone have any dealings with them? Trustworthy? No?

Good thinking. I just looked at rebuilding an obsolete gear on my obsolete diesel in my obsolete sailboat. Once they open it, they found other problems. So I took a rebuilt obsolete twin and so far, so good. 

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Well, I just ordered the TMC-40 transmission. 1 year warranty.

If I have a Hurth HBW-5, I'll need to adjust the rear engine mounts upwards by less than 1/4".  If I have an HBW-10, I'll need to adjust downward by 3/8".  (Tartan used both transmissions in the T-33 and they are visually very similar. I need to get down to the boat and look at the casting)

That should be the only adjustment I need to make.  The shaft will come forward into the boat by 1/2". I have plenty of room for that in the propeller and the shaft zincs will not interfere with the shaft movement.

I'll buy a new damper plate but I need to get the transmission off to determine which of 3 possible styles I have.

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