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jabrams

J105 distance race

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We are going to be doing the St pete to Cuba race in Feb next year on Ariel our j105. I was wondering what recommendations people that have done offshore races on a 105 have specfic to the boat. We are going to do mre meals(do not want to try and cook on board) and have a few coolers in the cabin area. Also plan on using some old sail material screwed to the rail of the cabin seats then tied up to the handhold on the roof for a sea bed setup. Any other thoughts on setting her up for this trip? Is not a transpac but want to make sure we cover all we can.

Thanks

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Suggestion? Don't do the St. Pete race. Do the Miami one instead. Worlds better management, a more tactical racecourse, and the traditional wind angle is perfect for a J/105.

 

Alternatively - get a code zero. Ditch anything heavy. Go to a Tuff Luff rather than roller furling headstay. Get your instruments calibrated well and invest in a navigation system which is bomb proof and simple enough to tell you exactly what you need to know in a reliable fashion.

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Appreciate the advice. Since I am a member of St Pete yacht club and the boat is there makes jumping over to the Miami race kinda hard.

We have been toying with the idea of a code zero.

The mesh instead of sail cloth is a great point.

Thanks

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Not sure what the class breakdown is for this particular race, OD, PHRF, IRC, ORC/R, but make sure you can use a Code Zero first. The skipper of the 105 I race on has a Code Zero and loved it, but hasn't been able to use it in years. We have to use our class legal sails even for handicap races, which doesn't include the zero.

 

Sounds like a fun race though.

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Not sure what the class breakdown is for this particular race, OD, PHRF, IRC, ORC/R, but make sure you can use a Code Zero first. The skipper of the 105 I race on has a Code Zero and loved it, but hasn't been able to use it in years. We have to use our class legal sails even for handicap races, which doesn't include the zero.

 

Sounds like a fun race though.

That sounds strange, maybe it's different in other areas but the Code 0 we use on our J109 is rated as a spinnaker and didn't change our rating. As long as it's not bigger than your kite it shouldn't change your rating. Unless of course you're racing one design against other 105's

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Our class rule applies to PHRF too. Pretty sure that J109s also have multiple jib/genny options too though, right? 105s have one size only. The code zero may be perfectly fine, I'm just saying double check. We would love to use it in our non-class races but currently can't.

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Our class rule applies to PHRF too. Pretty sure that J109s also have multiple jib/genny options too though, right? 105s have one size only. The code zero may be perfectly fine, I'm just saying double check. We would love to use it in our non-class races but currently can't.

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105's race with PHRF 155's, 81 with shoal keel and 72, like a 35, for RL courses in Tampa Bay. Not sure what may change on a distance course like that. See Fire and Ice, they have raced and won the Key West race numerous times, he should know what you need as far as set-up for that type of race. Not sure about a code 0, that time of year I would doubt you would need it, hard to tell.

 

Ariel is a deep draft boat, correct? Maybe talk to Jayhawk also.

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Our class rule applies to PHRF too. Pretty sure that J109s also have multiple jib/genny options too though, right? 105s have one size only. The code zero may be perfectly fine, I'm just saying double check. We would love to use it in our non-class races but currently can't.

The 109's are similar, one design rating is only for the class 105% headsail, anything bigger isn't one design and lowers the rating when racing PHRF handicap. Like much of the mystery surrounding PHRF ratings the code 0 must be rated differently in different areas.

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Ditch the MRE and go get a jet boil and freeze dried meals. Your gut will be thanking you when you reach the not so great Cuban plumbing.

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We are looking to avoid any flames. The jet boil does not look to bad but what do you do in a sea since it is not gimbled?

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Looks like yet another "J/105 and a code 0" thread. If a code 0 is going to incur the same rating hit as a 155% genoa, go with the 155% genoa. Remember that a J/105 was originally designed to carry an overlapping headsail which means there is a narrow shroud base. You'll be able to point a lot higher with the 155% than the code 0 and oh yea, you'll be able to tack the thing.

 

If a 155% or a code 0 give you a rating hit, I would invest in a spinnaker staysail that measures in as a 105% jib. Get in touch with Ullman. Remember that it can double as a wind seeker

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Looks like yet another "J/105 and a code 0" thread. If a code 0 is going to incur the same rating hit as a 155% genoa, go with the 155% genoa. Remember that a J/105 was originally designed to carry an overlapping headsail which means there is a narrow shroud base. You'll be able to point a lot higher with the 155% than the code 0 and oh yea, you'll be able to tack the thing.

 

If a 155% or a code 0 give you a rating hit, I would invest in a spinnaker staysail that measures in as a 105% jib. Get in touch with Ullman. Remember that it can double as a wind seeker

That gives you the bigger spinnaker as well. That makes a bigger difference than the 155

 

Did San Francisco to LA on a 105 once. 4 people, had a BBQ on the stern rail and a bunchy of stuff to cook. Last minute weather showed big breeze so I picked up 25 sandwiches the morning of the start and that ended up being all we ate

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Not going to get involved in the 155 vs code debate- but I always thought the 105 was NOT designed for an overlapping genoa. I knew the J 92 was - did not think the 105 was also.

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Trust me, the 105 was designed to carry overlapping head sails. The owner of the boat I race on removed all the hardware except the tracks.

 

Any boat were the shroud base goes all the way out to the edge of hull (Farr 30, J/111, J/122) was designed for jibs only

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Well then you'd be wrong.

 

Wouldn't be the first time a J/105 made someone go full retard

You really seem to have a thing against 105s. Out of curiosity is there a specific reason? Not trying to start anything, just interested.

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Well then you'd be wrong.

 

Wouldn't be the first time a J/105 made someone go full retard

You really seem to have a thing against 105s. Out of curiosity is there a specific reason? Not trying to start anything, just interested.

It's just Wes being a dick.... Again

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IMHO the 105 was not designed for 155 headsails, had it been they wound have made the shroud base narrower like on the 109 which was designed for them. Design bias: 105 US OD, 109 European IRC.

 

OP I raced my 105 offshore for 5 seasons, in UK it was the double handed offshore boat of chocie for probaby a decade. The boat won RORC yacht of the year twice. Still being raced competitvely especially 2-handed although the JPK's are weapons.

 

Offshore mods/thoughts

 

Lee cloths - yep great idea. We where 2 handed so only had 1 below but if more have someone sleep on the floor, I assume you don't have quarter berths ?

Jib sheeting. Experiment with outboard sheeting and get a padeye screwed into deck at toe rail so when (say 10-20) degrees off a beat you can close leech of jib - worth quite a but speed wise.

Reef. Learn when to reef, do not sail the boat overpressed its slow.

Waterproofing. Boats are wet, ie they leak. Mast sealed, bowsprit, forehatch (note as hatch hoisting is for inshore consider taping/sealing the forehatch. As boats are wet put any gear in drybags and of course take the absolute minimum

Code zero / jibtop: can be useful if rating efficient. Could also spend entire race in bag and be a waste of (a lot of) money

Sails. A good #4 was golden for us, we had a proper high technsail as strong as F--k with a headtape so furoer/halyard was in the right place. Kites, AP vs Runner vs Heavy kite (our kites are 90sqm mastheads, yours will vary, small heavy one in hindsight was useless in 30 knots just white sail)

Learn your angles: understand jib vs spi in various wind strengths. Learn how to white sail reach at various angkes, racing only W/L and you forget this

Jib tracks: if you can rules wise and budget get adjustable jjb cars, w/l you can tack and move car or do it downwind, offshore you can be on 1 tack for days

Stowage: work out where stuff is going to go and how to keep it there

 

Some ideas, its possible to drop $$$ but at some point you have to draw a line.

 

Enjoy. My avatar photo is rounding the rock in 2005 (!!!) Fastnet race

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Great suggestions. Thanks a lot. We talked about a code zero in the past but having just bought a new spin I think it is not in the cards right now. I like the pad eye idea. Do you have any pictures of where you put it?

Thanks

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Florida, on the west coast and Tampa Bay, is typically a light air area with 10-15 or less the norm. Exceptions are pre and post frontal during the winter months or another weather pattern such as we had this week with 15-18 out of the NE, totally out of character for August. Without a 155 the 105 is a sticky boat and I cannot think of one winning here unless it was a long reach. Even then it takes the larger PHRF size chute to do that, the class one is too small.

 

In an area where you are 15 plus most of the time or class race only then the small jib and class chute will be the call. We have both shoal and deep draft 105's here, the deep draft with a 155 will hang with us on the J35 upwind, the shoal draft not so much but the big jib keeps them in the running until they can set the big chute. This past Ft. Myers race (1/2 +/- same as the Cuba course) the s/d 105 was almost over the horizon with their big assym. up in a 8-10 knot seabreeze. Thunderstorm came out to the coast and shifted things to the SE at 15+ or so. Everybody goes to upwind mode and in the last hours of the race we caught and passed the 105 for first to finish. In those few hours the class jib was probably the call but as the storms faded they needed that 155. With class sails they would not have been even close until the wind came-up. Depending on the weather pattern they may see a long reach to Cuba or possibly on the nose the whole way, it is a matter of the timing or lack of a front passing through.

 

So I can appreciate what you do in the Solent or other big wind areas like SF but it is not what Ariel will see here except for limited instances. Most #3's die a death of old age, not from use. We have a dacron #4 that is still crispy new in the bag, never having been set once in 20 years. Congrats on the good work there.

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Specific to the boat … is yours a wheel or tiller boat? If wheel, verify that your emergency tiller fits before going offshore. There is a large bushing at the top of the rudder stock that was (I think) originally made of nylon, and over time it swells to the point that the emergency tiller will no longer fit over the top, which makes the emergency tiller useless.

 

Waterline sells a replacement, made from a better material: http://waterlinesystems.com/shop/boats/j-105-emergency-tiller-bushing-55555/

 

I had to do this replacement on my boat when I bought it just a few years ago. Took about 10 minutes with a beer break included.

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We use one of these to hold the jetboil. Works great.

 

http://www.wwpotterowners.com/images/6._Force_10_Seacook_82000_stove.JPG

 

I love that damn stove, used one on another boat years ago. Simple, reliable … it is a shame nobody makes them any more.

 

Then I guess I'd better keep it when I sell the boat.

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Great suggestions. Thanks a lot. We talked about a code zero in the past but having just bought a new spin I think it is not in the cards right now. I like the pad eye idea. Do you have any pictures of where you put it?

Thanks

Sorry for late reply and no photo's I am afraid. I did have a track installed outboard when the boat was new but in practice it wasn't in the right place. I wouod suggest you go for a sail and then sail say 10-15 degrees off the wind and have some one sir forward and leward with lazy/another sheet and pull pull clew forward and outboard (easing working sheet). This is what we did. To the padeye you can attach a block and tackle with another sheet on it. We used to lead this back to cabin top winch with main jib sheet on the primary and then trim the sail.

 

It's possible a rigger could come up with a better solution but this was simple and cheap and worked ok.

 

We took the view that the 105 isn't a great boat upwind/just off the wind in lighter airs so trying to turn it into one was a pointless excersize. The boats strengths are reaching and running and upwind in heavier air and its those sorts ofmconditions where you are most likely to win. All this under IRC and with our mathead 95sqm kites (frac hakyard too but rarely used). Our boats have different stronger masts.

 

Good luck and let us know howmthe race goes.

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