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Irrational 14

Penultimate, Classic, and Vintage International 14's in Canada and

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Old thread has been archived. Just reviving. Seems a few fine vintage boats have been discovered as of recent. List your finds here.

There is some amazing yachting history and names related to some of these boats...

 

I'll start:

US 104: 1930's Carvel Plank - Cedar and Mahogany. Alive and well in Southern California

US 360: 1947 US One Design (the original one design 14) - Hot Moulded Ply. Alive and well in Southern California.

US 377: 1948 US One Design. Hot Moulded Ply. Alive and well in Southern California.

US 34: 1930's Double Plank in Mahogany. Alive and well in NY.

 

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Wow! US-34 is quite a nice looking woodie! Thanks for sharing the pictures.

 

A few months ago there was a US One Design hull on a Southern California Craig's list for free or just a few bucks. There was discussion about this boat on the Wooden Thistle Facebook page.

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Old thread has been archived. Just reviving. Seems a few fine vintage boats have been discovered as of recent. List your finds here.

There is some amazing yachting history and names related to some of these boats...

 

I'll start:

US 104: 1930's Carvel Plank - Cedar and Mahogany. Alive and well in Southern California

US 360: 1947 US One Design (the original one design 14) - Hot Moulded Ply. Alive and well in Southern California.

US 377: 1948 US One Design. Hot Moulded Ply. Alive and well in Southern California.

US 34: 1930's Double Plank in Mahogany. Alive and well in NY.

 

 

...My dad told me my grandfather built a couple I-14's out of Syracuse, NY in the 30's. Looking at the some of the pictures, I remember we had one of those hand cranks for the sails in our garage. They were/are beautiful boats. When I was around 16(mid 80's) I joked and said we needed to find the boat that goes w the crank. About 2 months later, I had an old kirby 5 I14(USA 890??). Was a fun boat. It needed a bunch of work, actually made $400.00 of the thing when I sold it. LOL.

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Old thread has been archived. Just reviving. Seems a few fine vintage boats have been discovered as of recent. List your finds here.

There is some amazing yachting history and names related to some of these boats...

 

I'll start:

US 104: 1930's Carvel Plank - Cedar and Mahogany. Alive and well in Southern California

US 360: 1947 US One Design (the original one design 14) - Hot Moulded Ply. Alive and well in Southern California.

US 377: 1948 US One Design. Hot Moulded Ply. Alive and well in Southern California.

US 34: 1930's Double Plank in Mahogany. Alive and well in NY.

 

 

...My dad told me my grandfather built a couple I-14's out of Syracuse, NY in the 30's. Looking at the some of the pictures, I remember we had one of those hand cranks for the sails in our garage. They were/are beautiful boats. When I was around 16(mid 80's) I joked and said we needed to find the boat that goes w the crank. About 2 months later, I had an old kirby 5 I14(USA 890??). Was a fun boat. It needed a bunch of work, actually made $400.00 of the thing when I sold it. LOL.

 

You must be talking about Englert boatworks... who, with his brother Clarence, had been building a batch of 1930's 14's for George Ford of Rochester Fleet 1.

George went through a few builders on the East Coast who would take on the project then realize that the boats were too time consuming to build that they made zero profit.

They were replicating the techniques of Uffa Fox in the UK but that required hammering about 7000 copper rivets into many many frames. US builders decided no more and a more simple boat was made using molded plywood known as the One Design - see US 360.

US 34 is a Englert boat. These boats cost big money back in the day.

The top and bottom photos in post #1 is an unidentified build we are currently trying to track down. Could be an NY boat, could be Canadian or possibly the first California (Eichanlaub) build.

Sails are stamped by Ratsey and Lapthorne from 1939 and it shares many components and traits of the NY 30's boats. That's all we have so for.

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Old thread has been archived. Just reviving. Seems a few fine vintage boats have been discovered as of recent. List your finds here.

There is some amazing yachting history and names related to some of these boats...

 

I'll start:

US 104: 1930's Carvel Plank - Cedar and Mahogany. Alive and well in Southern California

US 360: 1947 US One Design (the original one design 14) - Hot Moulded Ply. Alive and well in Southern California.

US 377: 1948 US One Design. Hot Moulded Ply. Alive and well in Southern California.

US 34: 1930's Double Plank in Mahogany. Alive and well in NY.

 

 

...My dad told me my grandfather built a couple I-14's out of Syracuse, NY in the 30's. Looking at the some of the pictures, I remember we had one of those hand cranks for the sails in our garage. They were/are beautiful boats. When I was around 16(mid 80's) I joked and said we needed to find the boat that goes w the crank. About 2 months later, I had an old kirby 5 I14(USA 890??). Was a fun boat. It needed a bunch of work, actually made $400.00 of the thing when I sold it. LOL.

 

You must be talking about Englert boatworks... who, with his brother Clarence, had been building a batch of 1930's 14's for George Ford of Rochester Fleet 1.

George went through a few builders on the East Coast who would take on the project then realize that the boats were too time consuming to build that they made zero profit.

They were replicating the techniques of Uffa Fox in the UK but that required hammering about 7000 copper rivets into many many frames. US builders decided no more and a more simple boat was made using molded plywood known as the One Design - see US 360.

US 34 is a Englert boat. These boats cost big money back in the day.

The top and bottom photos in post #1 is an unidentified build we are currently trying to track down. Could be an NY boat, could be Canadian or possibly the first California (Eichanlaub) build.

Sails are stamped by Ratsey and Lapthorne from 1939 and it shares many components and traits of the NY 30's boats. That's all we have so for.

 

 

yes, I am an Englert. Never knew my grandfather, but my dad told be a bit and yes, he said they did not make any money on them.

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I'm the guy who writes the CBIFDA blog about North American I-14 history. As I got older I realized there were some large gaps in the history of the class in North America so I've been slowly trying to do the research to fill them. I feed the blog on an irregular basis.

 

US 104 is one of those interesting 14's where we have no clue at the moment where she came from. This happens in the history of the I-14 where there are a myriad of small builders; the class attracted the home-builder even in the early days.

 

If the Englert relative has any archived material that he would be willing to share, please contact me through the CBIFA blog. I would be glad to put it up in a post. We don't have any clear idea how many I-14's the Englert brothers built, though the figure 12-18 has been tossed around.

 

I got into the I-14's as a teenager, raced them mostly in the 1970's, capped off my serious racing in the 1981 Worlds in Annapolis.

 

http://earwigoagin.blogspot.com/2011/11/1981-international-14-team-races-and.html

 

Rod M.

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I'm the guy who writes the CBIFDA blog about North American I-14 history. As I got older I realized there were some large gaps in the history of the class in North America so I've been slowly trying to do the research to fill them. I feed the blog on an irregular basis.

 

US 104 is one of those interesting 14's where we have no clue at the moment where she came from. This happens in the history of the I-14 where there are a myriad of small builders; the class attracted the home-builder even in the early days.

 

If the Englert relative has any archived material that he would be willing to share, please contact me through the CBIFA blog. I would be glad to put it up in a post. We don't have any clear idea how many I-14's the Englert brothers built, though the figure 12-18 has been tossed around.

 

I got into the I-14's as a teenager, raced them mostly in the 1970's, capped off my serious racing in the 1981 Worlds in Annapolis.

 

http://earwigoagin.blogspot.com/2011/11/1981-international-14-team-races-and.html

 

Rod M.

 

Rod,

I am sorry but I don't have any more info that I know of. Just some vague mentions of the boats that were built. My dad passed away a few years ago. This thread has been fun, showing me something I have never seen. I saw from digging a bit that the mariners Museum in VA has one of these boats. They are just a few miles from my office, I contacted them and they said the boat is in storage, but offered to make arrangements for me to see it sometime.

 

A great opportunity to for me to see a piece of family history I never thought I would.

 

Thanks,

Jim Englert

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I'm the guy who writes the CBIFDA blog about North American I-14 history. As I got older I realized there were some large gaps in the history of the class in North America so I've been slowly trying to do the research to fill them. I feed the blog on an irregular basis.

 

US 104 is one of those interesting 14's where we have no clue at the moment where she came from. This happens in the history of the I-14 where there are a myriad of small builders; the class attracted the home-builder even in the early days.

 

If the Englert relative has any archived material that he would be willing to share, please contact me through the CBIFA blog. I would be glad to put it up in a post. We don't have any clear idea how many I-14's the Englert brothers built, though the figure 12-18 has been tossed around.

 

I got into the I-14's as a teenager, raced them mostly in the 1970's, capped off my serious racing in the 1981 Worlds in Annapolis.

 

http://earwigoagin.blogspot.com/2011/11/1981-international-14-team-races-and.html

 

Rod M.

 

Rod,

I am sorry but I don't have any more info that I know of. Just some vague mentions of the boats that were built. My dad passed away a few years ago. This thread has been fun, showing me something I have never seen. I saw from digging a bit that the mariners Museum in VA has one of these boats. They are just a few miles from my office, I contacted them and they said the boat is in storage, but offered to make arrangements for me to see it sometime.

 

A great opportunity to for me to see a piece of family history I never thought I would.

 

Thanks,

Jim Englert

 

Jim,

Please take plenty of photos when you do make visit. We would love to see this boat and others particularly of the pre-war era in North America.

 

Paul

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Found this searching their catalog:

 

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Accession #:

1993.0026.000001 Old Acc #: BU Object Name: DINGHY Title: INTERNATIONAL 14 DINGHY NO.79, CHIT Object Date: ca 1937-1938 Artist/Maker: ENGLERT BOATS\(MANUFACTURER) --FOX, UFFA\(DESIGNER) Marks: INSCRIPTION: 14 FT INTERNATIONAL DINGHY; UFFA FOX DESIGNER; BUILDER; ENGLERT BOATS; SYRACUSE N.Y. (the boat nameplate) Country: USA State: NEW YORK City: SYRACUSE Notes: NOTES: This International 14 Dinghy comes with excellent provenance in the form of its International 14 Association Official Measurement Certificate. CHIT is an Uffa Fox design built by Englert Boats of Syracuse for Richard W. Bess in 1937-1938. All three of the boat owners are listed in the documentation. William Lapworth is the certified measurer who signed off on this International 14 Association document. INVENTORY: Included with the hull are the mast and standing rigging, boom, forward and after flotation boxes, one set of cotton sails including the jib, main, and spinnaker, the spinnaker pole, rudder, tiller and extension, main sheet blocks, and parts to the boom vang. These items are associated with this boat. Please see component parts supplemental record for additional information. BOAT INFORMATION - BOAT TYPE: DINGHY BOAT DIMENSIONS: 14-0-0 (lenth OA); 4-10-5 (beam) Material: WOOD Terms: SMALL CRAFT, DINGHY, INTERNATIONAL 14 DINGHY NO. 79 Dims-Other: OBJECT SIZE: 13'-11-7/8" (overall length) x 4'-10-1/4" (overall width) Vessels: Credit Line:

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Nice find Torrid. These crafts are spectacular when viewed in person. So much work involved in the builds but remember there was still a great depression so good labor was dirt cheap.

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Just reviving this thread... Jim any chance you got to view the Englert boat? Any updates?

BTW way, US 377 is currently for sale if anyone is interested in a Bristol Vintage International 14.

55_3.jpg.5c86bb88af60b278a5dcb9c90caeac46.jpgboat1.jpg.47c0abbb7cfc92fbf5d3cd04988878ec.jpg

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While looking for some other wooden sailboats, I stumbled across the web site for Woodwind Yachts, which is located in Southern Ontario. They show one plank and frame I-14 (1950) unrestored. Upon talking to the owner of Woodwind, Ken Lavalatte, he's got another almost restored plank and frame I-14 that's been in his shop for many years (he can tell you the story).

Anyone interested should give him a call. Really nice guy and if you look at some of his work on the web site (look for the 6 meter restoration project) you will be very impressed.

http://www.woodwindyachts.com/sailboats/inter.htm 

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There's a sailalble,1950s vintage lapstrake I14 at the Royal Canadian Yacht Club in Toronto, stored indoors not far from the fleet of the latest carbon weaponry.  It comes out for a sail once a year or so and is a real treat to see.  Wish I had pictures.

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