dylan winter

Girl with patreon account goes sailing in hot place

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2 hours ago, Panoramix said:

That's what I thought first but according to their facebook page, they were still in Halifax on the 18th of August. I think that they filmed this episode just before going. They can be lucky but they can also get to the European side with the first Autumn lows.

I am somewhat surprised that they are either that far north at this time or even anticipating a transatlantic this late.  I'm sure they can 'do' it, but they will have no time to enjoy the northern cruising grounds.  Seems a shame to have to race by them on their way to the Med.  But, everyone has different priorities...

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1 hour ago, mad said:

Reading comprehension is obviously not your skill. 

Ironic.... I was suggesting that the link he posted IS porn... It was sarcasm... 

Maybe it's not your skill, either. 

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18 minutes ago, Zora said:

Ironic.... I was suggesting that the link he posted IS porn... It was sarcasm... 

Maybe it's not your skill, either. 

Fair enough, lost in translation. 

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2 minutes ago, mad said:

Fair enough, lost in translation. 

All good mate

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2 hours ago, Veeger said:

I am somewhat surprised that they are either that far north at this time or even anticipating a transatlantic this late.  I'm sure they can 'do' it, but they will have no time to enjoy the northern cruising grounds.  Seems a shame to have to race by them on their way to the Med.  But, everyone has different priorities...

Yes, if I were them, I would spend winter in Portugal or South Brittany - if they can't cross the bay of Biscay in time - and spend the next spring and summer cruising Ireland, Scotland and Norway.

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3 hours ago, Zora said:
3 hours ago, mad said:

Fair enough, lost in translation. 

All good mate

Two nations, separated by a common language.

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22 hours ago, Israel Hands said:

Teaching his daughter how to handle his boat...hope this doesn't mean he is ending his own sailing career

 

I didn't get that impression from this video.  It just seemed like she maybe hadn't done a lot of sailng lately and he was getting her back into the swing of things on his current boat.

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15 hours ago, mad said:

How long before he just makes the jump to porn?

I know they're all of age, but there something very Jeffrey Epstein about it...

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3 hours ago, charisma94 said:

I know they're all of age, but there something very Jeffrey Epstein about it...

Only if Epstein was poor.

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21 hours ago, mad said:

How long before he just makes the jump to porn?

About a day since you posted this... He's on Pornhub now... But not a "babe" to be seen...

He should get the girls to tidy up the boat a bit... it's a shit show.

 

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12 hours ago, seabell said:

Now is probably about the right time to buy an ad, Wagstaff.

Maybe a new banner ad for the front page??

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  Burns are one of the most common injuries at sea.

This is a good video

 

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This video needs a large breasted Australian girl in a bikini

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4 hours ago, olaf hart said:

  Burns are one of the most common injuries at sea.

This is a good video

 

Olaf,

I hadn't thought about that (burns, most common injuries).  I have not yet attempted any cooking while underway. We generally eat cold or prepared foods but I do expect the day will come where we end up cooking while sailing and I will take your comment to heart.

I have a fire blanket onboard but I should get some burn gel and anti-biotic ointment added to my 1st aid kits.

We don't make coffee with anything like the contraption in the video. I use an old, steel percolator (I remove the guts) to boil water and it has a lid.  I have a pressure cooker onboard so I can cook in a pot with a lockable lid. My galley range came with pot clamps.

Any other advice about gear, habits or clever tricks for dealing with hot galley items while underway?

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29 minutes ago, Dogscout said:

This video needs a large breasted Australian girl in a bikini

fek he strung this one out

man crying to camera for five minutes without telling you what happened

I gave up

D

 

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52 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Olaf,

I hadn't thought about that (burns, most common injuries).  I have not yet attempted any cooking while underway. We generally eat cold or prepared foods but I do expect the day will come where we end up cooking while sailing and I will take your comment to heart.

I have a fire blanket onboard but I should get some burn gel and anti-biotic ointment added to my 1st aid kits.

We don't make coffee with anything like the contraption in the video. I use an old, steel percolator (I remove the guts) to boil water and it has a lid.  I have a pressure cooker onboard so I can cook in a pot with a lockable lid. My galley range came with pot clamps.

Any other advice about gear, habits or clever tricks for dealing with hot galley items while underway?

 I have heard it suggested to wear your wet weather bibs(trousers) when cooking, don’t know how well that would go in the tropics.

that idea of a fire proof apron is a good one, I wonder if there is a more sensible sort than the leather one in the video, maybe a good solid canvas welding apron?

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1 hour ago, dylan winter said:

fek he strung this one out

man crying to camera for five minutes without telling you what happened

I gave up

D

 

Look, it says right on the thumbnail that it's painful to watch. You have only yourself to blame.

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I don't remember if I figured this out rationally, or it discovered it accidentally, but it was my turn to make soup & sandwiches one day while crossing the Columbia River Bar.  Use the pot clamps, and choose an over-sized pot, so that the soup has plenty of room to slosh around without spilling.  Works great, and probably heats faster that way as well.  Also, cook on starboard tack, whenever possible, so that the stove is below you, not above.  (YMMV if you have a starboard galley.)

Oshit! I was just staring out the window while typing this, and there was a lightning strike with simultaneous thunderclap right in front of me, somewhere in the woods.  Now I suppose I'll have to stay home all day and see if the forest is going to burn...

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5 hours ago, olaf hart said:

 I have heard it suggested to wear your wet weather bibs(trousers) when cooking, don’t know how well that would go in the tropics.

that idea of a fire proof apron is a good one, I wonder if there is a more sensible sort than the leather one in the video, maybe a good solid canvas welding apron?

Something we do in the family (at least waterproof bib + boots) when cooking in less than ideal conditions.

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5 hours ago, Panoramix said:
10 hours ago, olaf hart said:

 I have heard it suggested to wear your wet weather bibs(trousers) when cooking, don’t know how well that would go in the tropics.

that idea of a fire proof apron is a good one, I wonder if there is a more sensible sort than the leather one in the video, maybe a good solid canvas welding apron?

Something we do in the family (at least waterproof bib + boots) when cooking in less than ideal conditions.

We have an oil-skin/PVC apron. If it's bumpy I wear foulies and boots - just make sure your boots are tucked-in! Otherwise it's just a boil-in bag. 

 

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26 minutes ago, Elegua said:

We have an oil-skin/PVC apron. If it's bumpy I wear foulies and boots - just make sure your boots are tucked-in! Otherwise it's just a boil-in bag. 

 

Indeed.

Talking of footwear, am I the only one uneasy with all these people on YouTube sailing barefoot? When I skipper I ask for shoes when underway, I just don't want to have to deal with a butchered foot and there are lot of opportunity to do so when barefoot on a moving platorm with bits protruding everywhere.

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35 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

Indeed.

Talking of footwear, am I the only one uneasy with all these people on YouTube sailing barefoot? When I skipper I ask for shoes when underway, I just don't want to have to deal with a butchered foot and there are lot of opportunity to do so when barefoot on a moving platorm with bits protruding everywhere.

Which is why, when I built my boat, I did my utmost to make sure there *weren't* bits protruding everywhere. Mind you I had little to do as the designer had already eliminated all but 2 trip/kick hazards.

FKT

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5 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Which is why, when I built my boat, I did my utmost to make sure there *weren't* bits protruding everywhere. Mind you I had little to do as the designer had already eliminated all but 2 trip/kick hazards.

FKT

How do you deal with Genoa blocks, mainsheet attachment, etc...?

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8 hours ago, Panoramix said:

Indeed.

Talking of footwear, am I the only one uneasy with all these people on YouTube sailing barefoot? When I skipper I ask for shoes when underway, I just don't want to have to deal with a butchered foot and there are lot of opportunity to do so when barefoot on a moving platorm with bits protruding everywhere.

Wait what?

In more than ten thousand hours of sailing, I would have worn shoes for... a couple thousand at most, only on a boat with a rough tramp and on some trapezing boats without proper grip.

Never once had a foot injury. Sailed on everything from an Optimist to an SS34 to a 50' cat...

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4 hours ago, Panoramix said:

How do you deal with Genoa blocks, mainsheet attachment, etc...?

Precisely how the designer specified. As I said.

FKT

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46 minutes ago, darth reapius said:

Wait what?

In more than ten thousand hours of sailing, I would have worn shoes for... a couple thousand at most, only on a boat with a rough tramp and on some trapezing boats without proper grip.

Never once had a foot injury. Sailed on everything from an Optimist to an SS34 to a 50' cat...

I saw my dad cut his foot stepping on the (rough) shackle of the anchor when I was a kid, that was a bit messy. I know one event is not a statistic, may be I am over cautious, obviously I don't ask for safety shoes, deck shoes are more than good enough for me.

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19 minutes ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

Precisely how the designer specified. As I said.

FKT

I understood this. I must lack imagination but in my world sheets have to run above deck level, thus blocks protrude.

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10 hours ago, Panoramix said:

Indeed.

Talking of footwear, am I the only one uneasy with all these people on YouTube sailing barefoot? When I skipper I ask for shoes when underway, I just don't want to have to deal with a butchered foot and there are lot of opportunity to do so when barefoot on a moving platorm with bits protruding everywhere.

You're not alone.  I've gone barefoot a few times and I've given up on it because I am inherently clumsy and always bark my toes on something-  jib blocks, chain plates, or worse, cotter pins.  I find that Keens offer excellent grip and toe protection while also being an open, breathable sandal-type shoe. In cooler weather, I shift to Sperry's.

I'll go barefoot when at anchor because the boat is relatively stable and I can take my time avoiding trip hazards. In fact, I'll kick off my shoes while driving but if I have to go on deck, I put them on.

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I've bashed my toes too many times.  Now I always wear shoes underway.

Cooking at sea... like many tasks at sea mainly requires careful planning and moving slowly. Make sure you potholders work really well. Make sure you always have one hand for the boat (e.g. pots that don't need two hands). Boiling water is for sure a danger, so we used the sink for pouring anything. You can just have cold food if it is really rough, but hot drinks or soup are sometimes a must. At anchor I use the same type of pour over funnel as in the vid for making coffee b/c it makes good coffee.  But I use a French press at sea. Cups with spill-proof tops.

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A cup caddy is very handy for hot beverages. I have a bunch of old buffalo china mugs from my parents. If you drop one on your toe, it's not the hot water that will hurt. 

Shoes: I grew up not wearing shoes dinghy sailing or otherwise - and my parents had an S&S metal-shop/winchfarm.  Not sure how I still have feet. Or fingers. Now I like to wear Keenes underway and but don't wear shoes at anchor.   

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With all the bent frames installed in Arabella and all the bronze floors in place, we can now work on installing the sole beams. The sole beams are the members that will span from frame to frame and support the cabin sole inside of Arabella. We are installing these now because it will allow us to shape the ends of these to fit perfectly to the contour of the inside of the planks before installing the planks. If we were to install the sole beams later, we would have a hard time fitting them to the existing shape whereas if we do it now, we can just fair the ends using a batten on the outside of the frames as if it were the planking. While we were working on installing the sole beams, we also got a very important and long awaited delivery. John from Hansen Marine and Brooke from Nanni Diesel came by to deliver Arabella's brand new motor ( Nanni Diesel N4.50). It won't get installed until after we are done planking but it is great to finally have that paid for and in the boathouse waiting to go into its new home. Thank you to all of you who made this a possibility and for Hansen Marine and Nanni Diesel for the generous help. And of course to John, Brooke, Thad and Nevan for helping deliver it and move it to the second floor of the boathouse on one of the hottest days of the summer so far!!

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6 hours ago, t.rex said:

 

 

With all the bent frames installed in Arabella and all the bronze floors in place, we can now work on installing the sole beams. The sole beams are the members that will span from frame to frame and support the cabin sole inside of Arabella. We are installing these now because it will allow us to shape the ends of these to fit perfectly to the contour of the inside of the planks before installing the planks. If we were to install the sole beams later, we would have a hard time fitting them to the existing shape whereas if we do it now, we can just fair the ends using a batten on the outside of the frames as if it were the planking. While we were working on installing the sole beams, we also got a very important and long awaited delivery. John from Hansen Marine and Brooke from Nanni Diesel came by to deliver Arabella's brand new motor ( Nanni Diesel N4.50). It won't get installed until after we are done planking but it is great to finally have that paid for and in the boathouse waiting to go into its new home. Thank you to all of you who made this a possibility and for Hansen Marine and Nanni Diesel for the generous help. And of course to John, Brooke, Thad and Nevan for helping deliver it and move it to the second floor of the boathouse on one of the hottest days of the summer so far!!

meanwhile at the polar opposite end of the sailing film spectrum are these two

I am sure they are not stoned all the time - just some of it

rather interesting films though I think - unpolished, honest, simple

 

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I agree wholeheartedly Dylan, Wildlings Sailing is so refreshing, really a joy to watch. I would be more inclined to contrast them with Sailing Fair Isle (and in fact I do just that in my most recent column in PBO). Which is not to say that I don't appreciate Sailing Fair Isle's efforts, but seriously, I wish they'd just chill a bit already. Some space cakes might be just the thing for them...

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6 hours ago, kass said:

I agree wholeheartedly Dylan, Wildlings Sailing is so refreshing, really a joy to watch. I would be more inclined to contrast them with Sailing Fair Isle (and in fact I do just that in my most recent column in PBO). Which is not to say that I don't appreciate Sailing Fair Isle's efforts, but seriously, I wish they'd just chill a bit already. Some space cakes might be just the thing for them...

The Wynns are also a little too perfect -

it is astonishing how the style of film- making is changing and being constantly  tweaked

we have come a long way since the Hiscocks and Pardys

so....

 

are the Wildings stoners?

they seem to be terminally happy.

 

D

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I suspect if I persevere I could find sailing/cruising vids I enjoy. (I do enjoy KTL).

For me the big gap is I’m interested in the passage and places but not the self absorbed people (the selfie generation). I find WAY TOO MUCH of the screen time is taken up with the protagonists who are not all that interesting and not enough with the places they are or the process of getting there. I’d be interested in (but not interested enough to do it myself) to know the ratio of screen time these vloggers spend on screen compared with more commercial travel shows. Although Bourdain uses up lots of screen time “parts unknown” seems to be genuinely about the interesting food and places more than about Anthony. Even “Rick Steves’ Europe” manages to be more about the place than about Rick.

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7 hours ago, KC375 said:

I suspect if I persevere I could find sailing/cruising vids I enjoy. (I do enjoy KTL).

For me the big gap is I’m interested in the passage and places but not the self absorbed people (the selfie generation). I find WAY TOO MUCH of the screen time is taken up with the protagonists who are not all that interesting and not enough with the places they are or the process of getting there. I’d be interested in (but not interested enough to do it myself) to know the ratio of screen time these vloggers spend on screen compared with more commercial travel shows. Although Bourdain uses up lots of screen time “parts unknown” seems to be genuinely about the interesting food and places more than about Anthony. Even “Rick Steves’ Europe” manages to be more about the place than about Rick.

thanks for that

 

yakking at a screen is the quickest way of making two films a week - and the Wildings are aiming for two each week.  Making even one a week is really hard to do. Not many people have lives that are interesting enough to make half an hour of TV a week. They appear to have been stormbound in the scillies for a week yet they still churned out two films.

 

I reckon my films take about two to three  weeks of solid shed time editing, scripting, mixing, colour balancing, audio mixing and mastering to make one 15 minute film.  So I only make 12 films a year - The films I am currently editing for this coming winter were shot two years ago and I think that a bit of perspective on what happened makes things more interesting.  I write a script - usually around 2,000 words per episode and then I tweak it and tweak it and re-cut the images again. Then I go for a bike ride and leave the film for a week and come back to look at it

The productivity of the more professional film makers is beathtaking. But the requirement to hit the deadlines for a film per week does have an impact on the films.

"Never mind the quality - feel the width" is an old tailors term my dad used to use all the time.

 

Drenched have taken an interesting approach to the subject. They have 14(?) people on one boat - some are "performers" and some are film makers. In their last effort they split into three or four teams to make films about Tonga. Some were sent diving, some were sent to rabmble up a mountain and climb a radio mast(I assume the owners of the radio  mast would not be best pleased) and another team went to eat some food and interact with the  locals

and then they give them all away free.

The pace on board must be frenetic and their work ethic makes Delos and La Vag seem positively lackadaisical. However, if you want the google algorithmns to promote your films then you have to produce lots of them and post them regularly otherwise youtube makes them dissapear from people's feeds.

 

I have been redigitising my films and moving them all to  vimeo (which is not as good as youtube when it comes to delivering video) . I am giving away a low bandwidth smartphone version that looks pretty soupy on anything other than a phone and then getting people to pay $1 for the link to  the 4K version that looks good on a big telly, laptop or tablet. There is also  a download link - and  about a third of the people who cough up $1 download the films

So far so good...

I think that placing a value on the films encourages the viewers to value  them....

there is a canal  boat video maker who has also thrown in the towel on youtube - and charges $1 per film via vimeo - he tells me that his income is $400 a week. So I will see how my efforts pan out  this  winter.

. having said that I have not turned a frame on KTL for  the past two years while saving up for  a  warm boat for  cold sailing

in the  meantime this couple  are sailing in scotland in a  classic boat - goodonem

here they are going around the mull of kintyre

they are using music in their videos ... so all their work now belongs to google

 

12,000 views

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, dylan winter said:

...yakking at a screen is the quickest way of making two films a week... 

my films take about two to three  weeks of solid shed time ...

The productivity of the more professional film makers is beathtaking. But the requirement to hit the deadlines for a film per week does have an impact on the films.

... and then they give them all away free.

... if you want the google algorithmns to promote your films then you have to produce lots of them and post them regularly otherwise youtube makes them dissapear from people's feeds.

...I think that placing a value on the films encourages the viewers to value  them....

 

In some ways it feels like the internet allows us to live a modern version of the tragedy of the commons. The tyranny of the internet business models whether that is journalism or travelogues / nature documentaries is killing quality content. What you describe as more “professional” may be more polished and higher volume but not higher quality. I hope your and other pay per view efforts and journalism pay walls start to drive consumers back to paying for and demanding quality.

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1 hour ago, KC375 said:

In some ways it feels like the internet allows us to live a modern version of the tragedy of the commons.

It does, and at lightning speed, too!

 

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Has anyone else come across this series? While not sailing, they are very well made. His other videos are also brilliant, like the ones where he built a cardboard boat. 

 

 

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5 hours ago, Zora said:

Has anyone else come across this series? While not sailing, they are very well made. His other videos are also brilliant, like the ones where he built a cardboard boat. 

Yeah, I really enjoyed this one. Again, not sailing (in fact, not underway at all), no girls in bikinis, and not in a hot place. But still enjoyable. 

 

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15 hours ago, Zora said:

Has anyone else come across this series? While not sailing, they are very well made. His other videos are also brilliant, like the ones where he built a cardboard boat. 

Funny you should mention this, as it's the third channel (along with Fair Isle and Wildlings) that I mentioned in my latest PBO column (October issue). Very entertaining videos, but I fear his plan for taking that rib all the way around the UK is quixotic at best (speaking as someone who has raced a well-found yacht around Britain and Ireland). He so clearly doesn't know what he doesn't know. I'm tempted to put him in touch with some people who might clue him up a little (e.g. any of the guys who have recently broken records for sailing dinghies round, or Vendée Globe veteran Enda O'Coineen, who motor sailed a small Zodiac across the Atlantic a while back).

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24 minutes ago, kass said:

Funny you should mention this, as it's the third channel (along with Fair Isle and Wildlings) that I mentioned in my latest PBO column (October issue). Very entertaining videos, but I fear his plan for taking that rib all the way around the UK is quixotic at best (speaking as someone who has raced a well-found yacht around Britain and Ireland). He so clearly doesn't know what he doesn't know. I'm tempted to put him in touch with some people who might clue him up a little (e.g. any of the guys who have recently broken records for sailing dinghies round, or Vendée Globe veteran Enda O'Coineen, who motor sailed a small Zodiac across the Atlantic a while back).

I think his plan is to trailer it around the UK and make videos (like his most recent) of historical or interesting landmarks? Or if not on a trailer, then in stages from port to port... either way will be fun to see 

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6 hours ago, dylan winter said:

Christian Williams raises his game on the thumbnails

 

 

Christian's daughter (pictured) is in every frame of the film and gorgeous from any angle. You could probably say the same thing no matter what thumbnail he chose but I seriously doubt this was a conscious effort to drive clicks. 

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20 hours ago, Lake Schooner said:

Yeah, I really enjoyed this one. Again, not sailing (in fact, not underway at all), no girls in bikinis, and not in a hot place. But still enjoyable. 

 

That was really interesting.  I'm not sure why, but, I enjoyed it.

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22 hours ago, Lake Schooner said:

 

 

Really enjoyed that. What a whacky project!

Taciturn Ben is a breath of fresh air in a world of chirpy Instagram stars.

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5 hours ago, Tom Keffer said:

Really enjoyed that. What a whacky project!

Taciturn Ben is a breath of fresh air in a world of chirpy Instagram stars.

Taciturn is the new cool

as opposed to.....

 

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On 8/23/2019 at 6:49 PM, Panoramix said:

These 2 are now crossing the North Atlantic.

I would be nervous to cross so late in the summer....

They've made it across : https://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/details/ships/shipid:5892219/mmsi:316039039/imo:0/vessel:UMA/_:b8e1630a0ba37614a273a4005d7bf973

Just spotted SW of the Scillies by AIS. On marinetraffic, you can have 5 boats for free in your "fleet" and they will email you as soon as within range.

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I'm torn.  I want them to fuck off and stop their spammy advertising, but they did show us some boobies.

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On 9/4/2019 at 4:17 AM, dylan winter said:

and that was the wrong url

 

Every episode seems to feature her tendency to seasickness. How are they possibly going to make it around the world?

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37 minutes ago, Israel Hands said:

Every episode seems to feature her tendency to seasickness. How are they possibly going to make it around the world?

which is why they are going to the med down the french canals

I agree... sea sickness is going to be a real killer for the adventure

D

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6 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

which is why they are going to the med down the french canals

I agree... sea sickness is going to be a real killer for the adventure

D

She's a Chinese women who's made it all the way to blighty and started sailing there. That implies a certain amount of grit. 

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1 hour ago, dylan winter said:

which is why they are going to the med down the french canals

I agree... sea sickness is going to be a real killer for the adventure

D

They need to do a long crossing, unless she is one of these rare persons who don't get eventually used to the motion, after 36/48 hours she will be OK.

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2 hours ago, Israel Hands said:

Every episode seems to feature her tendency to seasickness. How are they possibly going to make it around the world?

Darwin did! Puking the entire way.

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3 hours ago, Panoramix said:

They need to do a long crossing, unless she is one of these rare persons who don't get eventually used to the motion, after 36/48 hours she will be OK.

This. Well, probably be ok. Some people never get their sea legs, as you say.

IME on bigger ships some people are effectively immune to motion sickness, most are affected slightly/severely and get over it in a couple of days and a few unfortunates had to find a new career.

FKT

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I was on a research cruise once where they had to helicopter evac someone off the ship because of dehydration brought on by prolonged seasickness. Could not even keep water down and it was not rough at all.

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3 hours ago, monsoon said:

I was on a research cruise once where they had to helicopter evac someone off the ship because of dehydration brought on by prolonged seasickness. Could not even keep water down and it was not rough at all.

Some people get gastritis as soon as they start to vomit, best option is to start something like ranitidine and antacids as well as sea sickness meds before heading out.

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4 hours ago, olaf hart said:

Some people get gastritis as soon as they start to vomit, best option is to start something like ranitidine and antacids as well as sea sickness meds before heading out.

Had one person was seriously ill, couldn’t even keep a teaspoon full of water down, after 2 days they were pale unresponsive and beyond even trying.

Emergency medical advice over SSB radio after some diagnosis was to give rectal hydration as quickly as possible and they talked us through it, we had to cobble something together and that was a task on it's own .

But It worked very well. We had glucose aboard and were told to add that and salt to warmed water.

I carry an proper enema kit now in the first aid and have never had to use it since.  My son ( a doctor )wants me to carry IV fluid and learn how to insert an IV drip.  I’m not sure that’s possible in severe weather in a smaller vessel. The enema is fairly foolproof.

What do you think Olaf

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Sounds like a pain in the ass....

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4 hours ago, MikeJohns said:

Had one person was seriously ill, couldn’t even keep a teaspoon full of water down, after 2 days they were pale unresponsive and beyond even trying.

Emergency medical advice over SSB radio after some diagnosis was to give rectal hydration as quickly as possible and they talked us through it, we had to cobble something together and that was a task on it's own .

But It worked very well. We had glucose aboard and were told to add that and salt to warmed water.

I carry an proper enema kit now in the first aid and have never had to use it since.  My son ( a doctor )wants me to carry IV fluid and learn how to insert an IV drip.  I’m not sure that’s possible in severe weather in a smaller vessel. The enema is fairly foolproof.

What do you think Olaf

Unfortunately, as of this month I am no longer qualified to comment, however I found this useful information on the interwebs...

https://www.realfirstaid.co.uk/rectal

IV cannulation is a motor skill, requires practice and regular updating. If you regularly sail offshore with this person it may be worth the effort, but it’s not easy for an unskilled person to cannulate a vein on a moving boat in someone who is already dehydrated.

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Hmmmnn...Pretty much don't get sick at sea, when leaving or during a passage.  Just lucky I guess.  If I did I would probably find another avocation.  Just sayin.

 

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For me its a mind game.  I have never gotten sick, but I think its cause I can process whats happening and move away from those feelings.  If I let myself get carried away, I would probably get sick sometimes, but I just focus on the task at hand, and relax and it goes away.  Sometimes I try to embrace the motion of the boat mentally and find it soothing.  Maybe growing up on a boat helps since I would sleep in the v-birth when I was kid while my parents sailed and the motion makes me sleepy.  :D

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Planking has been a very fun challenge though a bit of a challenge it has been. Learning to fit the oak planks to each other has its intricacies. We need to make sure the plank fits well fore and aft but also that the bevels match so that we can put in a good bead of cotton caulking. All of this is being done with thick, unruly oak planks! Once we finish these last broadstrakes, which will be the last oak planks, we will be moving on to cedar planking. Cedar, being a much lighter wood, is likely going to be much easier to work with. We are very much looking forward to seeing the difference this makes. But, before we get to those, we will have to wrap up a few more tasks... but that's for another video! In the mean time, we come across a few challenges with this last oak strake that we had not anticipated. But in Acorn to Arabella fashion, we just figure out the best way for us to just keep moving forward and making things work!

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35 minutes ago, dylan winter said:

what do you make of these two?

?

I really want to like them.  They seem nice enough and have an absolutely gorgeous boat and seem to be sailing thru some wonderful scenery...

But why are they constantly jabbering at the camera??  Needs less facetime and more sailing.

Cute doggo, tho.

-Z

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The boat and the locale got me interested.  Too much talk about hair.  A lot of pics of him just getting out of bed (with and without the dog).  Mostly motoring.  I think the boat is too much for them long term.  That varnish is already going downhill....

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19 hours ago, Veeger said:

The boat and the locale got me interested.  Too much talk about hair.  A lot of pics of him just getting out of bed (with and without the dog).  Mostly motoring.  I think the boat is too much for them long term.  That varnish is already going downhill....

I agree with that

The tyranny of the once a week posting means that if it rains in scotland for a week they do not have much to show you other than the bad weather  so they fill it with a lot of yak to the camera.

However, I think that with some elements of the audience  that one to one interaction is pretty important and helps to bind the audience to the presenters.

I have also travelled in a 26 foot yacht with our dog - a 7 year old labrador. A dog on a boat is a right pain in the arse. The relentless demands of the dog bowels tie you to the land in a most unpleasant way.   It took about three weeks after the dog had left that the occurrence black hairs in cups of coffee finally started to fade.

Dylan

 

PS - good hair though

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I give them points for having a go, sailing in Scotland and that beautiful boat.

But I made the mistake of watching their boat tour, they are ruining that boat down below ...

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7 hours ago, olaf hart said:

I give them points for having a go, sailing in Scotland and that beautiful boat.

But I made the mistake of watching their boat tour, they are ruining that boat down below ...

lots of un-finished stuff down below - cheap ply and self drivers used a lot... tongue and groove -.and much cutting out the previous owners excellent work -

Maybe they need a visit from Mads

Dylan - sailor of shit old minimally fettled plastic boats

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6 hours ago, dylan winter said:

lots of un-finished stuff down below - cheap ply and self drivers used a lot... tongue and groove -.and much cutting out the previous owners excellent work -

Maybe they need a visit from Mads

Dylan - sailor of shit old minimally fettled plastic boats

It's not bad below, much better than the boat sitting idle in a marina somewhere. The tongue and groove is fine? Plenty of boats built using that, mine included and lots of other boats I know built 30 years ago used it.. Fair enough it's a wooden boat and that comes with it's own level of responsibility (to a certain extent) to keep things "original" but He also mentions a lot of it is temporary.  

They're out sailing, working as they go and keeping a beautiful old ship going. Fair play to them. Easy for us to criticise from afar. 

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Easy for us to criticise from afar. 

And fun, too!

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We've done steam bent frames for the majority of Arabella, now, in the stem and the stern, it's time to make some sawn frames. Where the bow and stern come in to the centerline timbers, the shape of the hull is fairly sharp. Steam bending frames in these areas would not be very easy nor ideal. Not only are they very short, which would make them difficult to bend, but they also would have to have some sever twist in them. Because of this, making single sawn frames for the bow and the stern were a better idea in our minds. This gave us the opportunity to test our hand at making sawn frames. Making patterns, finding timber with curved grain to cut them from and then shaping them before installing them back in their place with a different kind of bronze floor. In this video we explain our process for picking up patterns and making the frames. In the next episode we will show more of the work being done organically. Hope you enjoy and thank you for the support!

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4 hours ago, dylan winter said:

and then are these people

hot water, blue skies, diving, fishing

 

  1. Greengrocer's apostrophe
  2. Irritating problems with autofocus picking out the wrong thing to focus on
  3. Too much talking head

Has potential though

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4 hours ago, dylan winter said:

and then are these people

hot water, blue skies, diving, fishing

 

Before setting out, these folks lived down the dock from me. Nice folks but I find their videos to be a bit repetitive. Suggested drinking game: take a shot every time Jeff says "good friends". 

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