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P_Wop

Old School Anarchy

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Well, it seemed to me that there's a far-flung and disparate (and rum-enhanced and dissipated) collection of characters here from the older days, all posting on different and divergent threads.

 

So.... Without creating a formal "Old School" Anarchy section in this site (not a bad idea, actually), how about a discussion on the optimum ways to do the shit we did back then?

 

Topics might include:

 

* Purpose and use of a chicken stay (and pix)

* Why and when to fly a blooper, and how to trim it

* The blooper gybe, and why it was a good idea (if it worked)

* High clew reacher and staysail - trimming hints

* Outside spin sets off the pole

* Forward drops

* Going up the rig to clear halyards

* Jib cunninghams - why they are a good idea in a jib change

* Tack-gybe sets at a starboard rounding (I love this one)

* How to manage wire on everything

* Rhythmic rolling - fast or slow?

* Loran, Decca, Consol, Consolan, RDF, sextant nav... Who needs bloody satellites?

* Southport Raw Bar or Chucks on a Friday night

* How you extracted yourself from owner's wife/daughter/mistress bonking discovery?

* Etc...

* Etc., etc....

 

Just trying to pull together some of us who had more fun than we imagined.

 

Go for it.

 

 

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Just when I thought those brain cells where dead and gone or possibly reallocated to better things, you have to go and ask the questions.

 

How about this:

 

When one of your shroud turn-buckles strip its threads clean and it sounds like someone just blew up a piano.

 

--Matt

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Southport. Hands down.

This

 

and that place has started more than one of problems in the next option.

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Well, I seem to remember a prolonged discussion regarding dropping the kids off at the pool....

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yea, wire.....the sound it make under heavy load towards the end of the jib being sheeted in.

 

Stay outta the triangle!

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Tack Gybe set to a starboard rounding....

 

Woof. Gear on port side, pole to the starboard?

 

This was a good one.

 

Imagine it was a port rounding bear-away set. Pole up both ends. Get the tack snaked out to the pole end, and the aftguy on the starboard primary all ready to go. Halyard on, sheet all ready.

 

Then instead of a bear-away, you arrive at the mark on starboard, pull the pole right back, start the spinnaker hoist and throw the boat into a tack. Jib trimmer eases 5 feet of jib sheet and cleats it. The backed jib throws the boat round into a massive tack and gybe. Main is eased and gybed. The jib flops back to the port side, and by the time the stern is round the mark, the kite is up and pulling.

 

And you're on starboard. And asserting it. Most disconcerting for boats on a port tack going for the mark.

 

Damn, that was fun. Worth training the team on if you ever have to do it.

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Reel halyard winch, all wire main halyard. How to reef without the winch handle cracking your elbow.

 

Early all Kevlar jibs that would not fit down the hatch or companionway

 

Luff and foot zippered shelfs (12 meter feature)

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Thigs our diffent nowe...... :)

 

Indeed they are, Snaggles, my friend. Which is why we need, perhaps, the understanding of what they were?

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Though the kids might think today it is, sprits and A-sails killed off the adventure that foredeck once held.

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And in case this was missed in another thread.....

 

Easing the jibsheet into a tack on Kialoa III

 

gallery_271_1014_30040.jpg

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Fuck off... Show tits... what it rate?

 

 

 

 

 

A n d what's a front page!

 

 

 

 

That about covers it.

 

 

 

 

Oh, did I say fuck off?

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Tack Gybe set to a starboard rounding....

 

Woof. Gear on port side, pole to the starboard?

This was a good one.

 

Imagine it was a port rounding bear-away set. Pole up both ends. Get the tack snaked out to the pole end, and the aftguy on the starboard primary all ready to go. Halyard on, sheet all ready.

 

Then instead of a bear-away, you arrive at the mark on starboard, pull the pole right back, start the spinnaker hoist and throw the boat into a tack. Jib trimmer eases 5 feet of jib sheet and cleats it. The backed jib throws the boat round into a massive tack and gybe. Main is eased and gybed. The jib flops back to the port side, and by the time the stern is round the mark, the kite is up and pulling.

 

And you're on starboard. And asserting it. Most disconcerting for boats on a port tack going for the mark.

 

Damn, that was fun. Worth training the team on if you ever have to do it.

We called that a backaround

 

 

 

 

 

Play the halyard not the sheet. Foot should just kiss the water

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Well, it seemed to me that there's a far-flung and disparate (and rum-enhanced and dissipated) collection of characters here from the older days, all posting on different and divergent threads.

 

So.... Without creating a formal "Old School" Anarchy section in this site (not a bad idea, actually), how about a discussion on the optimum ways to do the shit we did back then?

 

Topics might include:

 

* Purpose and use of a chicken stay (and pix)

* Why and when to fly a blooper, and how to trim it

* The blooper gybe, and why it was a good idea (if it worked)

* High clew reacher and staysail - trimming hints

* Outside spin sets off the pole

* Forward drops

* Going up the rig to clear halyards

* Jib cunninghams - why they are a good idea in a jib change

* Tack-gybe sets at a starboard rounding (I love this one)

* How to manage wire on everything

* Rhythmic rolling - fast or slow?

* Loran, Decca, Consol, Consolan, RDF, sextant nav... Who needs bloody satellites?

* Southport Raw Bar or Chucks on a Friday night

* How you extracted yourself from owner's wife/daughter/mistress bonking discovery?

* Etc...

* Etc., etc....

 

Just trying to pull together some of us who had more fun than we imagined.

 

Go for it.

 

 

The lost art of poking the hydraulic handle through the bottom of a Corona bottle so it will sink

 

Or how to get a beer can out of the wheel well at speed

 

Or the fluid elbow mojo needed to flip the sheet over the jaws after a gybe on the first try

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Just when I thought those brain cells where dead and gone or possibly reallocated to better things, you have to go and ask the questions.

 

How about this:

 

When one of your shroud turn-buckles strip its threads clean and it sounds like someone just blew up a piano.

 

--Matt

That's exactally the sound. The class of boat I used to sail ran very slack caps, like 2 feet of slack, and we used to run so much tension on the fwd lowers to get enough bend in the mast to make the old fucked main look ok, sometimes we would tack the boat and the top of the mast would stay up to weather, and need a thump to fall of to leeward. The reason for the slack shrouds was to keep the slot open as the main (Dacron) stretched. Sounds fucked but it's fast.

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And in case this was missed in another thread.....

 

Easing the jibsheet into a tack on Kialoa III

 

gallery_271_1014_30040.jpg

Arrghhh, easing wire spinnaker braces and checking to see if you've still got all your fingers. In fact easing anything that was wire round a drum.

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I was listening to one of the interviews on jc worldwide and the interviewee (maybe spanhake) said of the 12 bottom mark gybe roundings they had strengthened booms so they would gybe and the boom would come across and hit the runner and wind the boat around the mark, as they were too short crewed to have enough to do the runner and main as well as everything else.

 

Cool old school shit right there.

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When deep running and you want me to go to the end of the pole with the new kite, DON'T ease the FUCKING pole forward when I'm climbing up the FUCKING foreguy!!

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Fuck off... Show tits... what it rate?

 

 

 

 

 

A n d what's a front page!

 

 

 

 

That about covers it.

 

 

 

 

Oh, did I say fuck off?

 

 

you forgot "Eat my fuck"

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Reefing jibs/Genoa's.

 

Battens made of that brown stuff

 

No plastic!

 

Blocks with no bearings

 

Analogue speed.

 

Dacron

 

No roach mainsails

 

Crew who said " no"!

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Running down wind in 25 to 30 on a maxi with a helmsman on both wheels. Free board has gone from 6 feet to 6 inches. And, the guy keeps blowing the jaw open. That's when Robin looks over at me and says climb out therected and put the guy back in the jaw. Only it turns out that I climb out and ride the pole to put it back on the guy instead.

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Running down wind in 25 to 30 on a maxi with a helmsman on both wheels.

Twin wheels on a maxi? Kids today...

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* Why and when to fly a blooper, and how to trim it

 

Don't forget having matching bloopers for ALL your running kites.

 

--Matt

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Racer chasers had really hairy pussies in them days. Very difficult to navigate after a skinful of Mount Gay.

 

Owner's wife often did too. How times change......

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Big muffs were the fashion then, I never liked them myself - I like to be able to see where I'm going & what I'm doing

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And in case this was missed in another thread.....

 

Easing the jibsheet into a tack on Kialoa III

 

gallery_271_1014_30040.jpg

Nothing like the sound of wire sheets been easy on the drum.

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Food was always pretty crook. Did a Round the State Race on Ragamuffin in '84. 24 crew for 3+ days, all we took on board (or what Syd would allow) were 3 leg hams and about 40 cabbages... the WYC mait-tai's and burgers tasted pretty good at the finish.

 

Geez the boat stunk!

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Big muffs were the fashion then, I never liked them myself - I like to be able to see where I'm going & what I'm doing

I did.. But there was always that one hair stuck in the back of your throat that would drive me crazy.

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And in case this was missed in another thread.....

 

Easing the jibsheet into a tack on Kialoa III

 

gallery_271_1014_30040.jpg

Nothing like the sound of wire sheets been easy on the drum.

 

NOT releasing the lazy sheet completely - there was a fine, delicate balance to keep enuff tension on the sheet so the clew could not flog, and not getting 10 grinders pissed off at you for making their job to hard.

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Let's not forget the gybe floatoff peel

 

cutting up spare steering wires to splice into Kevlar braces using only a screwdriver when the Kevlar fails leaving the cover holding on_just! faark!

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Food was always pretty crook. Did a Round the State Race on Ragamuffin in '84. 24 crew for 3+ days, all we took on board (or what Syd would allow) were 3 leg hams and about 40 cabbages... the WYC mait-tai's and burgers tasted pretty good at the finish.

 

Geez the boat stunk!

Same race. Last 2 days on crackers n cheese....then we ran out of cheese. Was HYC for us with mai tais to excess....... then it went real pear shaped. ALOHAAAA!!!

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All analogue, black B&G instruments. Loved the TRIM display, which was supposed to show whether you were gaining speed or vice versa

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Or the fluid elbow mojo needed to flip the sheet over the jaws after a gybe on the first try

 

 

This ^^^^^ some never managed, how ever hard they tried :-)

 

1st time --> 1 beer, 2nd time --> 2 beers, etc.

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Food was always pretty crook. Did a Round the State Race on Ragamuffin in '84. 24 crew for 3+ days, all we took on board (or what Syd would allow) were 3 leg hams and about 40 cabbages... the WYC mait-tai's and burgers tasted pretty good at the finish.

 

Geez the boat stunk!

 

Same race. Last 2 days on crackers n cheese....then we ran out of cheese. Was HYC for us with mai tais to excess....... then it went real pear shaped. ALOHAAAA!!!
And some of the easiest hairy muffs at any regatta.

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Big muffs were the fashion then, I never liked them myself - I like to be able to see where I'm going & what I'm doing

I did.. But there was always that one hair stuck in the back of your throat that would drive me crazy.

I thought that was why we all had 'tashs back then. Stopped the shaving rash.

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Loran C

spinnaker flying

funnelators

 

Death rolls!!

Loran A - now that's old school. Anybody remember how to use a sextant? Geez, I must be getting old.

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Or the fluid elbow mojo needed to flip the sheet over the jaws after a gybe on the first try

 

 

This ^^^^^ some never managed, how ever hard they tried :-)

 

1st time --> 1 beer, 2nd time --> 2 beers, etc.

 

 

Nothing quite like the panic when they call for a gybe and you suddendly realise the fucker has slipped back under the pole. :lol:

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Anybody remember how to use a sextant? Geez, I must be getting old.

I remember being excited (?) when the HP came out with a "nav-pack" module for the HP-41 calculator. meant that I could quit dragging one or more volumes of HO-229, the current-year Nautical Almanac, my copy of Bowditch, assorted sight-reduction worksheets and home-grown DR log sheets, and about a metric ton of other stuff... except that I still had to bring it all because the HP-41 wasn't waterproof and didn't like being re-charged off a 12V system.

 

Much happier when the first generation of hand-held GPS units came out. Of course, back then they were the size of a shoe-box and cost a metric ton of cash, at least from the perspective of *my* wallet, but... whatever.

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Or the fluid elbow mojo needed to flip the sheet over the jaws after a gybe on the first try

This ^^^^^ some never managed, how ever hard they tried :-)

 

1st time --> 1 beer, 2nd time --> 2 beers, etc.

Nothing quite like the panic when they call for a gybe and you suddendly realise the fucker has slipped back under the pole. :lol:

Get up towards the shrouds, have enough slack in the line and it's a forward kinda flick and a quick snap back, followed by a casual rodeo flung around the guy to clean things up.

 

It was a God like status if you could pull if off consistently.

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Manitou Passage, Chi-Mac @ 0700. Surfing down 6-10'ers in a building smokey SW'er. I'm trimming the guy in the cockpit next to the wheel. Helmsman says maybe we should start thinking about peeling to the 1.5 oz. Just then a blast hits, the stern lifts and the boat starts turning into a Chinese jibe. Boat does a death roll, pole jams into the water, crew (including me) on the new leeward side start swimming. I reach up through the wheel spokes to the binnacle to pull my ass out of the water, just as the driver cranks the wheel to port. Something in my hand goes crunch. As the boat turns into the wind, the 3/4 oz. takes itself down. It takes about 30 minutes to clear the wreckage and count the crew. As we look around us, we see dozens of sails flogging and boats knocked down hard. We put up a #3 and have a coffee to clear the head.

 

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Well, it seemed to me that there's a far-flung and disparate (and rum-enhanced and dissipated) collection of characters here from the older days, all posting on different and divergent threads.

 

So.... Without creating a formal "Old School" Anarchy section in this site (not a bad idea, actually), how about a discussion on the optimum ways to do the shit we did back then?

 

Topics might include:

 

* Purpose and use of a chicken stay (and pix)

* Why and when to fly a blooper, and how to trim it

* The blooper gybe, and why it was a good idea (if it worked)

* High clew reacher and staysail - trimming hints

* Outside spin sets off the pole

* Forward drops

* Going up the rig to clear halyards

* Jib cunninghams - why they are a good idea in a jib change

* Tack-gybe sets at a starboard rounding (I love this one)

* How to manage wire on everything

* Rhythmic rolling - fast or slow?

* Loran, Decca, Consol, Consolan, RDF, sextant nav... Who needs bloody satellites?

* Southport Raw Bar or Chucks on a Friday night

* How you extracted yourself from owner's wife/daughter/mistress bonking discovery?

* Etc...

* Etc., etc....

 

Just trying to pull together some of us who had more fun than we imagined.

 

Go for it.

 

 

 

Sorry I missed the beginning of this thread. This weekend, my son graduated with a Bachelors in Chemistry / major BioChemistry this weekend so I was busy with all the usual family BS..................and that is not for bachelors of science.

 

Seeing that the original post came from Frisco, I can only say "Shit or get off the pot".

 

Old School, New School,................Old School Frisco.......................................

 

 

gallery_3_148_8492.gif

 

 

Like I said,

"Shit or get off the pot"

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Setting kites in "turtles"... then re-turtling them down below...

Yeah, we still do that.

It startled me for a moment.....

 

I know I'm moving towards the dinosaur arena but....

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And in case this was missed in another thread.....

 

Easing the jibsheet into a tack on Kialoa III

 

gallery_271_1014_30040.jpg

See the left hand on the wraps, kids? If you ease without doing that then all the wraps jump off at once and onto someone's arm or leg. Like a pissed off boa constrictor.

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Chart tables with a Mirror top and razor blades, but not a pencil to be found!

Cassette tape case with a bunch of little cuts outside and secret stuff (not a cassette) inside. Handed back and forth under divider between stalls at YC. Delivery home tomorrow? Let's leave now! Walking up Canon St with Jerry cans to the gas station cause the fuel dock is closed and leaving right now is a very very good idea.

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Setting kites in "turtles"... then re-turtling them down below...

Yeah, we still do that.

It startled me for a moment.....

 

I know I'm moving towards the dinosaur arena but....

 

 

some do... some dont... i try to sail with the boats that dont... or at least boats that have a dedicated sewer i can trust (so long as said sewer is not me). I do like the flexibility of the first hoist out of the bag, second out of the hatch for w/l - depending on how much the boat will give a shit about me being off the rail.

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On a long windward beat in lumpy conditions - trying get the inner forestay connected to the wire strop just above deck. 3-4 guys tensioning the stay, one guy timing everything and ready with the pin. You had to be quick!

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Off watch view off the bottom of the gimbaled stove during death rolls

 

The roaring sound of a stern wake 12" behind you and 18" above the deck

 

The snow storm of a delaminating, practice sail coming apart in 20kts

 

Strangling the tactician for not clearing the running backs!

 

WL

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Sailed on a Two Tonner that had a 2.5oz Mylar kite. Damn near shook the rig out of the boat when it refilled. Stuck like Saran Wrap to everything. Pretty cool to be able to see thru it!

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First Mooloolaba race, long time ago. 1300 off Smokey Cape

 

Building SEer, surfing with kite and blooper, Helmsman lost it in a Chinese.

Damage report. Kite and blooper and pole ok. Track on the front of the mast goes through the main, only a couple of feet at the bottom left attached.

Go to twin pole out whilst main goes below to be sewn back together using harness between reef points to hold leach together.

Main goes back up off Ballina, finish race.

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Or the fluid elbow mojo needed to flip the sheet over the jaws after a gybe on the first try

This ^^^^^ some never managed, how ever hard they tried :-)

 

1st time --> 1 beer, 2nd time --> 2 beers, etc.

Nothing quite like the panic when they call for a gybe and you suddendly realise the fucker has slipped back under the pole. :lol:

Get up towards the shrouds, have enough slack in the line and it's a forward kinda flick and a quick snap back, followed by a casual rodeo flung around the guy to clean things up.

 

It was a God like status if you could pull if off consistently.

I got pretty good at it. 😊

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Didn't think sails set with twin poles was legal when racing?

No mainsail hoisted at the time. Point being that these days of plastic sails, you can't sew them back together like Dacron.

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And don't forget... ready about.... Leo!... I think the poms still say these words....

 

And they still wear pyjamas when sleeping below!...

 

....plotters!

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CCA

 

rotten cotton

 

Merrimans with the slide-in handle

 

Wire-rope splices

 

Gasoline engines

 

Lccal beer

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And in case this was missed in another thread.....

 

Easing the jibsheet into a tack on Kialoa III

 

gallery_271_1014_30040.jpg

See the left hand on the wraps, kids? If you ease without doing that then all the wraps jump off at once and onto someone's arm or leg. Like a pissed off boa constrictor.

 

 

just remember to count your fingers as well!!

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Woman onboard!...

 

Bananas on board

 

No rum onboard

 

Owner onboard

 

Chicken shutes

 

Telltale windows

 

Hood sails

 

That blue sail fabric

 

Mylar sails

 

Cross cut spinnaker

 

Radial cut jibs

 

Jockey poles

 

Club bungees

 

Cheap booze

 

Cheap woman

 

Luff zippers

 

12 metres

 

Siblings

 

Curved vang travellers

 

Smoking onboard

 

Large heavy kit bags, boots and owners wives/ girlfriends.

 

Plentiful crew

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