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TheDragon

Re-doing bottom paint for a freshwater Illinois 1978 Tanzer 22

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So I rescued this boat "for free" from the back of the yard with red bottom paint directly onto the gelcoat, of unknown vintage or kind. Without knowing better I put a white ablative on it. Doesn't work in fresh water, just grows tons of algae, left in water for four years (I scraped the algae off as best I could every few months of the summer using a plastic scraper, but obviously it was unsatisfactory and I could not reach the fixed keel). So, now I've pulled the boat out and scraped off all the existing two layers of paint (came off nice and easy with a sharp blade scraper, using a chemical stripper only for a few tough spots and along the waterline), and sanded the gelcoat gently with 80 grit using an orbital sander, and 120 grit by hand. No blisters or any other obvious damage beyond some "cracking" of the gelcoat, it all looks perfect and smooth. So, I'm ready to do it right. But what exactly?

 

Seems recommendations are a 2-part epoxy primer, then two coats of Interlux 2000 epoxy, each with wet sandings inbetween with 200 grit. Then several coats of VC17m Extra.

 

I'm seriously thinking of skipping the first three layers and trying the VC17m Extra straight on the sanded gelcoat on one side of the boat and see how it holds up in comparison with the above.

 

Surely these tests have been done endlessly, but I can't find them.

 

Thoughts?

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Yes those tests has been done thousands of times. Mostly by dudes who want to save cash and are lazy, but many times by chemist in controlled testing and environs.

 

You were lucky your AF stuck. And lucky no blister. But that could change

 

In a nutshell...

 

Now that you have got a cleah and sanded surface...

 

Mask off, Apply 1st coat of interprotect by roller. Apply in the cool of the day and get it on smooth ( retard with thiiners if required)

 

When it is just dry enough that you cannot push your finger into the film and leave a mark ( print free and all solvent is gone) apply 2nd coat. Then repeat for both Antifoul coats. ( Thus system uses the solvent to bond the next coat to a semi hard but " open" previous coat)

 

If after 2 nd primer coat it is not smooth enough for you then let dry flat back with 180 - 220.

 

Most cruiser sailors ( just like commercial fleets) do not sand between application and just 3 m abrasive pad the AF every season and it smooths out nicely ( commerciwl fleets just rely on constant movennt to smooth the AF)

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Thanks, and just to understand completely, what is AF?

err ahh anti fouling??

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So I rescued this boat "for free" from the back of the yard with red bottom paint directly onto the gelcoat, of unknown vintage or kind. Without knowing better I put a white ablative on it. Doesn't work in fresh water, just grows tons of algae, left in water for four years (I scraped the algae off as best I could every few months of the summer using a plastic scraper, but obviously it was unsatisfactory and I could not reach the fixed keel). So, now I've pulled the boat out and scraped off all the existing two layers of paint (came off nice and easy with a sharp blade scraper, using a chemical stripper only for a few tough spots and along the waterline), and sanded the gelcoat gently with 80 grit using an orbital sander, and 120 grit by hand. No blisters or any other obvious damage beyond some "cracking" of the gelcoat, it all looks perfect and smooth. So, I'm ready to do it right. But what exactly?

 

Seems recommendations are a 2-part epoxy primer, then two coats of Interlux 2000 epoxy, each with wet sandings inbetween with 200 grit. Then several coats of VC17m Extra.

 

I'm seriously thinking of skipping the first three layers and trying the VC17m Extra straight on the sanded gelcoat on one side of the boat and see how it holds up in comparison with the above.

 

Surely these tests have been done endlessly, but I can't find them.

 

Thoughts?

 

 

that's what interlux 2000e is, a two part epoxy primer, barrier coating..

 

 

after having my boat on a lake, year round, for years is that NOTHING will prevent algae from growing on the boat..

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Do you have the fixed keel or centerboard model? The Fixed Keel T22's have a real issue with rust on the keel. I had one in the 1990's and my memory was the recommended procedure was to grind the keel bright and then IMMEDIATELY put on a barrier coat. I take it from the above that the Interlux 200e is, a barrier coat. Loved that boat, still have the sails from it and the old Tanzer Talk newsletters. I sailed her on northern lake michigan in fresh water. Built like a tank, sails like a J 24.

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Yup, fixed keel. I like the boat too, my first fixed keel but despite learning where the shallow spots in our lake are with a centerboard boat over the past decade, I have still run aground hard enough twice to need pulling off.

 

Anyway, yes, it has rust on the keel, but I have only sanded those spots down to the iron. The paint on the rest is really well attached. So I'll do some more prep, then do POR-15, the epoxy barrier, then VC17.

 

Dreaded, others on our lake who have done this process to several coats of VC17 have had it work very well for years, so I am hopeful.

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Dreaded, others on our lake who have done this process to several coats of VC17 have had it work very well for years, so I am hopeful.

 

 

cool.. I'd like to see how it works out.. we have excessively warm water here, slime and algae are a given especially with storm drain runoff

 

we have a boat lift and power washer for the fleet, you'll have some sort of growth in 1 week, you must clean the bottom before racing if you want to finish within 10 minutes of the fleet.

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So I rescued this boat "for free" from the back of the yard with red bottom paint directly onto the gelcoat, of unknown vintage or kind. Without knowing better I put a white ablative on it. Doesn't work in fresh water, just grows tons of algae, left in water for four years (I scraped the algae off as best I could every few months of the summer using a plastic scraper, but obviously it was unsatisfactory and I could not reach the fixed keel). So, now I've pulled the boat out and scraped off all the existing two layers of paint (came off nice and easy with a sharp blade scraper, using a chemical stripper only for a few tough spots and along the waterline), and sanded the gelcoat gently with 80 grit using an orbital sander, and 120 grit by hand. No blisters or any other obvious damage beyond some "cracking" of the gelcoat, it all looks perfect and smooth. So, I'm ready to do it right. But what exactly?

 

Seems recommendations are a 2-part epoxy primer, then two coats of Interlux 2000 epoxy, each with wet sandings inbetween with 200 grit. Then several coats of VC17m Extra.

 

I'm seriously thinking of skipping the first three layers and trying the VC17m Extra straight on the sanded gelcoat on one side of the boat and see how it holds up in comparison with the above.

 

Surely these tests have been done endlessly, but I can't find them.

 

Thoughts?

 

 

that's what interlux 2000e is, a two part epoxy primer, barrier coating..

 

 

after having my boat on a lake, year round, for years is that NOTHING will prevent algae from growing on the boat..

 

 

Ding ding! I have a freshwater boat, sits in the water May-November, and VC-17 doesn't really seem to do shit to prevent algae growth. Perhaps it might be a ton worse without it, but it grows pretty quickly. I'm not racing, so I don't really care, just pissed that I spent all that money and time and. . .

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So I rescued this boat "for free" from the back of the yard with red bottom paint directly onto the gelcoat, of unknown vintage or kind. Without knowing better I put a white ablative on it. Doesn't work in fresh water, just grows tons of algae, left in water for four years (I scraped the algae off as best I could every few months of the summer using a plastic scraper, but obviously it was unsatisfactory and I could not reach the fixed keel). So, now I've pulled the boat out and scraped off all the existing two layers of paint (came off nice and easy with a sharp blade scraper, using a chemical stripper only for a few tough spots and along the waterline), and sanded the gelcoat gently with 80 grit using an orbital sander, and 120 grit by hand. No blisters or any other obvious damage beyond some "cracking" of the gelcoat, it all looks perfect and smooth. So, I'm ready to do it right. But what exactly?

 

Seems recommendations are a 2-part epoxy primer, then two coats of Interlux 2000 epoxy, each with wet sandings inbetween with 200 grit. Then several coats of VC17m Extra.

 

I'm seriously thinking of skipping the first three layers and trying the VC17m Extra straight on the sanded gelcoat on one side of the boat and see how it holds up in comparison with the above.

 

Surely these tests have been done endlessly, but I can't find them.

 

Thoughts?

Question... Where in the heck did you keep a boat in the H20 in Illinois for 4 years??

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Clinton Lake. Kept my oday 23 in for 10 years before this.

 

So it finally cooled down enough this weekend to do the painting. Prepped the partially painted keel with degreaser, washed, then phosphoric acid for a few minutes, washed and dried. Then two coats of POR 15 on the keel, about 90 minutes apart. It is really sticky stuff. Then mixed a quart of the Interlux 2-part 2000e epoxy paint, let sit for 20 minutes per instructions, and it covered the whole boat perfectly. So started another quart before finishing the first coat ( had my wife helping), as it seemd to be drying far more quickly than promised. Put second coat on immediately, then three coats of VC17m. Looks fantastic, I just hope it works. But I don't plan to pull it out again for several years in any case. All took 8 hours.

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I would love to see that boat when hauled in 6 months.

 

A. If you put The 2000e over the POR 15 it will be mudcracked!

 

B. multible coats of epoxy and AF applied without full solvent evaporation between coats is a recipe for " ten billion" little blisters.

 

C. POR15 immersed if going to be very interesting.

 

Gooood luck!

 

Post photos when next hauled out.

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Boat bottom and keel both look great a week later. No sign of problems. Put it in the lake this week and first sail last night. Seems faster and slippier. Certainly it glides a long way and a lot faster once the power, outboard or sails, is turned off. I'm not sure I'll ever know how it holds up as I will not pull it out again for several years. At the same time I tried to fix slow leaks in the rear compartment with some epoxy before painting and that worked too, so I'm a happy guy, so far at least.

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Clinton Lake. Kept my oday 23 in for 10 years before this.

 

So it finally cooled down enough this weekend to do the painting. Prepped the partially painted keel with degreaser, washed, then phosphoric acid for a few minutes, washed and dried. Then two coats of POR 15 on the keel, about 90 minutes apart. It is really sticky stuff. Then mixed a quart of the Interlux 2-part 2000e epoxy paint, let sit for 20 minutes per instructions, and it covered the whole boat perfectly. So started another quart before finishing the first coat ( had my wife helping), as it seemd to be drying far more quickly than promised. Put second coat on immediately, then three coats of VC17m. Looks fantastic, I just hope it works. But I don't plan to pull it out again for several years in any case. All took 8 hours.

That lake does not freeze??? Or do they have bubblers in the marina?? Only 4 hours from Chicago I would think it would be solid come January.

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Yes, very solid, but this is the fourteenth year I've left my boat in the water, indeed, I've never hauled my boat for the winter. This winter the ice was not as thick as some, but I've seen it more that a foot thick. Always strange to be able to walk out to your boat, and I'm always relieved no one steals anything off it (I lock the cabin, of course, but everything else including outboard just sits there). 5-10 of us leave our boats in over the winter. Makes for some pleasant sailing during the January thaw, like last Saturday. The best is sailing through thin ice, or even better, the crumbling thick ice as it breaks up. Like sailing through chandeliers.

 

Anyway, back on topic, six months now and the bottom paint looks great, and no algae at all. Can't tell what is going on with the keel, but hope it is fine. And the leaks remain fixed, YAY! Worth all the sweat equity and a couple hundred bucks of paint.

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On 9/5/2016 at 12:20 AM, Auld Mug said:

I would love to see that boat when hauled in 6 months.

 

A. If you put The 2000e over the POR 15 it will be mudcracked!

 

B. multible coats of epoxy and AF applied without full solvent evaporation between coats is a recipe for " ten billion" little blisters.

 

C. POR15 immersed if going to be very interesting.

 

Gooood luck!

 

Post photos when next hauled out.

So I finally pulled the boat out to see how the paint was doing. That's two years in dam water which is eutrophic. It had a thin layer of algae, more than I would have liked, but a lot less than before. It all came off with a powerwasher. The VC17m was pretty thin, could see the underlying epoxy paint in places. There were some small blisters on the keel, but nothing big and nothing to bother with. No blisters anywhere else, it all looks solid and the boat is bone dry inside. So, now I want to put another coat or two of VC17m to last at least another two years. The VC17m can says I need to sand the existing paint, but that sounds like a nasty job with a ventilator, etc. Thoughts? Surface is a lot rougher than it was after the original AF application, which was very smooth, so I think new coats will stick just fine.

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Just roll a new coat on top. When you're  done, you can bunish it with a piece of carpet or rolled up tabloid newspaper and it'll get pretty slick. Use the West Marine VC-equivalent, it works as good or better and is $15 less per quart.

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