Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Timo42

Getting back aboard...C15

Recommended Posts

Not a dinghy guy or spring chicken, but a couple of weeks ago at the club it seemed like a good idea to drive a C15 in the Outlook regatta, the owner/driver is currently about 800mi out of Hawaii delivering a boat back to PNW. First practice, we zipped around the marina and up the channel before the wind died, I'm thinking, I got this...today, we went outside, 12kts, 2-3' swell, upwind to the mark, I got this, we may not be rockstars, but we made it out to S mark in good shape, and headed back to the barn with the whisker pole on the jib. got a little squirrely going down a wave and whap, both of us in the water with the centerboard sticking up. So we horse it around and get it upright, but neither of us are able to get back in the damn boat. What's the secret? Any reason not to tie a loop in a sternline long enough to use as a footloop to get up?Or is there some magic dinghy levitation trick?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What kind of life jacket? A sailing life jacket or a jet-ski lifejacket? Those buckles can make getting back in the baot that much harder. Most people dont kick with their legs enough to swim themselves into the boat. Some people are just freaking weak... I once made my entire 420 team do dock-ups everyday for the rest of the summer when it became apparently the kids were all too weak to get themselves back into their boat after a capsize....

 

Gotta swim yourself up over the gunnel, grab something in the boat like a hiking strap, and flop in like a fish. Sometimes its easier to get in over the transom, but i tend to try and find a route over the windward quarter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The same Zhik vest I use for buoy racing, though the crew had her hiking harness on, which was an issue. Definitely an upper body strength/exhaustion issue after getting the boat upright. It's amazing how high the rail looks when you are in the water next to it. :rolleyes: Hadn't thought it through beforehand, kicking would have helped.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, a trap harness definitely adds to the level of exertion needed - especially if you care about the boat and dont want to scratch it up with your hook.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The C15 has 2 drain holes in the transom that you can put a loop of rope thru with bungee retraction to use for boarding assistance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a dinghy guy or spring chicken, but a couple of weeks ago at the club it seemed like a good idea to drive a C15 in the Outlook regatta, the owner/driver is currently about 800mi out of Hawaii delivering a boat back to PNW. First practice, we zipped around the marina and up the channel before the wind died, I'm thinking, I got this...today, we went outside, 12kts, 2-3' swell, upwind to the mark, I got this, we may not be rockstars, but we made it out to S mark in good shape, and headed back to the barn with the whisker pole on the jib. got a little squirrely going down a wave and whap, both of us in the water with the centerboard sticking up. So we horse it around and get it upright, but neither of us are able to get back in the damn boat. What's the secret? Any reason not to tie a loop in a sternline long enough to use as a footloop to get up?Or is there some magic dinghy levitation trick?

 

The problem with trying to climb in over the stern is: your body is a drogue, the boat swings downwind and tries to sail away with you. It is much better to climb in over the gun'l at the shrouds. You can use a loop at the stern if the other person is holding the bow, but in big wind/chop it is still quite iffy.

 

You should not have righted the boat without one of you 'scooping' into the cockpit. That way the boat comes up with a person already aboard, it can't sail away ... or at least, not from BOTH of you. The person already aboard (usually the crew) then helps the other back in.

 

http://nbnjrotc-sail.blogspot.com/2011/09/capsize-drill.html

 

Here's our practice sessions in a swimming pool. The kids doing the drill have never been in a boat of any kind before.

http://nbnjrotc-sail.blogspot.com/2015/03/splash-capsizing-done-right.html

 

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a dinghy guy or spring chicken, but a couple of weeks ago at the club it seemed like a good idea to drive a C15 in the Outlook regatta, the owner/driver is currently about 800mi out of Hawaii delivering a boat back to PNW. First practice, we zipped around the marina and up the channel before the wind died, I'm thinking, I got this...today, we went outside, 12kts, 2-3' swell, upwind to the mark, I got this, we may not be rockstars, but we made it out to S mark in good shape, and headed back to the barn with the whisker pole on the jib. got a little squirrely going down a wave and whap, both of us in the water with the centerboard sticking up. So we horse it around and get it upright, but neither of us are able to get back in the damn boat. What's the secret? Any reason not to tie a loop in a sternline long enough to use as a footloop to get up?Or is there some magic dinghy levitation trick?

In Finns, most of us old guys have a loop in our hiking strap line or our traveler line. Simply install a line that is super long, long enough to pass through a piece of tubing and then tie a loop in the end. If you find yourself outside of the boat, simply grab that line, and yup, use it as a foot loop to put your foot in to give yourself something to push off of with your foot. For us out of shape old guys, the flopping in like a fish is hard if you don't have the upper body strength to do that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the suggestions, Hadn't really had to think about this stuff before, (lead is good) Going to go over it with the crew Sat, rig a line, etc, hopefully we won't have to put it into practice Sun...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another tip is not to try to climb up into a boat, because your feet will just disappear under it. Instead try to swim in with your body horizontal. Given a reasonably low freeboard you can then reach in, grab a toe strap and heave yourself in with the boat heeling towards you, but prevented from falling on top by person the other side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Step off the board into the boat? If I end up in the piss it's been either a horrible capsize or a mind numbingly stupid one-

 

As soon as it's gone past rightable, I'm out, over the rail and right on the board- the step in is different in every boat but the mast/board well is a good target-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites