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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

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Ajax,

 

I think you're going about this rescue entirely too quickly. ;)

 

Nonetheless, pretty cool and I'll be keeping an eye on this thread!

 

Exactly - I have counted about 4 months work so far.

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What was it Ferenc Máté said about when on a pier, being careful when backing up?

 

Am stoked for you Ajax, this'll be a fun summer for you.

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Blech. Poli Glow looks like a dirty soap bubble.

 

Do not not not use Poliglow unless you're soon selling the boat to some poor sucker who'll end up trying to scrape it off when it fades to piss yellow.

 

I've found all Collinite products to be top notch.

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You sir, are a badass. I know how backbreaking that stuff is you're doing and I'm amazed you're moving this fast. That bottom and topside work... yep, that's an honest two days of efforting. If I didn't have a race and my own boat to work on, I'd volunteer, just to watch you doing a Tasmanian Devil imitation on the boat's undercarriage...

 

FWIW, I've done the hole digging thing. Honestly... a couple hundred bucks for a few quick lifts isn't cheap but the hole digging thing to remove and replace a decent sized rudder is an enormous pain in the ass, if you haven't done it, you have no idea. I could bitch endlessly about how that sucks. It's worth $200 to outsource the lifting. Or $100 and a 12 pack if you're in the right yard. (PROTIP: Only the yards that gladly take beer in payment are likely to not mind you digging the hole).

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Blech. Poli Glow looks like a dirty soap bubble.

 

Do not not not use Poliglow unless you're soon selling the boat to some poor sucker who'll end up trying to scrape it off when it fades to piss yellow.

 

I've found all Collinite products to be top notch.

 

 

I like PoliGlow, ten years and counting. YMMV.

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I used PoliOx (ocyllic acid powder) on some of my cabin sides, but didn't use their polish/wax (will use some Meguirs I have kicking around). Dirty bubble on the horizon ?

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Good work Ajax. I find its easy to get stuck in and get heaps of work done when youre in 'the zone' and you have a pressing deadline. I would look at the 3M polishing compounds, all their stuff seems to work really well.

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Blech. Poli Glow looks like a dirty soap bubble.

 

Do not not not use Poliglow unless you're soon selling the boat to some poor sucker who'll end up trying to scrape it off when it fades to piss yellow.

 

I've found all Collinite products to be top notch.

 

 

I like PoliGlow, ten years and counting. YMMV.

 

 

Might be fine in PNW. I think in places that actually see the sun it tends to fade. It is damn near impossible to remove.

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Blech. Poli Glow looks like a dirty soap bubble.

 

Do not not not use Poliglow unless you're soon selling the boat to some poor sucker who'll end up trying to scrape it off when it fades to piss yellow.

 

I've found all Collinite products to be top notch.

 

 

I like PoliGlow, ten years and counting. YMMV.

 

 

Might be fine in PNW. I think in places that actually see the sun it tends to fade. It is damn near impossible to remove.

 

 

Acrylic floor stripper and a scrubbie. Maybe dacapo will chime in with his experience. http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=173234

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You sir, are a badass. I know how backbreaking that stuff is you're doing and I'm amazed you're moving this fast. That bottom and topside work... yep, that's an honest two days of efforting. If I didn't have a race and my own boat to work on, I'd volunteer, just to watch you doing a Tasmanian Devil imitation on the boat's undercarriage...

 

FWIW, I've done the hole digging thing. Honestly... a couple hundred bucks for a few quick lifts isn't cheap but the hole digging thing to remove and replace a decent sized rudder is an enormous pain in the ass, if you haven't done it, you have no idea. I could bitch endlessly about how that sucks. It's worth $200 to outsource the lifting. Or $100 and a 12 pack if you're in the right yard. (PROTIP: Only the yards that gladly take beer in payment are likely to not mind you digging the hole).

Boy, do I have a story for you tomorrow.

The travel lift sank in the mud up to the axle. NOW the yard let me dig a hole to pull the rudder.

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Blech. Poli Glow looks like a dirty soap bubble.

 

Do not not not use Poliglow unless you're soon selling the boat to some poor sucker who'll end up trying to scrape it off when it fades to piss yellow.

 

I've found all Collinite products to be top notch.

 

 

I like PoliGlow, ten years and counting. YMMV.

 

 

Might be fine in PNW. I think in places that actually see the sun it tends to fade. It is damn near impossible to remove.

 

 

Acrylic floor stripper and a scrubbie. Maybe dacapo will chime in with his experience. http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=173234

 

you have strong arms H-3579.jpg?$Medium$&iccEmbed=1&icc=Adobe

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Might be fine in PNW. I think in places that actually see the sun it tends to fade. It is damn near impossible to remove.

 

 

Acrylic floor stripper and a scrubbie. Maybe dacapo will chime in with his experience. http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=173234

 

you have strong arms H-3579.jpg?$Medium$&iccEmbed=1&icc=Adobe

 

 

We just lie the boat on its side, you can cover a lot of ground with one of those. It's a bitch around the stern though.

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You sir, are a badass. I know how backbreaking that stuff is you're doing and I'm amazed you're moving this fast. That bottom and topside work... yep, that's an honest two days of efforting. If I didn't have a race and my own boat to work on, I'd volunteer, just to watch you doing a Tasmanian Devil imitation on the boat's undercarriage...

 

FWIW, I've done the hole digging thing. Honestly... a couple hundred bucks for a few quick lifts isn't cheap but the hole digging thing to remove and replace a decent sized rudder is an enormous pain in the ass, if you haven't done it, you have no idea. I could bitch endlessly about how that sucks. It's worth $200 to outsource the lifting. Or $100 and a 12 pack if you're in the right yard. (PROTIP: Only the yards that gladly take beer in payment are likely to not mind you digging the hole).

Boy, do I have a story for you tomorrow.

The travel lift sank in the mud up to the axle. NOW the yard let me dig a hole to pull the rudder.

Got any pictures?

 

Seriously, respect for the work you're doing. Fucking around with a boat beats most other things, any day

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You sir, are a badass. I know how backbreaking that stuff is you're doing and I'm amazed you're moving this fast. That bottom and topside work... yep, that's an honest two days of efforting. If I didn't have a race and my own boat to work on, I'd volunteer, just to watch you doing a Tasmanian Devil imitation on the boat's undercarriage...

 

FWIW, I've done the hole digging thing. Honestly... a couple hundred bucks for a few quick lifts isn't cheap but the hole digging thing to remove and replace a decent sized rudder is an enormous pain in the ass, if you haven't done it, you have no idea. I could bitch endlessly about how that sucks. It's worth $200 to outsource the lifting. Or $100 and a 12 pack if you're in the right yard. (PROTIP: Only the yards that gladly take beer in payment are likely to not mind you digging the hole).

Boy, do I have a story for you tomorrow.

The travel lift sank in the mud up to the axle. NOW the yard let me dig a hole to pull the rudder.

 

 

 

Is your hard stand in a swamp?

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It is now.

I'm about to start loading animals 2x2. I'll start with women...

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Ok, so the Tartan 33 rudder system is constructed of a Foss foam rudder with a 3 inch (ok, 2 and 63/64 inch) or 76mm if you prefer, stainless post that rides in a long, bronze lower collar and an upper aluminum collar bolted to the underside of the cockpit.

 

Once I had the rudder removed, I began measuring everything with a digital caliper. The worst radial displacement I could find, was almost but not quite 2mm, but that was not in all places. Mostly, I have 1mm of RD. The SS post is consistently 76mm all along it's length and I swiveled the caliper around to ensure that it hasn't become eccentric or oval shaped. The bronze sleeve is slightly out of round by about 1mm when taking measurements 90 degrees offset from each other.

 

When I contacted the plastics shop, I was told that they could machine a 2mm bearing with no problem. 1mm is more difficult and that they really could only make them 1 inch high or they'll collapse on the lathe. I'd have to make a stack of 1 inch, 1mm bearings, epoxy them in place, hone them out, etc. I have it from a trustworthy authority that 2 - 2.5mm RD is about the right time to attack this problem. I'm going to put it all back together and sail it. If the rudder only makes the occasional thump, I'll live with it for a few years and re-assess.

 

If it makes a bad racket, I'll do something about it at the end of the season. This could include anything from honing out the bronze sleeve to accept a thicker bearing (NOT my preference) or epoxying in a stack of 1mm bearings and praying that they stay stuck to the inside of the bronze sleeve. I'd prefer that they aren't sliding on both surfaces as this will cause them to wear that much faster. The 3rd option is to inject West Epoxy mixed with graphite powder but I'm just not a fan of drilling holes into the lower bronze collar and the upper aluminum casting. That casting is thick. The bronze sleeve does have a grease fitting, so I'll keep the post well lubed to slow the degradation and we'll see how she sails.

 

This weekend we'll be applying anti-foul and polishing and waxing the hull. I'll run a hot lead for the bilge pump float switch.

 

Launching Day is supposed to be next Friday. You may have noticed the bogged down travel lift. The rain is taking brief interludes but it's not warm enough nor dry enough for any considerable evaporation, and every few days, it just rains some more. The yard really needs to spread a few dump trucks of gravel in the area. I don't know what their plan is, but they know that I want OUT.

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They did. First, they had a crane truck that nearly flipped itself forward into the travel lift. The front wheels got WAY off the ground, even with outriggers deployed...outriggers that sank into the mud because they couldn't be bothered to use the huge plywood pads stowed neatly in their brackets on the rear of the truck.

 

Next, they piled wood dunnage in front of the travel lift and attempted to jack it up using two, large bottle jacks. Apparently the force being transmitted had a slight, horizontal direction to it, because the dunnage and bottle jacks blew out with a BANG and the travel lift dropped into the hole with considerable force. Yard birds scattered in alarm and I can't believe we weren't calling 911 for a dead body.

 

Finally, a bucket digger with more powerful hydraulics crawled over and lifted and dragged the travel lift up and out of the hole using chain.

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You sir, are a badass. I know how backbreaking that stuff is you're doing and I'm amazed you're moving this fast. That bottom and topside work... yep, that's an honest two days of efforting. If I didn't have a race and my own boat to work on, I'd volunteer, just to watch you doing a Tasmanian Devil imitation on the boat's undercarriage...

 

FWIW, I've done the hole digging thing. Honestly... a couple hundred bucks for a few quick lifts isn't cheap but the hole digging thing to remove and replace a decent sized rudder is an enormous pain in the ass, if you haven't done it, you have no idea. I could bitch endlessly about how that sucks. It's worth $200 to outsource the lifting. Or $100 and a 12 pack if you're in the right yard. (PROTIP: Only the yards that gladly take beer in payment are likely to not mind you digging the hole).

Boy, do I have a story for you tomorrow.

The travel lift sank in the mud up to the axle. NOW the yard let me dig a hole to pull the rudder.

Got any pictures?

 

Seriously, respect for the work you're doing. Fucking around with a boat beats most other things, any day

 

 

You almost got it - "Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing—absolute nothing—half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats. Simply messing,"

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Enjoying your tale Ajax, keep up the good fight and you'll be the king of the Rhodes river in no time !

 

Wonder if a bearing-full of heavy grease might just be the ticket for taking up much of the 'play' in the rudder ?

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Enjoying your tale Ajax, keep up the good fight and you'll be the king of the Rhodes river in no time !

 

Wonder if a bearing-full of heavy grease might just be the ticket for taking up much of the 'play' in the rudder ?

 

There is a grease fitting on the bronze sleeve and I plan on pumping it full.

There was some grease on the rudder post, and there is no scarring or gouges on the post or the sleeve, so I feel I'm in decent shape.

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Just catching up here...

 

BTW, included in the costs of my Big Refit were three truckloads of crushed basalt road bed rock, just to make sure that the boat-bearing rig could get in and out again.

Some of us have learned a few things, the hard way...

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Hah, the lift sunk. Excellent! The Amazon rain forest has nothing on Naptown this year. You racing tomorrow?

 

.

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Hah, the lift sunk. Excellent! The Amazon rain forest has nothing on Naptown this year. You racing tomorrow?

 

.

 

Nope, my life belongs to the new boat until she's in the water.

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That travel lift story is pretty great.

 

I buffed my boat last weekend for the first time since i've owned it... whoops. It looked terrible before, extremely chalky. After about 6-8 hrs in total, it looks a lot better now but still nowhere near perfect. It oxidized to the point where I probably needed two rounds of compounding, or a more severe compound to cut through it all. I used a product called buff magic by shurhold and I think it would work great on a more normal condition gelcoat. I followed that with their pro polish wax. I've also never buffed anything before so I probably just did it wrong lol.

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"Extremely chalky" probably means you should have started with wet sanding rather than cutting polish.

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"Extremely chalky" probably means you should have started with wet sanding rather than cutting polish.

 

Yeah you're probably right. What grit would you start with for that? One pass with wet sanding and then move to compound?

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That's something you have to decide on in person, case by case. Start with the highest number that gets the job done without being an excessive amount of work. The lower the number you start with the more gelcoat you will lose.

 

I just did my very badly neglected deck - it was so oxidized that our pants would be white from the knees down at the end of of the day from rubbing on the sides of the cockpit.

 

I started by scrubbing it on hands & knees with detergent and a brown ScotchBrite pad. Then 800 wet, 1200 wet, coarse and fine compound on wool buffs, then wax.

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Doing the hull sides from a step ladder was a nightmare. To do anything more or even if I did it again I'd use a scaffold. I also don't think I have enough gelcoat left to do much more in depth of a correction. It seems to be getting really thin in some spots especially at max beam. With all the scratches and battle scars around the boat the next realistic step might be a paint job.

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These cheapo scaffolds can be found everywhere, generally around $160:

0eb36102-dcdf-4d91-942c-c478fe72f4c1_300

The deck is cheesy, but otherwise they are amazingly rigid & adjust quickly. I used one drywalling our house & plan to use it to prep & paint the boat. If I can recall whom I lent it to.... Hmmm.

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Never lend tools or books.

'Sokay. I think my buddy Dave has it. And two more just like it, which I will borrow from him come painting time. Also, his big skid steer loader for pulling the engine. See how that works? :P We pool our time and resources around here. He helped me pour the shop floor; payback this summer when he builds his straw bale house. I bring my own bull float -- why buy another? Meanwhile, we're not tripping over the damned scaffold in our garage.

 

I don't loan out my edge tools, however. You need something planed or chiseled, I'll do that for you. ^_^

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From shit to Shinola:

 

 

Great job!

 

 

Ah, you've just reminded me of something important:

 

Nearly all of the work on the mighty Pearson 30, I had done without help. Lots of excellent advice, but I did 99% of the labor all by myself with my own tools.

 

Not so with the Tartan. I have been the beneficiary of some very sage technical advice, several hours of assistant labor and the loan of expensive tools and equipment that enabled me to do these jobs quickly and correctly. Several people have had a hand in this project over the last couple of weeks, so to those folks I express my deepest gratitude. This has been a real group project.

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Nice shine!

 

I used to do that every Spring on my boat but I finally decided the price of an Awlcraft paint job was cheaper that rotator-cuff surgery...

 

FWIW, there are two well-maintained examples of your yacht down here, one in the yard just across from my boat.

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Ajax! Conrats I guess?! I'm a bit late to the party. Friend mentioned you were just thinking about it... heck you bought it and launched (or about to?). Seems I missed sending congrats on one of the best two days any boat ownership, LOL.

 

How many do you have now? Still got the Pearson? Didn't you have a Hobie too (what happened to that?)

 

Dang, where were you when I was working down the Wess Navy of 13 boats?? We are down to only 5 now (if you count the Kayak, only 3 if you count engines) and very proud of ourselves. If I hadn't just finished so many projects I would tell you how much faster you could go and how good you would look sailing an F27. Maybe you want a a jetski (no, the Mids would kill me). A Whaler (no, my kids would kill me along with the Mids). A Laser (no, to much fun for me). How about a Kayak?

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Ha, I can't afford dockage for a trimaran.

The Pearson goes on the block this week. In fact, one of my neighbors and his wife are former sailors looking to get back into the game and have asked me to show them the boat.

 

Yes, I have the Hobie and I sailed it last year for the first time. It's the perfect boat to scratch my speed itch. I drag it to the ramp at the end of my street and leave it setup all weekend.

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Ha, I can't afford dockage for a trimaran.

The Pearson goes on the block this week. In fact, one of my neighbors and his wife are former sailors looking to get back into the game and have asked me to show them the boat.

 

Yes, I have the Hobie and I sailed it last year for the first time. It's the perfect boat to scratch my speed itch. I drag it to the ramp at the end of my street and leave it setup all weekend.

Hey w/ re the Pearson: for sale ain't sold! You are a two boat owner in the truest sense. That makes you Admiral. Ditch the Captain Obvious avatar. You have been promoted given your fleet status.

 

You can't by the tri. We decided to see if we like it as a Mom and Pop cruiser. Its now got furling everything (even the chute), BBQ, raised enclosed pop-top, teak table, flowers, pillows and a new (coming soon) bigger and new engine. The porta potti we can live with but not so sure we are keen on no hot showers... but it can be easily trailered anywhere and is so fast and fun to sail that we want to see if we can live with this trade-off Its also very affordable compared to what we would do monohull wise which would take us well into 6 figures.

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I think using the tri as a cruiser is a great idea. Tucky is all over the place in his. Marinas are great for hot showers, plus you live in the Chesapeake so the black shower bags do get warm.

Well, they get warm when we actually have sunshine, which isn't often lately...

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Mmmm. Don't let my partner see that teal. It's her second favorite color, after eggplant. And we're not painting the boat dark purple. :P That's a really nice-looking boat, Ajax.

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Looking great but you need to slow things down. At the rate you're going this thread will be dead by next week.

 

I was expecting at least 6 months out of it.

 

Plus you are shaming me over my own restoration pace.

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Looking great ! What products and/or techniques did you use ? (I assume it's not awlgrip)

 

I believe it's paint, not gelcoat. What kind of paint? No idea.

 

I started off trying Meguire's Ultimate Compound with a DA polisher which was an Ultimate Failure. Not nearly aggressive enough.

Innocent Bystander dropped by to do some Bystanding and said "this won't do" and lent me a high speed polisher with a foam pad and a buffing wheel. I bought some 3M Marine Heavy Polishing Compound and hit the hull with the high speed wheel. You can polish until the compound is nearly completely gone then come back and hit it with the buffing wheel. If you get swirl marks, the Meguire's is a good intermediate step.

 

After polishing, I applied a marine wax. For the final step, I administered liberal amounts of Advil for my shoulders.

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From shit to Shinola:

 

 

Top Job mate!

 

 

Coming from our resident OCD Centaurian, that's a real compliment.

 

Looking great but you need to slow things down. At the rate you're going this thread will be dead by next week.

 

I was expecting at least 6 months out of it.

 

Plus you are shaming me over my own restoration pace.

 

No way, the bottom job on your boat was top-notch. If I had more vacation hours and more money to throw at the yard, I would stay there longer and drag this out.

My main consolation is that the sailing weather has largely been shit so I'm not missing much. I think I'm on track to enjoy the sailing season when the switch flips to "instant summer"

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Looking great ! What products and/or techniques did you use ? (I assume it's not awlgrip)

 

I believe it's paint, not gelcoat. What kind of paint? No idea.

 

I started off trying Meguire's Ultimate Compound with a DA polisher which was an Ultimate Failure. Not nearly aggressive enough.

Innocent Bystander dropped by to do some Bystanding and said "this won't do" and lent me a high speed polisher with a foam pad and a buffing wheel. I bought some 3M Marine Heavy Polishing Compound and hit the hull with the high speed wheel. You can polish until the compound is nearly completely gone then come back and hit it with the buffing wheel. If you get swirl marks, the Meguire's is a good intermediate step.

 

After polishing, I applied a marine wax. For the final step, I administered liberal amounts of Advil for my shoulders.

 

You missed a step Ajax.................. what about the rum???

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I administered liberal amounts of Advil for my shoulders.

Supposed to take them BEFORE work commences and if the directions on the bottle say to take two..... then take three.

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I administered liberal amounts of Advil for my shoulders.

Supposed to take them BEFORE work commences and if the directions on the bottle say to take two..... then take three.

 

Although if taking Tylenol/acetaminophen, take only two. Acetaminophen is the #1 cause of acute liver failure in the US, and the difference between the safe recommended dose and a toxic dose is typically one tablet or capsule. 'More is better' is a bad approach with acetaminophen.

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I administered liberal amounts of Advil for my shoulders.

Supposed to take them BEFORE work commences and if the directions on the bottle say to take two..... then take three.

 

Although if taking Tylenol/acetaminophen, take only two. Acetaminophen is the #1 cause of acute liver failure in the US, and the difference between the safe recommended dose and a toxic dose is typically one tablet or capsule. 'More is better' is a bad approach with acetaminophen.

 

I believe Ajax is using Advil - ibuprofen. Most sailors' liver ailments come from another drug...

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You missed a step Ajax.................. what about the rum???

 

 

 

That's usually my line :lol:

 

 

Rhum will happen when the boat successfully moves from the yard, around the corner to her temporary berth without sinking or major engine calamity.

 

With the exception of painting anti-foul where the stands are now, we're basically ready to move. I want to bend on the sails in case of engine failure, and swap in my Manson Supreme for the Danforth copy currently in place. I need to be at least able to "park" while I wait for a tow if something goes wrong. My submariner's maintenance paranoia is in full force right now.

 

The pre-launch checklist is:

 

Bend on sails, rig sheets.

2 full charged handheld VHF radios and cell phone.

PFD's onboard.

Anchor ready to let go.

All ball valves SHUT.

 

Once the boat is wet, but hanging in the slings:

 

Inspect depth and speed transducers and all ball valves, prop and rudder stuffing boxes for leaks.

Adjust stuffing boxes if required.

Cycle all ball valves open and inspect for leaks. Shut all valves except for engine raw water.

Start engine, monitor exhaust water flow and engine temperature for several minutes.

 

What am I missing?

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Get the slings out of the way before you throw it into reverse.

 

Isn't champagne involved at some point?

I have a bottle of Prosecco standing by.

 

Make sure he boat's battery (or batteries) are fully charged in case you end up needing to crank the engine repeatedly. :rolleyes:

 

Already done.

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You already know this, but give the stuffing a few minutes to soak and swell before adjusting. The first time I launched my boat I was alarmed at the trickle of water coming through so I tightened it down. Obviously didn't need to do that, and had to loosen it back up again later once I learned my folly.

 

That boat looks great! There is a nice green T33 in the harbor here I made new halyards for a couple of years ago.

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Looking great ! What products and/or techniques did you use ? (I assume it's not awlgrip)

 

I believe it's paint, not gelcoat. What kind of paint? No idea.

 

I started off trying Meguire's Ultimate Compound with a DA polisher which was an Ultimate Failure. Not nearly aggressive enough.

Innocent Bystander dropped by to do some Bystanding and said "this won't do" and lent me a high speed polisher with a foam pad and a buffing wheel. I bought some 3M Marine Heavy Polishing Compound and hit the hull with the high speed wheel. You can polish until the compound is nearly completely gone then come back and hit it with the buffing wheel. If you get swirl marks, the Meguire's is a good intermediate step.

 

After polishing, I applied a marine wax. For the final step, I administered liberal amounts of Advil for my shoulders.

 

 

Nice!! I'd be very surprised if that is paint. Don't think you can hit paint with polishing compound and have anything left to buff.

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I administered liberal amounts of Advil for my shoulders.

Supposed to take them BEFORE work commences and if the directions on the bottle say to take two..... then take three.

 

Although if taking Tylenol/acetaminophen, take only two. Acetaminophen is the #1 cause of acute liver failure in the US, and the difference between the safe recommended dose and a toxic dose is typically one tablet or capsule. 'More is better' is a bad approach with acetaminophen.

 

I believe Ajax is using Advil - ibuprofen. Most sailors' liver ailments come from another drug...

 

Yeah, I know. Ibu (Vitamin I) is the thing for muscle aches. But sometime people think OTC pain killers are basically the same & basically safe & approach them all like "Take one every 30 minutes until your shoulders stop hurting." There's been a rash of emergency room admissions due to people treating Tylenol like they treat aspirin or Advil. Acetaminophen is perhaps the safest OTC if you stick to the dosage on the label; perhaps the most dangerous if you pop extra.

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I'm not part of the pill culture. I rarely take pain relievers, preferring to sleep it off. When I do take them, I follow the label exactly.

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Thank gawd you don't follow that regiment with rum !

 

No! No, the proper wash down of 400 MG of IB is 2 oz Jack. Tons of side effects if done often, but provides fast relief.

 

Ajax awaiting pics awaiting pics of first sail.

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Can you run your engine up while the boats there?

 

We had a special device for this. Removed the stem from a toilet plunger, put a hole where the end of the stem used to be, and put a hose on it. A person who has removed his cellphone from his pocket gets under the boat and holds the thing against the engine water intake.

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Can you run your engine up while the boats there?

 

We had a special device for this. Removed the stem from a toilet plunger, put a hole where the end of the stem used to be, and put a hose on it. A person who has removed his cellphone from his pocket gets under the boat and holds the thing against the engine water intake.

 

Nice way to hydrolock your engine.

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I know the thing, you can buy them with an adjustable leg called a Fake-a-lake. I have had good results poking a hose up the intake and closing the valve on it to hold it but not block it. It lets water back past it so as to not pressurise the system but the pump can take what it needs.

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Can you run your engine up while the boats there?

 

We had a special device for this. Removed the stem from a toilet plunger, put a hole where the end of the stem used to be, and put a hose on it. A person who has removed his cellphone from his pocket gets under the boat and holds the thing against the engine water intake.

Nice way to hydrolock your engine.

Nah it's mainly for inboard ski boats with a open exhaust. The water blows past the plunger before it pushes past the impeller anyway.

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I've already run the engine while the boat is on the hard.

 

No need for the fake-a-lake, the raw water ball valve is easily accessible and it's 30 second's work to disconnect the hose and drop it into a 5 gallon bucket. There is a hose spigot nearby which enables me to keep the bucket full while the engine drinks normally. The engine is closed-loop cooled, so it has a heat exchanger. When we ran the engine, raw water output from the exhaust was normal and plentiful. The anti-freeze in the engine is a bright, healthy green but I'll stick a tester in it to verify that it hasn't degraded.

 

I did replace the raw water pump impeller with a new one last week. Even after 5 years, the old impeller seemed "ok" but 2 vanes did have a permanent bend in them. No need to tempt fate over a $12 dollar part, I guess.

 

Temperatures have been unseasonably cool here, so attempting to vacuum extract the engine oil was a very slow, frustrating process so I stopped and decided to do it when I can motor against my docklines for 15 minutes to warm the stuff up. I'm only motoring/sailing around the bend to a friend's house where I'll make some initial electrical repairs and assess how the boat is doing in the water.

 

If the boat is healthy and the weather is fair over Memorial Day weekend, I'll bring 'er home.

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Can you run your engine up while the boats there?

 

We had a special device for this. Removed the stem from a toilet plunger, put a hole where the end of the stem used to be, and put a hose on it. A person who has removed his cellphone from his pocket gets under the boat and holds the thing against the engine water intake.

Nice way to hydrolock your engine.

Educate me please. The engine in question is a saltwater cooled engine. The device is properly placed on the intake. There is no indication that the heat exchanger has not failed.

 

How would forcing water through the saltwater side of the cooling system hydro lock the engine???

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Can you run your engine up while the boats there?

We had a special device for this. Removed the stem from a toilet plunger, put a hole where the end of the stem used to be, and put a hose on it. A person who has removed his cellphone from his pocket gets under the boat and holds the thing against the engine water intake.

Nice way to hydrolock your engine.

Educate me please. The engine in question is a saltwater cooled engine. The device is properly placed on the intake. There is no indication that the heat exchanger has not failed.

 

How would forcing water through the saltwater side of the cooling system hydro lock the engine???

 

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/412140-post20.html

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Can you run your engine up while the boats there?

We had a special device for this. Removed the stem from a toilet plunger, put a hole where the end of the stem used to be, and put a hose on it. A person who has removed his cellphone from his pocket gets under the boat and holds the thing against the engine water intake.

Nice way to hydrolock your engine.
Educate me please. The engine in question is a saltwater cooled engine. The device is properly placed on the intake. There is no indication that the heat exchanger has not failed.

 

How would forcing water through the saltwater side of the cooling system hydro lock the engine???

 

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/412140-post20.htmlWe're supposed to believe somebody who claims city water pressure is 100psi?

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Well mine is 80 - requires a healthy reduction valve.

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