Caca Cabeza

Bigger Swan info

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Starting my 10-ish year exit plan. Thinking of disappearing into the warmer climes. Like to be able to have some room to move around as well as extra room to invite friends along.

 

Been hanging out on a Swan 47, but if you have guests, they sleep in the living room. I like the layout of the Swan 51 and 53. 57, too but they are a bit spends.

 

I've been looking at the 1980 to early 1190 models to keep prices in my "stretched" range. Since they are pretty few and far between, anyone have some first hand info, so I don't have to go all over just for a look see at first?

 

Any other models/boats I should look at? I really like the Swan durability and strength. Plus, to my eye, S&S drew some pretty sweet lines.

 

Thanks guys.

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If you want a post-1980 Swan you won't likely be getting an S&S unless it's a boat built late in its production life - they changed to Holland, Frers etc. around '80.

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If you want a post-1980 Swan you won't likely be getting an S&S unless it's a boat built late in its production life - they changed to Holland, Frers etc. around '80.

True story. Forgot that the 53 was Frers. Still nice lines.

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Starting my 10-ish year exit plan. Thinking of disappearing into the warmer climes. Like to be able to have some room to move around as well as extra room to invite friends along.

 

Been hanging out on a Swan 47, but if you have guests, they sleep in the living room. I like the layout of the Swan 51 and 53. 57, too but they are a bit spends.

 

I've been looking at the 1980 to early 1190 models to keep prices in my "stretched" range. Since they are pretty few and far between, anyone have some first hand info, so I don't have to go all over just for a look see at first?

 

Any other models/boats I should look at? I really like the Swan durability and strength. Plus, to my eye, S&S drew some pretty sweet lines.

 

Thanks guys.

 

 

You will have less visitors than you think. Focus on your life; not some dream of a boat load of people drinking your wine. Space for one couple is plenty. One single is better. What can you sail and paint by yourself. If any of my boats get crowded I am likely the one to move for a day or two. If you have unlimited funds. Get a nice big boat and a crew and tell the captain paid to sleep in a cubby when and where to have the boat. Without paid help. A couple of visitors at a time is plenty to take care of and clean up after.

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I know what I am looking for, and what it entails. I have done cruising, and I have kids who will be coming to visit, plus one who is special needs that will be living with me, hence the separate cabin, not in the "living room".

 

If I remember correctly, Frers got his start, after his father, with S&S. If not, the S&S design school ruled the day.

 

While I really like the Swan 47, it doesn't have the more than 2 cabin layout that I want. I know that visitors will not be often, but with myself and special needs child, a three sleeping area is a must - no, I'm not ignorant of nautical terms, just keeping the lingo simple. I have, and would do a smaller boat, but I am thinking about my cruising "partner". Quality of life is paramount while I am here. Hoping my other kids will continue when I am unable.

 

Other ideas that I have been mulling about, given performance, strength, living volume and comfort are: Waquiez, Baltic and C&C.

 

All feedback is appreciated.

 

You guys rock, as always.

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fun job...looking, thinking and imagining, especially when it's not just day dreaming

 

enjoy the journey

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sailed on the old 53, the new 53, the 57 and the 65 of the bigger ranges (also the 42, 45 and some others). Fun boats. the old 53 is plenty big. the version i sailed on had 2 2p cabins up front, the owners cabin in the back. so fits your needs, as well as provides the opportunity to go sailing with more people in case you need it. The owners of the 53 were at that point in their 60's and still double handed the boat (they did have powered winches).

 

Cool dreaming about pretty boats!

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Is there any way to calculate or determine what the performance difference is between the older and heavier Swans and the new models built today. Why did Swan and so many others stop making the very successful and proven hulls of the past. Besides the old boat what are you giving up when you go with a 20, even 30 year old design. It cannot be all weight savings? At one point during the Swan 65 build. Swan added 13,0000 of ballast to a very successful design.

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Pretty sure you wont find one better than BOO. Amazing condition and more space than a 4 bedroom house.

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listing/pl_boat_detail.jsp?&units=Feet&id=2840193〈=en&slim=broker&&hosturl=willismarine&&ywo=willismarine&

Depends, Not if it needs $100,000 new deck and she is a little thin on sail inventory.

 

Between Brexit fears and the exchange rates there are a shitload of used Swans ( and similar luxury items)

under contract now at bargain basement prices in Europe and the values are still falling.

 

(edit. sorry see 'new teak decks 2000' (16 years old) so still some life in them.

 

It comes down to Caca's budget. A Swan 57 is a lot of boat to handle if double-handing most of the time

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I know what I am looking for, and what it entails. I have done cruising, and I have kids who will be coming to visit, plus one who is special needs that will be living with me, hence the separate cabin, not in the "living room".

 

If I remember correctly, Frers got his start, after his father, with S&S. If not, the S&S design school ruled the day.

 

While I really like the Swan 47, it doesn't have the more than 2 cabin layout that I want. I know that visitors will not be often, but with myself and special needs child, a three sleeping area is a must - no, I'm not ignorant of nautical terms, just keeping the lingo simple. I have, and would do a smaller boat, but I am thinking about my cruising "partner". Quality of life is paramount while I am here. Hoping my other kids will continue when I am unable.

 

Other ideas that I have been mulling about, given performance, strength, living volume and comfort are: Waquiez, Baltic and C&C.

 

All feedback is appreciated.

 

You guys rock, as always.

 

Didn't want this to read like an ad so I PM'd you my favorite Swan broker's number who knows all of the models intimately and can help you with this stuff if you are interested.

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Pretty sure you wont find one better than BOO. Amazing condition and more space than a 4 bedroom house.

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listing/pl_boat_detail.jsp?&units=Feet&id=2840193〈=en&slim=broker&&hosturl=willismarine&&ywo=willismarine&

Depends, Not if it needs $100,000 new deck and she is a little thin on sail inventory.

 

Between Brexit fears and the exchange rates there are a shitload of used Swans ( and similar luxury items)

under contract now at bargain basement prices in Europe and the values are still falling.

 

(edit. sorry see 'new teak decks 2000' (16 years old) so still some life in them.

 

It comes down to Caca's budget. A Swan 57 is a lot of boat to handle if double-handing most of the time

 

 

I love Swans but would agree that a 57 is a lot of boat for two. One of the reasons they are selling for less now is because they can take a crew to saill well. Not really designed for shorthanded cruising. We did with ours but it was only a 41. There is nothing like them for sailing to wind, though.

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Pretty sure you wont find one better than BOO. Amazing condition and more space than a 4 bedroom house.

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listing/pl_boat_detail.jsp?&units=Feet&id=2840193〈=en&slim=broker&&hosturl=willismarine&&ywo=willismarine&

Depends, Not if it needs $100,000 new deck and she is a little thin on sail inventory.

 

Between Brexit fears and the exchange rates there are a shitload of used Swans ( and similar luxury items)

under contract now at bargain basement prices in Europe and the values are still falling.

 

(edit. sorry see 'new teak decks 2000' (16 years old) so still some life in them.

 

It comes down to Caca's budget. A Swan 57 is a lot of boat to handle if double-handing most of the time

 

Guys,

 

I am good friends with the owner of Boontasa. Hes a good guy and the boat is in GREAT shape. Well worth asking price

 

I know what I am looking for, and what it entails. I have done cruising, and I have kids who will be coming to visit, plus one who is special needs that will be living with me, hence the separate cabin, not in the "living room".

 

If I remember correctly, Frers got his start, after his father, with S&S. If not, the S&S design school ruled the day.

 

While I really like the Swan 47, it doesn't have the more than 2 cabin layout that I want. I know that visitors will not be often, but with myself and special needs child, a three sleeping area is a must - no, I'm not ignorant of nautical terms, just keeping the lingo simple. I have, and would do a smaller boat, but I am thinking about my cruising "partner". Quality of life is paramount while I am here. Hoping my other kids will continue when I am unable.

 

Other ideas that I have been mulling about, given performance, strength, living volume and comfort are: Waquiez, Baltic and C&C.

 

All feedback is appreciated.

 

You guys rock, as always.

 

Didn't want this to read like an ad so I PM'd you my favorite Swan broker's number who knows all of the models intimately and can help you with this stuff if you are interested.

 

you referring to KY?

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Pretty sure you wont find one better than BOO. Amazing condition and more space than a 4 bedroom house.

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listing/pl_boat_detail.jsp?&units=Feet&id=2840193〈=en&slim=broker&&hosturl=willismarine&&ywo=willismarine&

Depends, Not if it needs $100,000 new deck and she is a little thin on sail inventory.

 

Between Brexit fears and the exchange rates there are a shitload of used Swans ( and similar luxury items)

under contract now at bargain basement prices in Europe and the values are still falling.

 

(edit. sorry see 'new teak decks 2000' (16 years old) so still some life in them.

 

It comes down to Caca's budget. A Swan 57 is a lot of boat to handle if double-handing most of the time

 

 

I love Swans but would agree that a 57 is a lot of boat for two. One of the reasons they are selling for less now is because they can take a crew to saill well. Not really designed for shorthanded cruising. We did with ours but it was only a 41. There is nothing like them for sailing to wind, though.

 

Shitty layout as well.

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Pretty sure you wont find one better than BOO. Amazing condition and more space than a 4 bedroom house.

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listing/pl_boat_detail.jsp?&units=Feet&id=2840193〈=en&slim=broker&&hosturl=willismarine&&ywo=willismarine&

Depends, Not if it needs $100,000 new deck and she is a little thin on sail inventory.

 

Between Brexit fears and the exchange rates there are a shitload of used Swans ( and similar luxury items)

under contract now at bargain basement prices in Europe and the values are still falling.

 

(edit. sorry see 'new teak decks 2000' (16 years old) so still some life in them.

 

It comes down to Caca's budget. A Swan 57 is a lot of boat to handle if double-handing most of the time

 

Guys,

 

I am good friends with the owner of Boontasa. Hes a good guy and the boat is in GREAT shape. Well worth asking price

 

I know what I am looking for, and what it entails. I have done cruising, and I have kids who will be coming to visit, plus one who is special needs that will be living with me, hence the separate cabin, not in the "living room".

 

If I remember correctly, Frers got his start, after his father, with S&S. If not, the S&S design school ruled the day.

 

While I really like the Swan 47, it doesn't have the more than 2 cabin layout that I want. I know that visitors will not be often, but with myself and special needs child, a three sleeping area is a must - no, I'm not ignorant of nautical terms, just keeping the lingo simple. I have, and would do a smaller boat, but I am thinking about my cruising "partner". Quality of life is paramount while I am here. Hoping my other kids will continue when I am unable.

 

Other ideas that I have been mulling about, given performance, strength, living volume and comfort are: Waquiez, Baltic and C&C.

 

All feedback is appreciated.

 

You guys rock, as always.

 

Didn't want this to read like an ad so I PM'd you my favorite Swan broker's number who knows all of the models intimately and can help you with this stuff if you are interested.

 

you referring to KY?

 

No but I like him too. Alan Baines at Berthon helped me buy and sell my Swan and I would recommend him highly. Don't know Keith as well but I have a favorable impression.

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bigfoots dick" post="5388431" timestamp="1468856993"]

 

 

Pretty sure you wont find one better than BOO. Amazing condition and more space than a 4 bedroom house.

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listing/pl_boat_detail.jsp?&units=Feet&id=2840193〈=en&slim=broker&&hosturl=willismarine&&ywo=willismarine&

Depends, Not if it needs $100,000 new deck and she is a little thin on sail inventory.

 

Between Brexit fears and the exchange rates there are a shitload of used Swans ( and similar luxury items)

under contract now at bargain basement prices in Europe and the values are still falling.

 

(edit. sorry see 'new teak decks 2000' (16 years old) so still some life in them.

 

It comes down to Caca's budget. A Swan 57 is a lot of boat to handle if double-handing most of the time

 

Guys,

 

I am good friends with the owner of Boontasa. Hes a good guy and the boat is in GREAT shape. Well worth asking price

 

 

I know what I am looking for, and what it entails. I have done cruising, and I have kids who will be coming to visit, plus one who is special needs that will be living with me, hence the separate cabin, not in the "living room".

 

If I remember correctly, Frers got his start, after his father, with S&S. If not, the S&S design school ruled the day.

 

While I really like the Swan 47, it doesn't have the more than 2 cabin layout that I want. I know that visitors will not be often, but with myself and special needs child, a three sleeping area is a must - no, I'm not ignorant of nautical terms, just keeping the lingo simple. I have, and would do a smaller boat, but I am thinking about my cruising "partner". Quality of life is paramount while I am here. Hoping my other kids will continue when I am unable.

 

Other ideas that I have been mulling about, given performance, strength, living volume and comfort are: Waquiez, Baltic and C&C.

 

All feedback is appreciated.

 

You guys rock, as always.

Didn't want this to read like an ad so I PM'd you my favorite Swan broker's number who knows all of the models intimately and can help you with this stuff if you are interested.

 

you referring to KY?

 

No but I like him too. Alan Baines at Berthon helped me buy and sell my Swan and I would recommend him highly. Don't know Keith as well but I have a favorable impression.

 

I have bought and sold with both Keith and Jennifer Stewart (works with Alan Baines)

who would both be excellent choices. They all know where the old Swans are buried.

http://berthonusa.com/contact-us/

 

 

 

Here's a 51 2 years newer than Boon listed at $259k with a bunch of new shit. I just saved you $85,000 you're welcome

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Presence of a coffee grinder pedestal on that last-pimped one must say something about what the boat was intended for . . . and it wasn't husband and wife sailing!

 

E

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Presence of a coffee grinder pedestal on that last-pimped one must say something about what the boat was intended for . . . and it wasn't husband and wife sailing!

 

E

Yeah, and its not on centerline

CaCa dosn't need anything bigger than a 46

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On 15/07/2016 at 8:32 PM, Caca Cabeza said:

I know what I am looking for, and what it entails. I have done cruising, and I have kids who will be coming to visit, plus one who is special needs that will be living with me, hence the separate cabin, not in the "living room".

 

If I remember correctly, Frers got his start, after his father, with S&S. If not, the S&S design school ruled the day.

 

While I really like the Swan 47, it doesn't have the more than 2 cabin layout that I want. I know that visitors will not be often, but with myself and special needs child, a three sleeping area is a must - no, I'm not ignorant of nautical terms, just keeping the lingo simple. I have, and would do a smaller boat, but I am thinking about my cruising "partner". Quality of life is paramount while I am here. Hoping my other kids will continue when I am unable.

 

Other ideas that I have been mulling about, given performance, strength, living volume and comfort are: Waquiez, Baltic and C&C.

 

All feedback is appreciated.

 

You guys rock, as always.

You should definitely check the Wauquiez Centurion 47, classic lines by Dubois,  and different arrangements with either 2 or 3 double cabins.http://www.wauquiezforever.com/WauquiezForever/en/smasher_portfolio/centurion-47/

 

wauquiez-centurion-47-1.jpg

wauquiez-centurion-47-2.jpg

wauquiez-centurion-47-3.jpg

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"What can you sail and paint by yourself" (& pay!!!!!)

everybody write this in large letters on your wall! lest u forget!!!

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On 7/15/2016 at 2:32 PM, Caca Cabeza said:

I know what I am looking for, and what it entails. I have done cruising, and I have kids who will be coming to visit, plus one who is special needs that will be living with me, hence the separate cabin, not in the "living room".

 

If I remember correctly, Frers got his start, after his father, with S&S. If not, the S&S design school ruled the day.

 

While I really like the Swan 47, it doesn't have the more than 2 cabin layout that I want. I know that visitors will not be often, but with myself and special needs child, a three sleeping area is a must - no, I'm not ignorant of nautical terms, just keeping the lingo simple. I have, and would do a smaller boat, but I am thinking about my cruising "partner". Quality of life is paramount while I am here. Hoping my other kids will continue when I am unable.

 

Other ideas that I have been mulling about, given performance, strength, living volume and comfort are: Waquiez, Baltic and C&C.

 

All feedback is appreciated.

 

You guys rock, as always.

Grand Soleil 

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As far as i am concerned one of the major design changes that took place in the past 15 years or so (including the Swans)is the visibility, natural light, and airiness of the interior.

Older Swans are like caves that you need to climb in and out of.  There is hardly any sunshine in the interior and once you are inside there is almost no visibility of the external world.

Cockpits are there to run the boat and cabins are there to shut you off from all the external affairs. 

Modern designs are much more friendly in these respects and encorages one to move around the boat especially in and out more freely, creating a better balance between being outside and inside.

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On 7/15/2016 at 5:52 PM, Caca Cabeza said:

Starting my 10-ish year exit plan. Thinking of disappearing into the warmer climes. Like to be able to have some room to move around as well as extra room to invite friends along.

 

Been hanging out on a Swan 47, but if you have guests, they sleep in the living room. I like the layout of the Swan 51 and 53. 57, too but they are a bit spends.

 

I've been looking at the 1980 to early 1190 models to keep prices in my "stretched" range. Since they are pretty few and far between, anyone have some first hand info, so I don't have to go all over just for a look see at first?

 

Any other models/boats I should look at? I really like the Swan durability and strength. Plus, to my eye, S&S drew some pretty sweet lines.

 

Thanks guys.

The issue with all those older swans is teak decks...be careful, very expensive to repair

many of the older models have really clumsy decklayouts...winch farms...submarine hatches...difficult to live with as a cruiser. 

Keep an eye out for corrosion at the mast step, partners and under ss fittings like goosenecks

galvanized steel keel frames  on some of the boats should be looked at. 

Swans are nice boats , but in general the boats is see are overpriced.

if you dig deep you can find older  high class racer cruiser types 

ted hood was a very good designer

 

 

 

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I ran across an interesting and relevant comment on the S&S Swan 47 the other day. It was commentary by Nautor when the boat was new.

"This is a high performance cruising yacht that is within the capability of a foursome to handle, at least for day cruising and harbour hopping".

Apparently not a singlehander. :D

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2 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

I ran across an interesting and relevant comment on the S&S Swan 47 the other day. It was commentary by Nautor when the boat was new.

"This is a high performance cruising yacht that is within the capability of a foursome to handle, at least for day cruising and harbour hopping".

Apparently not a singlehander. :D

Couple electric winches, some furling gear, and bob's yer uncle....  Ok, as said in the O40 thread, docking might be a bother....

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The Swan 46 came in a 3 cabin version. The trade off is that you lose the huge sail locker.

http://au.yachtworld.com/boats/1987/Nautor-Swan-46-2740970/Thailand#.WmFDuaiWbIU

http://au.yachtworld.com/boats/1989/Nautor-Swan-46-078-2956144/Australia#.WmFEaKiWbIU

http://au.yachtworld.com/boats/1994/Nautor-Swan-Swan-46-MKII-3127435/France#.WmFE4aiWbIU

A Swan 53 and up would be too much for a family to handle. The boats are heavy, the gear is heavy and the loads are huge.

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3 hours ago, davekar said:

Around 65k for the 47 and 75k for the 53.  

All the hardware must be removed .this might cause some interior headliner or other damage 

Normaly by the time you have blasted the old teak off you will need a paint job.

when the deck is off you would  upgrade deck hardware...like new genoa tracks ,pull out chainplates, replace deck hatches

you never know what the condition of a cored deck is until the teak is off.

this work must all be done under cover

its not a cheap job.

you may choose to remove the teak deck and not replace it 

when you are looking at a older teak deck boat bargain hard.

 

 

 

 

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All the new teak decks are prefabricated in a shop...complete...then fitted on the boat.

many companies doing it. 

you can use Google and get a pretty good estimate for the teak deck materila and known fitting costs 

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Teak decks are a real, big, expensive problem. But they sure look and work very well.

I would ensure the teak decks were is absolutely excellent condition on any boat I bought, and would sell the boat long before the decks got sketchy.

If you are strong, fit, rich, and young, I would suggest an S&S Swan that is in stellar condition. If any of those criteria are missing, I would move on. The Swans designed by Freres are almost as good as the S&S designed boats, but with a wetter ride. The boats built since the mid 90s are faster! But handle worse, IMHO. For example, they slam in big chop, and they are slower unless you pay attention, in which case they can really rip.

On the S&S boats, everyone goes pretty fast. On the modern boats, the speed difference between you and your mother-in-law might be 100%.

Wonderful boats.

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The older bigger Swans are great boats but they are not manuverable; you pretty much need an end tie perpendicular to the main channel.

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On 1/18/2018 at 8:01 PM, savoir said:

The Swan 46 came in a 3 cabin version. The trade off is that you lose the huge sail locker.

http://au.yachtworld.com/boats/1987/Nautor-Swan-46-2740970/Thailand#.WmFDuaiWbIU

http://au.yachtworld.com/boats/1989/Nautor-Swan-46-078-2956144/Australia#.WmFEaKiWbIU

http://au.yachtworld.com/boats/1994/Nautor-Swan-Swan-46-MKII-3127435/France#.WmFE4aiWbIU

A Swan 53 and up would be too much for a family to handle. The boats are heavy, the gear is heavy and the loads are huge.

Agreed. The 46 is like a little big boat. Plenty of space for guests. Did a delivery on one 5 years ago to the BVI's. Did the Bermuda-VG run with 3. As long as auto held the course, you could do everything solo. Sailed amazingly well, pleasure to helm and solid as a brick house. Judging by the current prices, she was sold at a steal couple years ago. I was and am still amazed that a 46' boat had 17 freaking winches on it. Cleat? We don't need no cleat, got a container full of winches, just toss another one on. 

http://www.lymanmorse.com/boats/tango-246

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Catching up...

Capitan redid the decks on his Swan 47 about 15 years ago. Prefab estimate was ~$60k. One of the crew was a cabinetmaker, go the rough teak at wholesale, machined it. Found a guy who did decks for a boat builder who would do it for, um, self reported wages.

Got the whole deal done between the owner (in his70s') and the "contractor" for considerably (80%?) less.

The prefab quote did not include removal and replacement of the hardware, etc. Just materials.

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those big swans will suck up an amazing amount of money.., none of which will ever be seen again

older, bigger boats make no financial sense for anyone - they cost so much to restore and run that anyone who can afford it, can afford a newer one.

 

 

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On 27/01/2018 at 2:19 PM, Volume311 said:

Agreed. The 46 is like a little big boat. Plenty of space for guests. Did a delivery on one 5 years ago to the BVI's. Did the Bermuda-VG run with 3. As long as auto held the course, you could do everything solo. Sailed amazingly well, pleasure to helm and solid as a brick house. Judging by the current prices, she was sold at a steal couple years ago. I was and am still amazed that a 46' boat had 17 freaking winches on it. Cleat? We don't need no cleat, got a container full of winches, just toss another one on. 

http://www.lymanmorse.com/boats/tango-246

 

Clutches were a new invention back then. The more conservative builders such as Swan didn't trust them.

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3 hours ago, TomTraubert said:

Any specific thoughts on these two boats:

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1996/Nautor-Swan-60-3071923/Portsmouth/RI/United-States

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2001/Nautor-Swan-60-2928198/Portsmouth/RI/United-States

Asking for a friend of a friend whose spouse would have him committed for even asking the question.................

Soooo much deck teak...

stunningly beautiful vessels for those with the means to properly tend to them 

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4 hours ago, TomTraubert said:

Any specific thoughts on these two boats:

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1996/Nautor-Swan-60-3071923/Portsmouth/RI/United-States

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2001/Nautor-Swan-60-2928198/Portsmouth/RI/United-States

Asking for a friend of a friend whose spouse would have him committed for even asking the question.................

Those are the kind of boats you look at when you need to cover a lot of miles.

big deep fin keelers are hard to get out of the water and handle.  You will always need to go to proper shipyard, not so many of these around. 

lack of protection from the elements is a defect , difficult  to handle a tender 

it hard to determine how much they are worth, swans all tend to be overpriced

if you look at the modern boats , and have a half a million to spend, you can find user friendly boats 

these designs are plenty fast and have been designed to work the way people use a boat...crew protection , tender handling , large cockpit to get you out of the interior cave , natural locations for solar panels, swim boarding platform ....

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Anyone buying a Swan 60 should be able to afford to pay crew. Those boats are a handful. Note that the ones advertised had paid crew.

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Anyone considering buying a larger Swan and actually sailing it relatively short handed should probably start off by chartering a larger Swan and actually sailing short handed. (and if you balk at the cost of chartering a larger Swan, you can't afford to own one...) People who have been sailing since Jesus was calling tactics on the Israelite's  Americas Cup challenge and might find it a challenge, short handed, let alone relatively inexperienced sailors 

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48 minutes ago, savoir said:

Anyone buying a Swan 60 should be able to afford to pay crew. Those boats are a handful. Note that the ones advertised had paid crew.

If you want to cover long distances, have an aggressive schedule ... you need paid crew.

thats the whole reason for a big boat.

 

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I’ve caught a fish or two with the spinnaker.

It’s all how you cast it in the broach...

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Sailed thru a school of feeding tuna last fall

, waves were big and we picked up a deck full of little anchovies as we plowed thru the tuna.

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