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huntercutting

California Commissioners reject mega-marina loan for Treasures Island

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This last week California State Commissioners refused to approve a $22 million public loan for construction of a private mega-marina in Clipper Cove at Treasure Island.

Deadlocked by a 2-2 vote on Wednesday, Commissioners for the California Division of Boating and Waterways (DBW) declined to endorse a DBW staff proposal to fund $4.2 million of the proposed $22 million loan as long as several staff-proposed conditions were met. The loan application had been submitted by Treasure Island Enterprises, the consortium of real estate speculators seeking to build the mega-marina. And the loan application had been endorsed by the Treasure Island Development Authority Board led by Board Chair Vivian Fei Tsen.

The champions on the DBW Commission who stood up for public use at Clipper Cove were Katherine Pettibone and Cecily Harris. Pettibone and Harris deserve applause for standing tough in the face of heavy pressure by developers.

 

Currently Clipper Cove is home to some of the best recreational and instructional boating on the San Francisco Bay, including youth sailing, disabled sailing, dragon boating, Olympic class racing, keel-boat raft-ups, kayaking, paddle boarding, high-school and collegiate competition and more. The Cove is also home to the non-profit Treasure Island Sailing Center which each year puts thousands of San Francisco public schools kids on the water - most for the first time ever. The Cove also hosts national dinghy racing championships, such as the 2015 V15 nationals, the annual PCISA high school Golden Bear regatta, the Cal Sailing Team, and much more.

 

The DBW staff report noted "financial inconsistencies" in the loan application as well as “issues” regarding “public support” and “permitting.” Numerous public interest groups spoke at the Commission meeting prior to the vote, urging Commissioners to postpone consideration of the loan. Groups urging postponement of loan approval included the U.S. Sailing Association, Save Clipper Cove, the Treasure Island Sailing Center, and the Sierra Club.

The DBW staff report recommended approval of just $4.2 million in order to encumber current year funding provided in the State’s fiscal year budget. The staff also recommended that disbursement of the loan be withheld until all financial inconsistencies were “resolved” and “all outstanding issues described in this report have been addressed.

Nevertheless, the DBW Commission refused to endorse even a partial loan with conditional terms recommended by the DBW staff report.

Action on the loan application now shifts to DBW Deputy Director Lynn Sadler to take a final decision later this spring.

In the meantime, the campaign to save Clipper Cove plans on returning to the board members of the Treasure Island Development Authority (TIDA) and urging them to reconsider the proposed mega-marina.

 

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Anchored there just today. Kids had a great time. Then a gale kicked up on the way home. That sucked.

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Heaven forbid we add a man made structure to a man made structure.

I'm sure the Kali Koastal Kommission will set forth plans to remove the artificial landfill that is Treasure Island and return the area to it's natural state.

 

 

Treasure Island is an artificial island in San Francisco Bay and a neighborhood of the City of San Francisco. Built 1936–37 for the 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition, the island's World’s Fair site is a California Historical Landmark.[6] Buildings there have been listed on the NRHP, and the island's historical naval station and auxiliary air facility (for airships, blimps, dirigibles, planes and seaplanes) are designated in the Geographic Names Information System.[5]

 

http://www.formerbases.com/cal_no_treasureisland_history.htm

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If there was a big marina there how would all the cars get off the island and onto the bridge? Last time I was there we were the only car and had to wait 5 minutes to merge onto the bridge.

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My son teaches sailing at that youth sailing center. I think I'll ask him what he thinks of all of this.

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The new marina plans would basically eliminate the sailing area they use right now.

 

Why would the developers need public money anyway? Sounds fishy.

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The only thing I can figure is the public would benefit from development in some way like facilities or access. My understanding, and I'll have to wait until I confirm it, is the area is pretty much a barren pile of mud in the bay. Kind of similar to something we have in San Diego's east Mission Bay called Fiesta Island which is hardly the image the place evokes but it gets a lot of recreational use.

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they wouldn't change the mud part, just the water part. We anchored out there yesterday. Was blowing a light gale in the main bay, and the kids were in swimsuits and paddle boards in the anchorage. It would suck to lose that.

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If there was a big marina there how would all the cars get off the island and onto the bridge? Last time I was there we were the only car and had to wait 5 minutes to merge onto the bridge.

They frequently have huge car shows there, doesn't seem to be too big of an issue. People also live on the island and there are tons of tourists and they get on and off. I can understand why it was slow to get on the bridge for you as there is a stop sign and not a merge lane. But the bridge is most always slow. It's not as if you expanded the existing it would be a considerable addition to traffic (IMO) as sailing is not like a baseball game where everyone shows up and leaves about the same time.

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Why would the developers need public money anyway? Sounds fishy.

Public money is very common for these projects. AT&T Park was built without "public funds" but the land was donated by the city and large tax abatement and infrastructure upgrades carried by the public.

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they wouldn't change the mud part, just the water part. We anchored out there yesterday. Was blowing a light gale in the main bay, and the kids were in swimsuits and paddle boards in the anchorage. It would suck to lose that.

Basically what my son told me. He pointed me to an article in the SF Chronicle. Appears the main thrust of the new marina would be to get bigger yachts into the cove. The two marinas there currently average 31 and 36 ft slips. I'm not against development but it's hard to see how mega yachts would coexist with a lot of kids taking their first sails in FJs or Nomads and this is apparently a unique place to teach first timers out of the high winds and currents of the bay itself.

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they wouldn't change the mud part, just the water part. We anchored out there yesterday. Was blowing a light gale in the main bay, and the kids were in swimsuits and paddle boards in the anchorage. It would suck to lose that.

Basically what my son told me. He pointed me to an article in the SF Chronicle. Appears the main thrust of the new marina would be to get bigger yachts into the cove. The two marinas there currently average 31 and 36 ft slips. I'm not against development but it's hard to see how mega yachts would coexist with a lot of kids taking their first sails in FJs or Nomads and this is apparently a unique place to teach first timers out of the high winds and currents of the bay itself.

 

 

Here is the story

 

If I recall correctly, TISC was still going to be there. I've been fortunate enough to visit to a club with a fairly large and active fleet of Optis and most of the boats berthed there were mega-yachts, but you know, it's Monaco. I hope SF can figure out how to make it all work.

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Man, if the map shown in the article is anything close to scale, it's just not going to work. Slips or instructional sailing programs; choose.

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Heaven forbid we add a man made structure to a man made structure.

I'm sure the Kali Koastal Kommission will set forth plans to remove the artificial landfill that is Treasure Island and return the area to it's natural state.

 

 

 

Treasure Island is an artificial island in San Francisco Bay and a neighborhood of the City of San Francisco. Built 1936–37 for the 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition, the island's World’s Fair site is a California Historical Landmark.[6] Buildings there have been listed on the NRHP, and the island's historical naval station and auxiliary air facility (for airships, blimps, dirigibles, planes and seaplanes) are designated in the Geographic Names Information System.[5]

 

http://www.formerbases.com/cal_no_treasureisland_history.htm

 

Developers asking for public money/subsidy to develop a private marina for mega-yachts on public property... what's in it for the taxpayers?

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My comments;

 

It's good the marina isn't going forward, that really is a nice protected boating spot.

It's also a really nice spot to anchor, I'd hate to lose that.

 

However, it's still shallow; I found the bottom with my 5 foot keel last month. Had to go somewhere else.

 

And the exit onto the bridge is just about the worst one I've ever seen. A stop sign, a 90 degree turn and enter a freeway with zero acceleration lane.

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My comments;

 

It's good the marina isn't going forward, that really is a nice protected boating spot.

It's also a really nice spot to anchor, I'd hate to lose that.

 

However, it's still shallow; I found the bottom with my 5 foot keel last month. Had to go somewhere else.

 

And the exit onto the bridge is just about the worst one I've ever seen. A stop sign, a 90 degree turn and enter a freeway with zero acceleration lane.

it does seem to be silting up. You have to hug the breakaway on the north side to get through.

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Yea, I thought I *was* hugging the right....

In the middle of saying, "we really have to watch the depth here..." it went 6..5..4.. stopped.

Sometimes I'm grateful for the soft mucky bottom of the bay.

 

My own fault, I was trying to get in before the low... bad to be going on a falling tide, but I was able to wiggle out.

 

P.S. The Ayala cove moorings seem to have the same silt issues.

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Yea, I thought I *was* hugging the right....

In the middle of saying, "we really have to watch the depth here..." it went 6..5..4.. stopped.

Sometimes I'm grateful for the soft mucky bottom of the bay.

 

My own fault, I was trying to get in before the low... bad to be going on a falling tide, but I was able to wiggle out.

 

P.S. The Ayala cove moorings seem to have the same silt issues.

moorings and the docks as well.

 

I guess we need some global sea level rises to get some water back in the bay....

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